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Archive for the ‘social media marketing’ tag

On Facebook, photo content and News Feed priorities

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Keeping up with the changes around Facebook’s News Feed algorithm can be daunting, with new articles constantly coming out around changes in the type of content that Facebook prioritizes. Are photos still getting the best organic reach? Or is it statuses now? But if it’s statuses why do I keep seeing so many posts about how visual content marketing is everything? As with all social media there is unfortunately no magic answer that will work now and continue to work forever; the best strategy is a mix of best practices combined with what you already know about your audience and enough experimentation to keep learning about any changing demographics and/or interests. With that said, we dug around a little to see how we could best understand how the Facebook News Feed algorithm really works and the best approach for brands to take that isn’t so of-the-moment it will be instantly outdated.

The most recent changes and what they mean for brands.

This summer Facebook released several algorithm changes for News Feed that were written about at length: Time spent on story (stories that may not be “likeable” are still prioritized in a feed if friends spent time reading them), more criteria for video (considering users turning on sound or making video full-screen, instead of just counting likes/comments/shares), and “See First” which allows users to directly prioritize which friends and Pages they see content from in their feed. Brand takeaway: “See First” means brands shouldn’t be shy about asking fans to prioritize their content if it’s something they enjoy seeing and interacting with. Facebook also announced a growing interest in visual content for a global audience (emphasis added):

“People everywhere are embracing visual communication formats, like video, at a staggering rate. More than 50% of people on Facebook in the UK, Brazil, South Korea, Singapore, Israel and the UAE watch a video every day. In Asia-Pacific people are spending more time creating and consuming videos, including ads. In fact, in just one year, the number of video posts created per person on Facebook increased 75% globally, 52% in Australia, 36% in South Korea and 138% in the United Arab Emirates. People in the Middle East now consume more video per person than any other region in the world.”

Brand takeaway: Pay close attention to Page demographics and test content based on this information if their audience matches; brands might be surprised how widespread their audience is and there is potential to strengthen relationships with untapped audience.

UM photo post on FB

A recent photo post on the Union Metrics Facebook Page. You can follow us there for more robot visuals. 

But does this mean brands should definitely prioritize visual content? TIME has a thorough piece on how, exactly, News Feed works with this important takeaway:

“Around 2011, Facebook moved on from EdgeRank to a more complex machine learning system that better individualizes each user’s experience. Instead of assuming that all users enjoy photos, the algorithm would adapt to users’ behavior so that people who click on photos see more pictures and people who don’t click on them see fewer. This is the algorithm that’s currently powering your News Feed, and the one Facebook’s engineers are constantly tinkering with. ‘You have a lot of impact,’ Steinberg says about working on the News Feed. ‘When that team makes a change, the rest of the company is going to be paying attention.’”

Brand takeaway: Does your audience like photos? If you don’t know that answer, now is the time to start experimenting, and that doesn’t even have to take a ton of resources. For example, select a piece of content for re-marketing and present valuable information from it in multiple forms: Photos yes (try photos with captions and photos with text superimposed on them), but also short videos, status updates, links to related pieces, shares from Instagram. Pay attention to the response on each type of content and use that information to plan going forward.

What’s always true for brands.

Having the latest industry data and keeping up with best practices gives every brand a great benchmark to start testing from, not to create a rigid content marketing plan from. Why? Because every audience is unique and might not necessarily respond to industry best practices. Brands should test new content types, timing and other factors regularly to see what types of content their audience responds to the best, and build an ongoing dynamic strategy from there. It always takes hard work and research to listen to your audience, but when you really know what they want they’ll be way more likely to stick with you.

Need help listening? Check out our comprehensive Facebook analytics, available through the Union Metrics Social Suite

Written by Sarah

November 17th, 2015 at 9:10 am

On-demand demos available of Union Metrics Twitter and Instagram analytics

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Curious about what exactly Union Metrics analytics can do? We now offer on-demand demos of our Twitter and Instagram analytics! Take a tour of our analytics using live data from real accounts to see exactly what our analytics can do for you— and do it on your schedule.

What you get in the Twitter demo

Sign up here to access our live Twitter analytics demo to see exactly what you get with a subscription to TweetReach by Union Metrics. Our Twitter demo features everything you’ll see in our paid subscriptions – including live data from real Twitter accounts and topics – and allows you to access all areas of our product in read-only mode.

Union Metrics Twitter analytics allow you to easily:

  • Monitor all the Twitter accounts, keywords and topics that matter to you, with full-fidelity data in real time
  • Identify insights into what’s working and how you can improve your Twitter strategy
  • Discover influential Twitter users and people driving the conversation forward
  • Learn how to craft better Tweets to increase engagement and followers

And more!

What you get in the Instagram demo


Sign up here to access our live Instagram analytics demo to take a tour of what you get with a subscription to Union Metrics Instagram analytics. Our Instagram demo includes live data from a set of Instagram accounts and hashtags, and allows you to click around in a fully-functional Union Metrics account in read-only mode.

You can see how Union Metrics Instagram analytics enable you to:

  • Monitor all the Instagram accounts and hashtags that matter to you, constantly updated and in real time
  • Identify insights into what’s working (and what isn’t) and what you can do to improve your Instagram campaigns
  • Discover your biggest fans and influential community members to see how and when they engage
  • Explore how to optimize your content and hashtag strategies to increase engagement and followers

This is great, but I want to measure Tumblr and Facebook too!

No problem! If you want multi-channel social media analytics for everything - Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram and Facebook – we can help with that too. Contact us to set up a demo of the full Union Metrics Social Suite, or check out a recording of a Union Metrics Social Suite demo here if you’re crunched for time or want to get a feel for things before getting a personalized tour. Happy measuring!

As always if you’ve got questions or comments, leave them below or come find us on Twitter at @UnionMetrics

Written by Sarah

September 30th, 2015 at 8:44 am

4 ways to use social media to keep fans engaged year-round

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Whether you host an annual event like an awards show or you’re a small business like a dermatologist that only sees patients once a year, social media can help you stay engaged with your fans and customers during non-peak times.

These types of events and customer relationships require a very different social media strategy from their ongoing counterparts. During a big event, for example, you’ll likely receive thousands of new followers and lots of engagement with your content. A patient sitting in a waiting room is more likely to follow a sign prompting them to follow you on Twitter or Like you on Facebook. But if you let your blog stagnate during the off period between events or you don’t think of a content strategy to engage that patient between visits, you’ll have to start almost entirely over next year.

Through our own research we’ve seen evidence that suggests if you stop posting new content, you’ll start to lose followers over time.

How can you prevent this from happening? We’ll break down some ideas, but it’s up to you to test them with your own audience, measure the results, and keep planning your engagement strategy going forward. (Don’t worry, though, we’re always here to help if you have questions!)

1. Take advantage of existing fan bases.

Find who the celebrities and influencers are in your industry and tap into their existing fan bases to encourage engagement throughout the year.

Promote these influencers’ related projects.

No matter your industry, there are influencers for you to identify and connect and engage with in appropriate ways. One way to do this is to promote the projects they’re working on that are related to your own brand values and mission. For example, a small health clinic might find some healthy lifestyle influencers who focus on nutritious diet and active lifestyle to partner with, while a hardware store might produce a series of how-tos or tips and tricks with a local woodworker. Partnering with an appropriate influencer or expert boosts your reach across both audiences, while also giving your audiences the kind of content they want: Exactly what has value for them.

Share content that specifically engages current niche groups or fandoms.

Working with these influencers on your audience’s preferred platform- Instagram, Tumblr, Twitter, Facebook, or another, like Snapchat- also means you have in this influencer a resource that knows how to speak the language of this platform.  Be respectful of their knowledge of the particular culture of the platform, especially if it’s not one you’re familiar with. This listening is vital particularly if you want to tap into an existing niche community or fandom; you have to be authentic and build on existing fandoms in a respectful way or fans will outright reject your participation. Get to know a community before jumping right in.


Yogis who love beer are a growing niche, especially on Instagram, as we’ve written about on Tumblr.

2. Showcase content exhaust.

Every industry produces a ton of content that never sees the light of day, particularly around any large-scale events, but also during the daily grind. We call this “content exhaust” – what’s left over after you create publicly consumable content. Social media loves content exhaust and it’s a great way to expand a content queue.

Share behind-the-scenes content.

Day-to-day and especially during large events, take lots of pictures and videos behind the scenes and in non-public spaces. Post them to show people who aren’t there what you see as an insider. Fans and followers love insider information; they love to feel like they’re in the loop. How can you help them feel more included?

While we might not all have the resources of The Oscars, The Academy shared this beautiful set of GIFs from the orchestra’s rehearsal before the show. This is a view fans don’t normally see on the televised broadcast, and it helps create a more intimate feel of how the show actually works. Think of how you can use this on the scale of your business. What seems boring and routine to you might be fascinating to an outsider; how a hairdresser mixes dyes, for example, or a tattoo artist sketching new ideas while on break. Try to look around you with fresh eyes, or even asking friends and family what aspects of your job or industry they’re curious about. Build from there.

Post content featuring event setup and breakdown.

It might not seem like much beyond logistics for you, but to fans learning more about the ins and outs of producing an event can be fascinating. And we mean any kind of event: A tradeshow for any industry, a convention, an open house. Share images and stories from before and after the event that show how everything comes together. For some events, this can include activities from weeks or even months before it actually happens. Tap an entertaining coworker to be your on-camera tour guide, do quick interviews with the guys setting up the stage or planning the lighting, introduce the interns stuffing the swag bags, or anything else that comes to mind.

Getting fans and followers involved at an early stage might also make them more invested in the event itself, and encourage them to attend or even just follow along the hashtag across social media as it happens. (Note: This makes planning and promoting a unique, relevant hashtag for your event across social platforms very important!)

Highlight smaller related events leading up to the main event.

Going to a tasting with a catering company? Post artful photos of the food you’re sampling, or share a quick interview with the chef who made it. Even something spontaneous and funny that happens at a copy shop you’re forced to run into when planned collateral doesn’t arrive on time is a potential source of content—  especially if the staff behind the counter starts singing and you capture it. (It should go without saying you need the permission of these participants before sharing, however!)

3. Use trends to your advantage.

Participate in rituals like #TBT.

Social media channels have so many rituals, memes and shared behaviors. Get to know them and find some you can participate in. One of our favorites is throwback Thursday, also know as #TBT. On Thursdays, people across social media share pictures or memories from their past. This is a long-standing social ritual, and one that’s easy to participate in: You can share photos from a company’s early days, baby photos of employees (bonus points for having everyone guess who it is now!), or a throwback to everyone enjoying the closing party last year around your big event that happens to be coming up again soon.

One quick cautionary note: Before you jump into a meme or conversation, check to see what it’s really about and if it’s still relevant. On many social platforms, trends can emerge and then fade away in just a few days (see this post on Tumblr that’s a meta-analysis of Tumblr memes), and you don’t want to be caught using last week’s meme.

Engage in conversation around other events and holidays.

Wish fans and followers a happy new year or Valentine’s Day. Share their excitement about the upcoming weekend or warmer weather. It’s okay to talk about regular-people-things to relate to your fans. However, in general, it’s probably best to avoid piling on to newsworthy current events (a.k.a. “newsjacking”), particularly anything where people were killed, injured or in any way harmed. Stay out of those conversations, as that rarely goes well.


From CheapTweet to TweetReach to Union Metrics: Here’s a throwback to the CheapTweet days. Were you following us then? #TBT #throwback #tech #smm #socialmediamarketing #TwitterMarketing #CheapTweet #TweetReach #UnionMetrics

A photo posted by Union Metrics (@unionmetrics) on


4. Upcycle existing content.  

If your company or industry has a long history, you probably have a lot of historical content. Fans both new and old would love to see it! How can you share it with them throughout the year? Create a content calendar of ideas, if that helps, but don’t feel like you have to stick to it rigidly. It’s always best to leave room for new ideas and spur-of-the-moment inspiration.

Celebrate historical moments and anniversaries.

Talk about important dates in your history. What was going on this time last year, five years ago, 20 years ago? When did you start? Is an employee having an anniversary with the company you can celebrate? Even a funny post memorializing the first company laptop makes for a good moment of levity in a follower’s feed.

Share archive materials.

Dig up interesting content from your past. This could be old photos of early days, notes or minutes from your first meetings, screenshots of old websites, the CEO’s cover letter for their first job, anything.

A final note

It requires having someone dedicated to social media year-round if you want to truly keep fans engaged and continue to grow your audience during the off season. But with a little work and the right content, there’s no reason you can’t turn a one-time event, annual office visit, or semi-annual haircut into an ongoing social media sensation.

Written by Sarah

August 11th, 2015 at 10:38 am

The Week in Social Analytics #153

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content 

The Art of Finding Your Voice With Your Social Media Content [from Mack Collier]

“While I do think it’s more about giving yourself permission to share your voice versus finding it, I do think that writing consistently helps you to refine your voice.”

The #1 Reason Why Most Content Stinks And What You Can Do About It [from Pushing Social; written by Stan Smith]

Ugh. Reader surveys, right? But:

“You have two options.

  1. Guess. Playing content marketing strategy hop-scotch is easier but wastes time and cash.
  2. Know. Ask your readers want they want and see if you are meeting their need. Takes longer. Is a bit hard on the ego but the smart way to move forward.”

How to Turn Data Into Content Ideas (and Avoid Content Marketing Flops) [from Social Media Today; written by Victoria Hoffman]

“Even the best ideas are backed by some sort of data. If you’re going to be investing time and resources into creating content, you should want to make sure that it’s going to resonate with your audience and help you achieve your content marketing goals.”

Internal Content Curation: What Most Marketers Miss [from Heidi Cohen]

Plus 10 steps to maximize your internal content curation. But wait, what is internal content curation?

Internal content curation is defined as giving new life to content that you’ve already produced and published. It has one or more of the following 3 attributes.

  • Makes content contextually relevant on one or more new platforms through the use of new headlines, images and/or excerpts.
  • Extends content into a new format by re-imagining or repackaging it.
  • Targets new audiences through distribution on new media entities and/or repromotion on the same platforms.”

Emphasis original.

On social media marketing 

Everything Marketers Want To Know About Social Media Marketing But Are Too Afraid To Ask [from Marketing Land; written by Sahil Jain]

Check out “the top questions asked by marketers at a recent social media event, along with the expert panelists’ answers.”

8 Top Instagram Accounts Marketers Need To Keep Their Eye On [from Jeff Bullas]

Don’t know who to follow in the marketing space on Instagram? Here are a few suggestions to get started. (We also humbly submit ourselves over at Union Metrics.)

Written by Sarah

May 8th, 2015 at 8:33 am

The Week in Social Analytics #150

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On social media marketing. 

The first step in social media marketing is not social media [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

“In your B2B business, the first priority probably isn’t Facebook. If you’re creating a marketing plan from scratch, social media might not be in your top five priorities at all. . .”

Your first priority is learning the needs of your customers and where you need to be in order to best fill them. Use social media as a tool to do the latter when and where appropriate.

Top 10 Reasons for Using Social Media [from We Are Social; written by Stephanie Weise]

The top three reasons for using social media as cited in this study are passive, expected reasons: Keeping up with friends and family, getting news, entertaining themselves in their free time. But:

“Equally telling is that only 27% of internet users say that they are using social media to share details about their daily life. By some margin, this motivation is less important to networkers than sharing opinions or photos/videos. Clearly, then, many internet users have become more comfortable using social media to publish content rather than to broadcast personal details.

Emphasis added.


On content marketing. 

It’s spring and that makes it as good a time as ever to clean and restructure your content strategy. These three pieces will help you decide how to tackle an audit (yes you should do a comprehensive one no matter how odious it sounds) and design a sustainable content system going forward, including maintaining a steady content queue.

And more fresh marketing stats:  

B2B Marketers on Their Most Important Go-to-Market Strategies [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“As far as content marketing goes, respondents cited product videos as the most suitable for introductory and growth phases of the product lifecycle.”


Pair with Digital Video Better Be up to Millennials’ Standards and US Adults Spend 5.5 Hours with Video Content Each Day, both from eMarketer.

How Are Marketers Using Data? [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Data is changing the world. According to October 2014 research by the Economist Intelligence Unit, the greater availability and use of data in business can create a ‘virtuous circle,’ with nearly two-thirds of executives worldwide reporting that information and knowledge were being shared more quickly and freely in their companies. Even though firms still report struggles and obstacles in dealing with large quantities of data, it’s improving their businesses across a range of operational and strategic functions.”

marketing data

Written by Sarah

April 17th, 2015 at 8:53 am

The Week in Social Analytics #136

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

Marketing strategies 

If Your Holiday Campaign Failed, Start Working on Next Year Right Now [from Entrepreneur; written by Andy Lombard]

“The relationship with your audience has to be built continuously throughout the year so that you’re on your customers’ minds well before they start creating holiday shopping lists.”

New in 2015 

Three Digital Marketing Predictions for 2015 [from Business2Community; written by Andrew Hutchinson]

Content Marketing isn’t going anywhere, and neither is video marketing. Employee advocacy will continue to be important because if your own employees don’t believe in you (and your products) who will? But here’s the most important takeaway from this piece:

“The above trends are important to consider, as they’ll be important considerations from a wider industry perspective, but the real challenge of 2015 will be to understand how all this new data, all these new platforms, can be best tailored for your benefit.”

Learn the best practices, keep up with industry perspective, but always act on what you know about your audience and do what’s best for them.

“So What?” is the Big Trend of 2015 [from Geoff Livingston]

“Big data is not a new marketing trend. The ability to use it intelligently is.”

The One CES 2015 Trend Marketers Should Care About [from Social Media Today; written by Rohit Bhargava]

“In the future, the best customer experiences will be those that can integrate the data a brand collects on a customer with the data a customer chooses to share in order to improve their own experience.”

Content Marketing 

Falling Behind on Content? Catch Up With These Content Repurposing Tips [from TopRank Online Marketing Blog; written by James Anderson]

“These five repurposing methods bear repeating here.

  1. Turn Powerpoint decks into articles / blog posts
  2. Aggregate email interviews
  3. Break up a long article you’ve had published
  4. Repurpose press releases
  5. Revise old blog posts”

Everything else 

‘While You Were Away’ Will Make Twitter More Important for Business [from Soshable; written by JD Rucker]

“The new feature means that quality could trump quantity, or rather add to it. On Facebook, it’s better to post less and make it meaningful. Posting too much can hurt. With the new Twitter, it will likely make sense to focus on quality first but with the understanding that quantity will still help. In essence, “While you were away” means that you want to do whatever you can to generate some sort of interactions on some of your Tweets. If you do, your Tweets from minutes, hours, or even days ago have an opportunity to be seen by your audience in ways that were impossible in the chronological-only world of old Twitter.

Quality is new Twitter’s best friend.”

Emphasis added.

How Data Analytics Changes Marketing Campaigns [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“More than 7 in 10 executives believe that their reliance on data analytics for decision-making will either increase significantly (24%) or somewhat (47%) over the next 3 years, according to a report from Forbes Insights and Turn.”


The Week in Social Analytics #128

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

On content strategies. 

Harnessing the Power of Micro-Content [from; written by Dustin W. Stout]

“A good content marketing strategy incorporates regular micro-content distributed throughout social media that will keep your audience engaged.”

Read on for what makes a great micro-content strategy.

3 Unique Ways Brands Are Approaching Content Creation [from Convince and Convert; written by Jessica Gioglio]

“From offering a free place to stay in exchange for original content, to building dedicated content studios and partnering with creators, these companies are showcasing the value of re-evaluating how content is produced while aligning with brand goals and consumer interests.”

Use these examples to inspire your own strategy.

Convince Your Boss To Use Video Content Marketing [from Heidi Cohen]

“. . .video content supports sales, based on the following data about US adults from Animoto.

  1. 94% have watched a video in the last week.
  2. 73% are more likely to purchase after viewing a video. (Note: Other research showed that 53% of respondents were influenced to purchase by a YouTube video.)
  3. 83% prefer videos that are 5 minutes or less in length. (Note: Informational videos must be short to grab your audience’s attention. You must engage them within the first 20 seconds or they’re gone.)
  4. 58% believe that viewing a company video builds trust.
  5. 89% have shared an educational video.

A great roundup of research around video content marketing.



via 2015’s B2B Content Marketing Benchmark survey by Content Marketing Institute and MarketingProfs

On social platforms. 

The Art of a Tweet, Part 2: Corporate Tweeting [from Social Media Today; written by Dana Strokovsky]

“Here are a few items to keep in mind when creating a social voice:

  • Content pillars
  • Filters (do’s and don’ts)
  • Categories and specific breakdown of audience
  • Platform consideration
  • Imagery guidelines”

How B2B Businesses Can Use Instagram [from Maximize Social Business; written by Jenn Herman]

“Instagram is about visually connecting with your audience. Find fun, unique, and creative ways to share your business through images and videos and you’ll be surprised at the results from your audience and customers.”

On marketing strategies. 

Fear Is The Biggest Barrier To Real-Time Communications [from Lewis PR; written by staff]

“‘This is our opportunity: we know about this real-time idea. Never as a profession have we had a bigger opportunity than right now to spread the idea of how important public relations is, throughout the organisation…The biggest barrier I see to all of this is that four letter word that begins with F. The biggest barrier is fear.’”

Watch the YouTube video directly here.

How To Execute The 80/20 Of Your Social Media Marketing [from Business 2 Community; written by Maria Peagler]

1. Identify Your Marketing Goals

Can you articulate the goals for your marketing? According to a recent survey of SMOC members, their top three business goals are:

  1. Grow their business
  2. Get more sales
  3. Develop a personal brand

Awesome! Now, exactly what is your plan for doing that?”

Top Five Questions Marketers Should Always Be Asking Themselves [from Marketing Profs; written by Preeti Upadhyaya]

“When you approach marketing decisions from your audience’s perspective, you’ll end up with much stronger, targeted messages that speak to your potential customers. And by asking these five questions every day, you will produce focused, targeted messages that convert your audience into customers.”


Written by Sarah

November 14th, 2014 at 9:39 am

The Week in Social Analytics #113

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

10 very cool examples of experiential marketing [from Econsultancy; written by David Moth]

Looking to go in a new direction with your next campaign? Use these examples to inspire.

The Highest Converting Images to Use on Social Media Networks [from Social Media Today; written by Jesse Aaron]

The right image can make all the difference in catching your audience’s attention.

Why It Might Be Time to Completely Change Your Social Media Strategy [from Convince & Convert; written by Jay Baer]

“In the shotgun approach, you don’t worry as much about building a big audience in any particular network, but instead building a touchpoint corral around each of your customers and fans. The holy grail isn’t one million Facebook fans, but being connected to each of your fans in as many places as possible. The more places you are connected to your customers and fans, the more places you have permission to contact them, the greater the chances that you will actually be able to contact them somehow, somewhere.

Emphasis original.

A Social Media Contest, Cole Haan, Pinterest, and the Rules [from Spin Sucks; written by Gini Dietrich]

While this happened a while ago, it’s a good reminder that brands need to know the rules before launching a campaign on a new platform. No one wants to be the one that gets made an example of by the FTC.

Want more on Pinterest? Here’s 7 Ways to Make Your Video Stand Out on Pinterest and The secret to Pinterest: no faces and new heights [Infographic].

What’s in a Detailed Buyer Persona Anyway? [from Business2Community; written by Erin Cushing]

“In the B2B realm, there are a few common areas that are always useful, and some information that is only useful in specific circumstances. Here’s the down-low on what you should consider when building your buyer persona.”

How You Can Tap Into The Power Of Twitter [from Heidi Cohen]

This piece covers 6 Twitter Community Structures Simplify Your Work; below is the Brand Cluster Twitter Structure:

“High visibility, popular brands and celebrities attract large Twitter followings who tweet, comment and share information about them. BUT followers have NO connection to each other.”

These communities tend to have large or very large followings but little connection between all of the accounts that make up the following. Also:

“It’s interesting to note that…Brand Cluster Twitter Communities do very little of their own tweeting.”

Click through for some actionable marketing tips around this Twitter community structure. Also great from Heidi this week: 7 Tactics For Content Curation Success.

Real-Time Marketing Isn’t Just About Twitter: MTV uses Snapchat, ESPN’s on Twitter, and Hyundai works Tumblr [from Adweek; written by Garett Sloane]

“Snapchat, Tumblr and Pinterest ‘have the potential to change the way the industry thinks about real-time marketing,’ said Kevin Lange, Starcom MediaVest Group’s svp of social.”

3 TV Shows Doing Social Media the Right Way [from Likeable Media; written by Jessica Chen]

“One of the most well-developed marketing plans in the industry, the marketing campaign for True Blood is a four-part ongoing project. The online campaign features strategic blogger outreach and behind-the-scenes footage and interviews. HBO most excels in maintaining the True Blood image throughout multiple platforms: the show recently created a blog for one of the ‘newly-turned’ vampires.”

The Week in Social Analytics #95

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

6 Brands That Will Have You Rethinking Your Social Media Marketing Strategy [from Jeff Bullas dot com; written by Elli Bishop]

The big boys have bigger budgets and resources, but smaller brands can still take queues and get ideas from their strategies.

On Instagram, faces are 38% more likely to get ‘Likes’ [from Futurity; written by Jason Maderer]

“Researchers looked at 1.1 million photos on Instagram and found that pictures with human faces are 38 percent more likely to receive likes than photos with no faces.

They’re also 32 percent more likely to attract comments. The number of faces, gender, or age didn’t make a difference.”

Instagram Hits 200 Million Users: What Does This Mean For You? [from Social Media Today; written by Avtar Ram Singh]

“If your target audience is the younger demographic between the ages of 12-24, then you should definitely have a presence on Instagram – even if it’s one that involves you not talking about your product at all, but simply engaging and interacting with your fans to understand what they like.”

The Top 5 Brands on Instagram to Follow [from Jeff Bullas; written by Jason Parks]

Look to some of the best on the platform for inspiration in  your own strategy.

Pinterest Tacks On Paid Ads [from the Wall Street Journal; written by Mike Shields & Douglas MacMillan]

“. . .Pinterest Inc. now has a new goal: to reinvent online advertising.”

Who’s Engaging in Social TV? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Broken down into demographic groups, the study finds that the most socially engaged were Hispanics, for whom 10.5% of viewing occasions could be deemed ‘socially connected viewing.’ The next-most engaged were 25-34-year-olds (9.6%) and 15-24-year-olds (9.2%), while Asians (4.2%) and 45-54-year-olds (4.4%) were by far the least likely to engage in this activity.”

G.M. Uses Social Media to Manage Customers and Its Reputation [from The New York Times; written by Vindu Goel]

“G.M.’s dual approach — going about its normal business while trying to help specific customers — reflects the tightrope the company must walk on social media like Facebook and Twitter, where a customer’s perceptions of a brand are shaped by both what the company does and what other people say about it.”

Who, What, and Where Can You Personalize? Real-Time Personalization is Simpler Than You’d Think [from the Marketo Blog; written by Mike Telem]

“If you’re worried about creating enough personalized content for your real-time campaigns, stop worrying — you can personalize the content you already have. Real-time personalization can leverage existing content, personalizing your calls-to-action, user experience, images, and product offers.”

5 Must Read Perspectives on Social Media Marketing Strategy [from TopRank Online Marketing Blog; written by Lee Odden]

Stepping out of your own perspective sometimes can help inform your plans better than anything else.

10 Video Content Elements To Help You Become A Director [from Heidi Cohen]

If you’re going to get into video, do it right. The audience is there:

77% of global Internet users watch video, according to Global Web Index. In total, 1.15 billion people view video on a connected device. Of these, 626 million view video on a smartphone and 297 million view video on a tablet.”

Emphasis original.

Brands Respond To Customer Support Enquiries 8 Times Faster On Twitter Than On Email | STUDY [from All Twitter; written by Shea Bennett]

“Brands who offer consumer support on Twitter respond to tweets on average eight times faster than the typical brand email response, but only two in five successfully resolved the customer’s enquiry on the social network, reveals a new study.”


Written by Sarah

March 28th, 2014 at 9:18 am

Automotive social media marketing: Who’s doing it right, what to measure, and more

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Over the last few years we’ve watched the handwringing over social media and its usefulness evolve into campaigns with large social tie-ins, and stand-alone social campaigns. One of the industries that embraced this early- with both success and failure- was the automotive industry. Cars are seen as a necessary purchase for many households, particularly in cities where no reliable public transportation exists.

While Millennials are buying fewer cars right now, that doesn’t mean they won’t be doing so in a future of improved economic prospects. Smart automotive companies are targeting the next generation of car buyers on the social networks where they hang out.

Who has done it right?

One of the earliest and most comprehensive social campaigns came from Ford- an overall early social media embracer- and was centered around the launch of their new Ford Fiesta in 2009. It was successful enough that they’ve “remixed” the campaign for the 2014 Fiesta. The key to Ford’s success in this campaign was reaching out to their target customers where they were already hanging out- in this case, courting successful YouTubers- and giving them content for compelling storytelling: a car to use and take on adventures, and give honest reviews about. This strategy was designed to benefit both Ford and the vloggers, and it did, as per this Businessweek article discussing the campaign’s results:

“Fiesta got 6.5 million YouTube views and 50,000 requests for information about the car—virtually none from people who already had a Ford in the garage. Ford sold 10,000 units in the first six days of sales. The results came at a relatively small cost. The Fiesta Movement is reputed to have cost a small fraction of the typical national TV campaign.”

YouTubers don’t just spend time on YouTube either; they use platforms like Twitter to increase their exposure, find new viewers and subscribers, and connect with fans new and old– along with other YouTubers and brands.

Reason enough to remix it.

Other notable campaigns include an effort from AutoTrader, who put the fate of a car hanging over the Thames in Twitter’s hands, and more recently Toyota, who partnered with The Muppets around their latest movie Muppets Most Wanted to let the public know their Toyota Highlander has #NoRoomForBoring. Launched around this year’s Super Bowl, the ad campaign featured massive social tie-ins, with related tweets and posts to Instagram from both companies.


From Toyota’s Instagram.

From The Muppet’s Instagram.

We took a look at their Super Bowl results after the game (along with other brands), and partnering with lovable, family friendly Muppets was definitely a wise choice for Toyota. They’ve continued the brand partnership and campaign through the premiere of Muppets Most Wanted.

How do I plan this?

Before you start planning a social campaign, there are important questions to ask yourself. These will help you figure out what you’re going to measure as well (which we’ll get to in a minute):

  • Who is my target audience? Specific demographics tend to spend more time on specific platforms. Do the research and go where your people are.

  • Where do they hang out? Obviously whichever platform that is, is where you’ll want to be. If you’re a luxury vehicle brand, you might want to use Instagram to show off stunning visuals of your vehicles, tapping into the aspirational among Instagram users.

  • How do they talk in that space? Pay attention to how your target audience speaks to their friends, to brands, and just about brands. The golden rule of social media marketing is always listen first.

  • How do you, as a customer, like to be approached? Everyone has had good and bad customer experiences. Reflecting on your own can help in building a good experience for others.

Once you’ve answered those questions, plan to:

  • Talk to your audience and with them, not at them. This is why listening is so important.

  • Present your content in a beautiful and compelling way. Looking and listening can also inform the storytelling you’ll be doing on any platform. It should be high-quality, compelling, useful, and beautiful in form and function. When you’re approaching someone on a space they use for social interaction with their friends and family, be respectful of their time and attention so they won’t resent your presence and think of it as an unwanted invasion.

  • Involve your audience. The successful campaigns we referenced earlier have been interactive and smartly researched. The campaigns involving user-generated content that have backfired didn’t take the time to understand the audience they would be involving– and the audience shot back.

What should I measure?

There is no one right answer to this, because every company’s goals are different, as are the goals of every campaign. A lot of this is going to depend on how you answered the questions in the previous section; certain tactics will be more successful with different demographic groups and on different platforms.

Twitter is “especially appealing to 18-29-year-olds”, but there are “no significant differences by gender, household income or education” according to Pew Research via Marketing Charts. The same survey found Instagram to be especially appealing to women of the same age group. Do your research and use demographic information like this to tailor your campaign message for each platform, speaking to your target audience in the platform’s native language and to whomever you’re trying to reach there.

Further, look at what kinds of storytelling do best on each platform and let that inform your measurement goals: Will visuals on Instagram help raise brand awareness, while you tailor your message for Twitter to bring in sales? The most important question to answer is: What does success look like to you and your brand? That will tell you what you need to be measuring. For example:

  • If brand awareness is your goal, share of voice measurement will be important to monitor before, during and after your campaign 
  • If you’re looking to drive sales, bring your sales team onboard to decide what success will look like and how you’ll measure the traffic driving it
  • If you want to gain new fans and followers, share of voice will be important alongside paying attention to the reach of your campaign; don’t just concentrate on vanity metrics like the number of followers you have (though these are good baseline indicators).
  • If you want to see how a new Twitter campaign has improved over past campaigns, you’ll need historical Twitter data.

Need more references and help? Check out The 5 Easy Steps To Measure Your Social Media Campaigns, or shoot us an email to see how we can help. We’re always here.

Written by Sarah

March 26th, 2014 at 12:11 pm