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Archive for the ‘snapshot reports’ tag

5 ways to make the most of snapshot reports

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Our snapshot reports are a great way to get some quick analytics about a conversation or topic on Twitter, and we want to help you get the most out of them that you can! Here are five ways to make the most of your snapshots.

TweetReach snapshot report for #brandchat

1. Maximize your results

Take your snapshot as soon as a tweet chat, event or campaign ends to capture the best data possible. Free snapshots include up to 50 Tweets and $20 full snapshots include up to 1,500 Tweets, both from the past couple days (up to one week back in many cases). The longer you wait to run your report, however, the better chance that you’ll miss the best data. So don’t wait!

2. Narrow your results

Taking a snapshot of a weekly chat? Use the “since” modifier (example: #RKChat since:2015-01-30 would go in the search bar) to get results from just that day’s chat, and not any anticipatory chatter from the night before. To narrow your search in other ways to get exactly the data you want, check out this full list of advanced operators.

3. Do your research

Running a few free reports around different keywords, topics or hashtags can help you narrow your focus and decide which will be worth paying for a full snapshot, or even going Pro if you’ve got that option in your budget. Test out a variety of queries to see how the metrics compare.

4. Scope out the competition

A snapshot report on a Twitter account can give you a quick idea of that account’s recent activity; which tweets are the most retweeted? Who’s talking to and retweeting their posts? How large is their social footprint? You can run a snapshot report for any public Twitter account, so take a look at how your competitors stack up.

5. Scope out influencers

Who else is important in your industry? Run a few snapshots on the influencers in your community to find common threads and use them to improve your Twitter content strategy. See what you can learn from the experts. You may find new hashtags or people to follow.

Give it a try! Run your own free snapshot report right now.

Written by Sarah

February 12th, 2015 at 8:36 am

Quick Twitter analytics with TweetReach snapshot reports

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Here’s a brief primer on TweetReach snapshot reports – great for quick Twitter analytics on recently posted tweets.

Our free Twitter analytics snapshots include up to 50 tweets posted in the past few days. And our full snapshot reports include Twitter analytics on up to 1500 tweets from the past week (whichever comes first) for just $20. Both are perfect for fast insight into recent Twitter activity around anything – a hashtag, phrase, tweet, account, keyword, or any combination. You can run TweetReach snapshot reports any time, for any topic, on tweetreach.com.

Use our snapshot reports to learn more about:

  • Hashtag analytics – How has a hashtag been used recently? How large is the conversation around a hashtag? How are the main influencers using a Twitter hashtag?
  • Twitter account analytics – How far are your tweets reaching? Who is retweeting and engaging with your account?
  • Competitor analysis – How do multiple Twitter accounts compare to each other? Who has the largest reach on Twitter? Who’s getting more engagement?
  • Quick research – What kinds of things were people tweeting about a particular keyword, phrase or hashtag?
  • Tweet analytics – How far did a particular tweet spread? Who was retweeting or quoting a tweet? Who was responsible for the most impressions?

Try it now! You’ll have results in seconds.

And if you like our snapshot reports, you can now get more of them than ever before! TweetReach Pro subscription plans now include unlimited full snapshot reports, and start at just $99 per month. Learn more and sign up now.

Written by Jenn D

January 19th, 2015 at 1:47 pm

#CometLanding: Finding influencers and more using TweetReach snapshot reports

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Yesterday, for the first time in history, humanity managed to land a robot roughly the size of a washing machine (named Philae) onto a comet moving 40k mph through space. Twitter had a lot to say about it using the #cometlanding hashtag, so we took two full snapshot reports to compare the conversation on the day of the landing to the day after.

What can comparing snapshot reports tell me?

Full snapshot reports are limited to 1500 tweets, so extremely popular Twitter conversations like those around big public events tend to max them out quickly, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t still a lot to learn from what they capture! By comparing snapshots from two days back-to-back, you get an idea of who the most influential people and organizations in the conversation are, which you can continue to monitor by taking a few more days of snapshots, either free or full (free will just give you slightly more limited data). Alternatively you can use them as research to set up a TweetReach Pro Tracker around a similar topic in the same area of interest: Now you know which accounts to monitor, and you can look at those to see what kinds of hashtags they regularly use, etc, to get the most out of your Tracker.

So what did these two snapshots tell us?

The conversation on day two almost matches that of day one in terms of intensity, telling us that Twitter’s interest in Philae’s historical landing hasn’t wavered much from that of landing day:

#cometlanding day 1

#cometlanding day 2

This tells you it’s still a popular topic to work into your content schedule! And day two is ripe for original content. The first day had a lot more original information being broadcast; the breakdown of tweets vs. retweets was almost even, whereas today has seen a lot more retweets and fewer original tweets. This helps you hypothesize about the nature of the conversation: Perhaps on day one, everyone watching tweeted about how excited they were to watch the landing, from professionals down to amateur observers. On day two, maybe excited space and science enthusiasts are sharing information with their followers from official accounts. To confirm this, simply check the tweets timeline on your snapshot reports:

#cometlanding tweets timeline day 1

 

Day one Tweets Timeline: Tweets from laypeople excited about the #cometlanding

 

#cometlanding tweets timeline day 2

 

Day two tweets timeline: More RTs of official accounts with news and photos from Philae 

What about those influencers you mentioned?

No problem. The most retweeted tweets each day both included the official Twitter account for the Philae lander.

#cometlanding most RTd day 1 #cometlanding most RTd day 2

 

While NASA is an account you might have assumed would be influential in space and science conversations, BBC news might be less expected. And perhaps you didn’t know Philae had its own account!

Still have questions?

Leave ‘em in the comments. Like what our snapshots can tell you, and interested in going further with TweetReach Pro? Join us for a demo on Thursday, November 20th at 9:00am PST, or email us to set one up sooner!

Written by Sarah

November 13th, 2014 at 10:30 am

3 ways to use TweetReach snapshot reports to complement real-time Twitter monitoring for your events

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For monitoring tweets about large events we always recommend creating a plan and setting up TweetReach Pro Trackers ahead of time so that you capture the full set of tweets for your analysis. That doesn’t mean, however, that our snapshot reports can’t act as a great complement to your in-depth tracking. Here are three reasons why:

1. Get the big picture quickly

Before you have time to dig into all of the information in your TweetReach Pro Tracker, you can grab a snapshot report for quick insight into the size of the conversation around an event hashtag, who the top contributors were, and which tweets were the most retweeted. Here’s a great example of a snapshot from Communications Week, which took place in New York last week:

CommsWeekNY

2. Build relationships with attendees

From the lists of top contributors and most retweeted tweets in your snapshot, make sure you’re following active event participants. You can also use these lists to engage with or thank them for their contribution to the event conversation. Pay attention to who these accounts also follow and retweet to help further build your own network on Twitter; these are good target accounts as they are likely to be a part of or interested in your industry. Building strong relationships with the right people can lead to reciprocal partnerships in the future, even if it’s just giving each other little PR boosts through retweets down the line.

To make this even easier, every Twitter username mentioned in your snapshot report is a clickable link that takes you to their Twitter account. You can also retweet or reply directly from your snapshot. Here’s an example from a snapshot of SocialMedia.org, whose summit started yesterday:

TweetReach snapshot report

 

3. Easily share stats with attendees

Since snapshot reports are so quick to run, you can easily share a snapshot report at the end of each day of your event, or even at the end of a big panel or keynote to give everyone in attendance – and those watching via Twitter – an idea of how that conversation went. Attendees can share the report with their followers, or use it in writing their own recap posts of their experiences. This also gives others interested in your event a better idea of what kind of content and conversation it produces, encouraging them to book for the next year if it lines up with their business.

Want more on event tracking with TweetReach?

Be sure you’re getting the most out of your snapshot reports by keeping things simple. And if you want more on how to track social media engagement with your events with Union Metrics, check out some of our other posts on marketing your conference across platforms: Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr, as well as marketing your conference across platforms: Snapchat and Pinterest.

Written by Sarah

November 4th, 2014 at 9:46 am

Join us for a TweetReach Pro demo TODAY at 9am PDT!

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Join us for a short demo this Thursday, May 1st- that’s today!- at 9:00am PDT and we’ll walk you through TweetReach Pro, our historical analytics and our snapshot reports.

Demos usually take 15-20 minutes followed by an open Q&A session. At the end, attendees will receive a discount code that can be applied to a TweetReach Pro subscription.

You can register here. Hope you can make it!

Written by Sarah

May 1st, 2014 at 6:16 am

How the new Twitter API updates will impact TweetReach reports

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As you may know, Twitter is making some updates to their API and we’ve been working to incorporate those changes across TweetReach. We will be rolling out these changes to our snapshot reports on March 4, 2013. Most of the API changes won’t be visible to you, but a few of these changes will affect our reports, so we wanted to make sure you knew exactly what was going on.

Adding Twitter authentication

You will now need to authenticate with a Twitter account to run snapshot reports on TweetReach. This will be the same simple “Sign in with Twitter” process you’re used to on many other websites. These changes will allow us to run new kinds of analyses, so look for those in the coming months.

This authentication will apply to free and paid reports, as well as snapshots in TweetReach Pro. If you have an account with us – whether it’s a free account or a Pro subscription – you can save your Twitter info so you only have to sign in once. If you prefer not to create an account with us, that’s fine, too, but you may need to authenticate with Twitter each time. If you would like to create a free TweetReach account to save your Twitter credentials and your TweetReach reports, you can do that here.

We’re only asking for read-only permission to your Twitter account, so we will never post anything from or on behalf of your account. We will not be able to see your DMs or your password. We will only be able to:

  • Read Tweets from your timeline
  • See who you follow

There’s more about third-party authentication on Twitter’s help center, which we encourage you to read if you have any questions about how this process works and what it allows. We’re also happy to answer any questions or address any concerns you have, so please let us know.

Replacing exposure graph

We’re updating the exposure bar graph to now reflect the follower counts for all tweets in your report. With the new graph, you’ll be able to see how many tweets were sent from accounts with a certain number of followers. The x-axis shows follower tiers (0-99; 100-999; 1,000-9,999; 10,000-99,999; 100,000 or more), and the y-axis shows the number of tweets in each follower tier. For example, want to know how many tweets in your report were sent from accounts with more than 100,000 followers? This new graph will make that quick and easy.

New exposure graph shows how many tweets were sent from users with how many followers

Handling native retweets

In addition, we’ll be handling native retweets differently from now on. Twitter’s Search API no longer includes native RTs, and this change impacts all tools built on the Search API, which includes our free and full snapshot reports. All snapshot reports will now include a slightly limited set of native retweets. Full reports will include up to 100 native RTs for each of the 15 most important tweets in a report, and our free (50-tweet) reports will include up to 100 native RTs for each of the five most important tweets in a report. This change does not impact manual, copy/paste type retweets or modified retweets. For most of you, this will provide more than enough coverage to include all retweets, since it’s quite rare to see a tweet with more than 100 retweets. There’s more on our helpdesk, including our full-fidelity options for comprehensive analytics with no limits.

Changes to our reach metric

We’re also updating our reach algorithm, which we’ve already blogged about you can read all about here. Our new reach algorithm is based on a rigorous statistical model built on years of Twitter data. We’re very happy about this change, because it means reach will be faster and less resource-intensive to calculate.

So, to sum it up…

We’re really excited about these changes! Reach is so much smarter than it was before, and using Twitter authentication means we’ll be able to build new kinds of analyses, so there’s lots more coming in the future. We also know this is a lot to take in, so if you have any questions about any of these changes, please let us know.

Written by Jenn D

March 3rd, 2013 at 2:54 pm

Posted in News

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