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The metrics that matter on Facebook

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This article, written by our Editor-in-Chief Jenn Deering Davis, was originally published on PerformanceIN

One of the best things about Facebook is all the metrics we can access through Insights or third-party analytics providers (like Union Metrics!). For brands, it’s a veritable data buffet! However, there are so many metrics that it’s hard to know which ones to pay attention to. Here are some tips on the metrics that should really matter to brands on Facebook and how you can use them.

Union Metrics Facebook Analytics Tracker Overview Short

An overview of the Union Metrics Facebook analytics

Page-level metrics

First, it’s important to distinguish between page-level metrics and post-level metrics. The success of your Facebook campaigns depends on both.At the page level, you need to understand the size of your Facebook footprint and make sure it’s growing over time. The rate of that growth depends on your specific goals, so first get to know your normal growth rates, then decide if you need to increase those to meet your goals.

Facebook’s main page-level metrics are page reach and fans. Page reach measures the total unique audience for all your page and post content. It reflects the maximum audience size for your owned content, and grows through shares and stories spread across your fans’ News Feeds. Your fans count is the number of different people who have liked your page – your followers.

Post-level metrics

At the post level, there are several important metrics to measure to discover what content works well and what you can be doing more, including reach and a few types of engagement. Compare these metrics across individual posts, as well as across post types to learn if there are different types of content that work better than others.

First, monitor individual post reach over time. Identify how much reach you can expect from a typical post, and be able to identify posts that perform above or below that figure. Pay attention to your high-reach posts, as well as your low-reach ones. You may learn more from your lower performing content than your top content.

Beyond post reach, you definitely want to understand engagement with your content. Post engagement includes likes, shares and clickthroughs. Likes represent a simple acknowledgement of a post; they’re nice, but don’t do much to amplify or deepen engagement with your content. But shares are one of the most coveted engagement actions on Facebook. A share means someone liked your content enough to pass on to their friends. Plus, it amplifies your post to a wider audience beyond your own fans. Finally, clickthroughs on posts with links in them show you’re moving your audience from your Facebook page to your website or blog, furthering their engagement with your brand.

Next, look at where the engagement is coming from. Is it direct engagement from your fans (or those you’re advertising to), or is it downstream engagement from amplified content? Knowing how much amplified engagement your content gets can help you measure spread and uncover inflection points.

Finally, keep an eye on negative engagement actions. Hiding posts, unliking a page and marking a post as spam are all indicators – of varying severity – that your audience doesn’t like what you’re doing. It’s totally normal to see a few of these on any post, but if you see an increasing number or notice a post that gets more than normal, dig deeper. What are you doing differently? In general, negative engagement should represent only a tiny percentage of your overall fan engagement. If you receive negative engagement from more than 0.05% of your fans, something could be wrong.

Tracking these metrics on Facebook will help you monitor page growth and optimize your content. They’re a great place to start with Facebook analytics for your brand.

And if you’re interested in getting detailed Facebook analytics for your pages, take a look at the Union Metrics Social Suite!

Written by Jenn D

November 11th, 2015 at 8:50 am

The Week in Social #174

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We spend the week reading the best things we can get our eyeballs on and on Fridays we share them here with you. Leave your thoughts in the comments, or come find us on Twitter at @UnionMetrics.

On video and visuals.

While answers vary as to what, exactly, the visual web is, everyone does seem to agree that it’s very important. You can see these responses in eMarketer’s What Is the Visual Web?: Instagram, Pinterest are the social sites most closely associated with the visual web:

visual web

“Asked specifically about social media, respondents said Instagram was the service most closely associated with the visual web. At 92.4% of respondents, Instagram was about 10 percentage points ahead of second-place Pinterest. Facebook, at 58.1%, and Vine, at 56.2%, were far behind, and less than half of respondents (47.6%) named Snapchat.”

Emphasis added.

For those more specifically interested in the state of social video, check out 10 big trends happening in social video by Ben Davis for Econsultancy, and to act on that knowledge, check out 3 Types of Video to Incorporate Into Your Social Media Strategy via Navneet Kaushal for Social Media Today.

If you’re still skeptical about video numbers, you might want to take a look at Seven in 10 US Internet Users Watch OTT Video: The vast majority are regular YouTube viewers also from eMarketer.

OTT video service


The times, they are a changin’.

On Twitter.

You’ve probably heard of Twitter’s launch of Moments this week, but what about Twitter’s “Promoted Moments” & What They Mean for Brands? Aaron Rales sums it up for Ogilvy:

“Instead of slotting promoted tweets within live Moments feeds, Twitter is giving brands their own Moments called Promoted Moments. The Company is calling them ‘dedicated pieces of real estate…where a brand can curate a series of different tweets or Vines to actually tell their story.’ Like a Promoted Trend, Promoted Moments will be considered ‘premium’ purchases and thus given significant visibility on the platform (they’ll appear in every category list of Moments). Pricing has not yet been disclosed and testing will begin in ‘weeks, not months’ according to the company.”

See more brand implications + specifications at the link.

If you think earthquakes have nothing to do with marketing you’re right, except in the case of this particular case study Andrew Hutchinson broke down for Social Media Today: What Marketers Can Learn from How Tweets are Used to Track Earthquakes.

“The USGS case study provides an insightful example of how social data can be used, and the importance of tracking the right information to convert social data into something practical. The first step in the process is ascertaining what it is, exactly, you need to know. In this case, the team have started with mentions of earthquakes then narrowed down the data by cross-matching posts for relevance. For your business, maybe you’re tracking all mentions of your brand name (which you should be), maybe all mentions of your industry, all of your target keywords in some capacity. Track too much and you’ll likely never glean much insight, as you’ll be setting yourself a mammoth task in monitoring all those mentions every day. But through refining, though working out the key messages you need to track that are actually actionable and relevant to your business interests, you can focus your efforts onto the conversations and mentions that matter the most.

Emphasis added. Oh, and we can help with that refined tracking, by the way.

On everything else.

Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief Jenn Deering Davis tells it like it is in Mastering Engagement in Emerging Social Channels (by Anna Papachristos for 1to1 Media); calling networks like Snapchat, Instagram and Pinterest “unconventional” really sells them short. She also takes a look at the 11 most memorable social media marketing successes of 2015 (by James A. Martin for Network World) along with some other marketers, for all your 2016 content planning needs.

And finally, Jay Baer of Convince & Convert tells it like it is: Your Blog Post Is Too Damn Long aka tl;dr.

So thanks if you’ve made it this far.

Which Union Metrics product is right for you?

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As we’ve built out the Union Metrics Social Suite, we want to be sure we continue to provide analytics for those at a range of available resources. Along those lines, we’ve created this guide to help you find the perfect piece of UM to bring clarity to your social efforts, organized by your needs.

I have little or no budget.

Fear not my friend, we have some free tools to help you track your social efforts, even with $0 in the budget for it. As long as you plan accordingly, you should be able to cover a small Twitter campaign- a weekly chat, your own account growth, a hyper-local contest, etc- with TweetReach snapshot reports. Just make sure you run a snapshot within a couple days of your event – they can only go back 1-7 days. You get analytics on 50 tweets for free! If you do go over the allotted 50 tweets for the period you’re capturing on a free report, you can purchase a full snapshot report covering up to 1500 tweets for just $20.

The More You Know

As for Instagram, you can run a free Instagram account checkup to see which of your photos and hashtags are performing the best (plus more, like the best day and time for you to post!), and you can refresh your report once a day for updated metrics.

Account Checkup Small

I want to track an upcoming campaign on one social media channel.

Union Metrics offers single-channel analytics starting at $99 per month to monitor two accounts or topics on one social media channel. You can get analytics for Twitter, Instagram or Tumblr with one of these plans. You can keep your subscription running for new campaigns or clients (and change what you’re monitoring at any time), or you can cancel when you’re done. It’s an easy way to get the real-time analytics you need without a long-term commitment.

UM Single Channel plans

Simply pick the channel where you’ll be running your campaign, and sign up for the plan that meets your needs. We can walk you through a demo to show you exactly what you’ll be getting. We offer monthly and annual pricing.

I want to track an upcoming campaign across multiple social media.

For our larger customers or anyone wanting analytics across social media channels, the Union Metrics Social Suite is a great choice. With it you can monitor your social efforts on Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram AND Facebook, all in one place. That includes analytics for all accounts and topics you’re interested, plus cool features like our actionable insight stream.

Union Metrics Multi-Channel Detail InsightsDon’t worry, we still have different plan sizes to choose from so you can pick the one that best suits your needs, or the needs of your clients. The Social Suite starts at just $500 per month!

Why should I use Union Metrics?

Fair question. You can read more about Union Metrics and why our social media analytics are the best in the industry, let us know if you’d like a demo, or ask us any burning questions you might have.

We’re always happy to help!

Written by Sarah

July 20th, 2015 at 8:26 am

Introducing Union Metrics for Instagram and the Union Metrics Social Suite!

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Merle is excited to start measuring robot Instagram analytics

We’re so very thrilled to share some exciting news! Today we’re releasing two brand new products – Union Metrics for Instagram and the Union Metrics Social Suite. Both will give you even more options for analyzing your social media campaigns, as we’re now on Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram.

Union Metrics for Instagram

Our brand new Instagram analytics – Union Metrics for Instagram – allow you to access our real-time, ongoing analytics reporting for any account or hashtag on Instagram. Use these analytics to:

  • Discover your most popular media and hashtags

  • Identify an account’s biggest fans and advocates

  • Monitor hashtag reach and exposure over time

  • Track competitor performance to compare share of voice

  • Analyze likes and comments to determine when fans are most active

Interested? Union Metrics for Instagram subscriptions start at $199 per month.

The Union Metrics Social Suite

Our new enterprise cross-platform social analytics suite – the Union Metrics Social Suite is perfect for larger brands and agencies running campaigns across multiple social networks. This is our first-ever integrated suite, allowing you to monitor your social media presence across Twitter, Tumblr, and Instagram in one place. Union Metrics Social Suite subscribers receive access to Union Metrics’ comprehensive analytics across social platforms, as well as dedicated account management and other enterprise features. Social Suite pricing starts at $500 per month.

Learn more

We’ve set up a few webinars over the next week to tell you more about our new products. Join us for one to learn more and see the new analytics in action.

Union Metrics for Instagram

April 17, 1:00 p.m. PDT

April 22,  9:00 a.m. PDT

Union Metrics Social Suite

April 23, 9:00 a.m. PDT

If you’re currently a TweetReach Pro or Union Metrics for Tumblr subscriber, we can add Union Metrics for Instagram access to your account, or upgrade you to the Social Suite for the most flexible access. Just contact us and we’ll get it set up!

And if you’d like a personal demo or have any questions, please contact our sales team anytime. And there’s lots more info on our website, so let us know if you have any questions.


Written by Sarah

April 16th, 2014 at 8:27 am

This Week in Social Analytics #37

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

7 social media lessons from the Grammys for organizers of other events [from CNET news; written by Sree Sreenivasan]

What the Grammys did well, and what they could do better.

Big Data And The Landfills Of The Digital Enterprise [from ReadWrite; written by Matt Asay]

It’s okay not to have The Big Data Answer.

Marketing Analytics: 4 techniques to discuss with your data analysts [from Marketing Experiments Blog; written by Daniel Burstein]

“Recent research in the MarketingSherpa 2013 Marketing Analytics Benchmark Report indicates 48% of marketers are using analytics platforms to customize reports, but only 24% are creating and testing hypotheses.”

How US Consumers Value Online Media [PDF from The Boston Consulting Group; authored by Jean-Manuel Izaret, John Rose, Neal ZuckermanPaul Zwillenberg]

“U.S. consumers realize large and growing value from online media. In fact, they now derive more value from online media—net of the associated costs— than they receive from offline media, according to new research by The Boston Consulting Group. We call this measure of value ‘consumer surplus’ and, for online media, it amounts on average to approximately $970 per U.S. connected consumer, or online user, per year—or about 2.5 percent of the average annual income in the U.S.

The highest surplus ($311), accounting for about one-third of the online total, comes from UGC and social networks accessed through such platforms as Facebook and YouTube.”

Great Social Media Requires a Bigger Trash Can [from Social Media Explorer; written by Nichole Kelly]

 “That’s right, I said it. Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn, Vine or any other social media channel you are using will NOT generate success for your company. Ridiculously amazing content is what generates success.”

26 Ways to Market Your Business With Tumblr [from Social Media Examiner; written by Debbie Hemley]

SME’s post takes a look at 26 businesses with a presence on Tumblr and discusses the techniques they use on the platform, in addition to breaking down some of Tumblr’s features and lexicon. (Of course, we disagree with the assertion that only visually based brands belong on Tumblr.)

Social Media, Take Note of the Echograph Acquisition [from Social Media Today; written by Ioannis Tsiokos]

Echograph: somewhere between Vine and the GIF?

Written by Sarah

February 15th, 2013 at 9:07 am

This Week in Social Analytics #36

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

Game Over: Twitter Mentioned In 50% Of Super Bowl Commercials, Facebook Only 8%, Google+ Shut Out [from MarketingLand; written by Matt McGee]

“According to my count, Twitter was mentioned in 26 of 52 national TV commercials — that’s 50 percent of the spots that aired during CBS’ game coverage. Facebook was mentioned in only four of those commercials — about eight percent. Google+, which is reportedly the No. 2 social network in the world, wasn’t mentioned at all.”

Time-Saving Tips for Social Media Marketing [from Social Media Today; written by Chris Street]
Do you use these tactics? Or do you employ others?

5 Bad Social Media Analytics [from Business 2 Community; written by Dr. Angela Hausman]

“Of course, there are lots of bad social media analytics used when evaluating your social media marketing campaign. Commonly, they’re used either because they’re easy to measure or because someone THINKS they have some meaning in evaluating the success of your social media marketing. Here are just 5 examples of really BAD social media analytics.”

Murder, Execution & Other Strategic Plans for Ambitious CMOs [from Social Media Explorer; written by Barry Feldman]

Kill what isn’t working for your company.

Social Media is like coffee. . . [from Web Analytics Demystified; written by Eric T. Peterson]

“* Footnote: I cannot live without coffee, nor would I try … but I know some people who can.”

And a bonus long read, full of culture & history: The Wheel of the Devil: On Vine, gifs, and the power of the loop [from The Machine Starts; written by Chris Baraniuk]

“While visual loops have been in existence for centuries, they have arguably enjoyed special attention over the last hundred years. In this essay I want to consider the purpose and power of the loop. I also intend to propose that the reign of the loop is greatly empowered by digital media, and that today loops have enriched culture while offering new perspectives on the nature of reality.”

Written by Sarah

February 8th, 2013 at 9:27 am

This Week in Social Analytics #35

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

What Happens When You Double Your Tweeting Frequency? [from Social Media Today; written by Steven Shattuck]

“Conclusion: Tweeting twice as often had little effect on follower growth and slightly increased interaction while more than doubling referral traffic. Tweet as often only if you maintain a high standard of content quality and usefulness.”

Google+ surpasses Twitter to take number 2 social network after Facebook [from; written by Maxwell R.]

“That works out to about 343 million active users of Google+, and a little under 300 million active users for Twitter and YouTube.”

What exactly constitutes an “active user” isn’t defined in this piece, however.

What Twitter Really Looks Like [from The Atlantic; written by Megan Garber]

“But it’s also a reminder of the global scale of Twitter — and of the fact that Twitter has its own inclinations and energies. What’s maybe most striking about Tweetping is its presentation of data in pulses and punctuations: boomboomboomboom-PAUSE. That’s largely an accident of interface, but it also suggests something profound about Twitter and the social web: This stuff has a beat. It has rhythms and rushes and respites. It’s its own kind of organism, with its own kind of pulses — its own kind of heartbeat.”

Study Says Twitter Is Fastest-Growing Social Platform in the World [from Mashable; written by Anita Li]

“The number of active users on the microblogging service grew 40% from the second quarter to the fourth quarter of 2012 — equal to 288 million monthly active users, according to Global Web Index, a syndicated market-research service on web behavior and social media. (The index assessed 31 markets, and defines ‘active’ as those who claim to ‘have used or contributed to Twitter in the past month.’)”

95% Of Online Conversations About TV Take Place On Twitter [STATS] [from All Twitter; written by Shea Bennett]

“Moreover, 40 percent of all Twitter traffic around peak time is about TV.”

Tumblr – Untapped Marketing Goldmine [from ClickZ; written by Ekaterina Walter]

“Even if your business isn’t image- or product-based, Tumblr enables you to share images that relate to your demographic.”

You Can No Longer Pay to Pin Content on Tumblr [from Mashable; written by Fernando Alfonso III]

“Over the past six months, response to the pin feature has been mostly negative, with people claiming to unfollow users who used the feature.”

Facebook Tries Letting You Share Emoticons Of Exactly What You’re Feeling, Reading Or Eating [from TechCrunch; written by Josh Constine]

“Along with being fun for users, it could be a big help to advertisers, though Facebook tells me it’s not piping this data into its ad engine just yet. By selecting your current activity instead of merely writing it out, you structure data for Facebook. That could eventually help it to connect you with advertisers who want to reach people who frequently watch TV and movies, or listen to music, or eat at restaurants.”

Written by Sarah

February 1st, 2013 at 9:06 am