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The Week in Social Analytics #139

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On your audience 

Do You Know What Your Audience Is Doing On Social Media? [from Heidi Cohen]

“. . .marketers must create and update their social media persona for each of their key audiences and assess where, when and how they engage on social networks.”

If you haven’t done an audience audit in a while, it’s time.

6 Ways Social Data Can Improve Communications [from Cision; written by Jim Dougherty]

“Mining social data is entirely fallible, however.

It’s important to understand who you’re targeting, what you’re measuring, the quality of your data and the reliability your measurements in order to use social data most effectively.”

The Difference Between Popularity and Influence in Social Media [from Social Media Today; written by Brett Relander]

“It should always be kept in mind that a large number of visitors can sometimes stem from a significant number of one-time visitors. Of course, all visitors begin as first-time visitors, but if a user only visits your landing page and then quickly moves on, never to return, you are not gaining anything from them. You have no real opportunity to build influence with one-time visitors. With regular visitors, you are able to cultivate a true relationship. Over time, those visitors become invested in your brand and truly care about what you have to say. For this reason, it is vital to consider whether your viewership is based more on one-time visitors or on return visitors who are truly invested in what you have to say.”

Emphasis added.

Platform-specific marketing

Everything Brands Should Know About Twitter’s New ‘Recap’ Feature [from Social Media Today; written by Tim McMullen]

“The catch here is that Twitter is taking into account your inactivity. Which presumably means tweets posted at mostly inactive hours will–in a way–be rewarded. We could all be bombarded with midnight brand Tweets in the race to be displayed in the coveted morning recap. Eggs just taste better with a side of subliminal messaging.”

Emphasis added.

If your brand is looking to expand your strategy on Pinterest, check out these two pieces: The Definitive Guide To Pinterest For E-Commerce from Marketing Land and Five Keys for Using Pinterest to Market Your Business from Social Media Today.

If the recent changes to Snapchat have you wanting to investigate how your brand can use that platform, learn by example with Econsultancy’s Eight brands experimenting with Snapchat for social marketing.

Stats

28% of Time Spent Online is Social Networking [from SocialTimes; written by Shea Bennett]

“. . .average usage times for social media sites rose from 1.66 hours per day in 2013 to 1.72 hours per day last year.

Micro-blogging, which includes Twitter, is also up slightly to 0.81 hours per day, and now accounts for about 13 percent of total time spent online.”

time-spent-social-networking

 

Written by Sarah

January 30th, 2015 at 8:49 am

The Week in Social Analytics #120

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Crafting Your Analytics Story: 2 Guidelines to Keep in Mind [from ClickZ; written by Robert Miller]

“Identifying what information you need to present, and to whom, in order to progress your wants.”

Majority of Marketers Say ‘More’ to Brand Awareness Efforts [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Brand awareness was a higher priority for eMarketer’s audience than demand gen, global business expansion efforts, or spending on events—none of which attracted a majority to increase spending.”

Business Investment Plans According to Marketing Professionals Worldwide

5 Marketing Myths [from Geoff Livingston]

“1) Analytics Make Your Marketing Program Succeed

Analytics will inform marketing toward the best way to encourage desired customer behaviors. They will not make a brand better at marketing (myth revealed). . .Creative alone is wild and unpredictable. Data alone informs direction, but can’t stop crap communicators from producing, well, more crap. Together, informed creative is flat out dangerous.”

Listen Up. Your Customers Are Complaining On Social Media. [from Marketing Think; written by Gerry Moran]

“79% of your customers who complain on social media do so in hope that their friends see their dissatisfaction with your brand, reports Edison Research.”

Be sure you’re listening, and have a plan in place for how you’re going to respond.

Can Snapchat Really Work for Marketing? [from Marketing Profs; written by Dan Virgillito]

“Snapchat provides urgency, with powerful content that prompts quick action. Snapchat users have a few seconds to react, so they may be more impulsive and willing to interact to a Snapchat marketing campaign, as opposed to using other image-sharing platforms to do the same.”

8 Tips for Managing a Social Media Crisis [from Pamorama; written by Pam Dyer]

“Social media can be a useful tool to build your company brand or a nail in its coffin.”

Have a plan in place, but react to each situation as the unique confluence of events and technology that it is.

3 Post-Sale Content Marketing Strategies You Need [from Heidi Cohen]

“. . .the initial sale is only the beginning of the customer relationship.”

Why and When to Re-Evaluate Your B2B Brand Strategy [from Marketing Profs; written by Bob Domenz]

“This article details the signs that indicate it may be time to re-brand your business. Usually, that time comes during one of the following three circumstances:

  1. When it’s clear: Your company is about to undergo a Big Change.
  2. When it’s fuzzy: The brand hasn’t been evaluated in some time.
  3. When in a growth spurt: You’re trying to just get through today and don’t have a chance to think about tomorrow.”

How to Be a Visual Social Media Marketer [from SpinSucks; Eleanor Pierce]

Know when to go pro, and always keep things authentic.

To gain a customer’s trust; meet them on their preferred digital stomping ground [from Marketing Pilgrim; written by Cynthia Boris]

Different demographics and audiences prefer to communicate with brands in different places, using different methods; knowing this and acting accordingly can help brands gain trust faster than acting along more traditional routes.

Written by Sarah

September 19th, 2014 at 9:48 am

The Week in Social Analtyics #115

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Brand Storytelling Beyond the Marketing Silo [from Business2Community; written by Anton Rius]

“Content, then, can play a part in nurturing the relationship far beyond the point of sale. With a holistic content strategy, the marketing department becomes less of a vertical within the organization and instead reaches across many departments and can affect multiple company initiatives.”

Content Marketing and Social Media: What Nonprofits Must Know [from Maximize Social Business; written by Claire Axelrad]

“. . .content marketing is not a synonym for social media. Nor is it a synonym for social deployment.”

3 Big Benefits Brands Can Get From Visual Content on Instagram [from Jeff Bullas; written by Mairead Ridge]

“. . .90% of information transmitted to the brain is visual, and visuals are processed 60,000 times faster than text. Instagram’s visual appeal is a very effective way to showcase products and influence purchasing decisions.”

Is Snapchat Right for Your Brand? | Infographic [from Social Times; written by Kimberlee Morrison]

A simple flowchart can be made even simpler: If Snapchat’s demographics match your target audience, then that’s where you need to be.

How 12 Brands Used Snapchat [from Fast Company; written by Jeff Beer]

“A recent Comscore report found that with 32.9% penetration, Snapchat was the third most popular social app among 18-34-year-olds (behind Facebook and Instagram, but ahead of Twitter, Pinterest, and Vine). And if you look at just the 18-24-year-old base, the app has 50% penetration. The company is said to have about 30 million active users and claims that people send and view more than 700 million pictures and 500 million “stories”–which allow brands to create longer narratives that last 24 hours–a day.”

If that’s your target audience, then you need to pay attention to how these brands are using Snapchat to inform your own strategy. Want even more on Snapchat for brands? Check out our pieces: Snapchat for brands part I: The basics & brand specifics and Snapchat for brands part II: Brands who do it well.

Will your company’s social media efforts pay off? [from All Twitter; written by Shea Bennett

“Here’s a few social media truisms that many brands simply don’t want to hear.

1. Social media success takes time. Don’t expect overnight success. While customers increasingly expecting an almost instantaneous response to their enquiries, generating a worthwhile return on investment (ROI) requires considerable effort and patience.

2. Social media success takes resources. Do you have someone with several hours of quality time per week available to dedicate to your social strategy?

3. Social media success takes you out of your comfort zone. Are you prepared to share other people’s content in your social channels – even that of your competitors? Are you will to engage with other people and open conversations? Do you create original content that other people will want to share? Are you able to handle and respond to public criticism and customer complaints?”

Five Signs Your Company is Ready For a Brand Ambassador Program [from Mack Collier]

“The companies that aren’t ready for a Brand Ambassador program are the ones that view their customers as transactions, not people.”

US CMOs Rank Their Biggest Concerns [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

What’s your biggest concern, CMO?

Written by Sarah

August 15th, 2014 at 9:38 am

In case of emergency: Cruise lines and crisis communication on Twitter, Part II

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Costa Concordia Instagram

People fascinated by a disaster will create their own news accounts, that may or may not contain misinformation. This is happening on networks outside of Twitter as well, like this example on Instagram.

We’ve previously discussed how airlines should handle crisis communication in case of an emergency, and recently we shared the first part of the plan for cruise lines to do the same. This is the second part, which picks up after looking at what cruise lines should look for on Twitter, to what they should measure during and after a crisis, plus what to look for on platforms outside of Twitter.

What to measure on Twitter in times of crisis, and after

Now that you know what to look for, you need to have a plan in place for how to measure it. What, exactly, should you be measuring on Twitter as a crisis unfolds?

Before; or what you should have set up right now

Ideally you will already have Trackers set up to capture what we mentioned previously- tweets directly to your official handle, mentions of your brand in any variety of spelling imaginable, any well-known nicknames your brand has (official or not), and the ports you operate from. If you’re not already doing that, now is the time to implement Trackers or take frequent snapshots (using something like our aptly named snapshot reports) around those terms once a situation arises and begins to unfold.

If your resources have grown since you first made your plan, consider monitoring your major competitors and major keywords related to your industry as well.

During a crisis

Often during a crisis situation, a hashtag will be born organically. If you’re being proactive about communicating via Twitter, however, don’t hesitate to create one of your own and immediately set up a Tracker to measure it, or take continual snapshots of the situation. If another hashtag emerges organically, use that one in your messaging as well and be sure you’re tracking both.

After a crisis

If everything flies by too quickly and you’re a small enough team not to have time to set up Trackers or take frequent enough snapshots of the situation, a historical option to capture the entire incident is available. This can also be used to fill in any noticeable gaps in your data once you’ve begun to look through everything you’ve gathered.

In the aftermath of the event, you might also want to track a specific news story (using specific key words from the title if it’s unique enough not to return a lot of noise, or you can track via a specific URL) that went around if it directly involved comments from your brand, or got a lot of circulation with commentary from people passing it around. This will give you a much more accurate read on the sentiment around your crisis messaging, and let you see any missed opportunities, as well as highlight every win.

Go the extra mile

Once you have all of this data and you can clearly see how the situation unfolded and evaluate the strength of your response, take it a step further: What can you plan better next time, with this experience? What did you and your team do really well, that you should be sure to praise and also pass on as protocol to new team members? This knowledge can be distilled and turned into training and on-boarding materials for any new communications employees in the future.

If you’re not a cruise line (or an airline) a lot of these tactics still apply to you; if you’re a hotel, for example, you can offer to put up stranded travelers or victims of a natural disaster or other tragedy. Car rental companies and car sharing services can work out deals to get stranded people home if they don’t have far to go. For a less serious crisis, tour companies can even offer to keep stranded passengers entertained with local sites while they’re waiting for delayed travel to get sorted out.

Any of these companies can work out deals with each other ahead of a crisis to come in and support each other if and when it makes sense to.

Platforms other than Twitter

While Twitter is the best platform to use during a crisis because of the speed at which you’re able to share information and connect with concerned parties as well as news outlets, you need to be sure you have messaging in place on all of the other platforms you also have a presence on in the case of an emergency. For Facebook, be sure to make periodic, informative updates and answer as many questions as you can from concerned parties that may not be on Twitter. Do as much as you can with the resources that you have; don’t be afraid to make a post and then direct everyone to Twitter or your website for more information if those are the two places you plan to concentrate updates.

Tumblr will support text updates and it’s also a place where you can reblog information from the news outlets also on Tumblr, but it’s much more difficult to answer questions if they come in the form of reblogs. Do answer any questions directed to your inbox, publishing those that may help answer the similar questions of others.

Photo-based platforms like Snapchat and Instagram are more difficult to navigate; it’s hard to think of a tactful snap for announcing information around an emergency situation, but if that’s the only line of communication open to you and you’re in touch with your customers there, don’t hesitate to do what you can. If you do feel it’s appropriate to post a screenshot with emergency update protocols on your Instagram account directing followers to your website or Twitter for ongoing information, do so. Many of these details will depend on what’s right for your brand, the nature of the crisis, and the resources available as it unfolds.

The takeaway

The bottom line is to listen and step in where you’re needed, even if you’re not expected to.

Written by Sarah

August 12th, 2014 at 10:12 am

Marketing your conference across platforms: Snapchat and Pinterest

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While Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr are the main three platforms brands tend to work with, other brands are making strides in places like Snapchat and on Pinterest. If you have the resources to play around with these platforms in addition to the big three- or if you know that’s where you audience spends a large amount of their time- take the opportunity to see what you can do in these places to supplement and enhance everything you’re doing elsewhere. They’re particularly fun platforms to utilize in a cross-platform campaign.

Snapchat

We’ve covered the basics and specifics for brands on Snapchat, as well as showing which brands are using it well. Snapchat is a perfect way to keep in touch with event attendees in a lighthearted way throughout a conference; you can send snaps showing upcoming events, or recapping a session or a cocktail party. You can ask for snaps back in order to share free drink tickets or admission to a packed keynote; your creativity is the limit on Snapchat in terms of interaction with your followers. Like Instagram, it’s a great way to show off the atmosphere and get future attendees more interested in booking their trip for the next year.

It’s also a great way to foster conversations between attendees; intimidating names in a field can seem more approachable to build a connection with when they’re willing to send a silly snap.

Photo 6-25-14, 11 59 11 AM

 

A snap from Mashable attending a Google event in San Francisco. 

Just be sure you’re letting attendees know ahead of time across your other platforms that you’re on Snapchat, because most won’t think to look for you there. Having signage up around your conference will also let attendees know where to find you across platforms, and keep official hashtags in play, making post-event tracking easier for you!

Pinterest

Pinterest is a great way to help attendees get organized around a conference; build boards for them so they know what to pack, and what sites to see around town if they decide to come a few days early or stay a few days after. You could even encourage speakers to build their own boards around their areas of expertise, driving traffic back to their sites and letting attendees have a better idea of who they are and what their professional and personal focuses are.

SXSW Pinterest

 

An example of a Pinterest board from SXSW, showing off photos from Instagram and helping attendees figure out what to pack. 

The number and variety of boards you want to build up for your event is up to your creativity, time, and resources. Also keep in mind that Pinterest is great at driving sales, so pinning books your speakers have written after an event is a good idea as well as the same kind of snappy visual reminders you put on Instagram around deadlines for ticket prices.

The bottom line

The bottom line remains the same as in our previous post covering the big three social marketing platforms (aside from Facebook): Play to the strengths of every platform you have a presence on, but especially with these two, don’t be afraid to get creative and have fun.

If you have any questions or examples of great conference marketing we missed, please leave it in the comments!

Written by Sarah

July 15th, 2014 at 8:36 am

Snapchat for brands part II: Brands who do it well

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We’ve already covered the basics of how Snapchat works and some of the specifics for how brands should be using the app, so now we wanted to show examples of how some different brands have been using snaps and stories to connect with their fans and followers. Consider their work as a guide and inspiration for how you might want to use Snapchat yourself.

Taco Bell

Taco Bell was one of the first brands to embrace using Snapchat, behind a yogurt chain called 16 Handles who used the platform to send out coupons. Taco Bell initially the app to advertise its Beefy Crunch Burrito:

And since then has used the new features that launched in May to start a Doodle War with its Snapchat friends, among other things:

Mashable

Mashable uses Snapchat as a way to show some behind-the-scenes office culture- birthday celebrations, etc- and more of what the company is up to, such as events they’re attending, like in the snap below:

Photo 6-25-14, 11 59 11 AM

Mashable is a good example of how using simple enhancements like the pencil tool in several layers of text can make a snap more vibrant and interesting. To ramp up engagement, they have also hosted weekly Snapchat Challenges, like this emoji challenge:

MTV

MTV uses Snapchat as a way to share brief interviews with and photos of different celebrities and artists with their Snapchat friends, and to do show promotions like their first ever Snap promoting their show Teen Wolf. (MTVTeenWolf is now its own Snapchat account.) MTV UK previously used it as a way to promote their show Geordie Shore, the UK version of Jersey Shore.

A snap of Teen Wolf star, Tyler Posey.

Audi and Pretty Little Liars (PLL)

PLL teamed up with media sponsor Audi to send out snaps during episodes of the show meant to line up with certain scenes in the first campaign of its kind. PLL fans get exclusive content they can’t get anywhere else to enhance their favorite program, and Audi gets to introduce itself to a new and younger demographic. While that demographic might not be in the market for luxury cars now, they will have an established relationship with Audi for the future.

A fan response snap to PLL and Audi.

Pitch Perfect 2

The cast of the sequel to Pitch Perfect has been sending mostly behind-the-scenes selfies to their Snapchat friends, the same kind most users send to their Snapchat friends who double as IRL friends. This creates a sense of intimacy above what even a 10-second video interview from your favorite artist via MTV does; they’re framed so that it looks like the star themselves might have snapped the shot and sent it to you.

Anything else I should know?

Yes! Be sure you share your Snapchat username with your fans and followers on other social sites who might want to add you! Most audience members won’t think to search for brands there, so you need to be proactive about letting them know that you’re there.

And that’s about it.

Got any questions, or know of anything that we missed? Let us know in the comments!

Written by Sarah

June 30th, 2014 at 10:09 am

Snapchat for brands part I: The basics & brand specifics

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The trend of platforms providing a place for users to exchange ephemeral content isn’t an obvious one for most brands to join in on; after all, why spend hours planning and executing content only to have it disappear in moments once it hits your audience’s screens? But just like any other social platform, if Snapchat is where your target demographic is, then it’s where you should be spending some of your time. If that’s the case- or you’re just a marketer or brand who loves to experiment- read on to find out all you need to know about marketing on Snapchat for brands.

What do I need to know before getting started?

If you’re already familiar with Snapchat then you can skip this section and head straight for the second section. Otherwise stick around for a basic breakdown of how the platform works.

The very basics: Snapchat scores & finding friends

Your score is simply the total number of snaps you have sent and received, as per Snapchat themselves. That’s all there is to it!

As for finding friends, Snapchat has step-by-step instructions for how to find and add friends that includes screenshots. You can add those who have added you, and find friends via your contacts, or through searching for their Snapchat username.

Stories vs. individual Snaps

Every time you take a snap you have the option to add it to “My Story”- a collection of snaps that add up to tell a bigger story and are viewable for 24 hours- and stories are now more popular than snaps. Stories are also a better choice for brands above sending individual snaps, and we’ll discuss this more in the next section.

Our Story

Snapchat just launched a new feature called “Our Story” that is meant to let Snapchatters collaborate on a bigger story around an event they are physically attending. At the moment the first and only event to have “Our Story” is the Electric Daisy Carnival, but the wording on the page about the feature suggests it will be open to other events in the future. People who aren’t currently attending an “Our Story” event can still add the event as a friend to view the ongoing, collaborative story so they don’t miss out on the experience entirely. This is a great way for event organizers and attendees to persuade them to attend in the future.

Replaying Snaps

You can only replay one snap every 24 hours, so choose carefully! Also keep in mind that your audience can only do the same; that’s important to keep in mind if you’re designing a Snapchat contest or sending coupons.

Notifications

Snapchat notifies the sender of a snap whenever a recipient takes a screenshot of their snap or a chat between them. They have different icons to let you know if your snaps and chats have been sent, viewed, and more. Snapchat will also notify you if someone replays a snap.

And that’s it for the basics; if you have more questions you can find answers to them in Snapchat’s own support site.

What do I need to know specifically as a brand?

This is where we get into the specifics for brands using Snapchat; while creating consistently intriguing content is a given, there are also different settings you’ll want to consider than if you were using Snapchat for personal reasons.

Settings

In your settings you’ll want to make sure that you set “Who is allowed to view my story?” to “Everyone”. Otherwise only those you’ve added as “My Friends” will be able to see it, and you’ll be missing out on voluntary eyeballs until you manually add everyone who adds you. With a popular brand that could be quite an undertaking.

The manual aspect of individual snaps can be a daunting prospect for brands- as of now there’s no way to create a single snap and click on a “send to all” option; you have to go through your list and choose each recipient individually-  but the workaround is adding all of the content you create to your story. (Whether or not you choose to let your audience send you snaps back is up to you, and would mostly be useful in terms of building engagement through reciprocation they can see- the icon will let them know you viewed their snap- or in conducting a Snapchat contest. The option of who is allowed to send you snaps is controlled in “Settings”.)

Also be sure to check out “Manage” under “Additional Services” to turn on the “Front-Facing Flash”, “Replay” option, and enable “Special Text”, all of which will enhance the content of your snaps.

Kinds of content to post

Truly creative content is what makes Snapchat sing, so you’ll want to plan and execute content using all of the features we mentioned earlier to make your snaps as interesting as possible:

  • Draw on your photos using the pencil icon in the upper right-hand corner using the full range of colors available; this gives you the ability to turn your snaps into just about anything

  • Tap on the screen to add text; turning on special text lets you alter it to be larger and adjust the positioning

  • If you have an emoji keyboard on your phone, Snapchat will support adding these characters in with your text

Other than utilizing those features, the kind of content you want to share will depend on your brand and what your goals are with the platform. Is it to share behind-the-scenes company culture? Is it to share brief behind-the-scenes interviews and photos with the stars of your show or movie? Is it to show off your products in new and interesting ways?

We’ll look at a few different types of brands using Snapchat in the next post to give you some ideas of what kind of content has been successful.

Frequency of snaps

While regular snaps are limited to a maximum time limit of 10 seconds, stories aren’t limited except to a 24 hour period of existence. However, since Snapchat was built to be a quick and fleeting experience, you might not want to be the first to discover what the limits of a story are. Keep it simple, sweet, and relatively short; set up stories of different lengths and see if you get an increase in activity around one type or length above others.

What do we mean by increased activity? Well, measuring Snapchat is difficult, but pay attention to things like how many people are adding you to their friend list, taking screenshots, choosing to replay your snaps, or even sending you snaps in reply if you choose to make that option available.

Anything else?

That’s it for now! Check out the basics in the first section of this post if you need to, or stick around for our next post covering which brands use Snapchat well. If you still have questions, leave ‘em in the comments!

Written by Sarah

June 26th, 2014 at 8:40 am

The Week in Social Analytics #100

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Real-time marketing fails from major brands [from iMedia Connection; written by Jenn Deering Davis]

“Just because RTM is the hot marketing tactic of the moment doesn’t mean that it’s right for every brand at every event.”

We are not all Oreo: Check out these RTM fails and the lessons that come with them.

A Brand and a Person Offer the Same Post with Very Different Results [from Social Media Explorer; written by Jason Falls]

A good piece in the ongoing discussion of just how human brands should try to be.

Millennials Tweet About Brands When Rewarded [from All Twitter; written by Mary C. Long]

53% of Millennials could be following your brand on Twitter with the right incentives. Wink wink.

And that’s not all, according to the report, Millennial women are seven times more likely to retweet your brand and three times as likely to follow your brand on Twitter (and see all those great incentives you’re offering). Men are three times as likely to follow on Twitter as well, but they’re a bit less generous on the retweets.”

Emphasis added.

Instagram Video Ads Are Coming Soon [from AdWeek; written by Garett Sloane]

“‘Instagram is almost a magazine, and it wants its ads like in a magazine to be just as compelling as content,’ said James Borow, CEO of digital marketing platform Shift.”

How Do Social Media Styles Differ by Culture/Nation? | Part I [from Social Media Today; written by JC Giraldo]

We’re all in a global market, and understanding regional differences in social media use is important. You can read part 2 here, and part 3 here.

How to Develop a Pinterest Marketing Strategy for your Business [from Eli Rose social media; written by  Liz Jostes]

“Someone landing on your Pinterest profile will make a judgment on your brand and business within seconds. Developing a group of boards that presents a full, well-rounded view of your brand is absolutely the best strategy to have.”

Snapchat: A New Breed of Network [from Social Media Today; written by Derek Smith]

“Still, Snapchat is a potential gold mine for advertisers, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. We’ve become good at ignoring intrusive advertisements, but Snapchat users must quickly pay attention to messages before they’re deleted, so ad impressions could be impactful if they’re relevant to the demographic.”

Online Shares Could Be As Influential As In-Person Recommendations [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Across the three categories – supermarket, automotive, and mini-tablet – the average lift in purchase incidence from an “excellent” online share (a strong positive one) was found to be 9.5%. What that means, according to the analysis, is that an excellent online share increases the perceived value of these products by an average of 9.5% over a neutral share.”

3 Ways to Ensure Your Social Promotions Follow the Law [from Convince and Convert; written by Kevin Bobowski]

Be very clear about your social promotions, or the FTC could come calling.

Written by Sarah

May 2nd, 2014 at 8:26 am

The Week in Social Analytics #99

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Instagram Diverges From Vine By Personalizing Explore Tab [from TechCrunch; written by Josh Constine]

“. . .Instagram’s Explore page is now also personalized with top photos and videos Liked by people you follow. Personalization highlights Instagram’s focus on your own social graph and a subjective vision of beauty, to contrast with Vine, which centers around re-sharing and globally popular expert content creators.”

Pair with MIT algorithm predicts how popular your Instagram photo will be [from The Verge; written by Adrianne Jeffries].

Brands Need to Stop Trying to Play Hero [from AdWeek; written by Gaston Legorburu]

“Remember, the goal is participation, so brands must create experiences beyond the narrative where heroes become immersed and involved. That’s the differentiator between a story told and a story lived.”

Study: 4.7% of Your Customers Generate 100% of Your Online Word of Mouth [from Mack Collier]

“So to put it another way, it is 4.7 percente of your social media following that generates all of the word of mouth results, and by results we mean conversions, not just reach.”

Stop Trying to be Human– Try Being Useful [from Social Media Explorer; written by Tracey Parsons]

 “It is however, un-natural to “engage” with a product or brand. I almost never talk to my pillow. I occasionally talk to my treadmill, but not in a nice, friendly way. So, let’s drop this whole notion of being more human and try instead to be useful.”

The art of storytelling in 6 content marketing context questions [from Fusion Marketing Experience; written by J-P De Clerck]

“Do brands create stories? Or do stories create brands?”

3 Reasons Your Brand Should Be Using Video On Twitter Right Now [from All Twitter; written by Lauren Dugan]

Video can make it possible to create an in-platform experience to connect with your fans, followers, and customers.

Pins, Tweets, and the Law [from TheBuzzBin; written by Dave Folkens]

A must-read if you’re planning a social contest:

“The issue for the brand in this case, and for all brands across any social network or site online, is disclosure and transparency of the connection between an activity and the incentivized nature of that action. Would a Pinterest user potentially create a board of fashionable shoes they liked? Absolutely. If the reason for the board, though, is a chance to win a prize, then they are essentially advertising to followers on behalf of the brand. Based on FTC guidance within its .com disclosures material, social media pins or posts are equivalent to providing an endorsement of the products. The use of a hashtag as part of the contest was also required and some might argue that was enough to identify that it was a promotion but it didn’t clearly indicate the potential financial connection so it failed in that sense of the disclosure. So while the brand was not (in my opinion) trying to deceive or trick users, it did not meet the true standard of the disclosure guidelines.”

Plus two more pieces on Pinterest from Social Media Today: Pinterest: The Gentler, Kinder Side of Consumer-Generated Endorsements and 9 Marketing Tips for Pinterest.

The Social Media and Device Facts You Need In 2014 [from Heidi Cohen]

“. . .what’s critical for marketers using social media and content marketing is that consumers want the content they choose on the device of their choice when they want it.

Emphasis original.

How to Succeed with Snapchat Marketing [from Social Media Today; written by Chris Syme]

An in-depth breakdown of marketing on the platform famous for its ephemeral content.

Written by Sarah

April 25th, 2014 at 9:38 am

The Week in Social Analytics #98

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

25 Small Business Social Media Trends You Need [from Heidi Cohen]

“Due to smaller size and lower amount of resources, these firms tend to take advantage of social media opportunities faster than their larger competitors.”

Instagram for Small Businesses: Your New Best Friend [from Social Media Today; written by Stephanie Jones]

“People love visual content, so that makes Instagram the ideal social media marketing platform for small businesses.  It’s also currently a completely free way to market your business to potentially millions.  Follow people, engage and you will have an impassioned following before you can say hashtag.”

More Tips for Avoiding and Containing Social Media Crises [from PR Newser; written by Patrick Coffee]

Social media often rewards wit and a little bit of attitude, but how can editorial standards and monitoring allow a brand to be interesting without being risky or offensive?

Wit should be reserved for brand messaging, but never for customer service. Those coming to customer service are in need of support and aren’t looking for a witty response, but a solution to their problem or an answer to their question.

It’s a much more difficult and dangerous venture to be witty or snarky with customer service when the main goal is supporting your customer.”

25 Customer Chat Tips to Reassure and Nurture Your Online Customers [from KISSMetrics; written by Kevin Gao]

“Live chat has been around for more than a decade, but only recently have companies discovered its profound effect on website conversion rates. A recent eMarketer paper cited live chat as being directly related to 38% of online purchases. And, 62% of consumers who have used live chat said they would be more likely to purchase again from the merchant who provided the service.”

How to Use Snapchat for Business [from C-Leveled; written by Regina Lizik]

“This makes Snapchat perfect for retail establishments that target a younger audience, like clothing stores, can share coupons and give sneak peaks of upcoming merchandise.”

STUDY: Cause Marketing Creates Brand Loyalty Among Millennial Women  [from PR Newser; written by Patrick Coffee]

“54% of Millennial women switched brands because it supported a #cause they care about.”

Written by Sarah

April 18th, 2014 at 9:33 am