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Archive for the ‘YouTube’ tag

Social video: Facebook and YouTube, Vine and Instagram, Periscope and Meerkat

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Social video is still the new black, and when it comes to deciding which platform to invest your resources in you need all the latest and best information you can get. So we decided to help you out with that. And remember that it’s not about pitting platforms against each other, but choosing the one that’s the best fit for your brand to bring value to your audience.

Facebook and YouTube.

YouTube is the widely acknowledged granddaddy of video content marketing. Over the years it has grown to produce its own stars, and even its own studios where creators can produce work, sometimes in partnership with brands to create content that benefits both of them. YouTube supports its creators and empowers them to make money from their presence on its site and expand their personal brand through it. View counts of videos are made “at the point at which people seem to actually be engaging with the video and not just immediately clicking away” or usually around the 30 second mark, according to YouTube creator Hank Green.

If your work is stolen and re-uploaded by a different user, YouTube has a system in place (Content ID) to identify this as existing content and allow the copyright holder to claim it so they don’t lose revenue. This is an important feature for creators, and one for brands to keep in mind as they produce original video content.

Facebook has recently made more moves into the video space, introducing its own native video uploading option which the Facebook News Feed algorithm prioritizes over outside video links. Those who have worked for years to build an audience on YouTube are now working to balance their Facebook content strategy with this built-in preference in mind; most of the Internet has a Facebook presence so it’s wise to invest time and energy into having one for almost any brand, but there aren’t as many failsafes in place to protect original content (you can learn more about the issue of “freebooting” here or below).

Facebook says that they are working on this and other issues, and to be fair, YouTube has had a decade to work on these policies and grow relationships with their creators. Facebook has enormous resources, but its video program is still a fledgling with definite room for growth.

Our best tip for a brand that may have an existing YouTube presence or wants to build one but also wants to promote that content to their audience on Facebook is one that we picked up in a recent #socialchat: Post a native Facebook “teaser” video that links to the full piece on YouTube, which will still prioritize that content over an embedded YouTube video.

Platform stats

Just want the numbers for each? Here’s the latest we could find:

Final answer?

So which should you choose, Facebook or YouTube? For brands with enough resources to make it work (and you need decent resources if you’re serious about producing quality video content), we recommend using YouTube as a home base- it’s perfect for content archives and sub-channels, like highlights of the people working for you or product demos based off of FAQs- and then experimenting with different promotional tactics on Facebook.

L2 puts it well in Why Facebook and YouTube’s Competition for Views Might Be a Tie:

“Facebook provides a rapid boost of popularity and also reaches a wide audience with its interruptive viewing format. While YouTube can also achieve rapid short-term scale with advertising, the platform is better positioned for content discovery.”

Use each platform for its strengths for a more robust video content strategy.

Vine and Instagram.

Vine and Instagram are the shorter-form video options available on the social media landscape today; Twitter-owned Vines cap at 6 seconds while Facebook-owned Instagram video caps at 15. Both require creativity to pull off, but Vine even more so since you have to distill your entire story into 6 seconds. Vine also has its own language of memes, which tend to run even faster through a meme-cycle than memes elsewhere on the Internet. Brands who have seen success on Vine have either paired with influencers in the space, or launched a series of tips and tricks that fit in the 6 second format, like Lowes.

Instagram advertising is opening to everyone later this year, as previously they have only worked with select brands to produce high-quality ads that (ideally) flow seamlessly with the rest of a user’s timeline. Brands who have participated in this pilot advertising program saw a continued lift in engagement following the advertising period, according to our own research. Other brands on Instagram have paired with appropriate influencers in the space to give their content a boost, sometimes running campaigns in conjunction with various influencers in appropriate spaces.

Platform stats.

Final answer?

Vine and Instagram require a higher level of creativity to be successful for most audiences, but brands can also test using these platforms to tease a smaller part of a larger work, driving traffic back to their YouTube channel or wherever it is they desire.

It’s once again about choosing the platform that’s best for your brand, which is the one that’s best for your audience: Are they interested in 6 second tips? Or high-quality video that’s often aspirational in nature? Know your audience and go from there.

Periscope and Meerkat.

The newest players on the block, these two live-streaming apps seem to be all many marketers are talking about lately. Meerkat debuted just before Twitter-owned Periscope, but both are quickly becoming pretty even in terms of the features they have: You can save your live-stream for later playback on both, you can connect them to existing networks to promote your stream (Facebook for Meerkat and Twitter for Periscope) and find accounts to follow, and you can use either to do a product demo, AMA, behind-the-scenes tour, exclusive interview, or give a front row seat to your mobile audience at a product launch.

Meerkat’s distinguishing features include a scheduling ability to help your audience plan around watching your stream, and Cameo, the ability to let another user take over your stream for up to 60 seconds. Periscope does not have either of these features at the moment, but that doesn’t mean something similar won’t be incorporated in a future update. Periscope does have a private broadcasting feature, a great way to set-up communication between offices or for the camera-shy to practice their live-streaming.

For a further breakdown of what each platform offers, read this piece from Newsweek or this one from Econsultancy, then supplement with Meerkat’s post about their latest update.

Platform stats.

Final answer?

Choose the live-streaming app that has more of the audience you’re trying to reach, and be sure you at least have an outline or rough idea of what you’re going to talk about before you just start saying things at your phone for an hour. Remember that whoever you put on Periscope or Meerkat is representing your brand, so choose a brand representative that matches brand values, is articulate and engaging, and does well in front of a camera.

Live-streaming is a new area for almost everyone, so don’t worry about producing a highly-polished video. Use this to experiment and show largely unseen aspects of your brand: Give private tours of labs or venues, interview staff setting up for an event, host an AMA around an interesting topic in your industry.

Final recommendations.

We recommend bookmarking this handy chart from Marketing Land - Social Video Chart: Your At-A-Glance Guide To 7 Major Platforms - to refer to on a lot of social video platform differences when you’re deciding where to put your content.

And if you have any other questions, please leave them in the comments or find us on Twitter @UnionMetrics.

Written by Sarah

August 25th, 2015 at 9:12 am

The Week in Social Analytics #156

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

Platform-specific tips and tricks. 

How to Add Paragraph Spacing to Your Instagram Posts’ Caption Copy [from Social Media Today; written by Jim Belosic]

A nifty trick to break up that wall of text when you have a long caption for a contest, or to really tell the story behind an image.

Beyond Cats & Bloopers: Getting Real on the Future of YouTube [from social@Ogilvy; written by David Stone]

“The reason for all this lies in YouTube’s emerging business strategy: empowering and educating creators to create better quality content makes YouTube more desirable to audiences and allows the streamer to compete with services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime.”

YouTube marketing strategy a top priority for social media marketers [from Convince & Convert; written by Jay Baer]

“Is video harder than sending a tweet? Of course, but once you have a sound Youtube marketing strategy (or a video strategy overall that might include Facebook, Instagram, and even Twitter video) it doesn’t have to be a massive production burden.”

On influencers. 

If You Want Your Content Marketing to be Great, Ask Influencers to Participate [from TopRank; written by Lee Odden]

1. Set Goals for Marketing and Influencers

In order for co-created content to be successful for marketing, specific audiences and goals should be identified.

Think about: What do you hope to achieve with an influencer content program? How will influencers benefit? More importantly, how will your customers benefit?

Think about the distinct audience that you’re after with the content being co-created and set goals specific to what your idea of success looks like. Quantify those goals as well, whether it’s to increase the reach and engagement of your brand to the influencer’s community or to inspire more leads and sales by a certain percent.

Also, set goals for the influencers. For short term projects, focus on participation quality. With longer term programs, focus on participation, marketing outcomes and the relationship.”

A 4-Step Blogger Outreach Tool for Identifying Influencers [from Convince & Convert; written by Kristen Matthews]

“A crucial part of blogger identification for marketing purposes is thinking a step past buyer personas and coming up with “influencer personas.” An influencer persona is an overarching profile and data on the types of bloggers that appeal to your target consumers.”

And finally, on UX. 

How Important Is User Experience? 9 Things You Need To Know About UX [from Business2Community; written by Jasmine Henry]

“User experience (ux) is an emerging practice that sits at the intersection of behavioral science, web development, and domain-specific knowledge. It’s a human-centric approach to understanding how people engage with technology, and how to build the best web experiences possible.”

 

Written by Sarah

May 29th, 2015 at 8:53 am

The Week in Social Analytics #147

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content marketing

How to Overcome Content Marketing Struggles [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“In order to overcome resource, strategy and budget issues, marketers should consider having someone directly responsible for an overall content marketing strategy, as well as auditing, reusing and repurposing content.”

The 10 New Rules Of Visual Content Marketing [from Jeff Bullas]

8. The Law of Consistency 

Apart from engaging customers, the role of visual content is to reinforce your brand. For that to happen, your content needs to have consistency.

This isn’t strictly a new law, but it’s worth reinforcing. We’re not referring to publishing visual content consistently. It’s more about elements in your visuals that tell your target market that the visual is from your company – even if you’re not linked or tagged in it.

You can do this by using the same:

  • Fonts and colours as your website
  • Images in your company’s social media accounts and profile page headers
  • Design element like a background, banner, or logo.

Video Content Marketing: Pros, Cons, Examples and Best Practices [from TopRank Online Marketing Blog; written by James Anderson]

“Video has to be done right to be effective.”

Do YouTubers Fuel Purchase Intent Among Teens? [from eMarketer; written by staff]

Normally when you see a headline that ends in a question, you know it can immediately be answered with “no”. In this case, however, the answer is a resounding “yes”:

“YouTubers also had a much bigger influence on purchase intent among teens, as 63% said they would try a product or brand suggested by a YouTuber. In comparison, fewer than half of respondents said the same about recommendations from a TV or movie star.”

emarketer youtube

On social for events and making the most of social employees

Planning an Event? Don’t Get Skimpy With Your Social Media [from Marketing Profs; written by Joe Matthews]

“. . .to truly develop real-time, online buzz for an event, marketers must seek out genuine, nonintrusive ways for the brand to be included in the event content being shared to social. This means marketers need an event marketing strategy that taps into existing social habits of the audience.”

The Social Media Opportunity Most Businesses Miss (Do You?) [from Heidi Cohen]

Employees are the major social media opportunity most businesses overlook.

. . .

Change how you view your employees. See them as real people who have their own relationships, needs and interests beyond your business. Further, they’re experienced social media users who engage with their family and friends on a variety of networks.”

Emphasis original.

On campaigns

How to Create an Unforgettable Integrated Campaign [from Convince and Convert; written by Jessica Gioglio]

Not everyone has Oreo’s resources, but it’s always inspiring to see a clever and well-executed campaign across platforms and in the real world.

9 Word-of-Mouth Campaigns That Rocked [from Cision; written by Jim Dougherty]

“In 2015, social networks have demonstrably changed the word-of-mouth distribution model. Forty-seven percent of all U.S. adults use Facebook daily, 25 times the number of total daily social media users a decade earlier. While Jonah Berger’s research in Contagious: Why Things Catch On indicates that face-to-face word-of-mouth is more effective than social media word-of-mouth, social media is not an insignificant contributor to word-of-mouth ‘buzz.’”

Written by Sarah

March 27th, 2015 at 8:54 am

The Week in Social Analytics #144

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

Platform-specific pieces: 

5 Visual Storytelling Tips To Power Your Content Marketing On Facebook [from Jeff Bullas]

“. . .it’s becoming a necessity to be different. Your Facebook audience, while procrastinating their commitments ahead of them, will take out a few minutes to scroll through their News Feed. Most likely, they’ll skip anything uninteresting.

So with that in mind, you need to come up with content that’s well worth engaging with for an extended amount of time, which leads to the question:

How can your content break through the noise?

Instagram Will Top 100 Million US Users by 2018 [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Going forward, Instagram will also compete with other emerging social networks for attention among these younger demographics, and by extension, for brands’ ad dollars in reaching those demographics. However, over time, we believe Instagram’s straightforward and simple content feed has wider appeal across all demographics—no matter what age or level of digital savvy.”

emarketer Instagram

Do I need two Twitter accounts? [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

Addressed on both the “philosophical and practical” level.

On social strategy: 

How Small Businesses Should Be Using Social Media [from Social Times; written by Katherine Halek]

“What do you hope to gain from social media? If a high follower count or an overnight viral post is your idea of social success, you may learn the hard way that those things in themselves are not guaranteed to bring you more business. Instead of a one-hit wonder, your main focus should be meaningful interaction, with the end goal of building a dedicated fan base.”

On video marketing. So hot right now. 

3 Rules for Better Video Marketing [from Convince and Convert; written by Tyler Lessard]

“Online video is quickly becoming one of the most important and inventive parts of the modern marketing mix. It can seem daunting to dive into, but this report offers a good place to start for understanding how much more comprehensive video can be as a weapon in your arsenal when you approach it with a balance of strategy, integration, and measurement.

YouTube Stars More Influential Than Big-Screen Ones, Youth Say [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“There appears to be an age trend when it comes to following stars on social media, though: 13-year-olds are far more likely to follow a YouTube (59%) than TV/movie (32%) star, while the gap is closer for 14-17-year-olds (53% and 44%, respectively). Among 18-24-year-olds, slightly fewer follow YouTube (51%) than TV/movie (54%) stars.”

This has big implications for brands with certain target demographics who are looking to do celebrity partnerships.

DEFYMedia-YouTube-Stars-Influence-Youth-Mar2015

The Week in Social Analytics #119

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

On content:

5 ways to produce content that drives revenue [from iMedia Connection; written by Erika Goldwater]

“. . .some 90 percent of marketers invest a huge portion of their budget on content without a formal strategy in place. A documented strategy can dramatically improve resource and budget allocation, buyer targeting, and content idea generation. And it should include concrete and measurable goals, as well as a system for tracking performance relative to those goals across the lead-to-buyer lifecycle. If driving sales and revenue is your goal, there’s only one way to know if your strategy is working: measure effectiveness across the funnel and make adjustments accordingly.”

Content marketing and the difficulties of storytelling [from Econsultancy; written by James Curtis]

“The other big contributing factor to why content marketing campaigns fail to deliver good storytelling is that we forget that most obvious of challenges with digital media, the narrative is often non-linear.”

Visual content:

Visual Content, Confusion, and Copyright Laws [from Spin Sucks; written by Lindsay Bell]

Take it from the macaque: It’s your job to make sure you’re keeping up with and following copyright laws on the images you use in your visual content and marketing.

5 Visual Platforms to Boost B2B and B2C Engagement [from Social Media Today; written by Mordecai Holtz]

If you’re looking to produce and share more visual content, consider these platforms.

Three Instagram accounts every marketer and designer should follow [from Econsultancy; written by Edwyn Raine]

Any overlooked suggestions to add to this short list?

Master the platform:

How to Build Your Brand on YouTube and Reach New Customers [from Social Media Today; written by Joy Mali]

“Video is the best way of communicating your brand to your customers since it establishes a real time experience within them, and your customers feel as if they have really connected with your product. Hence, video can easily support your branding effort like no other medium.”

Brand Marketing on Vine: How to Sell Yourself in Six Seconds [from Social Times; written by Jon Mowat]

Key takeaways from some of the brands best at using Vine:

  • They all have the brand’s community at their heart. GE showcases science, Samsung showcases extreme outdoor sports and French Connection showcases their clothing range to those interested in fashion and travel.
  • There is never a hard sell. In fact, it’s best to avoid traditional advertising calls to action, as they just don’t work on the platform. Each of the Vines above simply give you something to think about; the takeaway is a simple, personal moment. Connection to the brand has to be more subtle and often only establishes itself after you’ve hooked your audience on your style of Vine.
  • They left the door open for you to return. Great Vines will make sure to leave you wanting the next story with anticipation.
  • Creativity was a watchword. Each Vine used the format to its strengths and didn’t try to make a Vine something it can’t be. With the platform, you’ve got a precious few moments to make an impact. Don’t waste them, but at the same time don’t try to cram everything in. Efficiency and the simplicity of your message is key.

Everything else:

Does Social Media Make Crisis Communications More Difficult to Manage? [from PR Newser; written by Shawn Paul Wood]

Seems especially applicable in the wake of DiGiorno’s Twitter mistake earlier this week, and brands’ inability to keep quiet on 9/11.

How to Incorporate Social Media Into Your Product Packaging [from Social Mouths; written by Francisco Rosales]

“Product design and product packaging are two of the only ways you can draw consumers back into your online campaigns as they navigate the physical world. A social campaign may get the ball rolling, but a single hashtag or slogan on your packaging will encourage users to engage more deeply both in person and online.”

The Ultimate Guide To Social Media Contests, 15 Steps [from Social Fresh; written by Erica Campbell Byrum]

Helps you build a plan with a timeline from three months out.

The Week in Social Analytics #102

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Instagram Ads Are Getting Instant Recall: Taco Bell and Hollister seeing picture-perfect results [from AdWeek; written by Christopher Heine]

“Taco Bell saw a 29 percentage point gain in ad recall for the April rollout of its breakfast menu, per data from Instagram’s user panel that pits a control group against a test group. The fast-food chain’s promos sometimes got engagement rates 400 percent higher compared to its organic posts. According to Union Metrics, Taco Bell’s Instagram following—currently at 411,000—jumped 45 percent during its monthlong ad campaign. The data company also reports that Instagram advertisers—including Michael Kors and Ben & Jerry’s—are averaging 60 percent higher engagement rates for their organic posts in the three days following their paid promos.”

Pair with these other great reads around Instagram this week:

The Value and Meaning of Community In Marketing [from Danny Brown; written by Tinu Abayomi-Paul]

“[Communities] are made up of people I go out of my way to advise, assist, appreciate and attend to when I can – not just when it’s required by the community manager/leader hat I have on that day. And I worry about this concept because there’s this false impression that a community is an entity that can be owned.

Like a thing.

Instead of a gathered group of humans.”

A great connection piece in the ongoing discussion about businesses and humanity. Pair with: How to Speak Like a Human (and Why It Matters) and Mass Personalization Through Digital.

Women Trust Word-of-Mouth Recommendations From Their Friends | Infographic [from Social Times; written by Kimberlee Morrison]

“As for what women sought advice about, 79 percent would ask a friend about food and beverage items, and 28 percent would buy or strongly consider buying something after talking to a friend. Trips and travel were second with 68 percent and third was home furnishing at 61 percent. Nineteen percent of those inquiring about home furnishings would buy or consider buying something immediately after chatting with a friend.

So perhaps when designing social media campaigns, consider seeking testimonials from your most-active users and fans. Their word means a lot.”

Small Business: Are You Using Social Media Photographs? [from Heidi Cohen]

Great tips for using images across social platforms, and tailored to each one.

How American Adults Spend Their Time Online [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Social networks account for the single largest share of consumers’ time online, per the data.”

We’re Using Twitter, Facebook Less, Instagram, Tumblr More, Says Data | STUDY [from All Twitter; written by Shea Bennett]

“In the meantime, Instagram goes from strength-to-strength, registering an incredible 25 percent grow in active usage since Q3 2013.

Tumblr (+22 percent) and Pinterest (+7 percent) also registered solid gains.”

Why We Favorite Tweets, According To Science [from Buzzfeed; written by Charlie Warzel]

A great breakdown of the myriad reasons why we favorite tweets. Pair with our piece on why brands should favorite tweets.

You can access the full study here.

How to Handle Twitter Trolls on Your Business Account [from Social Media Today; written by Matthew Y]

Dealing with negative comments is very different from dealing with trolls.

YouTube: How to Amplify Your Content With Social [from Social Times; written by Christie Barakat]

“To amplify your content using social, YouTube suggests you focus on Top Fans, Google+ Hangouts on Air, leverage all marketing channels and Google+. To be sure you’re leading productive community discussions, start by recognizing your community, develop relationships with top contributors and engage your them on and off YouTube.”

Pinterest Promoted Pins: What You Need To Know [from Edelman Digital; written by Andra Pintiliuc]

“In order to keep promoted pins as relevant as possible and ensure a seamless experience for the user, Pinterest will be taking a ‘Consultative Approach’ to ad selling by working closely with advertisers to understand what type of content resonates with their audience. These recently introduced promoted pins won’t show up in a user’s home feed or within their own pin boards, but rather through searches where they can be bought on a CPC basis and users are organically searching within their favorite categories. Keeping inspiration at the forefront, Pinterest manually selected the advertiser partners and will be working with the brands closely to ensure authenticity is maintained with their content.”

Written by Sarah

May 16th, 2014 at 9:38 am

Automotive social media marketing: Who’s doing it right, what to measure, and more

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Over the last few years we’ve watched the handwringing over social media and its usefulness evolve into campaigns with large social tie-ins, and stand-alone social campaigns. One of the industries that embraced this early- with both success and failure- was the automotive industry. Cars are seen as a necessary purchase for many households, particularly in cities where no reliable public transportation exists.

While Millennials are buying fewer cars right now, that doesn’t mean they won’t be doing so in a future of improved economic prospects. Smart automotive companies are targeting the next generation of car buyers on the social networks where they hang out.

Who has done it right?

One of the earliest and most comprehensive social campaigns came from Ford- an overall early social media embracer- and was centered around the launch of their new Ford Fiesta in 2009. It was successful enough that they’ve “remixed” the campaign for the 2014 Fiesta. The key to Ford’s success in this campaign was reaching out to their target customers where they were already hanging out- in this case, courting successful YouTubers- and giving them content for compelling storytelling: a car to use and take on adventures, and give honest reviews about. This strategy was designed to benefit both Ford and the vloggers, and it did, as per this Businessweek article discussing the campaign’s results:

“Fiesta got 6.5 million YouTube views and 50,000 requests for information about the car—virtually none from people who already had a Ford in the garage. Ford sold 10,000 units in the first six days of sales. The results came at a relatively small cost. The Fiesta Movement is reputed to have cost a small fraction of the typical national TV campaign.”

YouTubers don’t just spend time on YouTube either; they use platforms like Twitter to increase their exposure, find new viewers and subscribers, and connect with fans new and old– along with other YouTubers and brands.

Reason enough to remix it.

Other notable campaigns include an effort from AutoTrader, who put the fate of a car hanging over the Thames in Twitter’s hands, and more recently Toyota, who partnered with The Muppets around their latest movie Muppets Most Wanted to let the public know their Toyota Highlander has #NoRoomForBoring. Launched around this year’s Super Bowl, the ad campaign featured massive social tie-ins, with related tweets and posts to Instagram from both companies.

 

From Toyota’s Instagram.

From The Muppet’s Instagram.

We took a look at their Super Bowl results after the game (along with other brands), and partnering with lovable, family friendly Muppets was definitely a wise choice for Toyota. They’ve continued the brand partnership and campaign through the premiere of Muppets Most Wanted.

How do I plan this?

Before you start planning a social campaign, there are important questions to ask yourself. These will help you figure out what you’re going to measure as well (which we’ll get to in a minute):

  • Who is my target audience? Specific demographics tend to spend more time on specific platforms. Do the research and go where your people are.

  • Where do they hang out? Obviously whichever platform that is, is where you’ll want to be. If you’re a luxury vehicle brand, you might want to use Instagram to show off stunning visuals of your vehicles, tapping into the aspirational among Instagram users.

  • How do they talk in that space? Pay attention to how your target audience speaks to their friends, to brands, and just about brands. The golden rule of social media marketing is always listen first.

  • How do you, as a customer, like to be approached? Everyone has had good and bad customer experiences. Reflecting on your own can help in building a good experience for others.

Once you’ve answered those questions, plan to:

  • Talk to your audience and with them, not at them. This is why listening is so important.

  • Present your content in a beautiful and compelling way. Looking and listening can also inform the storytelling you’ll be doing on any platform. It should be high-quality, compelling, useful, and beautiful in form and function. When you’re approaching someone on a space they use for social interaction with their friends and family, be respectful of their time and attention so they won’t resent your presence and think of it as an unwanted invasion.

  • Involve your audience. The successful campaigns we referenced earlier have been interactive and smartly researched. The campaigns involving user-generated content that have backfired didn’t take the time to understand the audience they would be involving– and the audience shot back.

What should I measure?

There is no one right answer to this, because every company’s goals are different, as are the goals of every campaign. A lot of this is going to depend on how you answered the questions in the previous section; certain tactics will be more successful with different demographic groups and on different platforms.

Twitter is “especially appealing to 18-29-year-olds”, but there are “no significant differences by gender, household income or education” according to Pew Research via Marketing Charts. The same survey found Instagram to be especially appealing to women of the same age group. Do your research and use demographic information like this to tailor your campaign message for each platform, speaking to your target audience in the platform’s native language and to whomever you’re trying to reach there.

Further, look at what kinds of storytelling do best on each platform and let that inform your measurement goals: Will visuals on Instagram help raise brand awareness, while you tailor your message for Twitter to bring in sales? The most important question to answer is: What does success look like to you and your brand? That will tell you what you need to be measuring. For example:

  • If brand awareness is your goal, share of voice measurement will be important to monitor before, during and after your campaign 
  • If you’re looking to drive sales, bring your sales team onboard to decide what success will look like and how you’ll measure the traffic driving it
  • If you want to gain new fans and followers, share of voice will be important alongside paying attention to the reach of your campaign; don’t just concentrate on vanity metrics like the number of followers you have (though these are good baseline indicators).
  • If you want to see how a new Twitter campaign has improved over past campaigns, you’ll need historical Twitter data.

Need more references and help? Check out The 5 Easy Steps To Measure Your Social Media Campaigns, or shoot us an email to see how we can help. We’re always here.

Written by Sarah

March 26th, 2014 at 12:11 pm

Find health support just a click away

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The state of our health isn’t deemed polite conversation by most of society. Navigating the line between getting support from friends and family when you’re going through a hard time and not being the weird uncle who always talks about their colon at Christmas dinner can take some adept balancing.

Fortunately, just as social platforms can serve as support networks for those making physical changes aimed at fitness, they can also serve as support networks for those living with health issues from the temporary (How do I work out with a broken leg?) to those living with chronic illness (How do I restructure my life with this?).

Reaching out on Twitter

Building a supportive community on Twitter is one of the things that makes the platform the most worthwhile, and it can make a huge difference when a recently diagnosed person is able to surround themselves with supportive people dealing with similar health issues a few tweets away. Reaching out can start with browsing this master list of tweet chats and joining in whichever feel most comfortable; general health chats might point to more specific ones, and it’s hard not to find someone to connect with in most tweet chats. Doctors and other medical professionals sometimes host tweet chats in order to help answer questions from the general public. Building twitter lists of who participates in which chats, or is the most helpful in pointing out resources can help sort a barrage of new information.

There are also specific accounts dedicated to any number of health issues; Invisible Illness Wk, for example, connects those living with invisible illnesses in addition to raising awareness of the issues those will invisible, chronic illnesses face to those who are unfamiliar.

On other platforms

Sometimes there’s nothing more helpful than reading about someone else’s experience dealing with what you’re currently going through. Tumblr offers the same capabilities as a blog, but socially enhanced with reblogging and private messaging options, allowing one blog to draw from and connect with another easily, building up a support network without ever leaving the site.

For particular chronic illnesses, medical professionals will often point those newly diagnosed to message boards specific to a certain condition or related conditions. Inspire.com has a range of different communities that offer support, for example.

YouTube is also a popular platform for sharing experiences and getting feedback. Popular YouTuber Hank Green has shared his experience of living with a chronic illness, and the comments show many viewers grateful to see their own experiences mirrored in his video, especially from someone well-regarded and popular.

The bottom line

Ultimately social media helps connect those whose health might keep them from being able to attend a physical support group, and to supplement and organize the information and support they might receive from other sources.

Written by Sarah

February 12th, 2014 at 9:26 am