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Bare-faced on Twitter & Instagram: Amy Schumer’s #GirlYouDontNeedMakeup

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On Tuesday a new episode of Inside Amy Schumer aired on Comedy Central, and in anticipation of this boy band parody sketch, Amy posted a no-makeup selfie on Twitter and Instagram asking her followers to share selfies of themselves without makeup on either platform with the hashtag #GirlYouDontNeedMakeup.

And the response has been as sweet as a boy band’s choreographed dance moves.

On Twitter

Since it started on Tuesday, more than 13,000 tweets have been posted with the #GirlYouDontNeedMakeup hashtag by more than 12,000 different people, for a potential reach of 40 million unique Twitter users*. Many of the most retweeted tweets came from Amy herself, Comedy Central, or big media and tech outlets like Mashable or Slate, but some came from non-celebrity hashtag participants: 

(Though of course funnyman Zach Braff did add his own somewhat inexplicable and terrifying entry.)

On Instagram

While fewer posts were made on Instagram in the same window, they still had quite the impact with a maximum potential reach of 1.5 million**. The three most popular posts with the #girlyoudontneedmakeup tag were these two from Amy and one from Comedy Central, respectively, but the rest were all from Instagram users sharing their no-makeup faces, not other branded accounts as on Twitter:

#girlyoudontneedmakeup #catyoudontneedmakeup #insideamy

A photo posted by Emily Gordon (@thegynomite) on

One of the most popular Instagram posts includes an important related hashtag, #catyoudontneedmakeup.

Have you posted your no-makeup selfie yet?

Brand takeaways

The smaller number of posts made on Instagram likely has a lot to do with the interconnected nature of Twitter as a platform with its built-in retweets vs Instagram’s third-party apps as the only option for regramming. Twitter’s constant flood of information also makes it acceptable to post original and curated content several times a day, making it more likely for others to see, share, and/or participate in a hashtag than with a more contained stream like Instagram where users are more selective with what they participate in and share.

Both of these are things to keep in mind when planning a campaign, either for a specific platform or to run across platforms; you want to play to the strengths of each.

 

*read more about how we calculate reach on Twitter here

**read about how our Instagram analytics hashtag trackers work here

Written by Sarah

April 30th, 2015 at 9:00 am

A social video guide for brands

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Putting a first generation iPod on a really old television is not a recommended video hosting platform. Image via Alexandre van de sande on Flickr; used with Creative Commons license.

Still not recommended. Image via Alexandre van de sande on Flickr; used with Creative Commons license.

So you want to get into video content marketing.

Those who are excellent at video content marketing make it look easy, leaving the uninitiated with high hopes and a crushing sense of reality once they start researching the work that goes into a well-executed and branded piece of video content. Should you be live-streaming? On Meerkat, or on Periscope? Should you be on both? What about Google Hangouts, is anyone still doing those? All the kids are on Snapchat, right? What about the more established longer-form video platforms like YouTube and Vimeo? Or Vine? And what about the social media platforms that have a video option, like Instagram and now Facebook? It can all be a little overwhelming. Let’s break it down, so you can figure out which social video platforms are right for your brand, based on your resources and goals.

First things first: What does each platform do?

Live-streaming platforms:

  • Meerkat: A live-streaming app where footage is not accessible later. Twitter pulled their official card access after launching their competing acquisition, Periscope, leaving some to speculate on Meerkat’s eventual fate.
  • Periscope: Owned by Twitter, it’s a live-streaming app with videos you can replay later. There’s a private broadcast option as well. (For a more in-depth comparison of Meerkat and Periscope, read this.)
  • Google Hangouts: Face-to-face video conversation where your broadcast is automatically recorded and uploaded to YouTube after you’re finished.

Prerecorded video platforms:

  • Vine: 6 seconds of glory, but recent research shows you only get about 3 to catch your audience’s attention, so don’t rule it out for length.
  • Instagram: Videos on Instagram are limited to 15 seconds, giving you a lot more creative room than on Vine.
  • Snapchat: Send quick snaps in video or photo form, or build bigger and longer stories using both; stories expire in 24hrs whereas snaps last for the duration set by the sender (up to 10 seconds). Recipients can replay one snap a day and they can save snaps by taking a screenshot, but it tells the sender you did so.
  • Facebook video: Facebook has recently launched their own native videos, which autoplay on the site (and the same 3-seconds-to-catch-your-audience’s-attention rule stands) but without volume. Another recent update has made their videos embeddable on other sites.
  • YouTube: The granddaddy of video, they’ve been moving into the original content space as more and more of the younger generation move away from traditional TV (and even admire YouTube personalities over celebs). YouTube offers a lot of tools for building your audience, advertising, and being part of the Google family makes it good choice for SEO rankings.
  • Vimeo: Another option for brands producing high-quality video is Vimeo, which gives you branded players and the ability to embed elsewhere as on YouTube. Here are Vimeo’s brand guidelines.

So what is each platform best for?

As more users adapt to these newer platforms and shift with changes on the established ones, they’ll come up with new and creative ways to use them. In the meantime, here are some ideas for how you can use each platform based on what we’ve seen in the wild. Choose according to your brand’s goals, the type of content you’ll be producing with the resources you have available, and first and foremost, where your audience is. Live-streaming

  • Meerkat: Livestream an event that’s part of a series to get people interested in coming next time- a conference series, or an interview with a well-known expert in your industry- but they have to buy a ticket to the next one or catch the stream in time. If an element of exclusivity works well with your brand’s audience, then this might be the best approach for you.
  • Periscope: Livestream a speech or presentation to increase your audience. Share the playback to your established audience that might have missed it, and be sure to watch it yourself to help you tweak your delivery for next time.
  • Google Hangouts: Google Hangouts function best for meetings and the recordings are often best suited for internal use or transcribing an interview. However, long pieces can be edited down into a summary and other usable pieces. It’s not a bad idea to start with longform content and repurpose it across other platforms, given you have the time and resources to do so.

Pre-recorded video 

  • Vine: Got a clever way to show a how-to or answer a question? Vine’s for you. (Econsultancy does a monthly roudup with great brand examples on Vine.)
  • Instagram: For creative that’s a little longer than 6 seconds that you want to fit into your overall visual brand, there’s Instagram. Post a clip from longer content, as mentioned above, share tips and tricks, or even produce a series of short videos like Gap did for their spring campaign.
  • Snapchat: If your target audience is young, then sending fun behind-the-scenes Snapchat stories is a great move embraced by a lot of the brands currently on the platform. Here are some other creative ways brands are using the platform, from Convince & Convert.
  • Facebook video: If your audience is dedicated to Facebook, you might want to consider making this your video content hub. If you’re already invested in YouTube, you can repurpose content from your channel for Facebook or experiment with Facebook-exclusive content. Here’s a great example of shifting strategy from PopSugar on Digiday.
  • YouTube: Your video hub- create a dedicated brand channel from which you can spin off side-channels, if that makes sense for your content strategy, brand, and resources- from which you can repurpose content into smaller, shorter videos for all the above, aforementioned networks.
  • Vimeo: ReelSEO has a great breakdown of the differences between YouTube and Vimeo for brands, depending on what your priorities are. If you’ve got the resources, consider optimizing videos for both.

What else should I know?

It’s probably worth mentioning the biggest con in live-streaming video: Not everyone is a natural in front of the camera and with the lack of editing available when you’re streaming live, well, unless you’re famous or dealing with extremely topical subject matter in an entertaining way it can be tough to find an audience. The golden rule of content applies here as it does everywhere else: Be sure you’re creating content that’s of value to your customers and making it available on the platforms where they prefer to spend their time. Put in the work to find out where that is, and what it is they want from you.

Any more questions?

Leave ‘em in the comments. Just remember to have fun; your audience can tell when you are.

The Week in Social Analytics #151

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On community management and employee engagement 

How to Bring Humor to Community Management [from Convince & Convert; written by Jessica Gioglio]

Community managers are uniquely positioned to look at how fans respond to humor on a daily basis and test different types of responses. Consider this a mini focus group to power a broader campaign or piece of content.”

Emphasis original.

When You Define Employee Engagement, Culture Improves [from Spin Sucks; written by Maddie Grant]

“Engagement is a result, not a variable.

It is a natural byproduct of a deep alignment among four things:

  1. The employee;
  2. The work he or she does;
  3. What is valued internally; and
  4. What drives the success of the organization.

Those last two are your culture, and most organizations fail to see how important that is to engagement.”

On content marketing

11 Content Marketing Mistakes to Avoid [from Cision; written by Jim Dougherty]

“Here’s my point: a lot of the content advice that you’ll read is either too broad or too specific to be of value to most people. What I want to do in this post is to identify 11 content marketing mistakes that you should avoid. I’ll caveat that by saying that each tip needs to be specific, applicable to most and correctable.”

Pair with What to Know Before Creating a Content Marketing Strategy also from Cision.

Maximize Your Content Creation Commitment [from Convince & Convert; written by Dorie Clark]

We’re all working with a limited amount of time in our lives, so leverage your investment in content creation. 

Stats on youths 

Targeting Teens? Get on Instagram [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“There’s still plenty of room for Instagram adoption among companies. Based on recent research by GfK for Pew Research Center, the platform presents brands with a good channel on which to reach teens. The study found that 52% of US teen internet users used Instagram—the second most popular social media platform among the group after Facebook (71%).”

teens on ig

Teens & Social: What’s the Latest? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

Good read looking at two recent studies from Piper Jaffray and Pew:

“In sum, it’s probably safe to assume that Facebook-owned properties (whether Facebook or Instagram) are among the most popular with teens, with Snapchat very much in the conversation. Twitter’s position seems a little more difficult to ascertain, although it’s clearly in the top 4.”

PiperJaffray-Teens-Most-Important-Social-Network-Apr2015

Pew-Teens-Most-Frequently-Used-Social-Network-Apr2015

Written by Sarah

April 24th, 2015 at 8:07 am

A social analytics option for every budget

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You’re probably familiar with our TweetReach snapshot reports. Maybe you even have a TweetReach Pro subscription. But did you know we offer a variety of other analytics options at Union Metrics, including analytics for Instagram and Tumblr, along with our Twitter analytics? That includes free Instagram and Twitter analytics reports! We have analytics tools perfect for every budget.

Everyone, $0

We offer free analytics reporting for both Twitter and Instagram!

On Twitter, our free snapshot reports are perfect for quick insight into recent tweets. A free snapshot report will include up to 50 tweets from the past few days. It’s great to get a sense of the size and rate of a conversation, as well as what people are tweeting about. You can search for anything that appears in a tweet – a hashtag, phrase, username, URL, etc… Run a snapshot report any time here: http:/tweetreach.com

On Instagram, we offer a free account checkup. Our free Instagram account checkup includes analytics on the last 30 days activity with your Instagram account. It’s great to help you see what’s working and how you can improve your Instagram account. You can refresh your report daily to get updated metrics. You can run your free Instagram account checkup here.

Account Checkup Small

Small to medium businesses, $20 – $400

We sell one-off Twitter snapshot reports for just $20 each. That will include analytics on up to 1500 tweets posted in the past days, so it’s perfect for recent events, smaller campaigns, research into conversation on a hashtag or Twitter account, and so on. Run a free snapshot report here, then you’ll get the option to purchase the full snapshot for $20.

We also have single-channel analytics plans that start at just $99 per month. That includes 2 concurrent real-time Trackers with up to 100,000 social posts* per month. At that plan level, you can pick one channel – Twitter, Instagram or Facebook. And if you select Twitter, your subscription also includes unlimited snapshot reports (normally $20 each). We offer a few plan levels, all under $400 per month, that include more Trackers and higher monthly post volumes. You can view our pricing here.

Enterprise, $500 and up

We offer a full social analytics suite for larger brands, agencies and businesses. It starts at $500 per month for 10 Trackers and 1 million social posts. Our social suite includes access to analytics for all the channels we work with (currently Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr), plus a variety of features perfect for enterprise use. Suite subscribers also get early access to new features and channels as we add them, and larger accounts will get access to a dedicated account manager. You can view our enterprise plans and pricing here.

 

*Social posts refers to the allotted post volumes each month. On Twitter, that includes all tweets, retweets and replies. On Instagram, that includes posts for a hashtag Tracker and posts plus likes for account Trackers. On Tumblr, that includes posts plus notes. If you have any questions about what volumes your topics might bring in, just let us know and we can help you pick the right plan for your needs.

Written by Jenn D

April 23rd, 2015 at 9:21 am

Where does Union Metrics social data come from?

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Ever wondered where we get the social data we build our analytics on at Union Metrics? Here’s a quick rundown on where our data comes from and what that means to you.

Twitter

We get all our Twitter data directly from Twitter! We’ve had a relationship with Gnip since 2011, and now that Gnip has been acquired by Twitter, we have a direct relationship with Twitter. Specifically, our Pro Trackers access raw Twitter data directly through Twitter’s commercial real-time streaming API, which means full-fidelity ongoing coverage of any tweets you’re interested in. Our historical analytics are built on Twitter’s commercial historical stream, which is full access to the entire Twitter archive. And our snapshot reports use Twitter’s public Search API, which includes up to 1500 tweets from the past days. (This also means Twitter’s recent announcement about cutting off external data providers won’t impact any of the Union Metrics or TweetReach products you use and love.)

Tumblr

Our Tumblr analytics are based on full-fidelity Tumblr firehose that we commercially license through Gnip. We’ve been consuming that firehose since the summer of 2012. That means you’ll have full coverage of all posts for any blogs or keyword-based topics you want to monitor on Tumblr. We’re also a Tumblr preferred data partner, which means that Tumblr has certified us as legit.

Instagram

At this time, Instagram does not provide a commercial firehose. However, we’ve built a custom robust system that works with the public Instagram API to deliver the closest thing to a full-fidelity streaming experience you’ll find for any Instagram analytics in the market. This means you’ll have full coverage analytics in real-time for the accounts and hashtags you’re tracking.

If you have any questions at all about our data, where it comes from or how it’s treated, please don’t hesitate to ask! We’re here any time you need us.

Written by Jenn D

April 16th, 2015 at 9:41 am

Posted in Help,TweetReach Tech

Tagged with , , ,

Making the most of new Union Metrics features – projects, dashboards and insights

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If you have a current Union Metrics account, you’ve probably seen a few of our new features – upgraded dashboards, project functionality, and our brand new insight stream. These new features become incredibly powerful when used together, so read on to learn more about how you can make the most of them in your account.

First, let’s start out with a little background on the new Union Metrics features. If you know this already, skip down to the example section to see it in action.

Projects

A project can be a campaign, a client, a project – any kind of logical grouping that makes sense to you. The idea behind a project is to group multiple related Trackers together to make it easier to view your results and share access with select others. Use projects to:

  • Track competitors and measure share of voice
  • Group a client’s Trackers together
  • Organize an internal program
  • Manage user access permissions across your account

There’s more here about how to manage projects in your Union Metrics account.

Another great feature of projects is that you can invite other users into them. You can also manage their access levels, so if you’d like to invite in a client or coworker to view your Trackers, but not edit them, you can do that. It’s a great way of sharing guest access to certain Trackers without worrying about someone editing your tracked terms or seeing data they shouldn’t.

Dashboard and insights

The dashboard is the top-level view of your account. It shows you how a set of Trackers compare at a glance, and highlights the important trends in your data. It’s meant to provide a quick view into what’s going on in your account, what’s working well, and what you can do next. The dashboard helps you understand:

  • Important changes in key metrics like follower growth, engagement and potential impressions
  • What posts and hashtags are popular
  • How one account’s performance compares to others
  • Who’s active or influential in a particular community
  • Exactly what to do next to improve engagement

The best part of the new dashboard is the insight stream. It pulls out actionable, data-based insights selected to help you identify important changes in key metrics and figure out what steps to take next to improve your performance. The insight stream includes information like spikes in impressions or engagement, above-average follower growth, hashtags that perform better than normal, and the best time for you to post.

You’ll have a dashboard-level view for your full account (that’ll be one dashboard for Twitter, one for Instagram, one for Tumblr, depending on what channels you can access in your Union Metrics account). But even better, once you’ve created a project and either moved existing or set up new Trackers in it, you can view a dashboard specifically for that project. That means all the insights and overview graphs will reflect only the data in Trackers in that project. It’s perfect to quickly identify trends and key information for a particular topic.

Now, an example

So, let’s take a look at how you can make the most out of projects, dashboards and insights in your Union Metrics account. Here’s an demo account, where we’ve set up a bunch of different projects. You can see them in the following screenshot, and yours are accessible through the the projects menu in the top right corner of your account. To view the dashboard and drill into any project, just click on its name there in the drop-down menu.

Union Metrics projects

Then you’ll be taken to that project’s dashboard. You can think of it like a home page for that project – it’s an overview of everything going on in this project, an at-a-glance view of trends and key insights. In this example, we’ve selected the TV project and are viewing all the Instagram Trackers we have in the TV project. That’s four television-related Instagram accounts, which you can see in this screenshot.

Union Metrics Instagram analytics dashboard

There’s a ton of information about our TV project here. First, a quick comparison of the four Instagram accounts we’re monitoring in this project. That’s shown on the left side, with a set of graphs comparing metrics for the four accounts, plus a numerical table of that data. You can see that the @anthonybourdain Instagram account gets the most engagement of the four accounts we’re analyzing, but isn’t doesn’t post as often as the other accounts do. @comedycentral and @teamcoco post a lot more often, but to fewer followers. You can also see several big spikes in engagement in the graphs; you can hover over those spikes to get more information, as shown above.

Next, on the right side of this dashboard, you can see the insight stream, which highlights some key moments in these Trackers, followed by the what’s hot section, which shows the most popular post, publisher, hashtag and participant in this Tracker. In the insight stream, there’s a spike in followers for the @comedycentral account, as well as a few hashtags that are performing well in other Trackers. Insights are updated regularly, so anytime anything interesting happens, we’ll capture it here in the insight stream. If you scroll through the existing insights, you’ll see these two:

Screen Shot 2015-04-13 at 3.47.40 PM

These are time of day insights that show when engagement with an Instagram account happens at a different time than that account posts. Here, you can see one time of day insight for @brooklyn99fox and another for @comedycentral. It looks like both accounts get engagement later in the day, and may want to consider posting content at those times to reach their audiences when they are most active. You can click on any insight to be taken to the Tracker report that corresponds to this data, so you could drill into either of these to see a full heatmap illustrating when engagement with a particular account happens.

Instagram account engagement heatmap

Finally, you can customize your dashboard by changing the Trackers selected and displayed, as well as reordering the Tracker listing table. For example, here we wanted to remove the @anthonybourdain account from our results, since it’s not a comedy-related Instagram account. Now we’re left with three Trackers, as seen here:

Union Metrics Instagram analytics competitive analysis

Now you can see more clearly how these comedy accounts compare to each other. @comedycentral, shown in orange, has the most followers, posts most frequently, and also gets the most engagement. But the @teamcoco account has several spikes in engagement that are higher than @comedycentral’s, which are definitely worth investigating. Any time you want to see more detail, you can view the data in a particular Tracker by clicking on its name there in the table.

Want to see more?

If you’re a current Union Metrics customer and you’d like to learn more about how you can use projects in your account, our customer success team would be happy to walk you through it! Just send us a note and we’ll set up a time to go over it

And there’s more on the way to make this analysis even richer, so stay tuned. We’ll have all kind of interesting updates over the next few months, particularly for our suite subscribers. (If you’re not using our full social suite yet, why not? We should talk.)

 

Written by Jenn D

April 13th, 2015 at 4:30 pm

The Week in Social Analytics #145

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content strategy 

Five more examples of interesting content from ‘boring’ businesses [from Econsultancy; written by Dan Brotzel]

Are you an “apparently unsexy business”? That doesn’t mean your content has to be boring. Get inspired by those who have already done it right.

Why Snapchat Should be the Inseparable Addition to Social Media Strategies [from Social Times; written by Rohan Ayyar]

“The value of a marketing platform for a brand can be gauged to a certain extent by asking these questions:

  1. Who are its primary users?
  2. How popular is it with them?
  3. Do these users fit the bill as your brand’s target audience?
  4. What is the closest alternative to target these users?

Now consider this:

Snapchat has a median user age of 18 years, with the majority of its users between 13 and 25 years of age. Facebook on the other hand, has an average user age of 40 years. The last few years in fact, have seen a sharp decline in teen users on Facebook.”

On visual content marketing 

4 Ways to Dramatically Improve Your Social Media Photos [from Convince & Convert; written by Jay Baer]

A great breakdown of photography basics in a fun and funny presentation. Bonus points for a Myspace reference.

10 Ways to Create Beautiful Content: Storytelling, Visuals and More [from Social Media Today; written by Julia McCoy]

Add DIY Videos to Your Content Pieces. Following the same approach, don’t hesitate to post videos that complement your written ideas and basically convey a very simple message: “I’m the author, I’m real, I’m here for you, my readers!” Whether you choose to record Skype interviews or combine text, images and music in simple programs such as Animoto to reach your audience, uncomplicated DIY videos will help you amplify your messages and boost their realness and overall power of seduction.”

An In-Depth Guide on How to Create Awesome Visual Content That Gets Noticed [from Jeff Bullas]

“. . .let’s be honest for a minute. At the end of the day, the meat is still what matters the most. This means that if the core message that your publication/post conveys is subpar, no amount of great visuals will make it popular.

If, on the other hand, you do know that what you’re publishing is worth of your audience’s time, good visuals can be the difference between making the piece mildly well received vs. making it a true hit.”

Emphasis added.

On stats 

US Instagram User Estimates, by Age Group, 2013-2019 [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“While eMarketer doesn’t forecast last year’s 60% growth rate being matched in the years to come, the platform should maintain double-digit growth until 2018, when it will exceed 100 million US users and reach almost one-third of the US internet population.”

eMarketer-US-Instagram-User-Estimates-by-Age-2013-2019-Mar2015

Written by Sarah

March 13th, 2015 at 9:07 am

Understand how Instagram content performs on Twitter using TweetReach

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The lamentations of Twitter display cards being turned off for Instagram posts may have died out, but the need to measure all aspects of a content marketing strategy has only intensified, particularly when it comes to the visual. So how can you track and measure your Instagram content’s performance on Twitter? Let us show you how, using TweetReach.

The basics of URL tracking with TweetReach

The best way to keep track via TweetReach of how an Instagram photo travels around Twitter is by tracking its URL. TweetReach Trackers can monitor up to 15 separate queries about a single campaign or topic, including one or more URLs. (Full details on setting up topic Trackers here.) Here’s an example of how to set one up for specifically tracking a single Instagram URL:

Instagram tracking

URL queries should be set up as url_contains:instagram.com/p/utBPU3D5cL or with the full URL in quotes, as in the screenshot above. (You can find more details about specific searches and URL queries here.) This will search for all tweets containing this URL or portion of URL. Be sure that you have the full URL for a particular photo you want to track, since just adding a basic Instagram address (instagram.com) would return information on every Instagram photo posted to Twitter, drowning out the results you want.

Also keep in mind that a Tracker will find all tweets that match any of your search queries and aggregate their metrics together in your Tracker, so make sure all the queries in a Tracker are related; in this case one or more Instagram photos, depending on if you want to track a single photo or a set. You can drill down into some details (usernames, hashtags, URLs, etc…) if you set up all the terms around a campaign, but summary metrics will be calculated for the entire set of tweets.

So if you really want to concentrate on the data for just your Instagram photos, consider setting up a separate Tracker for any hashtags or keywords.

What if I already have a Tracker running, and want to see how the Instagram content I’ve cross-posted is doing?

Great question! First, check the Top URLs section of your Tracker to see if any Instagram links are there:

UA Women links

 

If you don’t see any, don’t get discouraged. Clicking on the menu bar in the top right corner of that section (the three dots and three lines) will take you to a full list of URLs shared that is automatically ranked by impressions, but you can change that to reflect ranking by tweets, retweets, or contributors as you prefer.

UAWomen URLs

We recommend paying attention to how your Instagram and other visual content URLs rank depending on how you’ve sorted them. This way you can answer some questions about your content strategy so far: How many of your tweets contain Instagram URLs? Do those get retweeted more or less than those with other content type URLs? The answer to these questions can help you tweak your content strategy, including how often and how you share Instagram content via Twitter.

Find even more details

Click through on each high-ranking Instagram link to see what these high performing visual content pieces have in common. Is it a hashtag you used with all of them? The subject matter, like the inclusion of a celebrity spokesperson? It might even just be the lighting, tone (warm or cool), or absence or presence of people in the photos. Finding a common thread in your Instagram posts will let you know how to best present your content for the maximum impact on your audience.

This page will also tell you which day a link was posted when you hover over a spike in the display, letting you know if certain days of the week work better for certain content (because you should repeat these steps with every kind of content that you’re producing, from YouTube videos to blog URLs):

Instagram URL day posted

If you have fans and followers who independently share your Instagram URLs to their audiences, you’ll likely see this show up here since they can only share it after you have initially posted it. Watching the performance of a repost from your Instagram account can let you know which of your fans and followers have a strong following of their own. In time you can consider them for a brand ambassador partnership if appropriate, or see if they would be interested in using your product in a sponsored post. You can even just thank and reward them for being a dedicated follower.

The bottom line?

Keeping track of what kind of content consistently performs the best with your audience lets you know what kind of content to plan more of for the future. Knowing how your Instagram content is performing is simply one piece of that puzzle, which TweetReach can help put together.

Written by Sarah

March 10th, 2015 at 9:29 am

The Week in Social Analytics #144

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

Platform-specific pieces: 

5 Visual Storytelling Tips To Power Your Content Marketing On Facebook [from Jeff Bullas]

“. . .it’s becoming a necessity to be different. Your Facebook audience, while procrastinating their commitments ahead of them, will take out a few minutes to scroll through their News Feed. Most likely, they’ll skip anything uninteresting.

So with that in mind, you need to come up with content that’s well worth engaging with for an extended amount of time, which leads to the question:

How can your content break through the noise?

Instagram Will Top 100 Million US Users by 2018 [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Going forward, Instagram will also compete with other emerging social networks for attention among these younger demographics, and by extension, for brands’ ad dollars in reaching those demographics. However, over time, we believe Instagram’s straightforward and simple content feed has wider appeal across all demographics—no matter what age or level of digital savvy.”

emarketer Instagram

Do I need two Twitter accounts? [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

Addressed on both the “philosophical and practical” level.

On social strategy: 

How Small Businesses Should Be Using Social Media [from Social Times; written by Katherine Halek]

“What do you hope to gain from social media? If a high follower count or an overnight viral post is your idea of social success, you may learn the hard way that those things in themselves are not guaranteed to bring you more business. Instead of a one-hit wonder, your main focus should be meaningful interaction, with the end goal of building a dedicated fan base.”

On video marketing. So hot right now. 

3 Rules for Better Video Marketing [from Convince and Convert; written by Tyler Lessard]

“Online video is quickly becoming one of the most important and inventive parts of the modern marketing mix. It can seem daunting to dive into, but this report offers a good place to start for understanding how much more comprehensive video can be as a weapon in your arsenal when you approach it with a balance of strategy, integration, and measurement.

YouTube Stars More Influential Than Big-Screen Ones, Youth Say [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“There appears to be an age trend when it comes to following stars on social media, though: 13-year-olds are far more likely to follow a YouTube (59%) than TV/movie (32%) star, while the gap is closer for 14-17-year-olds (53% and 44%, respectively). Among 18-24-year-olds, slightly fewer follow YouTube (51%) than TV/movie (54%) stars.”

This has big implications for brands with certain target demographics who are looking to do celebrity partnerships.

DEFYMedia-YouTube-Stars-Influence-Youth-Mar2015

How did the 2015 Golden Globes do on social media?

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The 72nd annual Golden Globes aired last night and as usual the show didn’t disappoint, and neither did the social activity we tracked in conjunction with mhCarter Consulting and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association Yesterday 704k contributors posted 2.4M tweets about the Golden Globes for a unique potential reach of 361M and it wasn’t just the normals live-tweeting the show either; a lot of celebrities weighed in on everything from the winners to what the show should be called, making for an extra entertaining evening. The most retweeted tweets included this from Demi Lovato about Gina Rodriguez’s win for Jane The Virgin:

This year’s Cumberbatch photobomb courtesy of Entertainment Weekly:

Oprah’s approval of Common’s acceptance speech:

And regular Twitter funny man and Vampire Weekend frontman Ezra Koenig’s critique of the show’s name:

The official Golden Globes Twitter account also encouraged fans to take a look at their Instagram account, where they posted more than a hundred behind-the-scenes photos. With the growing emphasis on visual content marketing, this was a very smart move and the payoff in engagement was huge. Yesterday the Golden Globes Instagram account posted 112 times and received 398k likes and 16k comments. That’s an average of more than 3,500 likes per post!

The most popular photo from the evening features Benedict Cumberbatch and Jennifer Aniston in the Instagram photo booth manned by photographer Ellen von Unwerth:

Golden Globes winners booth 15

Already, that photo alone has gotten more than 25k likes! (Instagram event takeaway: Hire a professional photographer to boost the quality of your event snaps, and boost your engagement to boot.)

9 out of the top 10 most popular posts were from the Instagram photo booth, and featured everyone from winners Amy AdamsMatt BomerGina RodriguezGeorge Clooney (Cecil B. Demille Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient) and Eddie Redmayne to attendees Adam Levine and Paul RuddJared Leto, and Kate Beckinsale.

The 10th most popular photo was Channing Tatum and Jenna Dewan Tatum on the red carpet.

The most popular hashtags around last night’s show highlight hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler and their bit starring Margaret Cho as a North Korean reporter for entirely real publication Movies Wow, in addition to expressing interest in the upcoming film 50 Shades of Grey:

  1. #goldenglobes
  2. #redcarpet
  3. #movieswow
  4. #merylstreep
  5. #margaretcho
  6. #benedictcumberbatch
  7. #50shadesofgrey
  8. #cecilbdemilleaward
  9. #amypoehler
  10. #tinafey

Meryl Streep is, of course, an eternally popular subject.

The most popular Twitter hashtags were similar, focusing on the red carpet and variations on the official broadcast hashtag, #GoldenGlobes:

  1. #GoldenGlobes
  2. #redcarpet
  3. #GoldenGlobe
  4. #eredcarpet
  5. #EWGlobes

The latter is Entertainment Weekly’s official Globes-related hashtag, similar to the approach we saw for Mashable and TechCrunch creating their own CES-related hashtags last week. E! News (#eredcarpet) always runs a popular red carpet countdown show prior to the beginning of the Globes and promotes their hashtags onscreen. (A best practice for any large-scale event, even if you’re just promoting them on conference-wide screens rather than national television.)

That brings us to the one big difference between the platforms: While official publications like People Magazine, MTV, E! Online, The New York Times, The Huffington Post, InStyle, Entertainment Weekly, Vogue, and the Today Show all featured in the top contributors to the Golden Globes conversation on Twitter, the top participants on Instagram were all fans who liked hundreds of photos tagged #GoldenGlobes. Compare that to an average of 4 tweets per contributor to the conversation on Twitter, fans and publications alike.

The Golden Globes successfully executed their social presence across platforms last night, drawing their engagement on Instagram to new heights using the established platform of Twitter. We can’t wait to see how their social strategy continues to grow and evolve in the next few years!

Want more Golden Globes? Check out our coverage for the 2014 show, 2013, 2012, and 2011, and marvel at how the social times have changed. 

Written by Sarah

January 12th, 2015 at 11:42 am