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Archive for the ‘snapshot report’ tag

Free snapshot reports now come with 100 tweets!

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Have you run a TweetReach snapshot report lately? Well we have great news! Our free snapshot reports now include up to 100 tweets! That’s twice the tweets they had before. Try it now – click on the image below to run your own free report.

Snapshot report

Run a snapshot report today on any hashtag, keyword, account name, or whatever it is that interests you (see more about what you can search for with a snapshot report here) and now get twice as many tweets about it. Still for free!

And don’t forget to share your report on Twitter once you’ve run it. We love to see what people are searching for!

Written by Sarah

August 19th, 2015 at 9:08 am

Quick tip for hashtags at a conference: #smx at a glance

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The Search Marketing Expo ( SMX or #smx on Twitter) kicked off yesterday in Las Vegas, and is continuing today. If you’re there now, check out our 7 tips to maximize your conference attendance using Twitter. If you couldn’t make it like us, check out our 5 tips for getting the most out of the hashtag on Twitter for a conference that you missed.

We went ahead and took some quick snapshot reports of the conversation around #smx and that brings us to our takeaway for a conference-enhancing quick tip; they’re smartly setting up different sub-hashtags for each session to go along with the conference’s main hashtag. This makes for easier tracking of particular sessions whose topics are most relevant to what your brand is interested in.

To capture a particular session in a snapshot, all you have to do is include both hashtags, like this:

#smx #13aOr include the session number and letter as a keyword in addition to the hashtag, like this:

#smx 11A


Either method will capture the data that you’re after to get an idea of the overall conversation. So once you have your snapshot reports, what next? What does this tell you about the overall conversation around something as a big as a conference?

We recently covered this with 3 ways to use TweetReach snapshot reports to complement real-time Twitter monitoring for your events looking at #commsweekny as an example. Just like with #commsweekny, these snapshots for #smx help you:

  1. Get the big picture quickly; what’s the overall estimated size of the conversation? Who are the top contributors and which are the most retweeted tweets?
  2. Build relationships with attendees by looking at the snapshot report’s contributors list and tweets timeline, and
  3. Easily share these stats with attendees

These insights are valuable from any perspective: someone interested in attending #smx who could not, someone who is attending, or even the team behind #smx. Additionally, with the use of session-specific hashtags or keywords, you get a more precise idea of who is influential in each topic: Session hosts will be clear, as attendees will be quoting what they have to say, and you can network with both those interested in learning more about a session’s particular topic or who are already well-versed in it. Check the session highlights and keep an eye on the main #smx feed on Twitter to hone in on the session topics most important to you, and grab some snapshots around them.

So even if you can’t afford to attend a certain conference or go TweetReach Pro to comprehensively track the conversation around it, there is still plenty of value to be found in strategic snapshot reports.

Want even more on Twitter and conferences? Here are 16 ways to use Twitter to improve your next conference

Written by Sarah

November 20th, 2014 at 11:05 am

#CometLanding: Finding influencers and more using TweetReach snapshot reports

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Yesterday, for the first time in history, humanity managed to land a robot roughly the size of a washing machine (named Philae) onto a comet moving 40k mph through space. Twitter had a lot to say about it using the #cometlanding hashtag, so we took two full snapshot reports to compare the conversation on the day of the landing to the day after.

What can comparing snapshot reports tell me?

Full snapshot reports are limited to 1500 tweets, so extremely popular Twitter conversations like those around big public events tend to max them out quickly, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t still a lot to learn from what they capture! By comparing snapshots from two days back-to-back, you get an idea of who the most influential people and organizations in the conversation are, which you can continue to monitor by taking a few more days of snapshots, either free or full (free will just give you slightly more limited data). Alternatively you can use them as research to set up a TweetReach Pro Tracker around a similar topic in the same area of interest: Now you know which accounts to monitor, and you can look at those to see what kinds of hashtags they regularly use, etc, to get the most out of your Tracker.

So what did these two snapshots tell us?

The conversation on day two almost matches that of day one in terms of intensity, telling us that Twitter’s interest in Philae’s historical landing hasn’t wavered much from that of landing day:

#cometlanding day 1

#cometlanding day 2

This tells you it’s still a popular topic to work into your content schedule! And day two is ripe for original content. The first day had a lot more original information being broadcast; the breakdown of tweets vs. retweets was almost even, whereas today has seen a lot more retweets and fewer original tweets. This helps you hypothesize about the nature of the conversation: Perhaps on day one, everyone watching tweeted about how excited they were to watch the landing, from professionals down to amateur observers. On day two, maybe excited space and science enthusiasts are sharing information with their followers from official accounts. To confirm this, simply check the tweets timeline on your snapshot reports:

#cometlanding tweets timeline day 1


Day one Tweets Timeline: Tweets from laypeople excited about the #cometlanding


#cometlanding tweets timeline day 2


Day two tweets timeline: More RTs of official accounts with news and photos from Philae 

What about those influencers you mentioned?

No problem. The most retweeted tweets each day both included the official Twitter account for the Philae lander.

#cometlanding most RTd day 1 #cometlanding most RTd day 2


While NASA is an account you might have assumed would be influential in space and science conversations, BBC news might be less expected. And perhaps you didn’t know Philae had its own account!

Still have questions?

Leave ‘em in the comments. Like what our snapshots can tell you, and interested in going further with TweetReach Pro? Join us for a demo on Thursday, November 20th at 9:00am PST, or email us to set one up sooner!

Written by Sarah

November 13th, 2014 at 10:30 am

Happy 5th birthday, TweetReach!

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They grow up so fast, don’t they? We can’t believe the TweetReach snapshot report is five years old already! We sold our very first snapshot report five years ago today, on April 3, 2009. Since then, we’ve run 6.5 million snapshot reports analyzing more than 251 million tweets.

This is what our early TweetReach Twitter analytics reports used to look like, in the spirit of Throwback Thursday. How far we’ve come!

TweetReach Snapshot Report circa 2010

TweetReach has grown so much in the past five years, and we want to thank everyone who has been a part of that journey. We wouldn’t be here without you.

And if you want to check on the reach of your tweets, you can run a snapshot report here any time (as always, the first 50 tweets are free, and up to 1500 are just $20). Here’s to the next five years, and beyond!

Written by Sarah

April 3rd, 2014 at 1:36 pm

Join us for a TweetReach Pro demo tomorrow 2/20 at 9am PST!

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Join us for a short demo this Thursday, February 20 at 9:00am PST and we’ll walk you through TweetReach Pro, our historical analytics and our snapshot reports.

Demos usually take 15-20 minutes followed by an open Q&A session. At the end, attendees will receive a discount code that can be applied to a TweetReach Pro subscription.

You can register here. Hope you can make it!

Written by Sarah

February 19th, 2014 at 9:01 am

Join us for a TweetReach Pro demo tomorrow 1/16 at 11am CT!

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Join us for a short demo where we’ll walk you through TweetReach Pro, our historical analytics and our snapshot reports. Demos usually take 15-20 minutes followed by an open Q&A session. At the end, attendees will receive a discount code that can be applied to a TweetReach Pro subscription.

The demo starts at 11am CT, tomorrow. You can register here.

And we promise it won’t be like this:

Written by Sarah

January 15th, 2014 at 9:25 am

TweetReach Tip: Less is more with snapshot reports

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Keep it simple with TweetReach snapshot reports! Here are a few things to keep in mind when you’re running a snapshot report:

1. Snapshots will analyze tweets up to one week old. Snapshots pull tweets from up to 7 days ago, so be sure you run them as soon as you can after your event. Older tweets are only available through our premium historical analytics.

2. Full snapshots will include up to 1,500 tweets. Due to restrictions from Twitter’s Search API (more on that below), a full snapshot report is limited to about 1500 tweets from the past week. If your topic or hashtag had more tweets than that, we’ll go back until we hit that limit, but won’t be able to pull them all into a snapshot report. For higher-volume topics, try our historical analytics or ongoing Pro Trackers.

3. A snapshot report is just that – a snapshot. We use the Twitter Search API for our snapshot report data, and it operates more on relevancy than on completeness. This means it will pull everything that Twitter considers most relevant to your search query from the past seven days, so some tweets or users might be missing from your results. For more complete results, try our Pro Tracker, which has access to the full-fidelity, real-time Twitter stream.

4. Narrow your snapshot search dates with filters. If you want more specific results for a snapshot report, you can include date filters. The since: and until: operators allow you to select a specific date range within the past week for your search. For example, let’s say you want to see all #TBT tweets for December 12, 2013 through December 17, 2013. Search for #TBT since:2013-12-12 until:2013-12-18 (use the YYYY-MM-DD format, which is tied to 00:00 for each date). Like this:

#TBT Snapshot

5. Tweets in our snapshot reports are displayed in the Universal Coordinated Time zone (UTC). This is to simplify and standardize our reporting across all time zones. If you need help converting UTC to your time zone, try this converter.

Written by Sarah

January 2nd, 2014 at 9:23 am

TweetReach Tip: Saving your snapshot reports

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You don’t have to go Pro to save your TweetReach snapshot reports. As long as you’ve registered for a free TweetReach account - and you’re logged in! – you can save every report you run for future access in your My Reports archive. That applies to both free, 100-tweet snapshots, as well as full, $20 snapshots.  Just be sure to log in to your account before you run your next snapshot report.

And whenever you purchase  a full snapshot report, you’ll still receive an email copy and a receipt. If you happen to purchase a report while you were logged out, just send us an email and we’ll be happy to move it into your account.

Are you new to TweetReach or want to learn more about our products? 

First, run a free snapshot report about your Twitter account, hashtag, keywords or URL on If you have any questions about our metrics, read this.

Second, if you’d like to set up ongoing monitoring for any Twitter account or keyword-based topic, check our TweetReach Pro. Starting at just $84 per month, it’s a great and affordable way to start tracking and analyzing your tweets in real time. Contact our sales team if you have any questions at all.


Written by Sarah

December 3rd, 2013 at 11:56 am

TweetReach Tip: Snapshot report receipts

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If you buy one of our full snapshot reports (up to 1500 tweets, posted up to one week ago), then we’ll send you an email with your snapshot report, as well as a receipt for your purchase.

In that report email, you’ll have links to access your report and receipt online, download a PDF, export a CSV file and find our support contact information. Here’s an example of that email:

Screen Shot 2013-11-26 at 11.06.37 AM

So, when you order your report, don’t lose this email! It has your receipt and report info, in case you need it later. But if you do lose the email, call or email us and we’ll be happy to send you another copy!


Written by Sarah

November 26th, 2013 at 1:31 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

Tagged with ,

TweetReach Tip: Excluding tweets from your search

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You can exclude certain tweets from your results by using the minus (“-”) operator in your TweetReach search. You can exclude tweets that include certain keywords or tweets that mention a certain account. For example:

 Sandwiches -ham 


#swag -justinbieber

The second example is a good one to use if you find a spammer or someone whose tweets you really don’t want to include in your reports.

Note that there should not be a space between the minus and the word you’re excluding.  If you’d like to exclude a two word phrase, wrap them in quotation marks, like this:

#swag -”justin bieber”

Written by Sarah

November 21st, 2013 at 9:08 am