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Archive for the ‘TweetReach tip’ tag

Tracking Vine, Instagram, and Snapchat with TweetReach

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We’ve briefly discussed before that you can track anything cross-posted to Twitter from an account on another social platform - a Vine video or Instagram photo – by using TweetReach, but we wanted to give some more specific tips about how these different platforms work together so you can get the best results possible for anything you’re tracking.

As always, let us know if you still have questions by leaving them in the comments, or shooting us an email.

TweetReach and Vine

Since Vine is a Twitter app and TweetReach is made to measure Twitter, you might think the easiest way to measure a Vine would be to track a particular tweet it was embedded in, but tracking the unique URL of the Vine itself will get you better results; if it gets picked up or shortened anywhere else on Twitter we should still be able to grab it.

With snapshot reports, all you need to do is put the URL of the Vine in the search box, like with this Vine of a panda from the San Diego Zoo. (For more details on what you can search in a snapshot report, see this.)

Vine TR report

And your returned report will look a little something like this.

Remember, however, that snapshots return limited results; even a full report purchased for $20 will only return results for up to 1500 tweets (reports will always tell you at the top if there are enough tweets to warrant purchasing a full report) so if it’s a wildly popular Vine that has been shared widely, your report won’t cover all of those shares. But if you don’t have a big budget or just want to get an idea of the scope of a single Vine, a snapshot is perfect for your needs.

For those with a bigger budget, TweetReach Pro can track a Vine as one of the queries in a Tracker; just be sure you use the URL of the specific Vine you want for the best results rather than its title. Just putting the word “Vine” will give you a Tracker filled with much more useless noise than with the information that you want. Always be as specific as possible with your search terms! 

TweetReach and Instagram

While Instagram revoked display cards for Twitter, never fear, you can still track any Instagram photo cross-posted to Twitter by its unique URL, or by any unique hashtags you may have paired with it. You can track both and compare results; it’s possible that someone saw your tweet and picked up a hashtag for their own use, perhaps purposefully for a contest, or as an organic use of online language.

Instagram tracking

For a full breakdown of how to track Instagram with a TweetReach Pro Tracker, see this post. For running a quick snapshot report, it will be the same as with Vines above: Simply plug in the URL of the Instagram photo you’re wanting to track, and you’ll get an idea of the spread of that particular Instagram photo on Twitter shortly.

TweetReach and Snapchat

Snapchat is a little bit trickier to track, simply because anything from the site will be a screenshot that someone has taken of a snap or a story and shared. If the screenshot of a snap was directly uploaded to Twitter, all you have to do is track that particular tweet; best results will be by tracking a specific hashtag tweeted with it (for example, #PatriotSnapsWhatUp for the snap below), but you can also search the specific wording of the tweet in quotes.

Is that everything?

That’s all we’ve got for now. Got any questions? Check out our help page for more details on what you can track with TweetReach and how, or leave any additional questions in the comments!

Written by Sarah

June 30th, 2015 at 8:37 am

Posted in Guides

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Best practices and tips for Twitter and TweetReach

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Whether you know someone just getting started with Twitter as they’re launching their new business, or you want to brush up on some of the basics yourself, we’ve rounded up all of the Twitter and TweetReach tips and best practices we’ve written up and tested and put them here for your convenience.

Twitter Best Practices

Twitter Hashtag Best Practices

Why you should use lists on Twitter

Use favorite tweets to find new resources

Brands: why you should favorite tweets

Using Twitter Trending Topics to your advantage

Twitter Quick Tips

Twitter Tip: Authorized apps 

Twitter Tip: Turn off mobile alerts at bedtime

Twitter Tip: User Widgets

Twitter Tip: Emergency alerts

Twitter Tip: Personalize

Twitter Tip: Discover

TweetReach Tips

Tracking Instagram, Vine and more with TweetReach (And now, of course, you can also use our Union Metrics for Instagram analytics!)

TweetReach Tip: Measuring the results of a Twitter contest

Using TweetReach to monitor a social media crisis

TweetReach Tip: Find & engage influencers on Twitter with TweetReach snapshot reports

TweetReach Tip: Common Tracker mistakes

TweetReach Tip: Improve your snapshot report search query

TweetReach Tip: Measuring the reach of a Twitter account

TweetReach Tip: Saving your snapshot reports

TweetReach Tip: Excluding tweets from your search

TweetReach Tip: Searching for a specific tweet

TweetReach Tip: Searching for URLs

TweetReach Tip: How to isolate specific dates in a Tracker

TweetReach Tip: How to isolate specific dates in a snapshot report

Today’s TweetReach Tip: When tweets are available for analysis

Got any good tips we missed or questions you want answered? Leave them in the comments, or find us on Twitter. We’re always happy to answer your questions!

Image courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery. 

Written by Sarah

May 7th, 2014 at 11:24 am

TweetReach Tip: Less is more with snapshot reports

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Keep it simple with TweetReach snapshot reports! Here are a few things to keep in mind when you’re running a snapshot report:

1. Snapshots will analyze tweets up to one week old. Snapshots pull tweets from up to 7 days ago, so be sure you run them as soon as you can after your event. Older tweets are only available through our premium historical analytics.

2. Full snapshots will include up to 1,500 tweets. Due to restrictions from Twitter’s Search API (more on that below), a full snapshot report is limited to about 1500 tweets from the past week. If your topic or hashtag had more tweets than that, we’ll go back until we hit that limit, but won’t be able to pull them all into a snapshot report. For higher-volume topics, try our historical analytics or ongoing Pro Trackers.

3. A snapshot report is just that – a snapshot. We use the Twitter Search API for our snapshot report data, and it operates more on relevancy than on completeness. This means it will pull everything that Twitter considers most relevant to your search query from the past seven days, so some tweets or users might be missing from your results. For more complete results, try our Pro Tracker, which has access to the full-fidelity, real-time Twitter stream.

4. Narrow your snapshot search dates with filters. If you want more specific results for a snapshot report, you can include date filters. The since: and until: operators allow you to select a specific date range within the past week for your search. For example, let’s say you want to see all #TBT tweets for December 12, 2013 through December 17, 2013. Search for #TBT since:2013-12-12 until:2013-12-18 (use the YYYY-MM-DD format, which is tied to 00:00 for each date). Like this:

#TBT Snapshot

5. Tweets in our snapshot reports are displayed in the Universal Coordinated Time zone (UTC). This is to simplify and standardize our reporting across all time zones. If you need help converting UTC to your time zone, try this converter.

Written by Sarah

January 2nd, 2014 at 9:23 am

TweetReach Tip: Tracking words with accent marks

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When you’re setting up a Tracker in your Pro account we want to make sure you get the best results possible. One thing that can be tricky is words with accent marks, such as crêpe, doppelgänger, or crème brûlée. Twitter treats accented letters as completely different letters from their unaccented counterparts. If you are searching for a hashtag or keyword that’s accented, it’s best to set up your Tracker terms to include both the accented and un-accented spelling (but only in Trackers; snapshot reports will return both results regardless of which you search and you can see an example of one at the end of this post), like this:

Crepe 1

For more specific results, there are two ways to filter by language in a Tracker to help capture more relevant tweets. For example, let’s say you’re tracking crêpe as the keyword for a contest for a French company, but you think some English speakers participating might leave off the accent marks. You can select the Universal language filters to only return results in French, like this:

Crepe 2

Or you can set it up to return accented results in French and non-accented results in English by putting a separate language filter at the end of each query line, like this:

Crepe 3

If you’re keeping it simple just to get an idea of the conversation around crêpes, a snapshot report would look like this.

Are you new to TweetReach or want to learn more about our products? 

First, run a free snapshot report about your Twitter account, hashtag, keywords or URL on tweetreach.com. If you have any questions about our metrics, read this.

Second, if you’d like to set up ongoing monitoring for any Twitter account or keyword-based topic, check ourTweetReach Pro. Starting at just $84 per month, it’s a great and affordable way to start tracking and analyzing your tweets in real time. Contact our sales team if you have any questions at all.

Written by Sarah

December 12th, 2013 at 12:30 pm

TweetReach Tip: Saving your snapshot reports

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You don’t have to go Pro to save your TweetReach snapshot reports. As long as you’ve registered for a free TweetReach account - and you’re logged in! – you can save every report you run for future access in your My Reports archive. That applies to both free, 50-tweet snapshots, as well as full, $20 snapshots.  Just be sure to log in to your account before you run your next snapshot report.

And whenever you purchase  a full snapshot report, you’ll still receive an email copy and a receipt. If you happen to purchase a report while you were logged out, just send us an email and we’ll be happy to move it into your account.

Are you new to TweetReach or want to learn more about our products? 

First, run a free snapshot report about your Twitter account, hashtag, keywords or URL on tweetreach.com. If you have any questions about our metrics, read this.

Second, if you’d like to set up ongoing monitoring for any Twitter account or keyword-based topic, check our TweetReach Pro. Starting at just $84 per month, it’s a great and affordable way to start tracking and analyzing your tweets in real time. Contact our sales team if you have any questions at all.

 

Written by Sarah

December 3rd, 2013 at 11:56 am

TweetReach Tip: Snapshot report receipts

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If you buy one of our full snapshot reports (up to 1500 tweets, posted up to one week ago), then we’ll send you an email with your snapshot report, as well as a receipt for your purchase.

In that report email, you’ll have links to access your report and receipt online, download a PDF, export a CSV file and find our support contact information. Here’s an example of that email:

Screen Shot 2013-11-26 at 11.06.37 AM

So, when you order your report, don’t lose this email! It has your receipt and report info, in case you need it later. But if you do lose the email, call or email us and we’ll be happy to send you another copy!

 

Written by Sarah

November 26th, 2013 at 1:31 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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TweetReach Tip: Excluding tweets from your search

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You can exclude certain tweets from your results by using the minus (“-”) operator in your TweetReach search. You can exclude tweets that include certain keywords or tweets that mention a certain account. For example:

 Sandwiches -ham 

or

#swag -justinbieber

The second example is a good one to use if you find a spammer or someone whose tweets you really don’t want to include in your reports.

Note that there should not be a space between the minus and the word you’re excluding.  If you’d like to exclude a two word phrase, wrap them in quotation marks, like this:

#swag -”justin bieber”

Written by Sarah

November 21st, 2013 at 9:08 am

TweetReach Tip: Searching for a specific tweet

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Say you want to search for a specific tweet in a snapshot report, like this one from our Twitter timeline:

TR Tweet

Be sure to search for the text of the tweet, rather than the tweet’s unique URL. Try searching for the first part of the tweet text. Keep it short – under 60 characters – and wrap it in quotations marks in order to catch any and all retweets. Like this:

“Vanity metrics- like FB Likes- have their uses”

Written by Sarah

November 14th, 2013 at 2:29 pm

TweetReach Tip: Searching for URLs

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If you want to follow a piece of news through Twitter, try searching for the article’s URL instead of its title or a set of keywords. In TweetReach snapshot reports, we can search for a root URL, so even if a link is shrunk into a t.co, bit.ly or other shortener, we’ll pick it up.

Some more tips to get the results you’re looking for:

  • Exclude the http:// or www. They don’t impact your search and lengthen your search query. And depending on the URL shortener, might not even be included in the link.
  • Keep queries at about 60 characters or under. If you have a long URL, consider searching for the second half – the unique part – of the URL to save space.

Want to see an example? Say you want to follow this New York Times article Sushi’s New Vanguard and watch how it spreads through Twitter. In your TweetReach search, you can leave out the http:// and www. portions of the URL. Search just for this:

nytimes.com/2013/10/30/dining/sushis-new-vanguard.html

That will result in this snapshot report. Note how it includes tweets that use nyti.ms shortened URLs, among others.

Have any questions about your URL? Just ask us!

Written by Sarah

November 5th, 2013 at 10:50 am

TweetReach Tip: Searching for more than one term in a snapshot report

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If you want to run a TweetReach snapshot report for more than one term, be sure to remember the magic of the “OR” operator. You can search for any two or three queries by combining them together with OR. Example:

term1 OR term2 – search for tweets containing either term1 or term2 (e.g. analytics OR metrics)

A few things to keep in mind to get the best results possible:

  •  Keep queries around 50-60 characters, 100 max.
  • If searching for two word phrases, use quote marks or you might not get the results you’re looking for. Example: “pumpkin ale” OR #manafromthegourd

Written by Sarah

October 24th, 2013 at 1:20 pm