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The Week in Social Analytics #146

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On social media platforms and best practices 

9 Social Media Rules That Are Meant To Be Broken [from Business 2 Community; written by Zoe Summers]

Know the rules thoroughly before you take smart risks breaking the right ones.

Actionable Tips for Finding the Right Social Media Platform [from Eli Rose Social Media; written by Kristin Zaslavsky]

“On any platform, consistency is key. If you can’t regularly schedule solid content on a social media platform, it may not be worth your time, money or sanity to be there just to be there.”

On brand personality 

#51: Putting More “You” in Your Business—A Guide to Building Brand Personality [from Amy Porterfield]

“Believe it or not, there is even an industry term for this way of infusing your brand with personality. Marketing analysts call it the “personality differentiator.” Here’s what it can do for your business:

  1. It demonstrates why you are different from others who provide very similar products or services.
  2. It engages your audience capturing their interest and drawing them into your message.
  3. It establishes an ongoing rapport between you and your audience, creating a bond that will help you convert leads into clients when the time is right.
  4. It proves there is more to you and your brand than just facts, figures, and fancy technology. It shows you actually have heart.
  5. It transforms your message from boring to fascinating, increasing both the impact of your message as well as the quality of the opportunities your messaging generates.”

On content marketing

Visual Marketing Key in Helping Brands Attract Teens [from eMarketer; written by staff]

Teens spend more time on visually based platforms like Snapchat and Instagram, but that doesn’t mean that Facebook is going to instantly disappear.

“[Facebook is a] long way from being replaced by the younger group. Right now, they’re just not going to spend a lot of time there.

Facebook did what Myspace was trying to do. Facebook allows you to stay in touch with your friends and family in an easy way. It’s hard to imagine something coming along that’s going to get that mass and that will do it in a more effective way than how Facebook is doing it now.”

Are brands the saviours of long-form content? [from Econsultancy; written by Michael Hewitt]

“Long-form content, particularly in the guise of investigative journalism, is a dying art. The instantaneous information age has left news publishers cutting budgets for investigative journalists, focusing instead on cheaper quick-fire click-bait, short-form stories and listicles. What little investigative journalist remains is usually reserved to more niche publications.

Too many news publications have wrongly assumed that incredibly connected and time-poor audiences have no desire for long-form content. They’re wrong.

Are brands going to replace genuine investigative journalism? Probably not. There is arguably too much self-interest for branded investigative content to be taken seriously enough by audiences. However, they are certainly capable of filling the gap for long-form that mainstream publishers leave behind in the pursuit of replicating Buzzfeed and Shortlist.”

Video Considered Difficult – but Effective – Content Marketing Tactic [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Some 59% of respondents cited video as among their most difficult content types to create, ahead of webinars/online events (50%) and research/white papers (50%). But almost half of respondents (46%) reported videos to be among the most effective content types used, second only to articles and case studies (54%).”


3 dos and don’ts for running a campaign across platforms

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Every social media platform has its own way of operating that stems from its users reasons for being there; the same person might use Twitter mostly for professional work connections and news, Facebook for family updates, Instagram to connect with friends, and Tumblr to keep up with the fandoms around their favorite shows, for example. If that person matches the ideal customer for a brand and that brand wants to run a social campaign across most or all of those platforms to reach that person, they need to tailor their message for each place.

How? Get started with these do’s and don’ts.

1. Don’t: discount a platform because you think you know what people are there for.

Do: The research to see how conversations form around things that matter to your brand. Instagram, for example, is often thought of as a place where people simply share photos with friends and family, but that’s not necessarily the case. Big events like the World Cup have enormous conversations happening around them on the photo-sharing site, and smart brands like Adidas have caught onto that.

Our Instagram analysis* showed that Adidas was a top publisher around the World Cup conversation on Instagram, and they received 22.7k actions (likes and comments) on their 5 World Cup related posts, earning 6.3 million impressions. That’s a big return on a relatively small effort, especially considering fan-run sports accounts and even official soccer athlete accounts are making anywhere from 14-128 posts related to the World Cup.

 2. Don’t: assume you know how to talk the talk.

Do: Listen first, then join the conversation respectfully. Tumblr, for example, has many different communities that all have different ways of speaking to each other, making jokes, and presenting information, all of which is part of the larger Tumblr community and culture. What works well in Twitter or Facebook advertising will not work well here; the users are part of a larger creative community and they respond well to brands who take the time to understand how Tumblr really operates (or they’re smart enough to hire and work with someone who does).

Denny’s, for example, has an extremely popular Tumblr that users have responded well to because it speaks in the language of Tumblr. It isn’t just an attempt to ape it.

Denny's Tumblr

3. Don’t: Be afraid to experiment.

Do: Learn from and build on your failures and successes alike. FIFA has a Twitter account for their official match ball. While normally inanimate objects spontaneously get their own parody Twitter accounts following a big cultural event with social coverage (Pharrell’s hat following the GRAMMY’s, for example), FIFA decided to give their match ball its own autonomy and hashtag early.

Running a quick free TweetReach report shows that the conversation and engagement around #ballin is already good, and there’s still more than a month of World Cup matches left to go. While something like a snapshot report gives a good idea of the general success of the account relative to the hashtag- it’s not just a bunch of people using the term in other, World Cup unrelated ways- more in-depth monitoring could tell FIFA what was successful and unsuccessful in their approach specific to Twitter, and help them plan better for next time. (You can read more about how to monitor a Twitter campaign with TweetReach here.)

So what does this mean for campaigns, exactly?

The bottom line is that you have to tailor your message to fit in each place, and that can only be done by taking the time to understand how the conversation around what your audience is interested in operates. Adidas looked at how sports fans use Instagram, Denny’s hired someone familiar with the culture of Tumblr and gave them the freedom to do it right, and FIFA is experimenting with giving their match ball its own voice.

After you’ve decided on the messaging for each platform- visual for Instagram and Tumblr, with different wording and approach on Twitter, for example- build goals based on how the audience you aim to reach in each place talks to one another about you or your industry. Are you there to increase your share of voice in the industry (here’s more on how to measure share of voice, and how to grow it), or to build engagement with your existing fans, while hopefully earning new ones? Your goals for the same campaign might be different for each platform, which increases the necessity for tailored messages in each place. 

The basic approach is the same in each place, however: Research, plan, test, measure, rinse, and repeat.


*Interested in our Union Metrics for Instagram analytics? Learn more here

Written by Sarah

June 18th, 2014 at 7:58 am