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The Week in Social #165

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We spend the week reading the best things we can get our eyeballs on and on Fridays we share them here with you. Leave your thoughts in the comments, or come find us on Twitter at @UnionMetrics.

What marketers struggle with: Multichannel, influencers, video.

Why Marketers Haven’t Mastered Multichannel? While marketers say they want to make this a focus- “84% of senior marketers worldwide said multichannel marketing was a key focus of their current marketing strategy”- many struggle with understanding and buy-in from higher ups, as well as time to invest in planning and the necessary tools to comprehensively and continuously measure their efforts.

multichannel marketing challenges

As for that last challenge, we know a good Social Suite marketers should look into.

You’ve probably heard of this strange phenomenon of moving pictures used in marketing at this point, but how you do you Start Smart, Scale Up, and Stand Out With Video? Robert Rose takes on these challenges for Content Marketing Institute:

  1. How do businesses empower themselves to create videos (cost effectively) in the first place?
  2. Once businesses are creating videos, how do they scale this ability across the business?
  3. Once businesses have a functional process for creating videos, how do they use this new skill to differentiate the content they’re producing?

Click through to read the whole piece and see what themes address successful video creation and more.

Working with a social influencer is one of the best ways to boost reach across a target audience, but that doesn’t mean it’s free of challenges and Ayaz Nanji takes this on in Marketers’ Biggest Challenges With Social Influencers:

challenges-influencers-280715

We would add one very important caveat: Be sure the partnership matches brand values on both sides. Throughly vet anyone you decide to partner with, be it brand or personal brand/influencer; that goes a long way toward “predicting behavior”.

The platform-specific info you need.

Because you can never get too good at Instagram, Jim Dougherty has 10 Pro Tips for Instagram from the pros, via Cision.

Heard about the Twitter Q2 announcements but weren’t sure what to make of them? SHIFT Comm has a great breakdown from Chris PennState of Social Media 2Q 2015: Twitter Users Plateau. The best takeaway?

“Should marketers be concerned with Twitter’s lack of growth? Perhaps, but that’s a determination marketers will need to make on an individual basis. Look in your web analytics at Twitter’s traffic over a multi-year period. Here’s an example:

shift comm

In this particular instance, while Twitter’s overall membership may not have increased, Twitter’s ability to drive traffic to a desired web destination has improved substantially in very recent times.”

Emphasis added.

Last but not least, Jay Baer is laying down 5 Reasons You Don’t Buy Likes with Facebook Advertising over at Convince and Convert. The bottom line?

“Remember: clicks first, fans second.”


 

So what’s the best thing you’ve read this week?

3 ways entertainment marketers can better engage fans on social media

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This post originally appeared on MediaPost and we are pleased to be able to share it with you here!

Some of the most popular social media accounts belong to entertainment brands — celebrities, TV shows, movies, entertainment media — the list goes on. These brands have built up large, loyal followings by sharing lots of great content on social media. These brands resonate well on visually focused channels like Instagram, Tumblr and Snapchat, and on social hubs like Facebook and Twitter.

What can we learn from these successes? How can other entertainment marketers better engage fans on social media? Luckily, entertainment brands have plenty of engaging, social-ready content at their fingertips; it’s just a matter of figuring out what to share and how. If you’re working with an entertainment brand, here are three ways to more deeply engage with your fans on social media.

Provide sneak peeks for your fans

Give your followers something extra or early. Reward their loyalty by sharing content earlier on your social channels than anywhere else. Some brands post new trailers first on social channels. Others send a secret password to share new content with lucky contest winners before sharing it publicly. No matter how you decide to do it, giving your social audiences early access to new content is a great way to reward followers (and get new ones).

Sony Pictures’ Goosebumps movie recently encouraged fans to tweet to unlock a new trailer. When fans posted enough tweets to hit a volume threshold, Sony released a new full-length trailer for the movie. It was a great way to get fans excited about the film and spread the word across Twitter.

Make the most of your content exhaust

Content exhaust is anything that’s left over after a project is finished, all the extra content that’s created and discarded as you work on polishing the final product. That can be outtakes, behind the scenes stories, images from the cutting room floor, backstage video, pre-Photoshop photos, and more. What may seem mundane to those involved in a production can be extremely interesting to fans who don’t experience the entertainment business every day. Inviting your fans behind the scenes makes them feel more connected and invested in your project. And on social media, it’s completely acceptable to share less polished content, particularly on channels like Snapchat. Just because something is public doesn’t mean it has to be perfect, so don’t feel like everything you share has to have the same production values as the show or movie itself. Use the content exhaust you’re already creating to your advantage.

ABC Family does a wonderful job with Pretty Little Liars. Across the “PLL” social accounts, they’re constantly posting pictures of the cast goofing around together, attending red carpet events, even posing with signs about fans. This kind of content rewards fans for following and makes them feel included in how the show is made.

 

We do too! #PLL #Ezria #EzriaForever

A photo posted by Pretty Little Liars (@prettylittleliars) on

Go beyond the story on screen

Fans of a show or movie will want to go deeper into the story, beyond what can be shown on screen. Use social media to provide more information for them. You could share extended scenes, deeper dives into a back story, more information about real-life events that influence a story, interviews with writers and directors — anything that extends the story beyond the main screen. The more information you provide about a story, the more invested the audience will be in its outcome. A lot of fans will try to piece together this information on their own, so provide some help or participate in the conversation when you can.

True Detective on HBO does this very well. The show’s story is full of mystery already, and every week fans discuss possible clues and conspiracies across social media. On Instagram, the show shares images and short videos through the season to encourage this conversation. They could take further advantage of this by sharing more information from the show’s writer about the unusual real-life events and locations that inspire the storyline.

 

#TrueDetective

A video posted by True Detective (@truedetective) on

 

Want to measure the impact of your social media content? Take a look at all the analytics we offer at Union Metrics.

Written by Sarah

July 30th, 2015 at 8:12 am

Our Favorite Social Media Stats and Facts

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Social media changes quickly, and it can be hard to keep up with the latest usage information for the top channels. We thought we’d make it easier by rounding up our five favorite nuggets for our four favorite social networks: Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram and Facebook.

Many of these come from Union Metrics research, so feel free to check out our resources page or see how we can help you measure your efforts in each of these places, if you’re eager to see how that after-hours Tumblr queue is paying off.

Tumblr

  1. Tumblr is a night owl. 42% of all Tumblr activity takes place between 5pm and 1am ET (Source). Takeaway: Brands should try posting outside of traditional business hours to see how their content performs.
  2. Disney is by far the most popular brand on Tumblr, seeing more overall activity and stronger engagement than any other brand – nearly two times more (Source). Takeaway: Consider a Tumblr presence to join in on the fan conversation that inevitably already exists around your brand.
  3. 50% of Tumblr users have gone out and bought something they’ve seen on their dashboard (Source). Takeaway: Make it easy for your followers to buy the things you show them on their dash. With the ”Buy” button introduced last year, it’s easier than ever.
  4. Saturday and Sunday are the most active days on Tumblr (Source). Takeaway: Have a content plan for the weekends. Pay attention to when the most original content is published (bonus stat: that’s 4pm on Sunday) and see how your content performs posted at or around that time.
  5. Fandom thrives on Tumblr (Source). Takeaway: Movies and television shows should know that their fandoms are on Tumblr, and they are legion. Incorporate fan art (like Teen Wolf) or photos (like Doctor Who) into your content strategy where it makes sense. Make fans feel heard, and appreciated.

Times of Tumblr

Twitter

  1. Most customers expect a response on social media within an hour (Source). Takeaway: This is true even of nights and weekends, so brands looking to have an active Twitter presence need to be prepared for that.
  2. Tweets with images or videos in them get more engagement than tweets with text alone (Source). Takeaway: Add appropriate visuals to your tweets whenever possible, but don’t just stick any old image on there just to have one. Choose striking, meaningful visual content to catch your audience’s eye.
  3. Related to that last point? Tweets with images take up more than twice as much vertical space in the timeline (Source). Takeaway: Simply taking up more space on someone’s feed- particularly when they’re out and about, scrolling through mobile- means your tweets are much harder to simply scan and dismiss. Especially if you choose that visually arresting image we talked about.
  4. Speaking of mobile users, recent numbers show “80% of users access Twitter via their mobile device” (Source). Takeaway: This means that unless those mobile users are on wifi, they don’t have as much bandwidth to work with and they aren’t going to want to wait forever for images to download, so make sure those visually arresting images aren’t huge. If it’s a big infographic, choose one piece to show and link back to the whole thing.
  5. When a show’s stars live-tweet an episode during its airtime, they “generate 64% more discussion (ie. tweets about the show) than programs whose cast members abstain” (Source). Takeaway: Even if you’re not in TV, live-tweeting a relevant event- a webinar, a conference, a presentation or panel during an industry meetup- will make you part of a bigger discussion and introduce you to new contacts. Just be sure to use the official hashtags—  or create them.

Instagram

  1. Our own Union Metrics research recommends brands try posting outside of U.S. business hours (Source). Takeaway: Evenings and weekends are times most people have free to browse social and catch up on their streams. Brands should test posting during these times and see if they get a bump in engagement from fans and followers who are otherwise busy during the work day.
  2. Keeping up your content cadence matters more than how often you post (Source). Takeaway: Obviously you don’t want to completely flood the Instagram feed of your fans and followers, but it’s not unusual for brands to post several times a day. If you have a large queue of content for a campaign, however, and it runs dry afterward before you can plan a robust content calendar, you will start to lose followers.
  3. Content on Instagram lives longer than you probably realize (Source). Takeaway: Although most activity happens in the first several hours after a brand posts to Instagram, it’s not unusual to see low-level content for days and weeks after a post is first made. Don’t be afraid to edit old posts with newer hashtags to see if you can boost engagement on them.
  4. Brands who advertise on Instagram may continue to see increased engagement after an advertising period has ended; in one case we saw a brand with “a nearly 10% increase in engagement rates across the board, increasing the total activities received per organic post by 25% on average” (Source). Takeaway: If you’re thinking of taking the plunge and advertising on Instagram, the benefits could be longer lasting than you might have assumed.
  5. Related to the previous point, Instagram is opening up advertising to everyone this fall (Source). Takeaway: Just be sure your creative is up to snuff; Instagram users are used to high-quality, well-executed content.

 

 

Facebook

  1. Images that include people and faces perform well on Facebook (Source). Takeaway: Facebook is a place people connect with friends and family they’re close to in real life, so reflecting this ease and friendliness in your visuals helps your content resonate with those who choose to connect with your brand there.
  2. You have three seconds to get your fans’ attention in a video (Source). Takeaway: Videos need to be immediately arresting, and also perform well without sound since not everyone opts to turn it on. Shorter videos also tend to perform better than long videos on Facebook.
  3. Posts with a ton of hashtags don’t perform well on Facebook (Source). Takeaway: Your audience may love hashtags on Facebook, but it seems like most don’t, unless they’re a big popular hashtag like #TBT or popular and annual, like #NationalRunningDay. Use your discretion and test one or two on your posts to see how your audience responds. But definitely don’t leave all 30 from your Instagram post on Facebook; edit that cross-post down!
  4. 79% of all users are accessing Facebook from their mobile (Source). Takeaway: A lot of social activity is happening on people’s phones, when they’re out and about, commuting, or at home in the evenings. Be sure your content is optimized for mobile to capitalize on this audience. Think about what you want to see within the confines of a smartphone screen and how much data you have to work with.
  5. Facebook isn’t just Facebook; most people know they own Instagram, but some forget about the other entities in the Facebook ecosystem, including WhatsApp, Messenger, and Occulus (Source). Takeaway: These other apps are something to keep an eye on as the industry develops over the coming years, particularly in the private messaging space. It’s direct access to consumers, but difficult for brands to balance without coming across as creepy or intrusive.

Written by Sarah

July 28th, 2015 at 9:08 am

The Week in Social #159

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

Big questions and B2B

Every marketing challenge revolves around these questions [from Seth Godin]

Great writeup on the essential questions behind marketing.

25 B2B Social Media Statistics About Platform Usage [from Social Media B2B; written by Jeffrey L. Cohen]

All the B2B specific stats from the latest social media industry report from Social Media Examiner.

On content marketing and the ubiquitous hashtag

Should you stop using hashtags in social media content? [from SHIFT Comm; written by Chris Penn]

“That said, should you change your hashtagging habits? The answer is: test for yourself. Over the next 2 months, alternate weeks. One week, use hashtags. One week, don’t use hashtags. Alternate for the next 2 months, then count up your likes, comments, shares, retewets, and favorites. See which posts get more engagement and which posts get less engagement.”

Emphasis original.

10 Simple ideas to achieve more content sharing now [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

Content Shares

Definitely worth clicking through the whole presentation.

 Platform-specific updates

7 Things You Need To Know About Twitter Auto-Play Videos [from Social Media Today; written by Sarah Matista]

Great summary of what exactly Twitter putting videos on auto-play means, from data usage to view counts and more.

 

What’s the best thing you read this week? 

 

 

Written by Sarah

June 19th, 2015 at 9:19 am

The Week in Social Analytics #157

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On social strategy 

The new guide to minimizing legal risks in Social Media Marketing [from {grow}; written by Kerry Gorgone]

Because “Get Out of Jail Free” cards aren’t real outside of Monopoly.

Managing Expectations Should Be Part Of Your Social Media Strategy [from Social Media Today; written by Mark Ferguson]

Set modest goals, and don’t be afraid to experiment:

“One of the good and bad things about social networks is how much information they have. Someone posts an update, you blink and you’ll miss it. This has some obvious disadvantages but one big advantage. You can experiment without major consequences. You can try various versions of tweets, updates, pins etc. to see which one works best for you. By the time you know, your failed experiments are buried under the 500 million tweets per day. There is no such thing as perfect in social media. That’s one of the beauties of it. The best time to experiment is when you start off as you have fewer followers and connections.”

Emphasis added.

Social video. Still so hot right now.

5 Mind-Boggling Video Stats and How To Use Them To Your Advantage [from social@Ogilvy; written by Justine Herz]

3) 1 in 3 viewers share a YouTube video after watching, and 700 YouTube videos are shared on Twitter alone every minute.

People like to share videos. They want something to share. Now, this ”1 in 3″ number is a bit misleading because the majority of those videos are not branded, however, the user behavior is there. People want to connect with content and tell their friends about it. We just need to give them something to connect with. If we make videos people love, find interesting, surprising, they’ll connect with it.”

Social Video Chart: Your At-A-Glance Guide To 7 Major Platforms [from MarketingLand; written by Martin Beck]

“A side-by-side feature comparison of the seven major social video players — YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Vine, Snapchat and Tumblr.”

social-video-posts-v5

Platform specific tips, tricks, and more

88 marketers you should follow on Twitter [from Convince & Convert; written by Jay Baer]

Double-check to be sure you’re following these fine people on Twitter. (You might want to be sure you’re following @tweetreachapp and @UnionMetrics while you’re at it.)

Tip: What are Facebook video ads good for? [from Social Fresh; written by Jason Keath]

“‘While video creative was not great at driving clicks to a landing page, we found that retargeting people who watched a video did improve the click-through and conversion rates. In other words, audiences that were warmed with video creative were more likely to take action on follow up campaigns.’ said Kistner.”

Emphasis added.

A Three Step Guide to Winning at Instagram [from Social Media Today; written by Andrew Hutchinson]

Image quality almost goes without saying, but you also need consistency in your visual branding. What else?

“One of the key things to remember in your images is that photography appeals to people’s aspirations – the things we want to do, the places we want to be. In the earlier examples shown from Nike, we’re inspired to go outside and smell the flowers, to get out into the elements. This is based on Nike’s in-depth knowledge of their audience – they know that these images will resonate with their followers, because they’re people who’re into running and the outdoors. How do they know this? Because they’ve done the research, they’ve built the audience personas, and they’ve tested over time. So how can you do the same?”

Emphasis added.

How TweetReach impressions compare to Twitter impressions

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At TweetReach, we provide measures of potential reach and impressions on Twitter.

Reach is the size of the estimated potential unique audience for a set of tweets. We calculate reach algorithmically, based on data we’ve been collecting from Twitter since we launched more than five years ago. It’s a great way of estimating how large your audience on Twitter could be, and takes unique recipients into account, removing duplicates.

Impressions measure the size of total potential exposure. This shows you how many total timelines your tweets were delivered to – including multiple deliveries to the same account – so it’s a count of the maximum total impressions possible for a set of tweets.

TweetReach reach and impressions

If you’ve ever seen the analytics Twitter provides for your Twitter account, you’ve noticed they provide a count of actual impressions for each of your tweets. That impressions number shows how many people actually saw that tweet. So you may be wondering how TweetReach impressions and Twitter impressions relate to each other. What do they each mean? Which one should you use? Why are they so different?

Twitter provides actual impressions for your tweets, while TweetReach calculates total potential impressions for those tweets. You can use these numbers together to fully understand how impactful your tweets are. The number of actual impressions your tweets receive will vary from tweet to tweet and account to account, but your actual impressions will likely be between 1% and 20% of your potential impressions.

Knowing how your actual impressions compare to your potential impressions shows you exactly how well your tweets are performing, how large your activated audience is, and how large your potential audience could be. What’s the ratio of your actual impressions to potential impressions? Are your tweets on the low side? Do some tweets perform better than others? Ask yourself the following questions to help improve the ratio of actual impressions to potential impressions.

What tweets get the most impressions?

First, look at which tweets are seen – and engaged with – by the most people. What makes those tweets different from your lower-performing tweets? Maybe you used a particular hashtag or included a photo. Maybe you mentioned someone who retweeted you. Whatever it is, try doing more of that to see how you can activate more of your potential audience, and improve your ratio of actual to potential impressions. For example, we’ve found for our own content, hashtags like #smm and #measure help get our tweets in front of a receptive, responsive audience interested in social media marketing. And our tweets with an interesting photo or video get high rates of engagement. And when it comes to posts about our company, tweets using the #hiring hashtag generate a lot more impressions than an average tweet.

What tweets get the fewest impressions?

Next, look at the tweets that are performing the worst. Which ones have the fewest impressions and least engagement? Look for patterns in those tweets. Sometimes you can learn more from what’s not working than from what is working. For example, we’ve found that some of our text-only tweets get fewer impressions and lower engagement than our visual content does. But not every time – there seems to be certain types of images that work better than others for us. What do you see in your analytics?

What’s different about your outliers?

Finally, are there any tweets that get way more engagement or impressions than the rest of your tweets? Dig deeper into these tweets, in both Twitter and TweetReach. What exactly spurred that response? Twitter will tell you how many retweets, replies, clicks and favorites a tweet received, and TweetReach can tell you who retweeted or replied to you and how much amplification they contributed to that tweet. Use this information to see what caused the spike, and think about how you can try to replicate this on future tweets.

Who engages with your tweets? And how?

Finally, you can use other metrics on engagement (like retweets and replies, average retweet rate) and contributors (such as the people who have engaged the most with your content and generated the most amplification for your content) to understand not just how far your content is reaching, but how and with whom. When taken together, along with actual and potential impressions, you can more completely understand what’s working with your Twitter account and how you can improve what isn’t.

You can run a free TweetReach snapshot report here any time, on any hashtags, usernames or keywords. Try it now! Want more? Check out our comprehensive TweetReach Pro subscriptions, with real-time monitoring and analytics, starting at just $99 per month.

Written by Jenn D

May 14th, 2015 at 8:21 am

Bare-faced on Twitter & Instagram: Amy Schumer’s #GirlYouDontNeedMakeup

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On Tuesday a new episode of Inside Amy Schumer aired on Comedy Central, and in anticipation of this boy band parody sketch, Amy posted a no-makeup selfie on Twitter and Instagram asking her followers to share selfies of themselves without makeup on either platform with the hashtag #GirlYouDontNeedMakeup.

And the response has been as sweet as a boy band’s choreographed dance moves.

On Twitter

Since it started on Tuesday, more than 13,000 tweets have been posted with the #GirlYouDontNeedMakeup hashtag by more than 12,000 different people, for a potential reach of 40 million unique Twitter users*. Many of the most retweeted tweets came from Amy herself, Comedy Central, or big media and tech outlets like Mashable or Slate, but some came from non-celebrity hashtag participants: 

(Though of course funnyman Zach Braff did add his own somewhat inexplicable and terrifying entry.)

On Instagram

While fewer posts were made on Instagram in the same window, they still had quite the impact with a maximum potential reach of 1.5 million**. The three most popular posts with the #girlyoudontneedmakeup tag were these two from Amy and one from Comedy Central, respectively, but the rest were all from Instagram users sharing their no-makeup faces, not other branded accounts as on Twitter:

#girlyoudontneedmakeup #catyoudontneedmakeup #insideamy

A photo posted by Emily Gordon (@thegynomite) on

One of the most popular Instagram posts includes an important related hashtag, #catyoudontneedmakeup.

Have you posted your no-makeup selfie yet?

Brand takeaways

The smaller number of posts made on Instagram likely has a lot to do with the interconnected nature of Twitter as a platform with its built-in retweets vs Instagram’s third-party apps as the only option for regramming. Twitter’s constant flood of information also makes it acceptable to post original and curated content several times a day, making it more likely for others to see, share, and/or participate in a hashtag than with a more contained stream like Instagram where users are more selective with what they participate in and share.

Both of these are things to keep in mind when planning a campaign, either for a specific platform or to run across platforms; you want to play to the strengths of each.

 

*read more about how we calculate reach on Twitter here

**read about how our Instagram analytics hashtag trackers work here

Written by Sarah

April 30th, 2015 at 9:00 am

Where does Union Metrics social data come from?

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Ever wondered where we get the social data we build our analytics on at Union Metrics? Here’s a quick rundown on where our data comes from and what that means to you.

Twitter

We get all our Twitter data directly from Twitter! We’ve had a relationship with Gnip since 2011, and now that Gnip has been acquired by Twitter, we have a direct relationship with Twitter. Specifically, our Pro Trackers access raw Twitter data directly through Twitter’s commercial real-time streaming API, which means full-fidelity ongoing coverage of any tweets you’re interested in. Our historical analytics are built on Twitter’s commercial historical stream, which is full access to the entire Twitter archive. And our snapshot reports use Twitter’s public Search API, which includes up to 1500 tweets from the past days. (This also means Twitter’s recent announcement about cutting off external data providers won’t impact any of the Union Metrics or TweetReach products you use and love.)

Tumblr

Our Tumblr analytics are based on full-fidelity Tumblr firehose that we commercially license through Gnip. We’ve been consuming that firehose since the summer of 2012. That means you’ll have full coverage of all posts for any blogs or keyword-based topics you want to monitor on Tumblr. We’re also a Tumblr preferred data partner, which means that Tumblr has certified us as legit.

Instagram

At this time, Instagram does not provide a commercial firehose. However, we’ve built a custom robust system that works with the public Instagram API to deliver the closest thing to a full-fidelity streaming experience you’ll find for any Instagram analytics in the market. This means you’ll have full coverage analytics in real-time for the accounts and hashtags you’re tracking.

If you have any questions at all about our data, where it comes from or how it’s treated, please don’t hesitate to ask! We’re here any time you need us.

Written by Jenn D

April 16th, 2015 at 9:41 am

Posted in Help,TweetReach Tech

Tagged with , , ,

The power of visual storytelling on Twitter (and beyond!)

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It’s no secret that in the never-ending stream of 140-character messages that is Twitter a snappy visual can make yours stand out; Twitter themselves did a study and found that across different content categories adding an image to your tweet boosted engagement in the form of a higher retweet rate.

So simply adding photos to your tweets is a great starting place and one that we’ve discussed before as Twitter has rolled out more image-friendly updates. But if you want to take it further than just adding relevant visuals to tweets, design a way to tell a visual story on Twitter. Put together something where the pieces can stand individually- after all, your tweets will be part of your followers’ stream- but when a prospective follower or curious fan looks at your homepage, they also see a cohesive visual story that communicates your campaign or company values, whatever it is that you’re trying to get across.

What does this look like?

Starbucks is great about using their timeline to tell little mini-stories, and they incorporate their fans and followers in them by retweeting their tweets as well. A great example is a recent celebration of National Croissant Day:

Starbucks visual storytelling Twitter

 

This example also takes it further, by integrating Snapchat. (We’ll talk more about expanding to other platforms in just a bit!)

Keeping things to Twitter, look at the timelines of any major brands you admire and ask yourself what makes their presentation successful or unsuccessful; do their visuals feel cohesive? Do they work together towards telling a single story and letting you know what they can do for you? Figure out how you can answer those questions and provide value to your own fans, followers, and customers.

Take it beyond a campaign.

Twitter shouldn’t just be about selling to your audience; using it like a bullhorn to shout at your fans and followers is unlikely to result in a reciprocal, engaged relationship with them. Use your social presence to tell any number of stories about your brand. Here are some ideas to get you started:

  • Tell the story of how your company came to be
  • Tell the story of how two companies came together as one in a merger, or the story of a rebranding
  • Show off company culture: Share spontaneous images your employees take of one another and let them tell daily office stories in their own words
  • Show off company values: Share the story of a day spent volunteering, or the different charitable things employees do on their own time and how you support them
  • Tell the story of an event or anniversary of your company
  • Tell the story of a partnership of two brands or a brand and a celebrity spokesperson around a campaign

All of these are ways to show off the human side of your brand, in addition to giving your employees some storytelling power.

Take it even beyond Twitter.

Go beyond just adding a photo to your tweets and use photos to tell a story not just on Twitter but across platforms: Tailor your story so that it’s told on your Facebook timeline, on your Tumblr, across your Instagram page. You can choose different parts of your story to tell in each place, if that feels more appropriate for your brand. Don’t be afraid to experiment with your narrative as long as you stay true to your brand values and the voice you’re trying to build or strengthen. 

See an example of each for inspiration: IKEA built a catalog on Instagram last year, Charity: Water mixes in stories from their different well-building campaigns with user-generated stories on their Facebook page (also seen below), and Sephora’s Tumblr acts as a combination catalog and digital magazine repository of inspirational images, tips, and tricks for their followers.

Charity Water FB

One woman even used Pinterest to tell the story of her Imaginary Well-Dressed Toddler, which eventually expanded to a presence on other networks and a book. In that case a powerful visual story became a brand.

Test content types constantly.

Finally, use the engagement levels on the types of visual content you use- images with words superimposed on them, images without words but with captions, etc- to plan content types moving forward. And you’ll want to keep testing; your audience’s tastes will most likely shift over time.

Written by Sarah

February 18th, 2015 at 9:41 am

5 ways to make the most of snapshot reports

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Our snapshot reports are a great way to get some quick analytics about a conversation or topic on Twitter, and we want to help you get the most out of them that you can! Here are five ways to make the most of your snapshots.

TweetReach snapshot report for #brandchat

1. Maximize your results

Take your snapshot as soon as a tweet chat, event or campaign ends to capture the best data possible. Free snapshots include up to 50 Tweets and $20 full snapshots include up to 1,500 Tweets, both from the past couple days (up to one week back in many cases). The longer you wait to run your report, however, the better chance that you’ll miss the best data. So don’t wait!

2. Narrow your results

Taking a snapshot of a weekly chat? Use the “since” modifier (example: #RKChat since:2015-01-30 would go in the search bar) to get results from just that day’s chat, and not any anticipatory chatter from the night before. To narrow your search in other ways to get exactly the data you want, check out this full list of advanced operators.

3. Do your research

Running a few free reports around different keywords, topics or hashtags can help you narrow your focus and decide which will be worth paying for a full snapshot, or even going Pro if you’ve got that option in your budget. Test out a variety of queries to see how the metrics compare.

4. Scope out the competition

A snapshot report on a Twitter account can give you a quick idea of that account’s recent activity; which tweets are the most retweeted? Who’s talking to and retweeting their posts? How large is their social footprint? You can run a snapshot report for any public Twitter account, so take a look at how your competitors stack up.

5. Scope out influencers

Who else is important in your industry? Run a few snapshots on the influencers in your community to find common threads and use them to improve your Twitter content strategy. See what you can learn from the experts. You may find new hashtags or people to follow.

Give it a try! Run your own free snapshot report right now.

Written by Sarah

February 12th, 2015 at 8:36 am