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Archive for the ‘Instagram’ tag

The Week in Social Analytics #145

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content strategy 

Five more examples of interesting content from ‘boring’ businesses [from Econsultancy; written by Dan Brotzel]

Are you an “apparently unsexy business”? That doesn’t mean your content has to be boring. Get inspired by those who have already done it right.

Why Snapchat Should be the Inseparable Addition to Social Media Strategies [from Social Times; written by Rohan Ayyar]

“The value of a marketing platform for a brand can be gauged to a certain extent by asking these questions:

  1. Who are its primary users?
  2. How popular is it with them?
  3. Do these users fit the bill as your brand’s target audience?
  4. What is the closest alternative to target these users?

Now consider this:

Snapchat has a median user age of 18 years, with the majority of its users between 13 and 25 years of age. Facebook on the other hand, has an average user age of 40 years. The last few years in fact, have seen a sharp decline in teen users on Facebook.”

On visual content marketing 

4 Ways to Dramatically Improve Your Social Media Photos [from Convince & Convert; written by Jay Baer]

A great breakdown of photography basics in a fun and funny presentation. Bonus points for a Myspace reference.

10 Ways to Create Beautiful Content: Storytelling, Visuals and More [from Social Media Today; written by Julia McCoy]

Add DIY Videos to Your Content Pieces. Following the same approach, don’t hesitate to post videos that complement your written ideas and basically convey a very simple message: “I’m the author, I’m real, I’m here for you, my readers!” Whether you choose to record Skype interviews or combine text, images and music in simple programs such as Animoto to reach your audience, uncomplicated DIY videos will help you amplify your messages and boost their realness and overall power of seduction.”

An In-Depth Guide on How to Create Awesome Visual Content That Gets Noticed [from Jeff Bullas]

“. . .let’s be honest for a minute. At the end of the day, the meat is still what matters the most. This means that if the core message that your publication/post conveys is subpar, no amount of great visuals will make it popular.

If, on the other hand, you do know that what you’re publishing is worth of your audience’s time, good visuals can be the difference between making the piece mildly well received vs. making it a true hit.”

Emphasis added.

On stats 

US Instagram User Estimates, by Age Group, 2013-2019 [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“While eMarketer doesn’t forecast last year’s 60% growth rate being matched in the years to come, the platform should maintain double-digit growth until 2018, when it will exceed 100 million US users and reach almost one-third of the US internet population.”

eMarketer-US-Instagram-User-Estimates-by-Age-2013-2019-Mar2015

Written by Sarah

March 13th, 2015 at 9:07 am

Understand how Instagram content performs on Twitter using TweetReach

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The lamentations of Twitter display cards being turned off for Instagram posts may have died out, but the need to measure all aspects of a content marketing strategy has only intensified, particularly when it comes to the visual. So how can you track and measure your Instagram content’s performance on Twitter? Let us show you how, using TweetReach.

The basics of URL tracking with TweetReach

The best way to keep track via TweetReach of how an Instagram photo travels around Twitter is by tracking its URL. TweetReach Trackers can monitor up to 15 separate queries about a single campaign or topic, including one or more URLs. (Full details on setting up topic Trackers here.) Here’s an example of how to set one up for specifically tracking a single Instagram URL:

Instagram tracking

URL queries should be set up as url_contains:instagram.com/p/utBPU3D5cL or with the full URL in quotes, as in the screenshot above. (You can find more details about specific searches and URL queries here.) This will search for all tweets containing this URL or portion of URL. Be sure that you have the full URL for a particular photo you want to track, since just adding a basic Instagram address (instagram.com) would return information on every Instagram photo posted to Twitter, drowning out the results you want.

Also keep in mind that a Tracker will find all tweets that match any of your search queries and aggregate their metrics together in your Tracker, so make sure all the queries in a Tracker are related; in this case one or more Instagram photos, depending on if you want to track a single photo or a set. You can drill down into some details (usernames, hashtags, URLs, etc…) if you set up all the terms around a campaign, but summary metrics will be calculated for the entire set of tweets.

So if you really want to concentrate on the data for just your Instagram photos, consider setting up a separate Tracker for any hashtags or keywords.

What if I already have a Tracker running, and want to see how the Instagram content I’ve cross-posted is doing?

Great question! First, check the Top URLs section of your Tracker to see if any Instagram links are there:

UA Women links

 

If you don’t see any, don’t get discouraged. Clicking on the menu bar in the top right corner of that section (the three dots and three lines) will take you to a full list of URLs shared that is automatically ranked by impressions, but you can change that to reflect ranking by tweets, retweets, or contributors as you prefer.

UAWomen URLs

We recommend paying attention to how your Instagram and other visual content URLs rank depending on how you’ve sorted them. This way you can answer some questions about your content strategy so far: How many of your tweets contain Instagram URLs? Do those get retweeted more or less than those with other content type URLs? The answer to these questions can help you tweak your content strategy, including how often and how you share Instagram content via Twitter.

Find even more details

Click through on each high-ranking Instagram link to see what these high performing visual content pieces have in common. Is it a hashtag you used with all of them? The subject matter, like the inclusion of a celebrity spokesperson? It might even just be the lighting, tone (warm or cool), or absence or presence of people in the photos. Finding a common thread in your Instagram posts will let you know how to best present your content for the maximum impact on your audience.

This page will also tell you which day a link was posted when you hover over a spike in the display, letting you know if certain days of the week work better for certain content (because you should repeat these steps with every kind of content that you’re producing, from YouTube videos to blog URLs):

Instagram URL day posted

If you have fans and followers who independently share your Instagram URLs to their audiences, you’ll likely see this show up here since they can only share it after you have initially posted it. Watching the performance of a repost from your Instagram account can let you know which of your fans and followers have a strong following of their own. In time you can consider them for a brand ambassador partnership if appropriate, or see if they would be interested in using your product in a sponsored post. You can even just thank and reward them for being a dedicated follower.

The bottom line?

Keeping track of what kind of content consistently performs the best with your audience lets you know what kind of content to plan more of for the future. Knowing how your Instagram content is performing is simply one piece of that puzzle, which TweetReach can help put together.

Written by Sarah

March 10th, 2015 at 9:29 am

The Week in Social Analytics #144

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

Platform-specific pieces: 

5 Visual Storytelling Tips To Power Your Content Marketing On Facebook [from Jeff Bullas]

“. . .it’s becoming a necessity to be different. Your Facebook audience, while procrastinating their commitments ahead of them, will take out a few minutes to scroll through their News Feed. Most likely, they’ll skip anything uninteresting.

So with that in mind, you need to come up with content that’s well worth engaging with for an extended amount of time, which leads to the question:

How can your content break through the noise?

Instagram Will Top 100 Million US Users by 2018 [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Going forward, Instagram will also compete with other emerging social networks for attention among these younger demographics, and by extension, for brands’ ad dollars in reaching those demographics. However, over time, we believe Instagram’s straightforward and simple content feed has wider appeal across all demographics—no matter what age or level of digital savvy.”

emarketer Instagram

Do I need two Twitter accounts? [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

Addressed on both the “philosophical and practical” level.

On social strategy: 

How Small Businesses Should Be Using Social Media [from Social Times; written by Katherine Halek]

“What do you hope to gain from social media? If a high follower count or an overnight viral post is your idea of social success, you may learn the hard way that those things in themselves are not guaranteed to bring you more business. Instead of a one-hit wonder, your main focus should be meaningful interaction, with the end goal of building a dedicated fan base.”

On video marketing. So hot right now. 

3 Rules for Better Video Marketing [from Convince and Convert; written by Tyler Lessard]

“Online video is quickly becoming one of the most important and inventive parts of the modern marketing mix. It can seem daunting to dive into, but this report offers a good place to start for understanding how much more comprehensive video can be as a weapon in your arsenal when you approach it with a balance of strategy, integration, and measurement.

YouTube Stars More Influential Than Big-Screen Ones, Youth Say [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“There appears to be an age trend when it comes to following stars on social media, though: 13-year-olds are far more likely to follow a YouTube (59%) than TV/movie (32%) star, while the gap is closer for 14-17-year-olds (53% and 44%, respectively). Among 18-24-year-olds, slightly fewer follow YouTube (51%) than TV/movie (54%) stars.”

This has big implications for brands with certain target demographics who are looking to do celebrity partnerships.

DEFYMedia-YouTube-Stars-Influence-Youth-Mar2015

How did the 2015 Golden Globes do on social media?

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The 72nd annual Golden Globes aired last night and as usual the show didn’t disappoint, and neither did the social activity we tracked in conjunction with mhCarter Consulting and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association Yesterday 704k contributors posted 2.4M tweets about the Golden Globes for a unique potential reach of 361M and it wasn’t just the normals live-tweeting the show either; a lot of celebrities weighed in on everything from the winners to what the show should be called, making for an extra entertaining evening. The most retweeted tweets included this from Demi Lovato about Gina Rodriguez’s win for Jane The Virgin:

This year’s Cumberbatch photobomb courtesy of Entertainment Weekly:

Oprah’s approval of Common’s acceptance speech:

And regular Twitter funny man and Vampire Weekend frontman Ezra Koenig’s critique of the show’s name:

The official Golden Globes Twitter account also encouraged fans to take a look at their Instagram account, where they posted more than a hundred behind-the-scenes photos. With the growing emphasis on visual content marketing, this was a very smart move and the payoff in engagement was huge. Yesterday the Golden Globes Instagram account posted 112 times and received 398k likes and 16k comments. That’s an average of more than 3,500 likes per post!

The most popular photo from the evening features Benedict Cumberbatch and Jennifer Aniston in the Instagram photo booth manned by photographer Ellen von Unwerth:

Golden Globes winners booth 15

Already, that photo alone has gotten more than 25k likes! (Instagram event takeaway: Hire a professional photographer to boost the quality of your event snaps, and boost your engagement to boot.)

9 out of the top 10 most popular posts were from the Instagram photo booth, and featured everyone from winners Amy AdamsMatt BomerGina RodriguezGeorge Clooney (Cecil B. Demille Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient) and Eddie Redmayne to attendees Adam Levine and Paul RuddJared Leto, and Kate Beckinsale.

The 10th most popular photo was Channing Tatum and Jenna Dewan Tatum on the red carpet.

The most popular hashtags around last night’s show highlight hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler and their bit starring Margaret Cho as a North Korean reporter for entirely real publication Movies Wow, in addition to expressing interest in the upcoming film 50 Shades of Grey:

  1. #goldenglobes
  2. #redcarpet
  3. #movieswow
  4. #merylstreep
  5. #margaretcho
  6. #benedictcumberbatch
  7. #50shadesofgrey
  8. #cecilbdemilleaward
  9. #amypoehler
  10. #tinafey

Meryl Streep is, of course, an eternally popular subject.

The most popular Twitter hashtags were similar, focusing on the red carpet and variations on the official broadcast hashtag, #GoldenGlobes:

  1. #GoldenGlobes
  2. #redcarpet
  3. #GoldenGlobe
  4. #eredcarpet
  5. #EWGlobes

The latter is Entertainment Weekly’s official Globes-related hashtag, similar to the approach we saw for Mashable and TechCrunch creating their own CES-related hashtags last week. E! News (#eredcarpet) always runs a popular red carpet countdown show prior to the beginning of the Globes and promotes their hashtags onscreen. (A best practice for any large-scale event, even if you’re just promoting them on conference-wide screens rather than national television.)

That brings us to the one big difference between the platforms: While official publications like People Magazine, MTV, E! Online, The New York Times, The Huffington Post, InStyle, Entertainment Weekly, Vogue, and the Today Show all featured in the top contributors to the Golden Globes conversation on Twitter, the top participants on Instagram were all fans who liked hundreds of photos tagged #GoldenGlobes. Compare that to an average of 4 tweets per contributor to the conversation on Twitter, fans and publications alike.

The Golden Globes successfully executed their social presence across platforms last night, drawing their engagement on Instagram to new heights using the established platform of Twitter. We can’t wait to see how their social strategy continues to grow and evolve in the next few years!

Want more Golden Globes? Check out our coverage for the 2014 show, 2013, 2012, and 2011, and marvel at how the social times have changed. 

Written by Sarah

January 12th, 2015 at 11:42 am

#CES 2015 on Instagram and Tumblr

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On Tuesday we looked at the conversation around early #CES2015 tweets, but this year for the first time we also wanted to look at the conversation on other networks.

Curious?

See how the early conversations on Tumblr and Instagram differ from the conversation on Twitter, and leave your thoughts in the comments.

 

MBUSA Instagram CES 2015

Photo from Mercedes-Benz USA Instagram account.

 

Written by Sarah

January 8th, 2015 at 8:53 am

Posted in Events

Tagged with , , , ,

Try our free Instagram analytics!

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Did you know we also provide Instagram analytics at Union Metrics? We do! In addition to the TweetReach Twitter analytics you know and love, we offer a number of social media analytics for other platforms, including Instagram. And we’ve just launched a brand new – FREE – Instagram account checkup that lets you see how you’re doing on Instagram.

Run your free Instagram account checkup report here

Learn the best time to post to Instagram

 

We’ll run a quick analysis of recent activity on your Instagram account and report back with analytics on things like:

  • The best time to post to your account
  • The hashtags that result in the most likes and comments
  • The people who engage with your content the most
  • Your posts that have received the most (and the least) engagement

See how your Instagram content performs! Try it for free now.

And of course, if you’re interested in our professional options, we have Instagram analytics subscriptions starting at just $99 per month. You can learn more and see our pricing here.

Written by Jenn D

December 29th, 2014 at 9:00 am

Posted in News

Tagged with , ,

Announcing our new free Instagram account checkup & updated Instagram analytics dashboard!

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We’ve got two huge pieces of news! First, we just launched our brand new free Instagram account checkup tool. Second, we’ve released a big update to our pro Instagram analytics. Read on for more about both.

Free Instagram Account Checkup

Today we released our brand new free Instagram account checkup! Just sign in and you’ll get a quick report with stats and insights about your Instagram activity. This is our first free Instagram analytics offering, and we’re really excited about it. With our new free report, you’ll be able to answer questions like:

  • When’s the best time to post to Instagram?
  • Who are your top fans?
  • Which hashtags get the most engagement?
  • What kind of content should you post?

Get your free Instagram account checkup now! You’ll have fresh, hot insights in just two minutes.

Account Checkup Hashtag Detail

Above, an example of your hashtag insights, and below, an example of insights into the best time for you to post. Account Checkup Time to Post Detail

Updated Analytics Dashboard for Pro Subscribers

We’ve also just rolled out a big update for our paid Instagram analytics subscribers. Our new top-level dashboard includes an insight stream that automatically highlights key metrics and helps you decide exactly what to do next to improve engagement. It also includes at-a-glance Tracker comparisons and trend data across all accounts or hashtags you’re monitoring. The new additions will help you learn more about:

  • What posts, videos and hashtags are popular
  • Who’s active or influential in a particular community
  • How one Instagram account’s performance compares to others
  • Important changes in metrics like follower growth and likes or comments
  • Exactly what to do next to improve post engagement

If you’re interested in trying our professional Instagram analytics out for yourself, plans start at just $99 per month and you can learn more here.

Dashboard Overview

Please let us know if you have any questions or want to see a demo!

Written by Sarah

December 4th, 2014 at 9:02 am

NFL fans and Instagram: 5 steps to follow fan activity

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NFL fans

From the @nflfanstyle Instagram account, a good start at UGC content and fostering fan engagement

To keep your fans’ attention, you’ve got to meet them where they are, and they are definitely on Instagram. User-generated content is an important part of a robust social strategy that engages your fans and followers; it’s exciting for them to know that you’re paying attention to what they’re posting for a sports team that they love, and that they might even have a chance to be featured on an official account or win a prize from their activity.

Step 1: Follow the general #NFL hashtag on Instagram.

What kinds of content do you see? Click around on some of the photos, keeping an eye out for those that seem like they were posted (or at least taken, we’ll get to that in a minute) during a game. What do they have in common? You will want to pay attention to those that fall into two categories: Those posted from an off-site watch party such as their home, a bar, or a friend’s house, and those posted from the stadium itself.

If your aim is to boost engagement from fans who are in the stadium during games, pay attention to the captions on photos, as well as the other hashtags being used. Are they posting a photo taken in the stadium, but uploading it from a different location after the game, or even days later, because they couldn’t get service in the stadium? The hashtag #latergram is a big indicator here.

What other hashtags should you look for? That’s in the next step.

Step 2: Check out related hashtags used on those #NFL posts.

What other hashtags are people using? If you see a lot of #latergram, you know you need to do something like implement better wifi in your stadium so fans don’t have to rely on using their cellphone data or an overcrowded network that isn’t reliable. Pay attention to any other recurring hashtags from the fans you’re wanting to connect with. Is there an organic hashtag they’ve created around their favorite teams or players? Which ones are you seeing over and over? Make a note of them, because you’ll need them in the next step.

Step 3: Track and listen.

Using something like our Union Metrics for Instagram analytics, set up some monitoring around the hashtags that specifically target the fans you want to reach. Concentrate on any hashtags fans have created and spread to one another. These will give you unparalleled insight into how fans discuss teams, players, and their overall experience with being an NFL fan.

Step 4: Implement a plan to increase engagement where you want it

Now that you have an idea of what the existing conversation is like, you can make a plan for how to improve it. Would more fans post during games if you improved wifi or cell service in the stadium? Do fans seek an incentive, like contests or social-only deals that go out during a game? How else can you increase engagement from fans?

Figure out what it is, make a plan, and make it happen.

Step 5: Measure, rinse, repeat.

Once you have some benchmark numbers from your initial analysis, make sure you keep checking to see if your engagement levels are increasing with each new step that you implement, like upgrading service connections in the stadium, for example, or before, during, and after a contest. This will tell you what’s working and what’s not, to let you know what you should keep doing more of and give you new ideas for content and strategy moving forward.

Anything else?

This doesn’t just apply to the NFL either; these same steps can work for college football or any other sports you’re interested in.

Have specific questions about how to make that happen, or how you can start using our Union Metrics for Instagram analytics? Leave us a comment, or shoot us an email. We’re always happy to help!

Written by Sarah

November 24th, 2014 at 8:23 am

The Week in Social Analytics #128

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

On content strategies. 

Harnessing the Power of Micro-Content [from dustn.tv; written by Dustin W. Stout]

“A good content marketing strategy incorporates regular micro-content distributed throughout social media that will keep your audience engaged.”

Read on for what makes a great micro-content strategy.

3 Unique Ways Brands Are Approaching Content Creation [from Convince and Convert; written by Jessica Gioglio]

“From offering a free place to stay in exchange for original content, to building dedicated content studios and partnering with creators, these companies are showcasing the value of re-evaluating how content is produced while aligning with brand goals and consumer interests.”

Use these examples to inspire your own strategy.

Convince Your Boss To Use Video Content Marketing [from Heidi Cohen]

“. . .video content supports sales, based on the following data about US adults from Animoto.

  1. 94% have watched a video in the last week.
  2. 73% are more likely to purchase after viewing a video. (Note: Other research showed that 53% of respondents were influenced to purchase by a YouTube video.)
  3. 83% prefer videos that are 5 minutes or less in length. (Note: Informational videos must be short to grab your audience’s attention. You must engage them within the first 20 seconds or they’re gone.)
  4. 58% believe that viewing a company video builds trust.
  5. 89% have shared an educational video.

A great roundup of research around video content marketing.

B2B-Content-Tactics-Used-2015-B2B-Content-Marketing-Benchmarks

 

via 2015’s B2B Content Marketing Benchmark survey by Content Marketing Institute and MarketingProfs

On social platforms. 

The Art of a Tweet, Part 2: Corporate Tweeting [from Social Media Today; written by Dana Strokovsky]

“Here are a few items to keep in mind when creating a social voice:

  • Content pillars
  • Filters (do’s and don’ts)
  • Categories and specific breakdown of audience
  • Platform consideration
  • Imagery guidelines”

How B2B Businesses Can Use Instagram [from Maximize Social Business; written by Jenn Herman]

“Instagram is about visually connecting with your audience. Find fun, unique, and creative ways to share your business through images and videos and you’ll be surprised at the results from your audience and customers.”

On marketing strategies. 

Fear Is The Biggest Barrier To Real-Time Communications [from Lewis PR; written by staff]

“‘This is our opportunity: we know about this real-time idea. Never as a profession have we had a bigger opportunity than right now to spread the idea of how important public relations is, throughout the organisation…The biggest barrier I see to all of this is that four letter word that begins with F. The biggest barrier is fear.’”

Watch the YouTube video directly here.

How To Execute The 80/20 Of Your Social Media Marketing [from Business 2 Community; written by Maria Peagler]

1. Identify Your Marketing Goals

Can you articulate the goals for your marketing? According to a recent survey of SMOC members, their top three business goals are:

  1. Grow their business
  2. Get more sales
  3. Develop a personal brand

Awesome! Now, exactly what is your plan for doing that?”

Top Five Questions Marketers Should Always Be Asking Themselves [from Marketing Profs; written by Preeti Upadhyaya]

“When you approach marketing decisions from your audience’s perspective, you’ll end up with much stronger, targeted messages that speak to your potential customers. And by asking these five questions every day, you will produce focused, targeted messages that convert your audience into customers.”

 

Written by Sarah

November 14th, 2014 at 9:39 am

The Week in Social Analytics #124

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Twitter and social television:

10 Secret #Twitter Tips, Tricks and Hacks (That You Probably Don’t Know) [from AllTwittr; written by Shea Bennett]

A good list of tips and tricks to browse, even if you’ve been on Twitter for years.

How SMBs Can Most Effectively Use Twitter [from V3; written by Shelley Kramer]

“. . .it’s also important to remember that prospective customers aren’t really interested in you singing your brand’s praises on Twitter. What they are looking for, however, and why they report they follow SMBs on Twitter is to learn about new products, show support for products and brands they already love and to get information they can use. Keep that in mind as you’re crafting your social media strategy and the content you create and share in social media channels. This research may be specific to Twitter, but I’d guess it can easily be extrapolated across other social media channels as well.”

Emphasis added.

Twitter and TV: 4 Ways to Make It Work [from Convince and Convert; written by Nick Cicero]

“As video becomes more fluid online, social engagement will become essential to finding and retaining loyal viewers for a show, as some have even said, social media is the new TV guide.”

Emphasis original.

Six ways social media is changing the nature of TV forever [from Econsultancy; written by Juliet Stott]

“Social media and social TV are two of the reasons why watching live TV is still so strong, says MTV Finland’s executive producer.

‘People cannot miss the show when it comes on air because they would miss the conversation – it’s part of the draw,’ says Rasimus.”

Instagram and Pinterest:

8 Business Growth Strategies for Instagram [from Social Media Today; written by Warren Knight]

Integration (social buttons on your site and cross-posting Instagram images to other social networks where you have a presence) is a key strategy in this list. After all, if your customers don’t know you’re on a platform, how can they follow you there?

Instagram Grows As Teens’ Social Network of Choice [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Roughly three-quarters of respondents reported using the visual platform, up from 69% in the previous survey.”

PiperJaffray-US-Teens-Social-Media-Preferences-Oct2014

The profile of Pinterest users [from We Are Social; written by Deniz Ugur]

“. . .almost two-thirds of users are in 16-34 age bracket and there are more women than men on the platform.”

Click through for the full infographic.

On digital storytelling and marketing psychology:

Harness the Power of Negativity Bias for Positive Marketing [from SHIFT Communications; written by JJ Samp]

“Your ability to resonate with your audience is enhanced by the finesse with which you can identify negative sentiment and gracefully associate it with a positive message.”

Baratunde Thurston on How to Make Digital Storytelling Fun [from Social Media Today; written by Mary Ellen Egan]

“. . .Baratunde emphasized the importance for companies to match their brand and their mission to their digital stories. If stories come off as inauthentic or tone deaf, consumers will revolt.”

Click through to watch the full video of his presentation.

Finally, some bonus stats on holiday shopping expectations:

Survey: Social Media To Influence Half Of Holiday Shoppers from Marketing Land and 41 percent of shoppers plan to spend more online this holiday season from Marketing Pilgrim.