TweetReach Blog

Archive for the ‘tweetreach’ tag

Want to analyze older or historical tweets? We can help!

without comments

At Union Metrics, we can access any tweets in Twitter’s history for TweetReach analytics reporting! So if you’re interested in understanding the impact of tweets about a past campaign or project, we can help. Use this guide to see which TweetReach product you need, depending on when your tweets were posted.

When were the tweets posted?

Recently

If the tweets you’re interested in were posted in the past week, try running a snapshot report. Snapshot reports are great for recent, smaller events. Free snapshots include up to 50 recent tweets, and our full $20 snapshots will include up to 1500 tweets from the past few days (usually up to a week).

A while ago

If the tweets are more than one week old, you’ll need our premium historical analytics. With our historical Twitter analytics, we access the full Twitter archive and can analyze any public tweets that have ever been posted, dating back to March 2006. Pricing starts at $199 and is based on report duration and total tweet volume. Request a quote or more information here.

In the future

If the tweets haven’t been posted yet, set up a Tracker with our TweetReach Pro Twitter analytics subscriptions. That starts at just $99 per month, which includes real-time, ongoing monitoring for two topics, hashtags, keywords or accounts and up to 100,000 tweets per month. You just need to set up your Tracker before tweets start going out, and we can capture them all. You can see full pricing here.

Learn more

If you’d like to learn more about our premium historical analytics, let’s talk! Email us if you have any questions or read more on our website.  You may also want to read this post on how to take advantage of our historical Twitter analytics.

Old Skool Tweet

 

Image via Iain Farrell on Flickr 

Written by Jenn D

January 9th, 2015 at 10:01 am

Posted in Guides,Help

Tagged with , ,

Why potential reach and impressions matter on Twitter

without comments

All TweetReach reporting includes a number of engagement and listening metrics for Twitter. Two of the main metrics we provide are potential reach and impressions. Let’s talk a little more about what reach and impressions are, and why they’re so important to your Twitter strategy.

Reach is the size of the estimated potential unique audience for your tweets. TweetReach calculates reach algorithmically, based on data we’ve been collecting from Twitter for more than five years. It’s the best way of knowing how large your audience on Twitter can be, and takes unique recipients into account.

Impressions measure the size of total potential exposure. This shows you how many total timelines your tweets were delivered to, so it’s a count of the maximum total impressions possible for your tweets.

TweetReach potential reach and impressions

Both of these estimated audience metrics are essential for understanding the full impact of your tweets, especially when used alongside Twitter’s internal analytics. Here’s how.

Reach and impressions for your Twitter account

Twitter’s analytics calculate actual impressions for each of your Twitter account’s tweets. That shows how many people actually saw that tweet. TweetReach calculates total possible impressions for those tweets. Use actual impressions and potential impressions together to fully understand your impact on Twitter. The number of actual impressions received will vary from tweet to tweet and account to account, but your actual impressions will likely be between 1% and 20% of your potential impressions.

Knowing how your actual impressions compare to your potential impressions shows you exactly how well your tweets are performing, how large your audience is, and how large your audience could be. What’s the ratio of your actual impressions to potential impressions? Are your tweets on the low side? Do some perform better than others? Use this information to determine how you can improve your ratio. Which tweets are seen – and engaged with – by more people? What makes those tweets different? Maybe you used a particular hashtag or included a photo. If so, try doing more of that to see how you can activate more of your potential audience, and improve your ratio of actual to potential impressions.

Additionally, you can use other TweetReach metrics on engagement (like retweets and replies, average retweets rate) and contributors (such as contributors who have engaged the most with your content and generated the highest exposure) to understand not just how far your content is reaching, but how and with whom.

Reach and impressions for competitors’ or influencers’ accounts

While Twitter’s activity dashboard focuses on your own Twitter presence, you can use TweetReach to analyze any Twitter account, including your competitors, influencers in your industry, celebrities, or any other public Twitter account.

Start with a quick share of voice analysis. How do your reach and impressions compare to those of your closest competitor? How about other similar Twitter accounts? Remember these are potential impressions, so know that – just like for your own Twitter account – your competitors’ actual impressions will be a similarly small percentage of their potential impressions.

For a more advanced analysis, dive deeper into competitive intelligence. Run TweetReach reports or Trackers for your competitors, then take a look at the popular content and top contributors in these conversations. What Twitter accounts are engaging with your competitors? Who are they and do you follow them? What hashtags are your competitors using? Are there any new or relevant hashtags you could use? What tweets are resonating in the conversation?

Reach and impressions for hashtags, keywords or other terms

With TweetReach, you can measure more than just a Twitter account – you can measure the impact of anything in a tweet, like a hashtag, a phrase or keyword, even a URL. Twitter’s activity dashboard only includes tweets posted from your account, so you can’t use it to analyze impressions for the overall conversation around a hashtag, for example.

You’re probably using a variety of hashtags in your tweets – some for specific campaigns or events and other more general hashtags to signal participation in a particular industry or conversation. Do you know the reach of those hashtags? With TweetReach, you can understand the potential reach and impressions for any hashtag, which helps you understand the size of the conversation you’re participating in. If a hashtag has a low reach, then you’ll be able to have a large impact in a smaller space. If the hashtag’s reach is high, you’ll less likely to make a big impact in the overall conversation, but you’re participating in a more popular topic. The best Twitter strategy includes a bit of both; use a combination of specific and general hashtags in your tweets to reach the most people.

Interested in learning more about how you can use potential reach and impressions to improve your Twitter strategy? We’d be happy to show you how to use TweetReach’s Twitter analytics to better understand the full impact of your tweets. Let’s talk!

Written by Jenn D

October 16th, 2014 at 10:04 am

Posted in Guides

Tagged with , , ,

Important update: Please change your TweetReach password

without comments

Last night, a laptop was stolen from one of our engineers. We took immediate action to ensure that all our systems were secure and there is no evidence of any compromise. But as a security precaution, we recommend you change your TweetReach or Union Metrics password right away.

TweetReach users can change their passwords here: https://tweetreach.com/user/edit

Union Metrics for Tumblr or Union Metrics for Instagram users can log in here: https://app.unionmetrics.com/. Then click the user icon in the top right corner to access your user profile.

While access to the laptop is password protected, it did contain a partial data export from two of our user databases. No credit card, financial information or analytics data was involved in any way, and all stored passwords are one-way encrypted using a cryptographic hash and a technique called “salting” which protects you even if you used the same password on other sites. Your password cannot be decrypted, so the risk to your personal information is quite low. However, it is possible that usernames and email addresses could be accessed, though they have not yet been. Changing your password will eliminate any possibility of a data breach, however unlikely.

We are extremely sorry for this inconvenience, and we have taken every step possible to ensure that your data is secure and your identity is protected, now and in the future.

We will be here if you have any questions, so please email or call any time.

support@unionmetrics.com
888-834-8113

Written by Jenn D

June 13th, 2014 at 4:21 pm

Posted in News

Tagged with , ,

Join us for our biweekly demo of TweetReach Pro!

without comments


Interested in learning more about TweetReach? Join us for our biweekly demo of TweetReach Pro.

TweetReach can help you measure the reach of brands, campaigns and events on Twitter. It’s a dead simple way to discover how far your message has traveled, what tweets are getting the most traction, and who’s influencing the conversation around your brand or product. Our demos usually take 15-20 minutes followed by an open Q&A session. Attendees will receive a discount code at the end.

Pick the date that works the best for you, and we’ll see you there! Register here, and be sure to select your preferred date from the drop-down menu:

Wednesday, April 24 | 12pm-12:30pm EDT

Wednesday, May 8 | 12pm-12:30pm EDT

Wednesday, May 22 | 12pm-12:30pm EDT

Wednesday, June 5 | 12pm-12:30pm EDT

Wednesday, June 19  | 12pm-12:30pm EDT

Got questions? Leave a comment, or click here.

Photo courtesy Powerhouse Museum Collection

Written by Sarah

April 23rd, 2013 at 9:01 am

Join us to learn more about TweetReach!

without comments


Interested in learning more about TweetReach Pro and our other Twitter analytics offerings? We’re holding two webinar demos next week, conveniently scheduled for our customers outside of the United States. Anyone is welcome to attend, of course!

Sign up for one of these short demos where we’ll tell you more about TweetReach Pro, our historical analytics, and our snapshot reports. To register, just follow the one of the links below:

Let us know if you have any questions. We look forward to having you there!

 

Photo courtesy Public Domain Pictures

Written by Sarah

April 4th, 2013 at 2:17 pm

Join us for a webinar this Wednesday, 2/27 at 11am PST!

without comments


Interested in more comprehensive, ongoing tweet tracking with TweetReach Pro? Sign up for a short demo webinar, where we’ll show you how it works, what’s included, and answer any questions you have. We look forward to to seeing you on the 27th, at 11am PST sharp!

Register here.

Got questions? We’ll answer them!

(Photo credit: US National Archives)

Written by Sarah

February 25th, 2013 at 10:45 am

Posted in News

Tagged with , , , ,

TweetReach Product Survey

without comments

Hey friends and fans, got a quick minute? We’d love it and be much obliged if you could take our product survey and let us know how your experience has been.

The feedback will help us keep making things better for you. Thanks!

-The TweetReach Team

Written by Sarah

January 21st, 2013 at 9:44 am

Posted in News

Tagged with , ,

Your in America: Overnight Twitter sensation teaches grammar and Twitter reach

without comments

The latest Twitter account to enchant us all, seemingly overnight, is bringing delight to grammar enthusiasts everywhere: “Your In America Bot” (@YourInAmerica) swoops in on unsuspecting offenders of the English language, who are, entertainingly, mostly trying to shame others for not speaking English.

Created on November 23rd, @YourinAmerica counted just under 15k followers only five days later, with an output of fewer than 100 tweets.

How is that possible? Let’s look at the reach of the single tweet above.

Not bad. But let’s understand how almost 250,000 accounts were reached, when this account has only a fraction of that number of followers, even at the rate it has grown.

Here’s the activity breakdown for the tweet:

So actually 241 separate Twitter accounts contributed to the exposure of this one tweet, mostly by picking it up and retweeting it: 219 retweets, 12 replies, and 18 other tweets were made. On the day this tweet was published, the account had about 8,000 followers, meaning just about 3% of the follower base was able to lead to this much exposure on a single tweet.

And here’s where it really gets interesting: looking at who is doing the retweeting. @SarahSpain, ESPN1000 host, has a lot more followers than @YourinAmerica and her retweet of the original tweet is actually what generated the most exposure.

In this way, TweetReach helps you figure out who the major influencer is in the reach of this particular tweet, in way that would be much more difficult and time-consuming to figure out manually.

This gives you an idea of whom to cultivate relationships with on Twitter. If you see that one account with a lot of influence (be that a large audience or simply highly engaged followers) consistently interacts with you and/or retweets your content, you know they like what you have to say and are helping you grow your own audience.

For example, the second most retweeted tweet only had 7 retweets – compared to the original, unaltered tweet’s 207- but this is still important to note because it indicates that @alysonfooter has an engaged audience of her own. (Note that these numbers reflect the two messages that were retweeted the most– the original and one with the original message plus commentary. More retweets were also made with different commentary added to the original, which altogether add up to the total number of retweets made: 219.)

Perhaps the most interesting takeaway from @YourInAmerica, however, will be if anyone really does learn a grammar lesson. So far most of the victims seem to have deleted the offending tweet in question after falling victim to @YourInAmerica.

Written by Sarah

November 28th, 2012 at 3:28 pm

What is TweetReach?

without comments

Here’s a quick video explaining what TweetReach is and how it can help you measure your – or your campaign’s – impact on Twitter.

Still have questions? Just ask!

Written by Jenn D

June 18th, 2012 at 6:31 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

Tagged with , ,

Can’t touch this: TechCrunch Disrupt hammers out 50MM Twitter impressions in 2 days, but….

with one comment

This week’s TechCrunch Disrupt conference has been quite a show. In fact, since the conference started Monday in San Francisco, TechCrunch Disrupt has seen total audience exposure of nearly 50 million impressions on Twitter (more about how we calculate impressions here). It certainly helps when there’s rumor followed by significant acquisition news (signed on stage, no less) with a dose of Hammer Time thrown in. Tweets from MCHammer himself, Om Malik, Robert Scoble, and Steve Case don’t hurt either.

This data comes from a TweetReach Tracker. The TweetReach Tracker is a new, real-time analytics feature we’re rolling out to Pro subscribers. This is a sneak peak – expect a larger announcement soon.

Upon closer review, the numbers reveal people were incredibly engaged and conversive around TechCrunch Disrupt, and absolutely told their followers – tweeting, retweeting and @replying over and over again. The 50 million in total exposure came from 3,300 Twitter users who tweeted over 10,000 times about the conference. In fact, 42% of the audience saw TechCrunch Disrupt-related messages SEVEN times or more. Talk about Hammer Time.  Just 18% saw a message once. Ultimately, since Monday, TechCrunch Disrupt has reached 5.7 million UNIQUE Twitter users.

By comparison, mid-September’s DEMO Conference saw total audience exposure of over 7 million with 1.1 million unique Twitter users were reached – all this from 3,700 tweets by 800 contributors. Yet TweetReach Tracker data shows the core DEMO audience was far less engaged or conversational: 58% of the audience saw a DemoCon tweet just once, while 20% saw a DEMO-related message more than seven times.

So what does this mean? While the TechCrunch Disrupt and DEMO ratios are roughly the same – and frankly, what you’d expect for these types of conferences – there seemed to be significantly more engagement by the TechCrunch Disrupt crowd. The same people saw tweets, retweets and @replies over and over again. But at some point, does this become annoying? If it’s a typical brand message, it probably does. If it’s a conference with breaking news and new technology being announced, perhaps not so much.

What do you think? Annoying or informative?

Written by Dean Cruse

September 29th, 2010 at 5:18 pm

Posted in Trends

Tagged with , , ,