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Archive for the ‘social strategy’ tag

The Week in Social #171

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We spend the week reading the best things we can get our eyeballs on and on Fridays we share them here with you. Leave your thoughts in the comments, or come find us on Twitter at @UnionMetrics.

On social strategy and content marketing.

Work smarter not harder when it comes to your social strategy, says Matt Walker for Social Media Today in Using Competitors to Guide Your Social Media Strategy.

As for your content marketing you can always find lessons in unexpected places, as Kerry Jones reminds us in 3 Content Marketing Lessons Reddit AMAs Can Teach via Marketing Land. And here are The 3 best brand storytellers on social media, as told by our very own Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief, Jenn Deering Davis for iMedia Connection.

All about that video and live-streaming.

First, the numbers from Marketing ChartsMarketers Say Video’s Effectiveness Is Increasing. Which Content Types Are Working?



If you’re struggling with video, an effective strategy might be what you’re missing. And what do you need for that?

“One of the chief elements of an effective strategy, of course, is setting appropriate objectives.”

Like brand awareness, online engagement, or customer education. But don’t forget:

“As is sometimes the case in these surveys (and in life?), what’s most effective is also most difficult.”

Tough breaks. But the effort seems to be well worth it, when it comes to video success:

“…just 15% reporting a lack of success achieving their objectives through video marketing.”

Our fearless Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief Jenn Deering Davis also discusses how The Future of Video is the Stream (But Not Streaming) for SocialTimes. See if you agree:

“This streaming video trend will prove to be just that — a trend. The truth is, most of us just aren’t that interesting. On YouTube and Facebook, we can prepare a script, rehearse and edit to make a high-quality video. On Snapchat and Vine, the videos are short, forcing their own sort of creativity. But most of the time on streaming platforms, there’s just nothing there to watch. Getting more celebrities and brands who have more streamable content (and lives) will help, but the average user just won’t have much of their own to stream. Streaming video isn’t a standalone product; it’s a feature in the rest of the social stream.”

Emphasis added.

If you’re feeling strapped for resources but still want to tackle adding video to your content strategy, you’ll want to check out Why Brands Should Syndicate Videos: Example From Benefit Cosmetics from Homa Zaryouni for L2′s The Daily. And get a great overview of the very latest happening with streaming video apps in Blab and Periscope [are] Generating Buzz – but Don’t Count Out Meerkat Just Yet, as told by the always-informative Andrew Hutchinson for Social Media Today.

Last but not least, platform-specific news and tips.

Whether you’ve been paying attention to fashion week or not, Sarah Hecks has Live tweeting lessons from the catwalk courtesy of We Are Social’s blog.

Finally, if you’re looking to get the scoop on Instagram advertising, we recommend reading Instagram Advertising: A Media Buyer’s Perspective from Paul Van Winssen.

The Week in Social Analytics #144

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

Platform-specific pieces: 

5 Visual Storytelling Tips To Power Your Content Marketing On Facebook [from Jeff Bullas]

“. . .it’s becoming a necessity to be different. Your Facebook audience, while procrastinating their commitments ahead of them, will take out a few minutes to scroll through their News Feed. Most likely, they’ll skip anything uninteresting.

So with that in mind, you need to come up with content that’s well worth engaging with for an extended amount of time, which leads to the question:

How can your content break through the noise?

Instagram Will Top 100 Million US Users by 2018 [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Going forward, Instagram will also compete with other emerging social networks for attention among these younger demographics, and by extension, for brands’ ad dollars in reaching those demographics. However, over time, we believe Instagram’s straightforward and simple content feed has wider appeal across all demographics—no matter what age or level of digital savvy.”

emarketer Instagram

Do I need two Twitter accounts? [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

Addressed on both the “philosophical and practical” level.

On social strategy: 

How Small Businesses Should Be Using Social Media [from Social Times; written by Katherine Halek]

“What do you hope to gain from social media? If a high follower count or an overnight viral post is your idea of social success, you may learn the hard way that those things in themselves are not guaranteed to bring you more business. Instead of a one-hit wonder, your main focus should be meaningful interaction, with the end goal of building a dedicated fan base.”

On video marketing. So hot right now. 

3 Rules for Better Video Marketing [from Convince and Convert; written by Tyler Lessard]

“Online video is quickly becoming one of the most important and inventive parts of the modern marketing mix. It can seem daunting to dive into, but this report offers a good place to start for understanding how much more comprehensive video can be as a weapon in your arsenal when you approach it with a balance of strategy, integration, and measurement.

YouTube Stars More Influential Than Big-Screen Ones, Youth Say [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“There appears to be an age trend when it comes to following stars on social media, though: 13-year-olds are far more likely to follow a YouTube (59%) than TV/movie (32%) star, while the gap is closer for 14-17-year-olds (53% and 44%, respectively). Among 18-24-year-olds, slightly fewer follow YouTube (51%) than TV/movie (54%) stars.”

This has big implications for brands with certain target demographics who are looking to do celebrity partnerships.


How can I use Twitter’s analytics alongside TweetReach?

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Twitter’s new tweet activity analytics  includes a set of metrics to help you understand the performance of your tweets. It provides a great complement to the Twitter account analytics we provide with TweetReach Trackers. Want to know how you can use them together to make the absolute most of your tweets? Here are a few suggestions.

1. Understand your brand’s impressions

Twitter’s analytics will tell you how many actual impressions your tweets received (defined as the number of times a user is served a tweet in their timeline or search results). Here’s an example of metrics for a tweet from our @unionmetrics account.

Screen Shot 2014-07-23 at 10.54.58 AM.png

With TweetReach, we provide a measure of potential impressions (defined as total maximum deliveries of a tweet) for each tweet. Here’s an example from a TweetReach Tracker showing maximum possible impressions for the same tweet above.

Screen Shot 2014-07-23 at 10.54.29 AM.png

Use these impressions numbers together to understand what portion of your audience you’re reaching and how impactful your tweets are.

2. Improve your tweet performance

Twitter’s new activity dashboard includes detailed metrics for each tweet, letting you know what kind of (and how much) engagement they receive. Over time, you can use this to learn what kinds of content perform better and use that to inform your Twitter strategy.

With TweetReach, we can drill even further into the content in your tweets – the hashtags and URLs you share, including those from Vines or Instagram photos cross-posted to Twitter, which is especially helpful during a campaign that spans platforms. Here’s an example:

TweetReach tweet content

Combining these sets of data you can clearly see which types of content are being shared more, clicked through or favorited more, or some combination of those. Use it to test the same content shared in slightly different ways to see which clearly resonates most with your audience, and build a stronger content strategy tweet by tweet.

Twitter activity

3. Measure engagement with your account

With Twitter, you’ll see stats on retweets, clicks, favorites and replies from the past month, including how these figures compare to the month before, like the image to the right. It’s broken down by tweets from your account, retweets and replies, and promoted tweets.

With TweetReach (pictured below), you get retweets and replies, and how that breaks down into an average retweet rate, in addition to an overview of your follower growth and the reach of your tweets. Look at an all-time overview of how many tweets you’ve sent with an average tweets per week stat, and all of your mentions, with an average tweets per contributor stat. This lets you understand your engagement levels with those who are contributing to the conversation around you; we’ll talk more about this in a minute.

TweetReach Twitter account metrics

Putting these together, you can see exactly which kind of content gets the most – and the best – engagement. If your how-to posts and tips and tricks are all getting favorited, you know which kinds of customers are looking for those resources and saving them to reference later. If your question-style headlines are getting the most clicks, you’ll know to write more of those in the future if you want to get your posts in front of more eyeballs. If your product posts are getting the most replies, look to see how many people ask further questions and how many thank you for sharing the information. Use their questions to inspire new posts and fill gaps in your FAQs.

4. Identify your biggest fans or advocates

Who’s engaging with your content and mentioning your account? TweetReach gives you a list of the top contributors to the conversation with your Twitter account, letting you know who your biggest supporters and advocates are, telling you who you should be paying attention to, engaging with, and rewarding and thanking. Being able to identify your brand advocates is absolutely invaluable to growing your following and increasing engagement.

TweetReach top contributors

Additionally, knowing who interacts with your account can help you understand more about who your audience is on Twitter. Is this the audience you want to reach? Should you shift your strategy to try and reach a slightly different audience? Twitter’s analytics will also help fill this part of the puzzle out; their follower analytics tell you where most of your followers are tweeting from and what they’re interested in.

Using TweetReach’s contributor list augmented by Twitter’s follower details will help paint a deeper portrait of the people who are most engaged with your account and the content you’re sharing. This will help you build the most informed Twitter strategy possible.

Want more?

These are just a few ways you can use TweetReach together with Twitter’s internal analytics to improve your Twitter activities. And that’s just for your owned Twitter account analytics. We can also monitor hashtags and keywords on Twitter to help you understand larger conversations and trends. Learn more about how we can help you measure and optimize your tweets. Email us if you want to talk more!

Written by Sarah

July 24th, 2014 at 12:51 pm

3 questions to ask to refresh your Twitter strategy

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Business Cat encourages you to ask these questions annually.

As new social platforms become ubiquitous in the business world, it can be easy to let strategy for their content and use become stale while focusing on building your presence on the latest thing. If you’ve let Twitter sit on the back burner for a while, now is the time to bring it forward and be sure it’s still working for you– not to mention playing well with your presence everywhere else.

1. Why are you on Twitter?

Has the reason changed since your brand first signed up for the platform? If you started out just looking for a place to periodically share your content or coupon codes, things have probably evolved. Consider the following:

  • Have a solid strategy in place for answering customer service questions; know who is responsible for this, what resources they can point customers to, and perhaps even a script with consistent company messaging they can work from (but not stick to verbatim every time, as people like talking to people and not robots). 
  • Invoke the 80/20 rule if you haven’t already. 80% of the content coming from your account should not be your own, promotional content. Share things that will be useful to your customers and help you build relationships with them. Share your own content and promotions 20% of the time.
  • If you’re just looking to engage with customers and followers, be sure you’re replying to every (non-spam) @ appropriately. People quickly lose patience with non-responsive accounts. If you have limited resources establish a time of day to jump on and catch up with asks. It’s better than nothing at all.

While these are obviously not all of the reasons a brand might be on Twitter, it’s a good starting place to rethink why you’re there.

Another important point: If you’ve never done the research to see where your target customers are spending most of their time, now is the time to do it. If it has been a while since you’ve done it, now is the time to take a look again. Has it shifted to or from Twitter? This might drastically change your reasons for being there, and what you’re going to do next. 

Speaking of which. . .

2. Where do you want to go from here with Twitter?

Perhaps you’ve been on Twitter for a few years, tending to customer questions, chatting with your followers, keeping a casual eye on the competition, and sharing a useful mix of your own content and that of others. Now you have the time, resources, and experience with the platform to take things a little further: You want to use it to gauge your share of voice in your industry.

First, use Twitter to measure your share of voice in your industry by comparing your metrics to the overall conversation about your area. Once you know where you stand, you can work to increase your share of voice by tweeting more, being sure you’re talking to everyone that it makes sense for you to be talking to, and working to bring the conversation from other platforms back to Twitter.

Which brings to our final question. 

3. Is Twitter playing well with my presence on every other platform?

Do you have your Twitter account linked to your Instagram account? Do your Twitter updates automatically feed to Facebook (we recommend turning that feature off; it will simply annoy customers who follow you in both places)? Check your sharing settings in each place and decide what makes the most sense for your brand moving forward. Content should absolutely be tweaked to perform its best in each place. 

This is especially important if you’re launching a cross-platform campaign soon, or hosting an event and want to utilize every platform that your followers and customers are on: Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr, as well as Snapchat and Pinterest.

Any other questions?

Leave ‘em in the comments, or find us on Twitter.

Written by Sarah

July 22nd, 2014 at 11:43 am

The Week in Social Analytics #111

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

The 8 best brands on Tumblr [from iMedia Connection; written by Brad Brief

“Part of [brands'] hesitation [to use Tumblr] could be linked to the level of commitment that a Tumblr campaign requires. To use it, and use it well, brands must provide new, interesting, and engaging content on an ongoing basis.”

Finding Tumblr’s Place In Your Social Strategy [from MarketingLand; written by Ric Dragon]

“If you do the online ethnography for your important segments, you’d do well to know if they are represented on Tumblr.  If your company sells micro-oscillator widgets that go into industrial machinery, no, this might not be the place for you. If you are consumer-oriented in any way, though, you should take a look.”

Instagram is ready to take its shot [from Fortune; written by Jessi Hempel]

“That’s true in part because Instagram has helped spawn a powerful new social phenomenon: Just as Kodak’s invention of a roll of film made it easy for almost anyone to take photographs a century ago, Instagram’s invention of a social feed paired with easy-to-use editing tools makes everyone capable of creating and sharing nuanced, edited pictures today. And that photo sharing has empowered people in powerful, unexpected ways—even those not named Kardashian or Bieber.”

The Kinds of Photos Instagram Followers Want to “Like” [from Social Media Today; written by Alexandra Jacopetti]

“Instagram is arguably the social media platform with the most opportunity for brands, but don’t post what the CEO had for lunch.”

That doesn’t mean that food is off limits; just tap into the big communities wisely. Like Dunkin Donuts and Oreo did to announce their partnership:

How brands can be brilliant at Vine [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

“Beyond the differences in length and available tools, Vine and Instagram video remain able to operate in the same space, whilst remaining unique in their own way, with brands tending to choose one or the other platform based on its own audience, content and tone of voice.”

As always, choose the platform where you audience spends their time and that fits your brand voice the best.

10 Reasons to Use Vine to Help You Build Your Brand [from Mashable; written by Bob Cargill]

“Vine presents brands with an innovative, surprisingly powerful way to take advantage of the fact that visual content performs well on social media.”

Does social media influence purchasing decisions? [from SHIFT Comm; written by Chris Penn]

“The big picture conclusion here is that while the Gallup and SHIFT polls showed that social media has influence in the minds of the consumer, the data you should be paying attention to most is your own. Pay attention to the statistical and methodological validity of data you see in the news, absolutely, but pay even closer attention to the things that influence your business first and foremost.”

A simple tip for improving your brand tone of voice guidelines [from Econsultancy; written by David Moth]

Consumers expect a consistent tone of voice from brands. Here’s how to lay out consistent ground rules for achieving that.

6 in 10 B2B Execs Agree That Social Business Has Created Value [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“The authors note that B2B companies are leveraging social business in a number of ways, including social data analysis to aid in product development.”

Quiz: Can You Tell What Makes a Good Tweet? [from the New York Times; written by Mike BostockJosh Katz and Nilkanth Patel]

A little informative Friday fun.

Turning ‘Likes’ Into a Career: Social Media Stars Use Instagram, Twitter and Tumblr to Build Their Career [from the New York Times; written by Sheila Marikar]

“In an era of new economies, this may be one of the most curious: the network that has sprung up to help the follower-laden stars of Instagram, Vine, Pinterest and other social media services make money by connecting them with brands wanting to advertise to their audiences. People like Mr. Lachtman and his co-founder, Rob Fishman, run what may be seen as a parallel universe to Hollywood, one in which shares and likes matter more than box-office sales and paparazzi shots. Here, authenticity — a word that comes up often in this arena — trumps a Photoshop-perfect facade or publicist-approved message.”


Written by Sarah

July 18th, 2014 at 9:18 am