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Archive for the ‘influencers’ tag

Finding fans and influencers on Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr

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One of the strongest forms of recommendation is still good old fashioned word of mouth, and the best way to cultivate that is to establish and strengthen relationships with your fans, followers, and brand advocates. The trouble is that they don’t usually take the time to message you announcing that they are going to recommend you to everyone now, so it’s up to you to pay attention to everyone discussing your brand— and that can be overwhelming.

The good news is, we’re here to help! And if you pay attention to the full conversation around your brand, it’s easy to pick out and identify the fans and followers who are acting as your brand advocates, as well as influencers in your industry that you want to keep an eye on and engage in conversation when appropriate. Let us show you how.

On Twitter

There are many different monitoring tools to choose from on Twitter, but we will admit to being wildly biased and preferring the ones we’ve built: Free and paid, full snapshot reports ($20) and our comprehensive tracking with TweetReach Pro Trackers (available at a variety of price points). Now the following is what you can do with them.

There are several different ways to find influencers around a particular topic with a snapshot report:

  1. Run a free snapshot report and check out the top contributors to the conversation, be it about a topic keyword, hashtag, or account. It’s that easy.
  2. Run a full report around that same topic keyword, hashtag, or account to get a fuller picture of that conversation and consequently, the top contributors.
  3. Run two reports around an event using a keyword topic or hashtag and compare them. Here’s an example from the #CometLanding.

With TweetReach Pro Trackers, you can look in several places to see who influencers are around a particular keyword topic or hashtag, and who your brand advocates might be if they keyword topic has to do with your brand, or it’s a Tracker around your Twitter account. Look at:

  1. Contributors: Test different time frames to see if the same people are always at the top of the list.
  2. Most Retweeted: Do the same people always talk about you and get retweeted by their followers more than anyone else who follows you? Congratulations, you have just identified a brand advocate!
  3. Top URLs: Does someone tweet about your blog posts and share them frequently? That might show up here.

On Instagram

Again you have a choice of metrics providers, and again we are biased when we suggest our own tools (be sure you’re asking the right questions while you’re shopping). We understand not everyone has a lot of resources, however, and are happy to be able to offer you a free option in our Instagram account checkup and more comprehensive tracking options with our Instagram analytics.

Now here’s how you can find those who are already supporting you on Instagram.

Instagram Summary Data

 

Above: An example of our Instagram analytics dashboard. 

With our free account checkup, the Top Fans section makes it easy: These are your three biggest fans who have engaged with your content the most over the last 30 days. Be sure you’re at the very least following them back, and reciprocate the engagement with their posts where appropriate. Keep an eye on total fans too, because someone might be lurking just out of the top three who is an important fan and potential brand advocate.

With our premium Instagram analytics, you can set up a hashtag tracker or an account tracker. With a hashtag tracker you’ll want to pay attention to the top publishers as well as the publisher summary. Are any of these people also in the top ten posts? If you narrow the tracker down to different time frames, are the same people always in top publishers? That’s who you want to pay attention to.

Account trackers are similar; pay attention to top participants and the participant summary in the same way described above. Clicking through to see participant details will tell you more about that particular follower, and whether or not it would be appropriate to engage with them. (When it wouldn’t be: They’re a minor using social, they’re a spam account, etc. Use your discretion for what’s appropriate for your brand.)

On Tumblr

Tumblr does give you built-in analytics, and much like those that Twitter gives you, using ours alongside them compliments what you can learn about your audience while taking your knowledge deeper in certain aspects.

Our Tumblr analytics offer both topic tracking and blog tracking. With topic tracking you want to look at popular contributors as well as top curators, to see who is contributing to a certain conversation the most. If someone who appears in either of those two sections also appears in the top ten most popular posts, then that’s someone you really want to follow and pay attention to at the very least, and consider a deeper relationship with- brand advocate, short-term collaboration partner etc- if that makes sense.

With blog trackers, you want to look at the top curators. These are the people who are consistently liking and reblogging your content. Are they adding commentary when they do? Is it praise, constructive criticism? Engage them in a dialogue about it if it’s appropriate.

The bottom line

Enthusiastic fans will be discussing your brand whether you’re there to listen or not, but many stop once they realize no one is paying attention. Brand advocates are built from nurtured relationships. Take the time to find them and connect in a way that’s appropriate and mutually beneficial.

Still have questions? Ask ‘em in the comments. Don’t be shy. 

Written by Sarah

April 7th, 2015 at 8:39 am

#CometLanding: Finding influencers and more using TweetReach snapshot reports

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Yesterday, for the first time in history, humanity managed to land a robot roughly the size of a washing machine (named Philae) onto a comet moving 40k mph through space. Twitter had a lot to say about it using the #cometlanding hashtag, so we took two full snapshot reports to compare the conversation on the day of the landing to the day after.

What can comparing snapshot reports tell me?

Full snapshot reports are limited to 1500 tweets, so extremely popular Twitter conversations like those around big public events tend to max them out quickly, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t still a lot to learn from what they capture! By comparing snapshots from two days back-to-back, you get an idea of who the most influential people and organizations in the conversation are, which you can continue to monitor by taking a few more days of snapshots, either free or full (free will just give you slightly more limited data). Alternatively you can use them as research to set up a TweetReach Pro Tracker around a similar topic in the same area of interest: Now you know which accounts to monitor, and you can look at those to see what kinds of hashtags they regularly use, etc, to get the most out of your Tracker.

So what did these two snapshots tell us?

The conversation on day two almost matches that of day one in terms of intensity, telling us that Twitter’s interest in Philae’s historical landing hasn’t wavered much from that of landing day:

#cometlanding day 1

#cometlanding day 2

This tells you it’s still a popular topic to work into your content schedule! And day two is ripe for original content. The first day had a lot more original information being broadcast; the breakdown of tweets vs. retweets was almost even, whereas today has seen a lot more retweets and fewer original tweets. This helps you hypothesize about the nature of the conversation: Perhaps on day one, everyone watching tweeted about how excited they were to watch the landing, from professionals down to amateur observers. On day two, maybe excited space and science enthusiasts are sharing information with their followers from official accounts. To confirm this, simply check the tweets timeline on your snapshot reports:

#cometlanding tweets timeline day 1

 

Day one Tweets Timeline: Tweets from laypeople excited about the #cometlanding

 

#cometlanding tweets timeline day 2

 

Day two tweets timeline: More RTs of official accounts with news and photos from Philae 

What about those influencers you mentioned?

No problem. The most retweeted tweets each day both included the official Twitter account for the Philae lander.

#cometlanding most RTd day 1 #cometlanding most RTd day 2

 

While NASA is an account you might have assumed would be influential in space and science conversations, BBC news might be less expected. And perhaps you didn’t know Philae had its own account!

Still have questions?

Leave ‘em in the comments. Like what our snapshots can tell you, and interested in going further with TweetReach Pro? Join us for a demo on Thursday, November 20th at 9:00am PST, or email us to set one up sooner!

Written by Sarah

November 13th, 2014 at 10:30 am

TweetReach Tip: Find & engage influencers on Twitter with TweetReach snapshot reports

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You can do a lot with your TweetReach snapshot reports and Trackers, and one of the most important and often underutilized tricks is identifying and then interacting with your biggest influencers on Twitter. How? It’s pretty simple:

  1. Run a TweetReach snapshot report
  2. Check out your contributors

That’s it. It’s that easy! Here are some screenshots from a report we ran about Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield:

Top contributors shows you the top Twitter accounts talking about Col. Hadfield. @Gizmodo earned the highest number of impressions from their tweets about the astronaut, @NewsBreaker garnered the most retweets, and @csa_asc (the Canadian Space Agency) generated the most mentions. (You can find a breakdown of a snapshot report here if you need one.)

What do these numbers mean? Exposure is the total number of times a tweet is delivered to Twitter streams, or the overall number of impressions generated. A high exposure means that account has a lot of followers, and tweets from that account were delivered to lots of other Twitter accounts. NewsBreakers got the most retweets, meaning many of that account’s followers found the Hadfield-centered tweet interesting enough to pass along to their followers. Finally, the Canadian Space Agency Twitter handle was mentioned in the most tweets about Col. Hadfield.

If you run regular snapshot reports and notice that you have repeat top contributors, those are definitely accounts you want to engage with,  if you aren’t already doing so. And remember, you can save your TweetReach reports if you create a free account, or download PDFs or CSVs for later reference.


Don’t just limit yourself to your top contributors either; be sure to look at the full list of contributors. Paying attention to everyone who is talking about you or your brand will let you see who is retweeting your content and generating impressions. These people might not be able to generate as many impressions as an account like Gizmodo because they have fewer followers, but having lots of followers isn’t necessarily as important as being able to influence others. Not everyone following Gizmodo will be interested in everything they retweet or talk about, but someone with a lot of pull with his or her followers – even if there are only 200 – may actually have more followers paying attention, possibly even clicking through and reading a link, or ultimately purchasing something. If that kind of person is consistently in your contributors list, you should be engaging with him or her.

How do you engage? Follow these accounts and talk to them when it’s natural. Do they take part in Twitter chats? If it’s relevant, join in. This will lead you to more likeminded people to connect with. Do they share interesting content? Retweet or reply to it; start a conversation.

On a related note, looking closely at contributors is also a great way to connect with those who are influential in your industry, or about the topic you’re tracking. Then later, if you want to join into that conversation, you know who to talk to.

So that’s how to do this with a snapshot report. How’s it different with a Tracker? We’ll cover that in our next post. Stay tuned, and as always, comment with any questions!

Written by Sarah

March 28th, 2013 at 1:03 pm