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Free snapshot reports now come with 100 tweets!

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Have you run a TweetReach snapshot report lately? Well we have great news! Our free snapshot reports now include up to 100 tweets! That’s twice the tweets they had before. Try it now – click on the image below to run your own free report.

Snapshot report

Run a snapshot report today on any hashtag, keyword, account name, or whatever it is that interests you (see more about what you can search for with a snapshot report here) and now get twice as many tweets about it. Still for free!

And don’t forget to share your report on Twitter once you’ve run it. We love to see what people are searching for!

Written by Sarah

August 19th, 2015 at 9:08 am

How TweetReach impressions compare to Twitter impressions

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At TweetReach, we provide measures of potential reach and impressions on Twitter.

Reach is the size of the estimated potential unique audience for a set of tweets. We calculate reach algorithmically, based on data we’ve been collecting from Twitter since we launched more than five years ago. It’s a great way of estimating how large your audience on Twitter could be, and takes unique recipients into account, removing duplicates.

Impressions measure the size of total potential exposure. This shows you how many total timelines your tweets were delivered to – including multiple deliveries to the same account – so it’s a count of the maximum total impressions possible for a set of tweets.

TweetReach reach and impressions

If you’ve ever seen the analytics Twitter provides for your Twitter account, you’ve noticed they provide a count of actual impressions for each of your tweets. That impressions number shows how many times people actually saw that tweet. So you may be wondering how TweetReach impressions and Twitter impressions relate to each other. What do they each mean? Which one should you use? Why are they so different?

Twitter provides actual impressions for your tweets, while TweetReach calculates total potential impressions for those tweets. You can use these numbers together to fully understand how impactful your tweets are. The number of actual impressions your tweets receive will vary from tweet to tweet and account to account, but your actual impressions will likely be between 1% and 20% of your potential impressions.

Knowing how your actual impressions compare to your potential impressions shows you exactly how well your tweets are performing, how large your activated audience is, and how large your potential audience could be. What’s the ratio of your actual impressions to potential impressions? Are your tweets on the low side? Do some tweets perform better than others? Ask yourself the following questions to help improve the ratio of actual impressions to potential impressions.

What tweets get the most impressions?

First, look at which tweets are seen – and engaged with – by the most people. What makes those tweets different from your lower-performing tweets? Maybe you used a particular hashtag or included a photo. Maybe you mentioned someone who retweeted you. Whatever it is, try doing more of that to see how you can activate more of your potential audience, and improve your ratio of actual to potential impressions. For example, we’ve found for our own content, hashtags like #smm and #measure help get our tweets in front of a receptive, responsive audience interested in social media marketing. And our tweets with an interesting photo or video get high rates of engagement. And when it comes to posts about our company, tweets using the #hiring hashtag generate a lot more impressions than an average tweet.

What tweets get the fewest impressions?

Next, look at the tweets that are performing the worst. Which ones have the fewest impressions and least engagement? Look for patterns in those tweets. Sometimes you can learn more from what’s not working than from what is working. For example, we’ve found that some of our text-only tweets get fewer impressions and lower engagement than our visual content does. But not every time – there seems to be certain types of images that work better than others for us. What do you see in your analytics?

What’s different about your outliers?

Finally, are there any tweets that get way more engagement or impressions than the rest of your tweets? Dig deeper into these tweets, in both Twitter and TweetReach. What exactly spurred that response? Twitter will tell you how many retweets, replies, clicks and favorites a tweet received, and TweetReach can tell you who retweeted or replied to you and how much amplification they contributed to that tweet. Use this information to see what caused the spike, and think about how you can try to replicate this on future tweets.

Who engages with your tweets? And how?

Finally, you can use other metrics on engagement (like retweets and replies, average retweet rate) and contributors (such as the people who have engaged the most with your content and generated the most amplification for your content) to understand not just how far your content is reaching, but how and with whom. When taken together, along with actual and potential impressions, you can more completely understand what’s working with your Twitter account and how you can improve what isn’t.

You can run a free TweetReach snapshot report here any time, on any hashtags, usernames or keywords. Try it now! Want more? Check out our comprehensive TweetReach Pro subscriptions, with real-time monitoring and analytics, starting at just $99 per month.

Written by Jenn D

May 14th, 2015 at 8:21 am

Monitoring tweets about the Brazilian 2014 presidential election: A TweetReach case study

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Brazilian 2014 presidential electionLast fall, Medialogue, a digital agency based in Brazil, was tasked with monitoring social conversation about the 2014 Brazilian Presidential election for the Aécio Neves campaign and supporting the efforts of the Brazilian Social Democracy Party. Medialogue selected Union Metrics’ TweetReach Twitter analytics to support this effort.

The Brazilian 2014 presidential election was a record-breaking event for the country on social media, even compared to the 2010 election, on which Medialogue also worked. The sheer volume of conversation on social media surpassed all estimates based on the previous national election, generating more than 40 million total tweets. However, by using TweetReach to sort through the noise, Medialogue was able to make informed social media recommendations back to their client.

Click here to read our full case study about how Medialogue used TweetReach to measure millions of tweets about the election.

Image source: Economist, Brazil’s presidential election: A riven country

Written by Jenn D

March 24th, 2015 at 7:23 am

Introducing the new TweetReach Pro insight stream and dashboard!

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Today, we’re excited to announce a new and improved TweetReach Pro dashboard! The new dashboard includes our brand new Twitter analytics insight stream, as well as updated Tracker comparisons and much more. The new TweetReach Pro dashboard will help you better understand:

  • Important changes in follower growth, engagement and potential impressions
  • What Tweets, hashtags and URLs are popular
  • How one Twitter account’s performance compares to others
  • Who’s active or influential in a particular community
  • Exactly what to do next to improve post engagement

New TweetReach dashboard

The details on your new Twitter insights

We’re really excited about the brand new insight stream, which features a number of actionable data-based insights built to help you identify important changes in your metrics and decide what steps to take next to improve your Twitter performance. The insight stream includes information like spikes in impressions or retweets, above-average follower growth, and the best time for you to post to get more engagement.

We’ve also upgraded the Tracker overview in your dashboard, which allows you to more easily compare Trackers at a glance. See how different Twitter accounts or topics measure up, who’s getting more engagement when, when potential reach and impressions spike, and more.

Finally, we’ve added an all-new what’s hot section that highlights popular elements in your Trackers, including the most retweeted Tweet, most influential contributor and most popular hashtag and URL. Use these highlights to easily see what’s trending across your Trackers.

To see the new dashboard and insights, log into your TweetReach Pro account now! There’s also more information on our help desk. And if you don’t already use TweetReach Pro, there’s more information here on our Twitter analytics, which start at just $99 per month.

Want insights across social channels?

And now you can access our insights and dashboard for any of the social media channels we analyze, which includes Instagram and Tumblr. This makes it even easier to track your social media campaigns across platforms and quickly see what’s working and what isn’t. Interested in learning more about our full social suite? Let’s talk!

Written by Sarah

March 11th, 2015 at 12:11 pm

Understand how Instagram content performs on Twitter using TweetReach

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The lamentations of Twitter display cards being turned off for Instagram posts may have died out, but the need to measure all aspects of a content marketing strategy has only intensified, particularly when it comes to the visual. So how can you track and measure your Instagram content’s performance on Twitter? Let us show you how, using TweetReach.

The basics of URL tracking with TweetReach

The best way to keep track via TweetReach of how an Instagram photo travels around Twitter is by tracking its URL. TweetReach Trackers can monitor up to 15 separate queries about a single campaign or topic, including one or more URLs. (Full details on setting up topic Trackers here.) Here’s an example of how to set one up for specifically tracking a single Instagram URL:

Instagram tracking

URL queries should be set up as or with the full URL in quotes, as in the screenshot above. (You can find more details about specific searches and URL queries here.) This will search for all tweets containing this URL or portion of URL. Be sure that you have the full URL for a particular photo you want to track, since just adding a basic Instagram address ( would return information on every Instagram photo posted to Twitter, drowning out the results you want.

Also keep in mind that a Tracker will find all tweets that match any of your search queries and aggregate their metrics together in your Tracker, so make sure all the queries in a Tracker are related; in this case one or more Instagram photos, depending on if you want to track a single photo or a set. You can drill down into some details (usernames, hashtags, URLs, etc…) if you set up all the terms around a campaign, but summary metrics will be calculated for the entire set of tweets.

So if you really want to concentrate on the data for just your Instagram photos, consider setting up a separate Tracker for any hashtags or keywords.

What if I already have a Tracker running, and want to see how the Instagram content I’ve cross-posted is doing?

Great question! First, check the Top URLs section of your Tracker to see if any Instagram links are there:

UA Women links


If you don’t see any, don’t get discouraged. Clicking on the menu bar in the top right corner of that section (the three dots and three lines) will take you to a full list of URLs shared that is automatically ranked by impressions, but you can change that to reflect ranking by tweets, retweets, or contributors as you prefer.

UAWomen URLs

We recommend paying attention to how your Instagram and other visual content URLs rank depending on how you’ve sorted them. This way you can answer some questions about your content strategy so far: How many of your tweets contain Instagram URLs? Do those get retweeted more or less than those with other content type URLs? The answer to these questions can help you tweak your content strategy, including how often and how you share Instagram content via Twitter.

Find even more details

Click through on each high-ranking Instagram link to see what these high performing visual content pieces have in common. Is it a hashtag you used with all of them? The subject matter, like the inclusion of a celebrity spokesperson? It might even just be the lighting, tone (warm or cool), or absence or presence of people in the photos. Finding a common thread in your Instagram posts will let you know how to best present your content for the maximum impact on your audience.

This page will also tell you which day a link was posted when you hover over a spike in the display, letting you know if certain days of the week work better for certain content (because you should repeat these steps with every kind of content that you’re producing, from YouTube videos to blog URLs):

Instagram URL day posted

If you have fans and followers who independently share your Instagram URLs to their audiences, you’ll likely see this show up here since they can only share it after you have initially posted it. Watching the performance of a repost from your Instagram account can let you know which of your fans and followers have a strong following of their own. In time you can consider them for a brand ambassador partnership if appropriate, or see if they would be interested in using your product in a sponsored post. You can even just thank and reward them for being a dedicated follower.

The bottom line?

Keeping track of what kind of content consistently performs the best with your audience lets you know what kind of content to plan more of for the future. Knowing how your Instagram content is performing is simply one piece of that puzzle, which TweetReach can help put together.

Written by Sarah

March 10th, 2015 at 9:29 am

Want to analyze older or historical tweets? We can help!

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At Union Metrics, we can access any tweets in Twitter’s history for TweetReach analytics reporting! So if you’re interested in understanding the impact of tweets about a past campaign or project, we can help. Use this guide to see which TweetReach product you need, depending on when your tweets were posted.

When were the tweets posted?


If the tweets you’re interested in were posted in the past week, try running a snapshot report. Snapshot reports are great for recent, smaller events. Free snapshots include up to 50 recent tweets, and our full $20 snapshots will include up to 1500 tweets from the past few days (usually up to a week).

A while ago

If the tweets are more than one week old, you’ll need our premium historical analytics. With our historical Twitter analytics, we access the full Twitter archive and can analyze any public tweets that have ever been posted, dating back to March 2006. Pricing starts at $199 and is based on report duration and total tweet volume. Request a quote or more information here.

In the future

If the tweets haven’t been posted yet, set up a Tracker with our TweetReach Pro Twitter analytics subscriptions. That starts at just $99 per month, which includes real-time, ongoing monitoring for two topics, hashtags, keywords or accounts and up to 100,000 tweets per month. You just need to set up your Tracker before tweets start going out, and we can capture them all. You can see full pricing here.

Learn more

If you’d like to learn more about our premium historical analytics, let’s talk! Email us if you have any questions or read more on our website.  You may also want to read this post on how to take advantage of our historical Twitter analytics.

Old Skool Tweet


Image via Iain Farrell on Flickr 

Written by Jenn D

January 9th, 2015 at 10:01 am

Posted in Guides,Help

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Why potential reach and impressions matter on Twitter

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All TweetReach reporting includes a number of engagement and listening metrics for Twitter. Two of the main metrics we provide are potential reach and impressions. Let’s talk a little more about what reach and impressions are, and why they’re so important to your Twitter strategy.

Reach is the size of the estimated potential unique audience for your tweets. TweetReach calculates reach algorithmically, based on data we’ve been collecting from Twitter for more than five years. It’s the best way of knowing how large your audience on Twitter can be, and takes unique recipients into account.

Impressions measure the size of total potential exposure. This shows you how many total timelines your tweets were delivered to, so it’s a count of the maximum total impressions possible for your tweets.

TweetReach potential reach and impressions

Both of these estimated audience metrics are essential for understanding the full impact of your tweets, especially when used alongside Twitter’s internal analytics. Here’s how.

Reach and impressions for your Twitter account

Twitter’s analytics calculate actual impressions for each of your Twitter account’s tweets. That shows how many people actually saw that tweet. TweetReach calculates total possible impressions for those tweets. Use actual impressions and potential impressions together to fully understand your impact on Twitter. The number of actual impressions received will vary from tweet to tweet and account to account, but your actual impressions will likely be between 1% and 20% of your potential impressions.

Knowing how your actual impressions compare to your potential impressions shows you exactly how well your tweets are performing, how large your audience is, and how large your audience could be. What’s the ratio of your actual impressions to potential impressions? Are your tweets on the low side? Do some perform better than others? Use this information to determine how you can improve your ratio. Which tweets are seen – and engaged with – by more people? What makes those tweets different? Maybe you used a particular hashtag or included a photo. If so, try doing more of that to see how you can activate more of your potential audience, and improve your ratio of actual to potential impressions.

Additionally, you can use other TweetReach metrics on engagement (like retweets and replies, average retweets rate) and contributors (such as contributors who have engaged the most with your content and generated the highest exposure) to understand not just how far your content is reaching, but how and with whom.

Reach and impressions for competitors’ or influencers’ accounts

While Twitter’s activity dashboard focuses on your own Twitter presence, you can use TweetReach to analyze any Twitter account, including your competitors, influencers in your industry, celebrities, or any other public Twitter account.

Start with a quick share of voice analysis. How do your reach and impressions compare to those of your closest competitor? How about other similar Twitter accounts? Remember these are potential impressions, so know that – just like for your own Twitter account – your competitors’ actual impressions will be a similarly small percentage of their potential impressions.

For a more advanced analysis, dive deeper into competitive intelligence. Run TweetReach reports or Trackers for your competitors, then take a look at the popular content and top contributors in these conversations. What Twitter accounts are engaging with your competitors? Who are they and do you follow them? What hashtags are your competitors using? Are there any new or relevant hashtags you could use? What tweets are resonating in the conversation?

Reach and impressions for hashtags, keywords or other terms

With TweetReach, you can measure more than just a Twitter account – you can measure the impact of anything in a tweet, like a hashtag, a phrase or keyword, even a URL. Twitter’s activity dashboard only includes tweets posted from your account, so you can’t use it to analyze impressions for the overall conversation around a hashtag, for example.

You’re probably using a variety of hashtags in your tweets – some for specific campaigns or events and other more general hashtags to signal participation in a particular industry or conversation. Do you know the reach of those hashtags? With TweetReach, you can understand the potential reach and impressions for any hashtag, which helps you understand the size of the conversation you’re participating in. If a hashtag has a low reach, then you’ll be able to have a large impact in a smaller space. If the hashtag’s reach is high, you’ll less likely to make a big impact in the overall conversation, but you’re participating in a more popular topic. The best Twitter strategy includes a bit of both; use a combination of specific and general hashtags in your tweets to reach the most people.

Interested in learning more about how you can use potential reach and impressions to improve your Twitter strategy? We’d be happy to show you how to use TweetReach’s Twitter analytics to better understand the full impact of your tweets. Let’s talk!

Written by Jenn D

October 16th, 2014 at 10:04 am

Posted in Guides

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Important update: Please change your TweetReach password

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Last night, a laptop was stolen from one of our engineers. We took immediate action to ensure that all our systems were secure and there is no evidence of any compromise. But as a security precaution, we recommend you change your TweetReach or Union Metrics password right away.

TweetReach users can change their passwords here:

Union Metrics for Tumblr or Union Metrics for Instagram users can log in here: Then click the user icon in the top right corner to access your user profile.

While access to the laptop is password protected, it did contain a partial data export from two of our user databases. No credit card, financial information or analytics data was involved in any way, and all stored passwords are one-way encrypted using a cryptographic hash and a technique called “salting” which protects you even if you used the same password on other sites. Your password cannot be decrypted, so the risk to your personal information is quite low. However, it is possible that usernames and email addresses could be accessed, though they have not yet been. Changing your password will eliminate any possibility of a data breach, however unlikely.

We are extremely sorry for this inconvenience, and we have taken every step possible to ensure that your data is secure and your identity is protected, now and in the future.

We will be here if you have any questions, so please email or call any time.

Written by Jenn D

June 13th, 2014 at 4:21 pm

Posted in News

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Join us for our biweekly demo of TweetReach Pro!

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Interested in learning more about TweetReach? Join us for our biweekly demo of TweetReach Pro.

TweetReach can help you measure the reach of brands, campaigns and events on Twitter. It’s a dead simple way to discover how far your message has traveled, what tweets are getting the most traction, and who’s influencing the conversation around your brand or product. Our demos usually take 15-20 minutes followed by an open Q&A session. Attendees will receive a discount code at the end.

Pick the date that works the best for you, and we’ll see you there! Register here, and be sure to select your preferred date from the drop-down menu:

Wednesday, April 24 | 12pm-12:30pm EDT

Wednesday, May 8 | 12pm-12:30pm EDT

Wednesday, May 22 | 12pm-12:30pm EDT

Wednesday, June 5 | 12pm-12:30pm EDT

Wednesday, June 19  | 12pm-12:30pm EDT

Got questions? Leave a comment, or click here.

Photo courtesy Powerhouse Museum Collection

Written by Sarah

April 23rd, 2013 at 9:01 am

Join us to learn more about TweetReach!

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Interested in learning more about TweetReach Pro and our other Twitter analytics offerings? We’re holding two webinar demos next week, conveniently scheduled for our customers outside of the United States. Anyone is welcome to attend, of course!

Sign up for one of these short demos where we’ll tell you more about TweetReach Pro, our historical analytics, and our snapshot reports. To register, just follow the one of the links below:

Let us know if you have any questions. We look forward to having you there!


Photo courtesy Public Domain Pictures

Written by Sarah

April 4th, 2013 at 2:17 pm