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Archive for the ‘storytelling’ tag

The Week in Social Analytics #155

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content strategy, content marketing, and storytelling. 

Content Strategy vs. Content Marketing: How to Get Buy-in From Decision Makers [from Business2Community; written by Michael Riley]

“Showing hard numbers will motivate any decision maker. You need to find ways to track how any “costs” can be tied to revenue growth. It helps to use technology and systems for keeping track of all the data.

The key three factors to track are:

  1. How much is a new customer worth to the business. LTV – Lifetime Value
  2. What converted them into a paying customer. CTA – Call to Action
  3. How much it cost to get them into that funnel. CAC – Customer Acquisition Cost

If the CAC is lower than the LTV, then your efforts are profitable and should be scaled up. It should just be common sense, and an easy decision to make, when done right.”

How to Execute a Carefully Thought-out Content Plan [from Spin Sucks; written by Nathan Ellering]

An in-depth guide on actually executing on that content plan you worked so hard to get buy-in for.

Storytelling In A Data-Driven, Cross-Device Era [from Marketing Land; written by James Green]

“Marketers should build stories that reach people with the information that matters to them wherever they engage — across different channels and devices.”

Platform-specific tips. 

5 Ways Brands Are Using Tumblr to Stand Out [from Entrepreneur; written by Nate Birt]

“Tumblr takes a blog-plus-the-kitchen-sink approach to storytelling, meaning brands have the flexibility to create their own template and engage with fans in ways that best suit their mission. As the fastest-growing network of 2014, Tumblr and its 420 million users deserve a second look. (Note for your sales team: Tumblr users have higher median incomes than those of Pinterest or Twitter users.)

Pepsi

10 practical Vine and Instagram video tips for brands [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

The most popular Vines from everyday users are just completely lo-fi, easy to make, and cost no money whatsoever. For brands it’s a good idea to do the same thing.

All the best Vines have a sense that they can be made by anyone, no matter what budget or skill level.”

As for Instagram:

Instagram is less aesthetically forgiving then Vine. Instagram users expect a slightly higher quality video and image than on Vine. But it’s also easier to make your videos look good.”

Emphasis original.

Video content marketing. 

Seven video marketing lessons learnt from #ThisGirlCan [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

“Lesson six: enjoy and share the response

In a surprising development, women starting making their own This Girl Can videos and sending them to Sport England, showing how inspired they were by the campaign.

These were then shared by the campaign team, which helped make a stronger community and strengthen the core message.”

Written by Sarah

May 22nd, 2015 at 9:15 am

The Week in Social Analytics #152

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On saying sorry

If your brand is truly trying to connect to your customers human-to-human, you’re going to make mistakes. Here’s how to apologize in a way that’s meaningful and sincere.

How brands can say sorry like they mean it [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

This piece rounds up great apology examples and concludes with a list of  tips “that can help other companies pour water on almost any fiery situation.”

Craft a Better Apology [from Spin Sucks; written by Daniel Schiller]

“Relationships are by nature complicated, requiring constant cultivation and care. Acknowledging that with open, honest, and sincere personal communication establishes the framework for your strongest business relationships yet.”

On Snapchat

What You Are Missing About SnapChat and the Future of Storytelling? [from Social Media Today; written by James Calder]

“Look at your content and ask yourself if you are providing value and helping. That is the key to everything in social marketing.”

If we could tattoo that on this blog, we would.

5 Reasons Why Brands Should Be Using Snapchat [from Social Media Today; written by Chris Kyriacou]

“There is less pressure for Snapchat users to be perfect compared to other platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, or Pinterest. Snaps will disappear over a few seconds, and you are encouraged to add drawings or captions to the photos or videos you record.

Snapchat allows you to show off the personalized side of the brand that relates to your followers. You can build stories on Snapchat that help you feel like a friend to your audience, providing a personal insight of your brand directly to your stakeholders, avoiding a lot of ‘noise’ associated to other social media channels.”

From personal experience 

The one word journalists should add to Twitter searches that you probably haven’t considered [from Medium; written by Daniel Victor]

Not just for journalists; that piece breaks down how to conduct better Twitter searches.

Nobody Famous: What it’s like to have the social network of a celebrity, without actually being famous [from Medium; written by Anil Dash]

“I sometimes respond to people with facts and figures, showing how the raw number of connections in one’s network doesn’t matter as much as who those connections are, and how engaged they are.”

 

 

Written by Sarah

May 1st, 2015 at 9:00 am

The power of visual storytelling on Twitter (and beyond!)

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It’s no secret that in the never-ending stream of 140-character messages that is Twitter a snappy visual can make yours stand out; Twitter themselves did a study and found that across different content categories adding an image to your tweet boosted engagement in the form of a higher retweet rate.

So simply adding photos to your tweets is a great starting place and one that we’ve discussed before as Twitter has rolled out more image-friendly updates. But if you want to take it further than just adding relevant visuals to tweets, design a way to tell a visual story on Twitter. Put together something where the pieces can stand individually- after all, your tweets will be part of your followers’ stream- but when a prospective follower or curious fan looks at your homepage, they also see a cohesive visual story that communicates your campaign or company values, whatever it is that you’re trying to get across.

What does this look like?

Starbucks is great about using their timeline to tell little mini-stories, and they incorporate their fans and followers in them by retweeting their tweets as well. A great example is a recent celebration of National Croissant Day:

Starbucks visual storytelling Twitter

 

This example also takes it further, by integrating Snapchat. (We’ll talk more about expanding to other platforms in just a bit!)

Keeping things to Twitter, look at the timelines of any major brands you admire and ask yourself what makes their presentation successful or unsuccessful; do their visuals feel cohesive? Do they work together towards telling a single story and letting you know what they can do for you? Figure out how you can answer those questions and provide value to your own fans, followers, and customers.

Take it beyond a campaign.

Twitter shouldn’t just be about selling to your audience; using it like a bullhorn to shout at your fans and followers is unlikely to result in a reciprocal, engaged relationship with them. Use your social presence to tell any number of stories about your brand. Here are some ideas to get you started:

  • Tell the story of how your company came to be
  • Tell the story of how two companies came together as one in a merger, or the story of a rebranding
  • Show off company culture: Share spontaneous images your employees take of one another and let them tell daily office stories in their own words
  • Show off company values: Share the story of a day spent volunteering, or the different charitable things employees do on their own time and how you support them
  • Tell the story of an event or anniversary of your company
  • Tell the story of a partnership of two brands or a brand and a celebrity spokesperson around a campaign

All of these are ways to show off the human side of your brand, in addition to giving your employees some storytelling power.

Take it even beyond Twitter.

Go beyond just adding a photo to your tweets and use photos to tell a story not just on Twitter but across platforms: Tailor your story so that it’s told on your Facebook timeline, on your Tumblr, across your Instagram page. You can choose different parts of your story to tell in each place, if that feels more appropriate for your brand. Don’t be afraid to experiment with your narrative as long as you stay true to your brand values and the voice you’re trying to build or strengthen. 

See an example of each for inspiration: IKEA built a catalog on Instagram last year, Charity: Water mixes in stories from their different well-building campaigns with user-generated stories on their Facebook page (also seen below), and Sephora’s Tumblr acts as a combination catalog and digital magazine repository of inspirational images, tips, and tricks for their followers.

Charity Water FB

One woman even used Pinterest to tell the story of her Imaginary Well-Dressed Toddler, which eventually expanded to a presence on other networks and a book. In that case a powerful visual story became a brand.

Test content types constantly.

Finally, use the engagement levels on the types of visual content you use- images with words superimposed on them, images without words but with captions, etc- to plan content types moving forward. And you’ll want to keep testing; your audience’s tastes will most likely shift over time.

Written by Sarah

February 18th, 2015 at 9:41 am

The Week in Social Analytics #132

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

Brand Loyalty

Building Brand Loyalty in the Digital Age [from PSFK; written by Melanie Ehrenkranz]

“Brands have it rough in the digital age: the competitive set is growing for everyone as startups and homespun brands are sharing the stage with the big guys. With the fragmentation and distribution of media, branded signals are more diffused on the whole, but can catch fire without warning. One misstep can mean disaster, but one triumph is no guarantee of success. The landscape makes it harder to create impact with messaging or image alone. So it all comes down to creating meaningful experiences for people. Focusing on the fundamentals of product functionality, service excellence and dedication to quality at a time when much of the marketplace is speculation, hype and hot air is a serious strategic advantage.”

Emphasis added.

Strategy

Three Ways to Customize Content Across Social Channels for Greater Response [from Marketing Profs; written by Keith Quesenberry]

“Different aspects of your brand or product can be promoted in different ways, and matching objectives with channels can really pay off.”

Goals, strategy and tactics for change [from Seth Godin]

“The strategy isn’t the point, it’s the lever that helps you cause the change you seek.”

Content marketing and storytelling

Engage, Share and Buy: 3 Reasons Brand Storytelling Matters More Than Ever [from Social Media Today; written by Marc Cowlin]

“The brilliance of the combination of permission based marketing and great storytelling is that it matches both the needs of the customer, and those of the marketer:

  • The customer finds a non-disruptive form of content seemingly accidentally as they consume media (permission based) and that content is both entertaining and it connects emotionally (brand storytelling). If all goes as planned, the connection is so strong that they will engage and/or share with friends. Over time, as their brand affinity grows so does the likelihood of a purchase.
  • The marketer gets a brand impression that manages to build an emotional connection between the brand and their customer. That customer becomes an advocate of the brand by sharing the content with their friends and those friends do the same. Over time the viral impact of sharing and engagement lead to more buyers.

The rise of the jaded consumer and permission-based marketing has upped the importance of story and connection.”

Emphasis added.

Holiday marketing

Real Talk: How Social Media Drives Holiday Sales [from Social Media Today; written by Carlos Gil]

Excellent in-depth look at holiday marketing.

The Holidays and Social Media [from Soshable; written by Lauren Galli]

“The holidays can prove to be a powerful marketing tool via social media if utilized properly. Don’t allow your customers to feel that you’re capitalizing on their holiday spirit, however. There is a fine line between a holiday push and being overly aggressive. The number one recommendation for social media is to think about what you’d like to see as a consumer, and follow your own lead.”

Written by Sarah

December 12th, 2014 at 8:37 am

The Week in Social Analytics #127

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

On platforms

You Can Put A Price On Pinterest [from Heidi Cohen]

“Pinterest users are highly active on other social media networks according to Global Web Index. As a result they don’t need the same input from family, friends and colleagues that they get from other social media platforms.”

On emotions and trust

Why trust is vital if brands are to make the most of consumer data  [from Econsultancy; written by David Moth]

“Digital technology has given marketers access to an unfathomable amount of customer data, however it should be used in a responsible manner for risk of destroying consumer trust.”

how much trust do you have in comanpanies

Four ways social media impacts emotional branding [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

  1. We build relationships with brands like we build relationships with our friends. It takes many positive interactions over a period of time.
  2. Loyalty trumps everything. If the world turns upside-down, your loyal customers will be there. So our ultimate goal is to create loyalty.
  3. It is impossible to achieve true brand loyalty in the long-term without emotional connection.
  4. Emotional connection comes when we feel a brand becomes part of our self-identity.

Funny, followers and follow back; how social cues affect our perceptions on Twitter [from Marketing Pilgrim; written by Cynthia Boris]

“But without evening knowing it, your choices are based on social proofs that you’ve picked up in a split second – unconscious cues that help you quickly decide what’s worth your time and what isn’t.”

Also covered by Digiday with Why people don’t like your brand on Twitter, in five charts.

Twitter Tone of Voice

On B2B

Understanding the Channels: An Overview of Social, Mobile, Digital and Traditional Marketing for B2B [from Forbes; written by Daniel Newman]

Marketing strategies must overlap

At some point, your marketing strategies need to converge to give you the best outcomes. For instance, if you are selling software, you can find new customers and educate or inform the existing ones about new products or updates through social media and/or the use of video in creative ways. But, if you sell farming equipment, you might split your marketing efforts into two ways – social media for educating customers, combined with traditional methods like direct mail, banner ads or TV spots to help you do the actual selling.”

The Content Habits of B2B Enterprise Marketers | Infographic [from Marketing Profs; written by Ayaz Nanji]

“More than half (53%) of B2B enterprise marketers spend fewer than two hours a day engaging with industry content. Moreover, 31% say they probably overestimate how much time they spend with this sort of content.”

Pair with B2B Content Marketing Trends for 2015 [Infographic] also from Marketing Profs.

On measurement and everything else

How #TechnologyAndStuff Became GM’s Oreo Moment [from Social Media Today; written by Mark Schaefer]

“This small victory gives me hope. If a bureaucratic company with 1,000 lawyers like GM can embrace an embarrassment and use social media in a wise and fun way, maybe there is hope for all of us! Here is what they did right:

1) In a PR crisis, they cut through the bureaucracy to let the storytellers, instead of the lawyers, run the show.

2) They responded IMMEDIATELY and set the tone for the reaction. If they had reacted in a formal or legalistic way, they would have become part of the controversy instead of part of the fun. They would have reinforced an image of being stiff and out of touch instead of being playful and cool — like their trucks.

3) Instead of focusing on the bumbling #ChevyGuy and the negative implications for the brand, they hijacked the meme with #TechnologyAndStuff which is still funny but also connects the brand to something positive. And stuff.

In a world where traditional media often pokes fun at social media mess-ups, it is refreshing to see a traditional media mess-up become a social media success story.”

Pair with Why Brands Should Stop Idolizing Oreo’s Social Media Strategy, also from Social Media Today.  

The Danger Of Focusing Expectations On A Single Metric [from Marketing Land; written by Kendall M. Allen]

“When doing our business, marketing plan and any given initiative within it justice — do we always slow down and really think through what we are trying to accomplish and why? Do we take the time to lay out the strategy and tactics, and then determine the various (operative word: various) things we should care to learn?”

What Fashion Designers & Publicists Need to Know about Product Photography [from PR Couture; written by Lori Riviere]

Quality product photography enhances a consistent brand image.

 

Written by Sarah

November 7th, 2014 at 8:33 am

The Week in Social Analytics #126

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

On content and storytelling. 

The Five Parts to Brand Storytelling Nearly Everyone Misses [from Spin Sucks; written by Gini Dietrich]

“There are five essential parts to brand storytelling.

They include: Passion, a protagonist, an antagonist, a revelation, and the transformation.”

What Corporate Storytellers Can Learn From Fairy Tales [from Lewis PR; written by Sander van Buuren]

“A good narrative at least contains the following elements:

Setting – scene where the story takes place
Character – description of the protagonist of the story
Theme – description of what the story is about
Plot – series of events that tell the story
Conflict – struggle of the protagonist with itself or other forces
Climax – part where the conflict builds up to its peak
Resolution – end of the story when the conflict is being resolved”

Is there a “content pattern” that builds a brand? [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

“. . .if you have ever been lucky enough to have something rise up the charts for a day or two, you will attest to the fact that after a short spike in traffic, viral content rarely has a long-term effect on your business.

Instead, you need something more robust, more consistent, to build a real business around your content and YouTube revealed a plan that just might be the answer.”

The Role Content Plays In B2B Social Selling [from Marketing Land; written by Rebecca Lieb]

“Without “content,” all you have left in social sales is “social,” i.e., a platform, a forum or a social network. Devoid of content, all these channels amount to empty containers.”

How to Make Your Content Relatable and Actionable [from KISSmetrics; written by Asher Elran]

“If your content is not appealing to your audience on a personal level, it will be overlooked. Content must be relatable and actionable in order to increase user attention span. So, it is important to find out what content your audience relates to, and then create a plan to boost it across all the platforms you use.”

On social sharing.

Are You Missing These 5 Social Sharing Powerhouses? [from Heidi Cohen]

“Here are 7 key social sharing findings from The Psychology of Sharing: Why People Share Online research conducted by The New York Times Consumer Insight Group and Latitude Research.”

Why-we-share-on-social-media-via-New-York-Times-e1414414916798

On live events and real-time marketing. 

4 Powerful Ways to Integrate Social Media Into Your Live Event [from Social Media Explorer; written by David Saef]

“Your social media presence is so much more than a promotional tool for live events. If you stop using social media when the event starts, you’re cutting off the conversation far too soon and throwing away a significant community-building opportunity.”

Real-Time Marketing Is Now Right-Time Marketing [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“The definition of ‘real-time marketing’ is changing. Many now refer to it as ‘right-time marketing.’ The difference is subtle, but important: Something delivered at the right time doesn’t necessarily have to be created in real time. Even if it was developed days or weeks before, if it is delivered at the optimal moment, it feels real time.”

RTM now right time marketing

Written by Sarah

October 31st, 2014 at 8:43 am

The Week in Social Analytics #123

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

B2B marketing 

The Number One Secret to B2B Content Marketing Success Plus 150 B2B Marketing Statistics [from TopRank Online Marketing; written by Lee Odden]

“Document your content marketing strategy and follow it closely.

If you’re feeling a bit underwhelmed, here’s the thing:

  • 35% of B2B marketers in this year’s survey said they have a documented content marketing strategy
  • 48% said they have a content marketing strategy, but it is not documented.”

6 Pinterest Tips for B2B Brands [from Social Media Today; written by Ekaterina Walter]

“Pinterest is uniquely placed to grab the attention of a variety of people. By creating different boards, you can reach out to everyone, from a designer to a buyer. GE has a fantastic page; boards such as the ‘Art of Innovation’ show its quirky side, while ‘From the Factory Floor’ shows technical information.”

Study: 86% Of B2B Marketers Use Content Marketing, But Only 38% Believe They’re Good At It [from Marketing Land; written by Amy Gesenhues]

CMI-study-types-of-content-marketing-used

 

See the full report here.

Content Marketing 

How To Break Through The Noise With The 3 Vs Of Content Marketing [from B2B Marketing Insider; written by Michael Brenner]

“Volume. Variety. Value.”

9 Ways to Utilize Social Media for Storytelling! [from Millennial CEO; written by Brian Fanzo]

“Social Media is the perfect platform for storytelling but to do it correctly it’s more than just telling your story with words it’s a compilation of all your digital actions.”

Five Steps to Creating a Video Marketing Strategy [from Marketing Profs; written by Michael Litt]

“A good plan is the difference between knowing that your content is delivering ROI and throwing things at the wall and seeing what sticks.”

Hashtags 101: How to Create Your Own [from AllTwitter; written by Lauren Dugan]

“. . .businesses may choose to create their hashtag for a number of reasons, including:

  • Encouraging event participants to live tweet
  • Hosting a Twitter chat
  • Hosting an online Q&A
  • To promote a product launch
  • To show support for a charity or cause

. . .Be sure that you understand what purpose your hashtag will serve before your create it.”

Everything else 

Doing Real-Time Marketing Right [from SHIFT Communications; written by Zach Burrus]

“If done right, RTM has the potential to go beyond other strategies and generate the kinds of authentic interactions and relationships that ultimately lead to brand ambassadors.”

Youth and Brands: What’s the Relationship? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“The results suggest that youth are more connected to brands than their elders, but that many feel they’re not being taken seriously enough.”

 

HavasWorldwide-Consumer-Relationship-with-Brands-Oct2014

Written by Sarah

October 10th, 2014 at 9:29 am

The Week in Social Analytics #122

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

On marketing and psychology

Everything You Need to Know About the Psychology of the Call to Action [from KISSMetrics; written by Jeremy Smith]

“The call to action has a fascinating psychology behind it that includes width, color, border size, copy, and cool CSS effects. Yet, at the same time, this psychology goes far beyond those elements. When we understand the psychology of the call to action, we take huge strides forward in our effectiveness as marketers.”

Twitter 

Twitter Conversations with Impact [from Social Media Today; written by Autom Tagsa]

Want to get in on Twitter chats? Here are some great guidelines. We participate in #MMchat and #socialchat Monday nights from 7-9pm CT, from our @UnionMetrics handle.

How 16 retail banks handle social customer service [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

The author reached out to 16 different banks on Twitter, with varying results. Your customers expect you to be present and responsive on social media, so be sure that you are!

DiGiorno Pizza Returns From Its Self-Imposed Social Media Penalty Box [from Marketing Land; written by Martin Beck]

DiGiorno is back on Twitter after 3 weeks of silence following the misuse of a hashtag, and their fans are happy about it! (We wrote about how well they handled the situation when it happened.)

Instagram

20% of internet users use Instagram [from We Are Social; written by Deniz Ugur]

“The study shows one fifth of adult internet users have an Instagram account worldwide, a figure that has consistently risen since mid 2013.”

26th-Sept-2014-20-of-internet-users-now-have-an-account-1

Pair with Instagram Use Remains Heavily Concentrated Among Youth from Marketing Charts.

Content, storytelling, and communication 

How Curated Content Performance Beats Original Content | Content Marketing: Original Versus Curated Content [from Heidi Cohen]

If you have limited resources, consider curating more content than you produce.

How Consumers Respond to Irrelevant Brand Communications [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Two-thirds of survey respondents (aged 18-55) said they have at some point unsubscribed from a company’s email list after it sent them irrelevant information or products.”

The One Storytelling Tactic You Need to Succeed [from American Express Small Business Forum; Erika Napoletano]

Bookending for businesses.

Written by Sarah

October 3rd, 2014 at 9:08 am

The Week in Social Analytics #121

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

On Tumblr: 

How to Do Native Advertising Right on Tumblr [from Yahoo Advertising; written by Team]

Deliver good content consistently 

Tumblr is known for original, striking content. Make your posts stand out enough to grab attention on users’ dashboards, the primary destination on Tumblr.”

The evolution of Tumblr: From micro-blogging platform to an eco-system of content [from Taylor PR; written by Sandeena Ahmed]

“This is where I think Tumblr’s evolution is best illustrated; in the interaction between and creation of various subcultures on this platform. What started as a way to micro-blog (a change of pace from the Blogger, Livejournal, and WordPress days) has turned into a thriving eco-system of content. Tumblr gives you a platform to post about art that you have created, articles that you enjoy, TV and movies that you adore, and discuss and argue on everything from the latest fashion trends to the ontological value of the pineapple in SpongeBob Squarepants.”

Brands need to fully understand how a platform’s users express themselves in each place, and how their interactions and content production differ even among different subcultures on the same platform. Once they do that work, then they can begin to contribute valuable content and become a part of the conversation.

On Instagram: 

5 Ways to Fall into Instagram Marketing [from Business 2 Community; written by Kelly Shepsko]

“One tried and true way of increasing your following and engagement on your content is by following others and engaging on their content. Search hashtags to locate target audience members, whether your company is B2C or B2B. Follow relevant users and then periodically engage on their posts by liking their photos or commenting. However, you don’t want to sound “spammy”, so don’t bombard them with your sales pitch!”

On visual content marketing & storytelling: 

Incorporate Visual Social Media in Your Content Strategy [from Spin Sucks; written by Carol Scott]

Includes some important steps for brands creating a visual social strategy:

Think broadly about your visuals. Not every pin or Instagram photo has to be (or should be) focused on your brand. Capital One and American Express both maintain pinboards for brides, world travelers, and bucket-list creators. These images are inherently shareable, regardless of a user’s affiliation with the companies, which makes it easier for the brands to spread organically.”

10 Tips for Managing Your Visual Content (Without Going Crazy) [from Marketing Profs; written by Liz McLellan]

If you’re a large company with a large amount of unorganized visual assets, then you definitely want to look to this piece for advice on how to manage your various digital assets.

The 3 Factors That Drive Content Marketing Success [from B2B Marketing Insider; written by Michael Brenner]

“. . .one of my biggest secrets is that I don’t spend nearly as much time writing as you might think. I am opportunistic with re-purposing the content I already create.”

Tip: Data isn’t sexy, but visual storytelling is [from Social Fresh; written by Jason Keath]

“Find the data. Make it visual. Share. Rinse, repeat.”

What is storytelling for brands and why do you need it? [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

“Storytelling in marketing terms isn’t just about telling ‘a story’ (producing an advert where a narrative arc occurs), it’s about telling the story of the ‘brand’ across multiple channels and using various tools and methods.”

On Twitter: 

Study: Live-Tweeting lifts Tweet volume, builds a social audience for your show [from Twitter; written by Anjali Midha]

“Besides increasing the volume of Tweets about a show, live-Tweeting can contribute to building an audience on Twitter.”

You can also look at this data in alternate chart form from Marketing Charts.

How to blast your Twitter engagement rates through the roof [from Econsultancy; written by Matt Owen]

“People like big, colourful pictures. They like them more if they look like they include information, and there are twin psychological reasons for this.

  • Firstly, it’s a (I’m sorry for using this phrase, I really am) value-add. You don’t even have to click on a link to get at that sweet sweet insight.
  • Secondly, it’s easy to share this and show people that you too are a valuable source of information (Or if you’re like me, at least give the appearance of knowing what you’re talking about).”

The Week in Social Analytics #114

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

5 Measurement Pitfalls to Avoid [from Mashable; written by Eliza Berman]

“. . . in the quest to back up every move with cold, hard data, it can be easy to mistake any old numbers for useful numbers. Not all data is created equal, and the best way to ensure you’ll be collecting the right data is to develop the right set of performance metrics.”

How To Corrupt The Social Data You’re Gathering (And Kill Your Focus Group In The Process) [from Marketing Land; written by Kevin Ryan]

“There is a big difference between listening to your best customers and lurking among them to gather information; in the former, you have initiated a meaningful dialogue, while the latter will leave your customers feeling like lab rats.”

How To Set Marketing Goals You Can Actually Achieve: Advice From The Experts [from KISSMetrics; written by Chloe Mason Gray]

A few of the key takeaways:

  • Take time to truly understand your current position in order to set achievable marketing goals.
  • Choose 1-2 core goals that impact the bottom line and 3-5 supporting goals. Anything more than that will distract you from what’s most important.
  • Alternatively, try focusing completely on just one goal.
  • Pick goals that you genuinely care about achieving (be authentic).
  • Don’t just focus on the finish line; enjoy the process of achieving your goal.
  • Set the minimum bar at delivering on at least 70% of the planned improvements each quarter.
  • Approach each new marketing goal with as much data and information as possible.
  • Make sure your short-term goals always support your long-term prospects.

How the World Sees You Should Govern Your Social Media Style [from Convince and Convert; written by Jay Baer]

“…if you can understand how people see you at your best, then you can simply focus on those areas where you’re most primed to succeed and avoid the areas that are going to be like quicksand.”

How to Write a Crisis Communications Plan [from Spin Sucks; written by Gini Dietrich]

“But the real issue isn’t that they did bad things—we’re all human and we all make mistakes—it’s that they were handled by people who didn’t have any crisis communications experience.”

Pair with our piece on crisis communications for airlines, as well as part I of our crisis communications for cruise lines (look for part II next week.)

The Five Essential Elements of a Great Company Story [from Marketing Profs; written by Sandra Stewart]

Not every company is the wunderkind of tech, but every company does have a story to tell.

How Digital Media Has Changed the Art of Storytelling | Infographic [from Social Times; written by Kimberlee Morrison]

“From ‘blog’ being named the 2004 Merriam-Webster word of the year, to the rise of content curation and visual media — the art of storytelling is a craft that remains at the heart of digital media.”

Who Are You? How to Develop a Brand Identity for Instagram [from Likeable Media; written by Roly Gonzalez]

You have to be authentic to who your brand and develop a brand identity on Instagram that accomplishes the following:

  • Stays true to your overall brand identity
  • Conveys a straight forward persona to your audience
  • Utilizes the tone, feel, and language of the platform

What Types of Brand Videos Do Consumers Want to Watch? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“According to the Levels Beyond survey, consumers are most interested in how-to, instructional or tutorial videos (67%), followed by:

  • comedy or spoof videos (42%);
  • product/informational videos (34%);
  • micro-documentaries, telling the story of a person or event (33%); and
  • animations/infographic videos (30%).”

Written by Sarah

August 8th, 2014 at 8:54 am