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3 non-traditional use cases for TweetReach historical analytics

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We’ve already looked at 5 ways to use our premium historical analytics, including an in-depth look at how to use them to build brand voice, and now we want to go over some more non-traditional use cases for them.

Even if you’re part of a more traditionally minded marketing team, these could inspire some new approaches to your content strategy. Plus, we’ve paired each of these use cases with a more traditional marketing takeaway.

1. Journalism

Use our historical analytics to see how a story broke out on Twitter, and how it spread. How did the people on the ground at the incident share information? Did local and national news sources communicate with them and contact them to be interviewed for newscasts, or did they send their own people ? How were those journalists’ social media reports different from those of civilian witnesses? A journalist who was on Twitter when a story broke and might have most of this information cataloged in screenshots already could use our historical analytics to fill in any remaining gaps in the story. New story leads or witnesses could be discovered in this way, and investigated or interviewed.

Traditional marketing takeaway: This is the same style of research you can employ to see how a social crisis broke and spread on Twitter, and help build your own crisis communication plan accordingly.

2. Comedy

Running low on material? Reach back through past periods on Twitter to rework some old jokes into something new for your next standup show or writing gig. Likewise you can look at another funny person you admire’s timeline to see how their skills developed over time, inspiring new joke styles, approaches to writing, or even just timing.

Traditional marketing takeaway: If it fits with your brand, don’t be afraid to be funny. Have you used humor in your content strategy in the past? See how those tweets performed vs. neutrally toned tweets that were conveying similar types of information. If it doesn’t fit with your brand, don’t force it.

3. Charity

Running a charity campaign on social media is tricky; you want to strike just the right balance of reaching the maximum amount of people in and just outside of your network who might be interested in contributing, without annoying them. Know of a campaign that nailed it? Use historical analytics to sample their campaign, or even study the entirety of it and model your own approach after theirs.

Traditional marketing takeaway: Use this same approach to study a past campaign that your company- or a competitor- has run either successfully or to lackluster results. What worked and what didn’t? Use that to inform how you plan and execute your next campaign in the same space.

Want to get started and learn more?

Fantastic! You can read more about our premium historical analytics here, and even request a quote. And remember, we can analyze anything and everything ever posted to Twitter, all the way back to the very first public Tweet posted in March 2006.

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Written by Sarah

October 14th, 2014 at 11:39 am

The Week in Social Analytics #75

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Twitter News Consumers: Young, Mobile and Educated [Pew Research Journalism Project; written by Amy Mitchell and Emily Guskin]

“Nearly one-in-ten U.S. adults (8%) get news through Twitter, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center, in collaboration with the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Compared with the 30% of Americans who get news on Facebook, Twitter news consumers stand out as younger, more mobile and more educated.”

Ten Ways in Which Your Tumblr Blog Can Help in SEO [from Social Media Today; written by Mark Scott]

“Tumblr essentially functions as a secondary blog you can use solely for the purpose of SEO. You can send optimized links back to the main website, allowing your website’s reach to expand and incoming traffic to multiply. What makes Tumblr great for SEO is the inbuilt promotion and SEO-friendly features that it comes packed with by default.”

And here’s a response on that from JD Rucker on Soshable: Tumblr as an SEO Tool.

Our Tumblrs, Our Teenage Selves [from New York Magazine; written by Ann Friedman]

“Way back in 1977, Susan Sontag wrote that  ‘industrial societies turn their citizens into image-junkies; it is the most irresistible form of mental pollution.’ And the notion has persisted. The never-ending stream of social-media images is routinely declared a symptom of our collective narcissism or intellectual weakness. Again, perhaps we can take a cue from teenage girls. They’re quite aware that they’re seen as frivolous and self-absorbed, but on a deeper level they know they’re engaged in an important project: figuring out who they are and what they want to be. If we took our Instagrams and Snapchats and reblogs half as seriously as they do, perhaps we’d reach some new insight about our adult selves, too.”

LinkedIn and Tumblr: Tips for Effective Video Marketing [from OnlineVideo.net; written by Shelley M. Johnson]

“This is the art of becoming ubiquitous as a brand. When marketing video, there are more networks to rely on than just YouTube, Twitter, and Vine. Some marketers see this as unchartered territory, but what they fail to realize is that other platforms can be just as effective, if not more.”

It’s a Wide, Wide, Wide, Wide Social Media World: 4 Things You Probably Didn’t Know [from The Measurement Standard]

“Despite being blocked in China, the major social networks still have many millions of Chinese active users who use various stratagems to access these services. Google+ has 100 million users in China, Twitter has 80 million, and YouTube has 60 million.”

The Evolution of Visual Storytelling [from The Buzz Bin; written by Erin Hurley-Brown]

“Our current students see no difference between working traditionally and digitally, they simply see them as different media. Where 10 years ago, an illustrator might have chosen to work in gouache or oils, they now choose to work traditionally or digitally, and that may switch from one assignment to the next.”

Cats Are Over: Social Media in the Post Cat Economy [from The Webby Awards]

Say it ain’t so! The Webby Awards presents their first social media report and presents the notion that we’re living in a post-cat economy. Regardless of whether you agree, it’s a great read with a lot of examples and tips from top brands in social media.

Instagram ads and the future of brand advertising [from Gigaom; written by  Om Malik]

“Systrom explained that in order for companies and their brands to be successful, they need to create Instagram-like content for the advertising campaigns. If the brands veer away from Instagram-i-ness, Systrom said they will run the risk of losing impact in a what is a very high-touch environment. The kind of ads and the number of times they will be shown to us will be key to community acceptance (or rejection) of advertising.”

Unlock the Potential of Real-Time Marketing [from Marketing Profs; written by Jenn Deering Davis]

“And there is good reason to take notice: Regardless of product or category, marketers who engage in real-time marketing can expect a 21% increase in positive brand perceptions and 18% increase in likelihood to buy (Golin Harris).

Real-time is not some marketing fad, but a natural progression of social media marketing and a great way for marketers to capitalize on the immense volume of social conversations. And a key part of unlocking the potential of real-time marketing is implementing social analytics that can help guide your media strategies.”

Do Retailers Understand Millennials? Are They Even Trying To? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Abstaining from any kind of research into this demographic – no matter how difficult it is to decipher – seems curious.”

Consumers Say They Respond to Online Ads With Actions Other Than Clicks [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Indeed, when respondents were asked how long they would generally wait until they researched a company or product whose ad they found interesting but did not click, a majority indicated they would wait longer than one hour, with a significant number doing so ‘days later.’”

Written by Sarah

November 8th, 2013 at 9:45 am

This Week in Social Analytics #55

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest – Complete Social Media Image Size Guide (Infographic) [from AllTwitter; written by Shea Bennett]

“This super-handy infographic from those nice folks at Tent Social contains, in their own words, ridiculously exhaustive social media design information (that’s image heights and widths to you and me) for Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Instagram and YouTube, all in one fact-packed blueprint.”

Definitely a handy resource to bookmark.

These Amazing Twitter Metadata Visualizations Will Blow Your Mind [from Fast Company; written by Neal Ungerleider]

“A second visualization shows language use on Twitter. Metadata from Twitter messages also tells the language the tweet was sent in. In the United Kingdom, most tweets are in English…except in London, where a cacophony of foreign-language tweets dominate the visualization. Across the channel in France, a blip of color shows up from the tourists and non-Francophone migrants in the seaside city of Calais.”

Global study shows more journalists embrace social media [from PaidContent.org; written by Jeff John Roberts]

“The Oriella Digital Journalism Study asked 553 journalists in 15 countries about their outlook and their publications, and reflects some interesting geographic differences. Here are some highlights:

  • 59 percent of journalists are tweeting in 2013, versus 47 percent in 2012.
  • Twitter use is highest in English-speaking countries, while barely a third of German journalists have a Twitter account.”

5 questions that nag social media marketers [from Ragan's PR Daily; written by Gini Dietrich]

“Social media isn’t about getting really good at Facebook and Twitter and YouTube and LinkedIn. It is about doing the job you’ve always done with the new tools available for you.”

Hidden Social Media Costs [from Heidi Cohen]

“Determining the true cost of social media as separated from other aspects of your business is tricky since existing resources often handle many of these functions. Even if it’s done poorly, social media take time and time means money. Without assessing the true cost of social media, it’s difficult to determine it’s true impact on your bottom line.”

Bonus: What do you think of the new Complete Social Media Measurement Standards put forward?

Written by Sarah

June 21st, 2013 at 9:46 am