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A day in the life of Twitter Moments

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By now, you’ve probably had some time to check out Twitter’s newly launched Moments. It’s an incredibly cool new Twitter feature that gives users a look at the best of what’s happening on Twitter at any given, um, moment (sorry about that).

So of course we wondered what happens to a tweet featured in a Moment. Does engagement skyrocket when a tweet is featured? It should, right? Let’s investigate.

Some Twitter Moments are very timely, featuring tweets about events that are happening right now. Others are focused on surfacing cool stories that are more evergreen and include tweets posted earlier. For example, this tweet from March 2015 is the top post in the Climbing Everest Moment.

When this tweet was first posted in March, it got a handful of retweets and favorites. But when it was featured in Moments today, it immediately saw a huge spike in engagement, which has increased throughout the day. It’s generated more than 90% of its engagement today alone.

Here’s another example from the International Walk to School Day Moment.

This tweet was posted earlier today and has since generated 22 retweets and more than 100 favorites. This is way more favorites than the average @PCArsenault tweet receives. Interestingly, this seems to be true for other Moments, too; most Moment-related engagement so far seems to consist more of favorites than of retweets and replies. But this is just a tiny sample, so we’ll continue to look at these patterns as Moments continue. We’re also curious if being featured in a Moment leads to an increase in followers.

It’s only been a day, but Twitter Moments are already a great addition to the Twitter experience. We’ll check back in with them in a few weeks and see what else we can learn and how brands can take advantage of this new functionality. What do you think? Have you spent much time looking at Moments yet?


Want to measure your engagement on Twitter? Take a look at TweetReach by Union Metrics for a variety of Twitter analytics options! We’ve got an option for every budget. 

Written by Jenn D

October 7th, 2015 at 11:38 am

The Week in Social #173

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We spend the week reading the best things we can get our eyeballs on and on Fridays we share them here with you. Leave your thoughts in the comments, or come find us on Twitter at @UnionMetrics.

Getting the most from Twitter.

If you’ve struggled with writing effective promoted tweets- or effective tweets at all- definitely make time for Twitter Releases Guidelines on Tweet Copy Best Practices for Promoted Tweets from Andrew Hutchinson for Social Media Today.

And while the focus of their advice is on one specific Twitter ad element – ‘Mobile App Install’ campaigns – the notes outlined really apply to all promotional tweets, even all tweets more generally. If you want to make better use of your tweets and generate better engagement, there’s some solid learnings in here, based upon research gleaned from 3,200 mobile app promotion campaigns from US-based advertisers.” 



If you need help tracking a Twitter campaign to see how all those tweets are performing, we know someone who can help with that.

For those in the PR industry, this piece from Shannon Felder for Lewis PR covers how you can reach your full potential on Twitter in a PR capacity.

Catch the latest on the Twitter buy button from Justin Lafferty for Social Times, and ICYMI, there’s a rumor going around that Twitter isn’t going to limit itself to 140 characters forever, which Chris Thilk covers for Voce.

On social media policy and getting customers to share your content.

Banning employees from social media entirely is a terrible plan (because they will always find ways around it) and brands are much better off crafting a policy to guide and maximize return from employee use of social. If you’re a brand who needs help with that, we offer How to craft an effective social media policy from Jennifer Lonoff Schiff for CIO.

As our fearless Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief Jenn Deering Davis puts it,

“The best social media policies are direct and specific, and communicate clearly to employees what they should and shouldn’t do. Make sure your guidelines are both easy to understand and to follow.”

If it’s customers sharing your content you’re struggling with, check out 11 ways to encourage your customers to share your content from Scott Gerber for Mashable. They should know.

Finally, what you might not have considered about Periscope.

If you’ve immediately dismissed Periscope from your visual content marketing plan, consider Why Embracing Periscope Opens Up New Avenues for Your BrandShawn M. Smith makes a great case for exposing yourself to a new audience (global and millennial; good to note if those are your target audiences), having a home for supplemental content, and more.

Written by Sarah

October 2nd, 2015 at 9:21 am

On-demand demos available of Union Metrics Twitter and Instagram analytics

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Curious about what exactly Union Metrics analytics can do? We now offer on-demand demos of our Twitter and Instagram analytics! Take a tour of our analytics using live data from real accounts to see exactly what our analytics can do for you— and do it on your schedule.

What you get in the Twitter demo

Sign up here to access our live Twitter analytics demo to see exactly what you get with a subscription to TweetReach by Union Metrics. Our Twitter demo features everything you’ll see in our paid subscriptions – including live data from real Twitter accounts and topics – and allows you to access all areas of our product in read-only mode.

Union Metrics Twitter analytics allow you to easily:

  • Monitor all the Twitter accounts, keywords and topics that matter to you, with full-fidelity data in real time
  • Identify insights into what’s working and how you can improve your Twitter strategy
  • Discover influential Twitter users and people driving the conversation forward
  • Learn how to craft better Tweets to increase engagement and followers

And more!

What you get in the Instagram demo


Sign up here to access our live Instagram analytics demo to take a tour of what you get with a subscription to Union Metrics Instagram analytics. Our Instagram demo includes live data from a set of Instagram accounts and hashtags, and allows you to click around in a fully-functional Union Metrics account in read-only mode.

You can see how Union Metrics Instagram analytics enable you to:

  • Monitor all the Instagram accounts and hashtags that matter to you, constantly updated and in real time
  • Identify insights into what’s working (and what isn’t) and what you can do to improve your Instagram campaigns
  • Discover your biggest fans and influential community members to see how and when they engage
  • Explore how to optimize your content and hashtag strategies to increase engagement and followers

This is great, but I want to measure Tumblr and Facebook too!

No problem! If you want multi-channel social media analytics for everything - Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram and Facebook – we can help with that too. Contact us to set up a demo of the full Union Metrics Social Suite, or check out a recording of a Union Metrics Social Suite demo here if you’re crunched for time or want to get a feel for things before getting a personalized tour. Happy measuring!

As always if you’ve got questions or comments, leave them below or come find us on Twitter at @UnionMetrics

Written by Sarah

September 30th, 2015 at 8:44 am

The Week in Social #172

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We spend the week reading the best things we can get our eyeballs on and on Fridays we share them here with you. Leave your thoughts in the comments, or come find us on Twitter at @UnionMetrics.

All about Facebook.

You may have seen a dozen headlines declaring Facebook’s forthcoming “dislike” button, but that’s not actually what Zuckerberg promised. Andrew Hutchinson breaks down What Facebook’s ‘Other Than Like’ Option Will (Probably) Look Like, and What it Means for Marketers in Social Media Today. We also recommend his piece Facebook Looking to Ramp Up Instant Articles and Live Streaming on Platform to get fully acquainted with upcoming Facebook changes.

On UGC and permission.

When it comes to disclosing brand partnerships and sponsorships, we and the FTC say to always err on the side of caution with the mantra “When in doubt; disclose”. Similar to that, always ask for permission from fans and followers before you use their images, even if they tagged your brand’s handle or used a brand-related hashtag that isn’t specifically set up as a contest explicitly stating using said hashtag gives you permission to use their photos. (Even then, asking again wouldn’t hurt.) Below is an example, from the National Park Foundation:

Denali National Park, Alaska, for #TravelTuesday. #travel #Alaska #FindYourPark #travelgram #instapassport #landscape

A photo posted by Sparker (@sparkerpants) on

Need more convincing? Read On Instagram and Other Social Media, Redefining ‘User Engagement’ from Sydney Ember and Rachel Abrams for the NYT.

All about those tweets and other Twitter properties.

80% of Twitter’s 316 million monthly users are mobile. Are you optimized for that? Social Times is here to help with How to Make Your Tweets Mobile-Friendly by Lauren Dugan.

If you’re looking at adding Vine to your video content marketing plan, you might want to read over these Best Practices for Creating Budget-Friendly Branded Vine Videos from Eric Dahan.

And finally. . .shiny things.

Quinn Whissen breaks down The Social Media Shiny Object Syndrome in Marketing Land. 

If you’re worried you may have fallen ill with the Social Media Shiny Object Syndrome (SMSOS), ask yourself these questions:

  • Where does my audience hang out online?
  • Can I consistently engage my audience with unique, relevant content on my chosen platform(s)?
  • Where do I get the best engagement that actually benefits my business?
  • Am I spread too thin to the point where I can’t focus where it matters most?
  • Why am I on this platform in the first place, or why do I want to be on it?

The cure? “Focus where it matters. Spend your time wisely and strategically. Be intentional.”

And if you need help measuring to figure out where your efforts are paying off- and therefore best spent- we can help with that.

Written by Sarah

September 25th, 2015 at 8:57 am

Previewing the new 2015 fall TV shows on Twitter

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It’s September and that means it’s time for new fall TV! Over the next few weeks, the big networks will roll out their new TV series. Not all of these series will survive the year; some will be cancelled within a few weeks. One of our favorite exercises each fall at Union Metrics is to dig into what Twitter thinks about the new fall TV shows. What can we learn from early Twitter conversation and what can that tell us about whether or not a show might be cancelled?

Like last year, all of the new network series have official Twitter accounts and hashtags, so they’re all actively participating on Twitter to promote their premieres and encourage viewers to tune in. However, not all the new shows are doing well on Twitter. Let’s take a look at the crop of new shows to see how they’re doing on Twitter, and what that means for their cancellation chances.

The best of the best

First, let’s talk about the fall TV shows that are doing well on Twitter. Theses are the series potential viewers are most excited about, the ones stirring up controversy and conversation on social media. We’ll start with the front-runner, Scream Queens.

FOX’s new show Scream Queens is absolutely crushing all other the new programs on Twitter. There have been more than 330,000 tweets about the show in the past month alone. That’s more than 5x the tweet volume of its closest competitor. Scream Queens generated more tweets in the past month than even the Late Show with Stephen Colbert, which started this week. The official Twitter account has already collected more than 126,000 Twitter followers. Why?

The marketing team behind Scream Queens has been working hard for months to promote the show across social media, sharing teasers and news and behind-the-scenes pictures, starting early this spring. And of course Scream Queens’ celebrity firepower doesn’t hurt. It stars Emma Roberts, Jamie Lee Curtis, Nick Jonas, Ariana Grande, Lea Michelle and a host of other well-known names. It’s also created by Ryan Murphy (who created American Horror Story, which has performed very well on social media over the past few years). And finally, the demographic this show is targeting is perfect for Twitter – that young, hip audience so many advertisers want to reach. So it’s no surprise that no other show comes close to Scream Queens’ numbers on Twitter. It’s practically perfect for social media. But what about the others?

The rest of the best

Beyond Scream Queens, there’s a handful of other shows that have excited Twitter. A few of these are expected to be big hits and have had huge marketing campaigns around them, so it’s not surprising to see them here. All of them have generated at least 1,000 daily tweets on average over the past month. They are:

  • The Muppets on ABC
  • Heroes Reborn on NBC
  • Blood & Oil on ABC
  • Quantico on ABC
  • Supergirl on CBS

Here’s a look at how they compare in terms of tweets over the past month.

Tweets about the top fall TV shows

Supergirl doesn’t premiere until the end of October, so it’s likely to continue to gain momentum over the next six weeks. The Muppets and Heroes Reborn are nearly tied right now, and premiere just a couple days apart the week of September 21. Blood & Oil has had a few flurries in tweet activity recently (see the purple spikes on the chart). And Quantico is performing well so far.

The mediocre middle

In order not to leave any shows out, there are a set of new series that are doing fine on Twitter. There has been some conversation about them, but nothing record-setting or particularly impressive (good or bad). We’ll monitor these are they get underway to see if they trend up or down, but for now, here are the mediocres:

  • Best Time Ever with Neil Patrick Harris on NBC
  • Minority Report on FOX
  • Blindspot on NBC
  • Grandfathered on FOX
  • Rosewood on FOX

Best Time Ever premiered this week on NBC, and gained a little traction during the premiere. The first episode only generated about 20k tweets on premiere day – that’s a fairly small showing for a brand new show with such a big name star.

The back of the pack

Not all the new shows are doing well. There are a few that haven’t made much of an impact at all on Twitter. As we’ve seen in past years, some shows just don’t make the cut – on Twitter or on television. Maybe their marketing departments haven’t spent enough time promoting the shows on Twitter, maybe the concepts just don’t excite potential viewers, maybe the cast hasn’t been active enough in their own accounts. But these six shows haven’t generated very many tweets (some of them getting 50 or fewer tweets a day!) and are in risky territory.

  • Life in Pieces on CBS
  • Limitless on CBS
  • The Player on NBC
  • The Grinder on FOX
  • Code Black on CBS
  • Dr. Ken on ABC

Now just because a show isn’t generating many tweets, that doesn’t guarantee it’ll be cancelled. But many shows that can’t find a Twitter audience probably aren’t finding a TV audience either. If no one’s talking about it, that either mean no one’s watching it or they’re watching it but it’s just so dull there’s nothing to talk about. That’s a good first step for cancellation.

The most surprising show in this bottom group is FOX’s The Grinder, which stars Fred Savage and Rob Lowe. These are two big names who should draw in a bigger crowd. The show doesn’t premiere until the very end of September, so it has a couple weeks to grow, but we would expect more early chatter for this one. The same goes for ABC’s Dr. Ken.

Some shows still have some time before they premiere – a set of new series don’t start until mid October or November. We’ll keep an eye on those are we get closer to their premiere dates, as they still have time to develop a larger audience on Twitter. That includes Truth Be Told and Chicago Med on NBC, Wicked City on ABC, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend on The CW, and Angel From Hell on CBS.

We’ll check back in on these numbers in a couple weeks, once most of these shows have premiered. In the meantime, what do you think? What shows will stay? Which will get cancelled?

Want to monitor tweets (or Instagram or Tumblr or Facebook) about your show this fall? Take a look at the social media analytics we provide at Union Metrics.

Written by Jenn D

September 17th, 2015 at 3:10 pm

Posted in Events,Trends

Tagged with , , ,

Ranking the GOP candidates on Twitter

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A month ago, we wrote a little about the first round of GOP debates. Today, as we prepare for the next debate, let’s take a look at how the remaining Republican candidates are doing on Twitter. Here’s a list of the candidates in the debate tonight, ordered by how many tweets* have been posted about them in the past month.

Tweets about GOP candidates

As he has for several months, Trump continues to dominate the GOP conversation on Twitter, generating 10x more tweets than his closest competitor. What has changed is who Trump’s competitors are. Cruz and Bush are still round out the top three, but Carson and Fiorina have both seen tremendous growth in Twitter conversation in the past month and their popularity on Twitter has more than tripled since the last debate. Paul has dropped down the list since the last debate.

This chart shows a comparison between the top candidates (minus Trump, since his tweet volumes dwarf all others).
GOP Candidates on TwitterA few other interesting things to note about this data. Only one candidate has seen decreases in Twitter conversation since the first debate: John Kasich. That doesn’t bode well for his future in this presidential race. In addition, these numbers reflect some of what we saw in this week’s New York Times/CBS News poll, including the increase in popularity of Ben Carson.

9/17/15 update: We took at look at tweets posted during and after the debate to see how Twitter thought the candidates performed. Carly Fiorina was the overwhelming favorite on Twitter, generating nearly 250k tweets during the debate. She’s been trending up on Twitter for a while and solidified that last night. In comparison, there were about 500k tweets about Donald Trump during the debate. While that is still 2x the volume Fiorina received, up until now, Trump has been getting 10x more tweets than his closest competitor. Fiorina is rapidly closing that gap. The next closest was Jeb Bush, we received just under 200k tweets during the debate.

We’ll keep watching the tweets throughout the election and update as things get interesting! And if you want metrics or graphs like these for your own brand, take a look at the social media analytics we offer at Union Metrics.

*This includes all tweets that match a set of search terms about the candidate, including account mentions and hashtags. Tweets were posted between August 17 and September 16. 

Written by Jenn D

September 16th, 2015 at 5:32 pm

How Twitter etiquette has evolved: Be a modern Emily Post on Twitter

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Etiquette definitely evolves over time and that’s just as true of social media etiquette as it is of which fork you’re supposed to be using at Thanksgiving dinner (and now much anyone actually cares about it). We’ve covered how to be the Emily Post of Twitter chats, so we thought we might be sure everyone has brushed up on the rest of their Twitter manners too.

Disagree with an element of our updated etiquette or have something to add? Tell us about it in the comments, or find us on Twitter @UnionMetrics.

On Auto-DMs

The old advice: We’re not sure who started the idea that automatically sending every new follower a direct message asking them to Like your Facebook page or answer a very broad (and obviously auto-generated) question was a good way to grow your audience, but even if it was true at one point, it’s no longer true now.

The new advice: If you have these set up, disconnect them. Unless you have hard numbers that prove people are engaging with them and loving them, it’s more likely they go ignored at best and get you unfollowed at worst.

On networking

The old advice: Never meet someone in person from the Internet! (And your mom might still be worried about this, because your mom remembers when people weren’t really who they said they were in an AOL chat room circa 1994. But times have changed, mom.)

The new advice: Don’t be afraid to ask for a meet-up when it makes sense! Twitter connections are great to tap for some face time when you’re both at the same conference or other event, or even if you find yourselves in the same city and want to talk shop over a cup of coffee or a cocktail.

On asking for favors

The old advice: Don’t immediately ask for something from a new connection.

The new advice: This advice stands because this is sound, timeless advice.

On hashtags

The old advice: Once hashtags were conceived it was only a matter of time before someone decided that where one hashtag was a great way to gather ideas into a single, searchable space, 1000 hashtags could do that even better! And then the spammers were born.

The new advice: These days Twitter themselves have a whole explainer for hashtags, and it’s a general best practice not to use more than one or two in a single tweet. Although they can also be used to make a great #punchline. Just do what works with your brand and your brand voice.

On following

The old advice: Follow everyone back who follows you!

The new advice: Some still take this approach, but it’s usually best to avoid following spam accounts or other accounts who aren’t customers or relevant to your industry that would simply clutter your feed. Conduct regular audits to unfollow any accounts that have gone inactive or are no longer relevant to make room for new customers and upcoming leaders and personalities in your industry.

What else?

How have you seen Twitter etiquette evolve over bios, profile shots, retweeting and favoriting? Leave your thoughts below!

Written by Sarah

September 10th, 2015 at 9:00 am

Twitter loves the Late Show with Stephen Colbert

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Stephen Colbert kicked off a new era at the the Late Show last night, with the premiere of his first show as host. Twitter was excited to have Colbert back.

Yesterday, there were more than 113,000 tweets about Stephen Colbert and the Late Show. During the episode itself, fans posted nearly 50,000 tweets. Here, you can see the buildup in tweets in the week leading up to the episode, with an increase in volume the day of, a huge spike during the episode, and lots of tweets discussing the show after.

Tweets about Stephen Colbert

How does Colbert stack up to the other late night talk show hosts? The top five hosts according to Twitter are Jimmy Kimmel, Jimmy Fallon, John Oliver, Conan O’Brien and Stephen Colbert. Take a look at how they compare on Twitter over the past few weeks.

Comparing tweets about late night hosts

Jimmy Fallon leads the late night pack on social right now, followed by Jimmy Kimmel, but Stephen Colbert is only a little bit behind them and his show just started. Fallon typically generates around 15k tweet mentions a day, Kimmel around 7k, and John Oliver and Conan O’Brien around 4k daily. Colbert has gotten around 5k tweets daily over the past month, with that number growing every day (he averaged almost 7k per day over the past week).

A lot of Fallon’s Twitter engagement is driven by his celebrity guests. For example, @fallontonight has averaged more than 1,500 retweets per tweet over the past few days, driven by a handful of tweets mentioning Justin Bieber, which generated way more engagement than average (Bieber fans still generate some of the platform’s highest engagement rates, which you can see in the large green spikes in early September). Aside from the Bieber-related tweets, Jimmy Fallon averaged a more typical 150 retweets per tweet over the past month. That means Bieber led to 10x engagement for @fallontonight this month.

In addition, @fallontonight has nearly 3M followers, so Jimmy Fallon is speaking to a much larger audience than the other late night hosts. He’s also been hosting the Tonight Show for 18 months, so he’s had more time to grow his social following. @colbertlateshow has just under 80k followers right now, so Colbert has a lot of room to grow over the next few months as his new show gains its footing. He’s already gained 20k followers in just the past day or two. 

We’ll keep watching to see how Colbert’s team takes advantage of Twitter and other social media to engage their fans and share new content. But for now, it looks like his first show was a success! What do you think? Did you watch?

Interested in monitoring tweets or other social posts about your TV show or brand? At Union Metrics, we can help! Get to know our social media analytics product and let us know if you have any questions. 

Written by Jenn D

September 9th, 2015 at 8:55 am

Posted in Trends

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How to get more followers, the right way!

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While the number of followers you have on any given platform isn’t the end-all, be-all of your existence on that platform, learning how to grow an audience is one of the most important aspects of social media marketing (even if all you’re marketing is your personal brand!).

With that said, we thought we’d share some of the best practices we’ve found and the tips we’ve learned through our own research across social platforms, growing our own audiences. As always if you have any questions feel free to leave them in the comments or come and find us on Twitter @UnionMetrics.

On Twitter

Slow growth is always frustrating, but it’s the kind of growth that tends to stick: Putting in the time and effort to find the kind of accounts you’re interested in who might also be interested in what you have to say (and later, sell) means they’re more likely to stick around for the long haul. So as tempting as it may be to have that follower number shoot right up for only $x, don’t buy bots. Instead, try these tactics:

  • Conduct regular follower audits: Follow back appropriate accounts, and unfollow anyone who has gone inactive or is no longer relevant to your brand or industry
  • Participate in chats: Twitter chats are a great way to find quality accounts in your industry, and you never know who might be in the market for exactly what you have to offer. They’ll be more interested in buying from someone they’ve already established a rapport with via chats than a strange brand, too.

  • Social listening is key: Track industry keywords and enter conversations but bring something of value, don’t just show up to sell yourself/your brand. That will turn people off quickly and you’ll be more likely to get blocked than followed.
  • Follow first: Follow relevant accounts you find in chats or through keyword tracking. Don’t worry too much about whether or not they follow you back immediately. Just work on sharing valuable information and interacting with these and other accounts when appropriate.
  • Copy industry leaders: See who leaders in your industry- even competitors- are following and follow them. (Just don’t follow 1,000 of them in one day. In addition to being somewhat creepy, Twitter puts a cap on how many accounts your account can follow in order to avoid spam.)
  • Tap your followers: Who are your followers following? Who do they retweet? Some of these will be relevant for you to follow, and many will follow you back. Circle back around to regular audits and you can unfollow any accounts who have lost relevance or haven’t followed you back when you’ve honestly tried to engage them.

You’ll notice a lot of these revolve around finding accounts to follow. How does that help your follower growth? Many accounts will follow you back if they see that you’re posting things that are relevant and interesting to them. Others will as soon as you engage with them in a meaningful way— such as in a Twitter chat. The key is that you’ve got to put in a little work to prove that you’re worth following.

On Facebook

It’s hard to read much about Facebook marketing advice these days without reading “pay to play”, but you don’t have to have an enormous budget to grow your Facebook audience. Here’s a few tips to get you started without breaking the bank:

  • Tap into existing connections: Ask relevant Facebook connections to “Like” your page. You don’t have to send the request to every single person you went to college with. Think about who might be interested in hearing from your brand based on the type of content you plan to share on Facebook; chances are you have connections interested in your industry or who work in a related area.
  • Tap into existing followers: Ask those already following your page to put you in their top 30 priority News Feed accounts. Any actions they take are more likely to be seen by their followers, and they’re more likely to take an action if they actually see your content.
  • Run an inexpensive campaign at a targeted audience. Who’s your target audience on Facebook? Set up an ad that’s relevant to them and cap it at a budget you’re comfortable with. It will stop running when the money runs out, and you’ll have some new followers who are piqued to hear what you have to say.
  • Share interesting, relevant content. Test different content types too; Facebook is always changing the algorithm favoring different types of content (natively uploaded Facebook video is favored at the moment!) and your particular audience might favor one over all others.
  • Ask questions in status updates. Creating interactive content is a great way to get your existing audience involved, which may prompt them to tag others to join the conversation too. Just be sure whoever handles social for you is prepped to handle any resulting volume increase!
  • Host a Facebook contest. Work to create and interesting and engaging contest for your followers beyond just “Like our page to be entered to win [x]” and any new followers will be more likely to stick around once the contest ends.
  • Promote your most successful posts. Once again you can set things up to end once you’ve spent your budget, so set things at an amount you’re comfortable with.

On Instagram

Based on this post on the Union Metrics Tumblr. 

  • Post great content: Postcontent people actually want to see. The best brand content on Instagram shows off a product in an alluring or inspirational way without feeling too much like an advertisement, and also stays true to the brand voice. For example, what works for Sephora isn’t the same as what works for Dennys
  • Time your posts appropriately: The most successful Instagram and Tumblr accounts post at least once a day, and typically not more than five times a day. If you’re looking for the best time to post to these platforms, post outside traditional US business hours.

  • Find and follow interesting people: Try searching on a hashtag related to a topic you’re interested in, and follow people posting content you like. If fans are talking about your or your brand, give them a follow back and engage with them – they’ll appreciate it. Basically, if you follow new people, many of them will follow you back.

  • Use (hash)tags: Hashtags increase content discoverability, so use them in your posts. Adding a hashtag is the single best way we’ve found to get content in front of new audiences.

On Tumblr

Based on this post on the Union Metrics Tumblr. 

  • Search relevant tags: You’ll find some great blogs to follow, and as you may have picked up, many accounts will check you out and follow you back if you’re relevant to their interests on almost any platform.
  • Search relevant featured tags: Featured tags have changed on Tumblr over the years, but Unwrapping Tumblr has an entry about them here and keeps an updated list of them here.
  • Track tags: Some of the tags you searched earlier that are relevant to your brand and industry might be relevant enough to keep constant tabs on, in which case you’ll want to designate them as “tracked” tags. Read exactly how to do that here, and once you do they’ll pop up any time you drop your cursor into the Tumblr search bar.

Tumblr tracked tags


  • Make good art (as Neil Gaiman says): Whatever it is that you’re creating or curating on Tumblr, make sure the content that you’re sharing is the very best it can be. If you’re bored or underwhelmed by your own blog, who else is going to be interested in following- let alone sharing- what you’re producing? 
  • Be sure you’re using the best tags: We can’t emphasize enough how important proper tag usage is on Tumblr. It’s how your content can be found by new followers interested in whatever it is that you’re talking about. 
  • Interact with your followers: Like, reblog, follow back. Consider thanking new followers in a post periodically and inviting them to ask any questions (you have an ask box, or you can set up a particular post to be able to receive answers) they might have about your brand. Also consider sharing UGC when it makes sense, either through reblogging, a campaign, or both. Anyone new who stumbles across your blog is more likely to follow if they see you interact with your followers.
  •  Cross-promote: Let people know you’re on Tumblr! Post about it on your Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and on another blog if you have one. Pin images from posts on your Pinterest and send Snaps about your Tumblr. It’s a lot harder for people to find you if they don’t know you’re there. 

That list tip really works across all platforms: Be sure you have a consistent handle and occasionally let your followers on Twitter know you’ve got a Facebook, Instagram, Tumblr and Snapchat, and vice-versa.

Everywhere else.

We haven’t officially experimented with growing our own followings on Pinterest or Snapchat (yet!), but other people have. We recommend reading A Marketer’s Guide To Snapchat & How Brands Can Build Followers Through “Stories” from MarketingLand along with NPR’s excellent Engaging an audience on Snapchat for building out your Snapchat audience, and 6 Ways to Get More Pinterest Followers from Social Media Examiner for Pinterest.

Got any tips we missed or other resources you’d recommend? Leave ‘em in the comments!

Written by Sarah

September 8th, 2015 at 9:00 am

Twitter and the 2015 MTV VMAs

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How many tweets did fans post about the MTV VMAs yesterday? A LOT. There were more than 11.5 million tweets posted about the VMAs during the 2.5-hour show and 20.9 million tweets during the full day on Sunday. A few other highlights:

  • Kanye West announced he will run for president in 2020, and generated 2.8 million tweets in just an hour and 4.6 million tweets all day.
  • There were more than 3.6 million tweets about Miley Cyrus yesterday.
  • Justin Bieber made a big appearance – with a brand new haircut – and spurred 2.9 million tweets yesterday.

MTV’s big publicity push around this year’s show really paid off, making it one of the most-tweeted about VMAs in history. What was your favorite moment?

Written by Jenn D

August 31st, 2015 at 9:19 am

Posted in Events

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