The Union Metrics Blog

Archive for the ‘multi-platform’ tag

4 tips for visual content marketing across platforms

without comments

Merle coaster

From our Instagram account.

Whether you’re building or maintaining your brand voice online, cohesiveness is important. You need to create a consistent experience across social media channels, particularly in your visual content marketing tactics. To be successful in any social media channel, you need content that fits that channel. However, it’s time consuming and impractical to create brand new creative for every single social media platform you participate in. So it’s important to strike the balance between sharing carbon content copies on every social channel, and a taking a completely unique approach in each place.

If you don’t know where to start with your cross-channel content marketing, start with these four tips:

1. Know the best practices for images on each platform.

Audiences seem to like different image elements on different platforms; be sure you have the most up-to-date information about what performs well in each place. Get started with 4 tips for creating content that works across social channels (includes a list of resources for best practices on each platform) and see an example of a cross-platform campaign with The best back-to-school campaigns on Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr.

2. But your own analytics should take precedence.

If the best practice for a particular social channel tells you that photos without faces in them perform the best, but your audience engages more with photos that do have faces, then continue to include faces in your content. What your audience likes and responds to is always what you should design your content strategy around. Best practices simply give you a place to start from and something to test against.

3. Know what elements are important to tie your brand together.

Identify the elements you consider a key part of demonstrating the core values of your business and find a way to communicate that visually across platforms. Color schemes, fonts, framing, and even copy placement are all things to consider (consult your style guide, or build one). Tweak until everything feels just right, then make sure to incorporate enough in every new piece to make it clear that it’s your piece.

4. Tailor copy for every platform.

This is about visuals sure, but rarely do we post a visual without any accompanying words. Don’t just write up one caption or paragraph and paste it with the same photo everywhere you have a social presence. Tailor everything to fit what your audience has shown they like in each place. If you don’t know what that is, start testing and be sure to track your audience’s responses.

Written by Sarah

February 24th, 2015 at 9:04 am

How did the 2015 Golden Globes do on social media?

without comments

The 72nd annual Golden Globes aired last night and as usual the show didn’t disappoint, and neither did the social activity we tracked in conjunction with mhCarter Consulting and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association Yesterday 704k contributors posted 2.4M tweets about the Golden Globes for a unique potential reach of 361M and it wasn’t just the normals live-tweeting the show either; a lot of celebrities weighed in on everything from the winners to what the show should be called, making for an extra entertaining evening. The most retweeted tweets included this from Demi Lovato about Gina Rodriguez’s win for Jane The Virgin:

This year’s Cumberbatch photobomb courtesy of Entertainment Weekly:

Oprah’s approval of Common’s acceptance speech:

And regular Twitter funny man and Vampire Weekend frontman Ezra Koenig’s critique of the show’s name:

The official Golden Globes Twitter account also encouraged fans to take a look at their Instagram account, where they posted more than a hundred behind-the-scenes photos. With the growing emphasis on visual content marketing, this was a very smart move and the payoff in engagement was huge. Yesterday the Golden Globes Instagram account posted 112 times and received 398k likes and 16k comments. That’s an average of more than 3,500 likes per post!

The most popular photo from the evening features Benedict Cumberbatch and Jennifer Aniston in the Instagram photo booth manned by photographer Ellen von Unwerth:

Golden Globes winners booth 15

Already, that photo alone has gotten more than 25k likes! (Instagram event takeaway: Hire a professional photographer to boost the quality of your event snaps, and boost your engagement to boot.)

9 out of the top 10 most popular posts were from the Instagram photo booth, and featured everyone from winners Amy AdamsMatt BomerGina RodriguezGeorge Clooney (Cecil B. Demille Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient) and Eddie Redmayne to attendees Adam Levine and Paul RuddJared Leto, and Kate Beckinsale.

The 10th most popular photo was Channing Tatum and Jenna Dewan Tatum on the red carpet.

The most popular hashtags around last night’s show highlight hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler and their bit starring Margaret Cho as a North Korean reporter for entirely real publication Movies Wow, in addition to expressing interest in the upcoming film 50 Shades of Grey:

  1. #goldenglobes
  2. #redcarpet
  3. #movieswow
  4. #merylstreep
  5. #margaretcho
  6. #benedictcumberbatch
  7. #50shadesofgrey
  8. #cecilbdemilleaward
  9. #amypoehler
  10. #tinafey

Meryl Streep is, of course, an eternally popular subject.

The most popular Twitter hashtags were similar, focusing on the red carpet and variations on the official broadcast hashtag, #GoldenGlobes:

  1. #GoldenGlobes
  2. #redcarpet
  3. #GoldenGlobe
  4. #eredcarpet
  5. #EWGlobes

The latter is Entertainment Weekly’s official Globes-related hashtag, similar to the approach we saw for Mashable and TechCrunch creating their own CES-related hashtags last week. E! News (#eredcarpet) always runs a popular red carpet countdown show prior to the beginning of the Globes and promotes their hashtags onscreen. (A best practice for any large-scale event, even if you’re just promoting them on conference-wide screens rather than national television.)

That brings us to the one big difference between the platforms: While official publications like People Magazine, MTV, E! Online, The New York Times, The Huffington Post, InStyle, Entertainment Weekly, Vogue, and the Today Show all featured in the top contributors to the Golden Globes conversation on Twitter, the top participants on Instagram were all fans who liked hundreds of photos tagged #GoldenGlobes. Compare that to an average of 4 tweets per contributor to the conversation on Twitter, fans and publications alike.

The Golden Globes successfully executed their social presence across platforms last night, drawing their engagement on Instagram to new heights using the established platform of Twitter. We can’t wait to see how their social strategy continues to grow and evolve in the next few years!

Want more Golden Globes? Check out our coverage for the 2014 show, 2013, 2012, and 2011, and marvel at how the social times have changed. 

Written by Sarah

January 12th, 2015 at 11:42 am

How to track share of voice and the competition across platforms

without comments

We’ve talked before about how to track your share of voice in the industry on Twitter (and how to increase it), but how do you monitor your share of voice and the competition across platforms? Here are some steps to get you started doing just that. Have questions or something we didn’t cover here? Leave it in the comments, find us on Twitter, or email us!

 First: Identify keywords for your industry

If you’re in marketing, for example, start with broader terms like “marketing” and then look at the more specific terms you’re interested in, such as “social media marketing” and “content marketing”. Who is talking about these things? What hashtags go with them? (We’ll get more into this one in the next step.)


Make a list of these keywords and hashtags to set up your tracking with. You don’t have to come up with them off the top of your head, either; searching one in Twitter’s search bar, for example, will turn up the top tweets associated with that term and show you with other terms and hashtags those top tweeters are using. This helps you narrow down your list much quicker!


Alternatively, you can start or supplement by browsing the timelines of big names in your industry and seeing what keywords and hashtags they use.

Second: Ask, are these keywords and hashtags the same across platforms?

Popular hashtags are rarely the same across all platforms, with the exception of big ones like #TBT. The group of people you might want to be found alongside in an audience member’s search result might be using #smm on Twitter, something else entirely on Tumblr, and nothing like that at all on Instagram, because your competitors are using that particular platform to show off their company culture. Do your due diligence in research to find out what exactly you need to be tracking in each place.

#contentmarketing Ig

Who is using this hashtag on Instagram? Is it your competitor, or those in a different industry?

And don’t worry too much if it isn’t obvious at first; you can always adjust as you keep going. This is just to get started!

Third: Set up trackers for benchmark numbers

To know what your share of voice is you’re going to need some starting numbers to work from, or benchmarks. Set up a tracking system- something like our TweetReach Pro Trackers would work wonderfully to keep an eye on several conversations- to capture the conversation around the key terms and hashtags you identified earlier, then monitor these over time and compare how often your brand appears in conversation versus that of your competitors.

TR Tracker content marketing

TweetReach Pro doesn’t just cover Twitter conversations either; it can keep track of content posted on Twitter from other platforms, like links shared from Tumblr or Instagram photos. If you do want a comprehensive suite to track your keywords and hashtags in each place, we can help with that.

Fourth: Analyze and recalibrate

Once you have a good chunk of data to work with, ask yourself some questions, such as:

  • Are you using the popular hashtags you already identified to their full potential in the posts you’re making across platforms?
  • Who else is regularly using these hashtags; are you already following them? Do you engage them in conversations? (Start doing this if you aren’t already!)
  • What about your competitors’ strategy can you emulate; a certain posting style, or frequency? Test this alongside what your results tell you that you’re doing well.

If you’re using TweetReach Pro, you can find the answer to which other popular hashtags to use and who the top contributors are in the conversation- to include in your conversation- in their respective sections of the Tracker:

SM Analytics Top Hashtags

Are you tracking and using these hashtags?

SM Analytics Top Contributors

Are you following, listening to and engaging with these top contributors to the conversation you’re monitoring?

Additionally you can see how active these influencers are on other platforms, and how they’re contributing to the conversation in each place. A personal brand might have a strong following on Twitter, but only use Instagram for photos of family, friends and hobbies.

One more thing

Don’t have the budget to go TweetReach Pro? If you time it right, you can compare free or full snapshot reports from regular intervals to get at least a slice of the conversation. While real-time, ongoing analytics that can encompass an entire conversation are more comprehensive and will give you much richer data, small slices give you a starting point!

Written by Sarah

December 9th, 2014 at 10:24 am

4 tips for creating content that works across social channels

without comments

Every time we’ve discussed running a campaign across social media platforms, we’ve emphasized how important it is to tailor content for your audience in each particular space. The kinds of content that perform extremely well on Facebook might not have the same effect on Tumblr, and vice versa. We understand, however, that not every department has the resources to create custom content for each channel. With that in mind we offer these tips for creating content that only requires some tweaking on each platform.

1. Start with visual content.

Visual content is striking and memorable, and it works well on all social media platforms. Even on Twitter, which is typically considered more of a text-based channel, tweets with photos perform better than those that don’t. If you don’t have the time to create custom content for each channel, then start with an image with some visual impact that you can use across social media. You can pair it with different taglines or headlines in each channel (more on that shortly).

2. Choose an image that will have impact across platforms with some simple adjustments.

Keep in mind what types of images work best on each platform. Does your audience respond well to long, vertical images without faces on Pinterest, but engages more with photos that includes faces on Instagram? Work with the same image and crop or edit it so it has maximum impact in each place.

Experiment with text placement, as well. Do photos with text superimposed over them do better on Instagram, or should you leave all the text in the caption? What about on Pinterest, Twitter, or Tumblr? Pay attention to how text placement performs on different social networks, and adjust your plan for the next time.

3. Tweak your tagline for each platform.

Start with some basic copy about your campaign, and then tweak the wording so it works the best in each channel. Keep it short and snappy for Twitter, avoid using a wall of hashtags on Instagram, leave the hashtags off entirely for Facebook, and don’t let the ability to make a long post on Tumblr let you think that’s the best place for it. If you haven’t tested long-form content on Tumblr before, now might not be the best time to do so. Do what’s best for your brand and a particular campaign with the resources that you have. (After the campaign is over? Test away!)

If you have a unique campaign or event hashtag, it’s a good idea to use the same hashtag across social media platforms. But if you’re using more general hashtags to participate in existing conversations, you may want to use different hashtags on different social media sites, even if you’re pairing those tags with the same image across channels.

4. Work from industry research about visual and content copy in each place.

Definitely base your content decisions on the data you collect from your own followers’ engagement, but don’t be afraid to also use what you know more generally about what your target audience likes in each place. Here are some resources to get you started:

Coupled with your own analytics about what your current, ideal and target customers respond to in each channel, you should be receive the maximum impact with the minimum amount of work!

Got questions or examples of campaigns you’ve pulled off using similar tactics, or something we missed? Leave it in the comments. 

Written by Sarah

October 21st, 2014 at 9:10 am

Marketing your conference across platforms: Snapchat and Pinterest

without comments

While Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr are the main three platforms brands tend to work with, other brands are making strides in places like Snapchat and on Pinterest. If you have the resources to play around with these platforms in addition to the big three- or if you know that’s where you audience spends a large amount of their time- take the opportunity to see what you can do in these places to supplement and enhance everything you’re doing elsewhere. They’re particularly fun platforms to utilize in a cross-platform campaign.


We’ve covered the basics and specifics for brands on Snapchat, as well as showing which brands are using it well. Snapchat is a perfect way to keep in touch with event attendees in a lighthearted way throughout a conference; you can send snaps showing upcoming events, or recapping a session or a cocktail party. You can ask for snaps back in order to share free drink tickets or admission to a packed keynote; your creativity is the limit on Snapchat in terms of interaction with your followers. Like Instagram, it’s a great way to show off the atmosphere and get future attendees more interested in booking their trip for the next year.

It’s also a great way to foster conversations between attendees; intimidating names in a field can seem more approachable to build a connection with when they’re willing to send a silly snap.

Photo 6-25-14, 11 59 11 AM


A snap from Mashable attending a Google event in San Francisco. 

Just be sure you’re letting attendees know ahead of time across your other platforms that you’re on Snapchat, because most won’t think to look for you there. Having signage up around your conference will also let attendees know where to find you across platforms, and keep official hashtags in play, making post-event tracking easier for you!


Pinterest is a great way to help attendees get organized around a conference; build boards for them so they know what to pack, and what sites to see around town if they decide to come a few days early or stay a few days after. You could even encourage speakers to build their own boards around their areas of expertise, driving traffic back to their sites and letting attendees have a better idea of who they are and what their professional and personal focuses are.

SXSW Pinterest


An example of a Pinterest board from SXSW, showing off photos from Instagram and helping attendees figure out what to pack. 

The number and variety of boards you want to build up for your event is up to your creativity, time, and resources. Also keep in mind that Pinterest is great at driving sales, so pinning books your speakers have written after an event is a good idea as well as the same kind of snappy visual reminders you put on Instagram around deadlines for ticket prices.

The bottom line

The bottom line remains the same as in our previous post covering the big three social marketing platforms (aside from Facebook): Play to the strengths of every platform you have a presence on, but especially with these two, don’t be afraid to get creative and have fun.

If you have any questions or examples of great conference marketing we missed, please leave it in the comments!

Written by Sarah

July 15th, 2014 at 8:36 am