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Archive for the ‘historical analytics’ tag

Union Metrics Twitter Trackers now include free 30-day backfill

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Great news! Our Twitter Trackers now include automatic, complimentary 30-day backfill.

Next time you create a new Twitter Tracker in your Union Metrics account*, it’ll start by filling in with existing tweets to give you some data to start. That will include tweets from the past 30 days (up to 5,000 tweets for TweetReach Pro subscriptions, and up to 20,000 tweets for Social Suite subscriptions). And then it will continue to monitor all new and future tweets in real-time, just like before.

A few reasons why this is awesome:

  • No more missing tweets if you’re a few minutes or hours late to set up a Tracker
  • Get some baseline data right away
  • Twitter Trackers now get the same data to start as the other channels we monitor
  • Makes handling a social media crisis or last-minute client changes much easier

TweetReach Pro from Union Metrics starts at just $99 per month. Give it a try, and get your backfilled data now!

Need more or older tweets? We can always backfill more tweets in any Tracker for a fee, any time you want. Submit your historical data request here.

*Automatic backfill is available to all Union Metrics Social Suite and TweetReach Pro Small, Medium and Large subscribers. If you’re on one of our older TweetReach Pro plans (Mini, Basic, Plus, Premium or Max), you’ll need to change to a new plan to access backfill. You can change plans any time in your account’s billing settings. Or email us and we’ll help find the right plan for you!

Written by Jenn D

August 17th, 2015 at 9:25 am

3 non-traditional use cases for TweetReach historical analytics

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TR Historical 1

We’ve already looked at 5 ways to use our premium historical analytics, including an in-depth look at how to use them to build brand voice, and now we want to go over some more non-traditional use cases for them.

Even if you’re part of a more traditionally minded marketing team, these could inspire some new approaches to your content strategy. Plus, we’ve paired each of these use cases with a more traditional marketing takeaway.

1. Journalism

Use our historical analytics to see how a story broke out on Twitter, and how it spread. How did the people on the ground at the incident share information? Did local and national news sources communicate with them and contact them to be interviewed for newscasts, or did they send their own people ? How were those journalists’ social media reports different from those of civilian witnesses? A journalist who was on Twitter when a story broke and might have most of this information cataloged in screenshots already could use our historical analytics to fill in any remaining gaps in the story. New story leads or witnesses could be discovered in this way, and investigated or interviewed.

Traditional marketing takeaway: This is the same style of research you can employ to see how a social crisis broke and spread on Twitter, and help build your own crisis communication plan accordingly.

2. Comedy

Running low on material? Reach back through past periods on Twitter to rework some old jokes into something new for your next standup show or writing gig. Likewise you can look at another funny person you admire’s timeline to see how their skills developed over time, inspiring new joke styles, approaches to writing, or even just timing.

Traditional marketing takeaway: If it fits with your brand, don’t be afraid to be funny. Have you used humor in your content strategy in the past? See how those tweets performed vs. neutrally toned tweets that were conveying similar types of information. If it doesn’t fit with your brand, don’t force it.

3. Charity

Running a charity campaign on social media is tricky; you want to strike just the right balance of reaching the maximum amount of people in and just outside of your network who might be interested in contributing, without annoying them. Know of a campaign that nailed it? Use historical analytics to sample their campaign, or even study the entirety of it and model your own approach after theirs.

Traditional marketing takeaway: Use this same approach to study a past campaign that your company- or a competitor- has run either successfully or to lackluster results. What worked and what didn’t? Use that to inform how you plan and execute your next campaign in the same space.

Want to get started and learn more?

Fantastic! You can read more about our premium historical analytics here, and even request a quote. And remember, we can analyze anything and everything ever posted to Twitter, all the way back to the very first public Tweet posted in March 2006.

TR Historical 2

Written by Sarah

October 14th, 2014 at 11:39 am

5 ways to use TweetReach historical Twitter analytics

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Ever wanted to measure the impact of a past event or hashtag on Twitter? You can with TweetReach premium historical analytics! They’re a powerful tool for researching, planning, executing campaigns and so much more on Twitter. Here are just five ways you can utilize our historical Twitter analytics to your benefit.

Get historical twitter analytics through TweetReach

But first, where does TweetReach’s historical Twitter data come from?

At Union Metrics, we have licensed commercial access to the full historical Twitter archive from Gnip, which means we can reach all the way back to the first public tweet posted in March 2006. This goes beyond the scope of basic Twitter search and anything that can be pulled with Twitter’s public API; the information you can get from those sources is limited to data from the past few days or weeks. Our historical access includes the full archive from Twitter itself, and you can’t get that just anywhere.

The possibilities for using our historical analytics are as varied as the content on Twitter itself. And if you’ve ever used our TweetReach Pro Trackers, the analytics in our historical reporting is similar: potential reach, exposure, volume, individual tweet, hashtag, URL and contributor metrics. It’s delivered in the same detailed format as our Trackers, so you have comprehensive reporting and interactive metrics, allowing you to drill into interesting trends.

Still have questions about TweetReach historical Twitter analytics? You can read more about our historical analytics here, or send us an email to learn more.

So, how can you use our historical Twitter reporting? Here are a few ideas.

1. Nail a pitch

Are you an agency trying to win over a new client? Want to prove to your boss that you can handle bigger and better projects? Use our historical analytics to build out comprehensive proof of the performance of campaigns you’ve managed in the past, or evidence that those you managed performed better than those of your competition. It’s hard to argue against numbers.

2. Create an airtight content marketing plan

A quick Google search will provide thousands of content marketing best practices, but the bottom line is that you can only know what works best for your industry, and more specifically, for your customers, when you measure it. Do you have chunks of missing data from the performance of past campaigns? Use our historical analytics to fill in any gaps in your history of data, or to build out a history if one doesn’t already exist, either because of a lack of budget or a change in your role. Get the metrics you need to fully understand how your content performs on Twitter.

3. Plan for crisis communications

Has your company faced a crisis in the past? What about anyone else in your industry? Are there notable past social media crises you’d like to study to help model your own crisis communication plan after? Our historical analytics can give you a clear picture of what happened in the course of an entire event: who reacted when and how to which tweets. Understand which communication tactics worked, and which backfired. Use this information to build out a comprehensive crisis communication plan, should such a situation occur when you’re at the helm.

4. Conduct research

Similarly, you can use our historical analytics to understand how a past event unfolded in Twitter in order to write about it from a journalistic, academic, or other point of view. Want to know how many tweets were posted about an election last year? What hashtags were most popular at a previous conference? The top picture shared during a protest? We can search on any keywords, hashtags, usernames, URLs – anything that appears in a tweet. Use this to unearth and study conversations about past events.

5. Build your brand voice

We’ve discussed in detail how you can use our historical analytics to build a brand voice from scratch, or even learn (or rebuild) the voice of a brand you’ve recently taken over for. Once you’ve solidly established your brand’s voice, you can work on increasing your share of voice in your particular industry.

Want to learn more or run your historical Twitter analytics report? Start here.

 

Written by Sarah

September 29th, 2014 at 1:17 pm

Posted in Guides

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Join us for a TweetReach Pro demo TODAY at 9am PDT!

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Join us for a short demo this Thursday, May 1st- that’s today!- at 9:00am PDT and we’ll walk you through TweetReach Pro, our historical analytics and our snapshot reports.

Demos usually take 15-20 minutes followed by an open Q&A session. At the end, attendees will receive a discount code that can be applied to a TweetReach Pro subscription.

You can register here. Hope you can make it!

Written by Sarah

May 1st, 2014 at 6:16 am

Using TweetReach historical analytics to build brand voice

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A strong and authentic brand voice is more important now than ever in the age of social media; you want to be approachable, human, and responsive on your social accounts while still matching the overall tone and messaging of your brand. Accomplishing all of that can seem incredibly overwhelming, and there are several circumstances where building from the past can be especially helpful: taking over from someone else who built the voice for a brand (or even created it), creating and establishing the voice of a brand yourself, or wanting to build something bigger and better than your brand- or a competitor- has built in the past.

So just exactly how do you go about doing this? Let’s break it down.

Taking over a brand’s voice.

As your predecessor most likely won’t leave behind a checklist of how they went about establishing a brand’s voice and what you should do to maintain and further build it, that burden falls to you.

Depending on your resources- just you, or a team and branded documents that provide guidelines, etc- there are a few ways you can go about doing this. Obviously a good start is reading over recent posts, but sampling from accounts such as Twitter a few different times throughout the brand’s history is the best way to really learn how the voice evolved– and if and when it ever derailed. Sampling from specific campaigns will give you an idea of how a brand’s voice was meant to reach larger audiences, bring in new customers, and interact with them.

Here are some good questions to keep in mind while you work:

  • Is the existing voice appropriate for our audience? This is the most important question to ask, because it should inform your entire plan.
  • Is there a lot of turnover in the voice, or consistency? If there hasn’t been consistency in the past, pay attention to the interactions during more experimental times to take note of what worked and what didn’t. Use that information to build out brand voice guidelines, both for yourself and any teammates you have now or in the future. 
  • What about cross-platform consistency? Did tweets get automatically shared to Facebook? Or Instagram posts? Was the language the same in each place, or were messages tailored to each platform, but matching in tone? The latter is definitely what you want to aim for.
  • Which formats have been most successful? Does the brand Twitter account, for example, only tweet in proper English? Has it used popular abbreviations in the past, seriously or as a joke? (And were these jokes well-received?) What about photos and videos; if those are used, do they match the tone of the tweets or did they clearly come from another team with little communication?
  • How many interactions and how much sharing has there been vs. straight promotion? If the brand hasn’t been answering questions, interacting with fans and followers, and sharing useful content from other sources in the past, these are good practices to implement immediately. They make a brand friendlier, more human, more approachable.

These questions will help you establish consistency in brand voice, which makes you instantly recognizable to customers, potential customers, and fans.

Building a brand voice from scratch.

Starting from scratch is always both terrifying and liberating, and fortunately there is also the example of those who have come before- both good and bad- to lead your efforts.

The list of questions in the previous section can still apply to you; simply build guidelines of your own based on them. The most important question is still the first one: Who is my audience, where do they spend time, and how do they speak to each other and to or about brands in that space? Nothing other than listening can address this question and help you build from there. It doesn’t matter how clever and helpful the voice is that you establish if it doesn’t reach the right people or is reaching those who aren’t interested in what your brand offers.

An additional strategy involves looking at past tweets from campaigns of brands you admire or that are your competition. These can give you invaluable insight into how to build things for your own brand moving forward. Ask:

  • What did well? (Or badly.) 
  • Where?
  • And for whom?

The simplest questions are often the most important ones. Address details like cross-sharing on platforms, tailoring messages, frequency of posts after you’ve established the foundation of your voice. These things are still important and still inform the overall presentation and reception of your brand.

So what’s my next step?

If you’re interested in gaining access to old tweets and Twitter campaigns, then our premium historical analytics are for you. We have ability to reach all the way back to the first public tweet posted in March 2006 – we have access to the full archive of historical Twitter data from Gnip – and we can search anything and everything you can think of. This goes beyond the scope of basic Twitter search and anything that can be pulled with Twitter’s public API; the information you can get from those sources is limited to about a week back. But the historical archive includes the full archive from Twitter itself, and you cannot get that just anywhere.

There’s more here about the specifics of how it works and you can also request a quote. Historical analytics start at $49. Pricing is based on report duration and tweet volume.

Got any more questions? Shoot us an email.

Image courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery

Written by Sarah

April 2nd, 2014 at 9:18 am

Posted in Guides

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Join us for a TweetReach Pro demo tomorrow 2/20 at 9am PST!

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Join us for a short demo this Thursday, February 20 at 9:00am PST and we’ll walk you through TweetReach Pro, our historical analytics and our snapshot reports.

Demos usually take 15-20 minutes followed by an open Q&A session. At the end, attendees will receive a discount code that can be applied to a TweetReach Pro subscription.

You can register here. Hope you can make it!

Written by Sarah

February 19th, 2014 at 9:01 am

Join us for a TweetReach Pro demo tomorrow 1/16 at 11am CT!

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Join us for a short demo where we’ll walk you through TweetReach Pro, our historical analytics and our snapshot reports. Demos usually take 15-20 minutes followed by an open Q&A session. At the end, attendees will receive a discount code that can be applied to a TweetReach Pro subscription.

The demo starts at 11am CT, tomorrow. You can register here.

And we promise it won’t be like this:

Written by Sarah

January 15th, 2014 at 9:25 am

How to take advantage of TweetReach historical analytics

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Unfortunately, our historical analytics don’t go back quite THIS far

If you’re in charge of planning a big Twitter campaign, you want to arm yourself with as much information as possible. Our premium historical analytics can help you see where holes have been in past campaigns, what worked, what you might want to test out this time around, and a lot more. From planning out a campaign to filling in your knowledge when something unexpected happens, our historical analytics have you covered.

What exactly are historical analytics?

With the ability to reach all the way back to the first public tweet posted in March 2006 – we have access to the full archive of historical Twitter data from Gnip – we can search anything and everything you can think of. This goes beyond the scope of basic Twitter search and anything that can be pulled with Twitter’s public API; the information you can get from those sources is limited to about a week back. But the historical archive includes the full archive from Twitter itself, and you cannot get that just anywhere.

The possibilities for using our historical analytics are as varied as the content on Twitter itself, and if you’ve ever used our Pro Trackers the analysis is similar: you get reach, exposure, volume, tweet and contributor metrics. Better still, it’s delivered in the same format as our Trackers, so you don’t have to learn to navigate something new (unless you’re entirely new to TweetReach, in which case welcome, and we’re here to help you!).

What can I use historical analytics for?

Here are just a few ideas of what you can use our historical analytics for:

  • Research: Know how the public reacted to a particular event as it unfolded. See how a news story evolved; pinpoint who broke it, who influenced it at different points, and when other major players joined in, or didn’t. This applies to business as well as news research: look at those same things, but with a campaign instead of a news story. Gauge public reception to a certain business sector, or a new business specifically. Don’t take the word of articles telling you how the public is reacting- see it for yourself, in their own words.

  • Fill in the gaps: Did you sign up for a Pro suscription after you launched a campaign, and missed some data? Now you can fill it in.

  • Competitor analysis: See how your competitor’s past campaigns stack up to yours. Measure your share of voice (we’ve got a detailed four steps to doing just that here) and plan for how to improve it. Are you leading the conversation, or is your competitor? Is nobody leading the conversation, and you have a chance to step in and do so? Have the information to definitively show your boss where you stand, and how you plan to improve that standing. Take the guesswork out of it.

  • Year-by-year comparison: If you joined your company recently, historical analytics are a great way to see what results past campaigns have brought in. It can also help you fill in past metrics if you’ve just gotten a budget for analytics. Historical analytics give you an ideal way to measure benchmarks: the only way you can truly understand the performance of present and future campaigns is by knowing where you have been. This way you can establish KPIs for your social program.

  • Industry standards: Historical can be used for competitor analysis- compare campaigns from several different players in an industry, to see how each one’s strategy stands up- and for competitor research– an extension of the earlier research point, and related to share of voice. Use the information you get from historical analytics to pitch potential clients, showing them that you have consistently run campaigns that will increase their share of voice, and that you’ve outperformed other, similar campaigns run by competitors. This can also give them a reason to hire you, if they haven’t taken on an agency before. Prove to them that they can do better with you than without you.

  • Crisis communications: Sometimes things happen that are impossible to plan for, and therefore you weren’t already tracking them. Historical gives you the opportunity to go back to fully understand the conversation as it unfolded and act accordingly. It’s great to know that, even if something unexpected happens, we can still access the data to make the best decisions about how to move forward in a crisis.

Got something you want to use historical analytics for? Great! There’s more here about the specifics of how it works and you can also request a quote. Historical analytics start at $49. Pricing is based on report duration and tweet volume.

Image courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery

Written by Sarah

May 28th, 2013 at 10:57 am

Which TweetReach product should I use?

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We know you’ve got different needs and different budgets, even on different days. That’s why we offer a range of TweetReach products to help you get the best return on your Twitter investment– and we’re here to help you figure out which tool to use.

We have three main products at TweetReach: our snapshot reports, Pro Trackers, and historical analytics.

A Tracker is best when:

Your topic is going to pull in a lot of tweets.
If you’re running a conference or other major event or tracking any large or popular topic where you’re anticipating a large volume of tweets to be generated, set up a Tracker beforehand to be sure you don’t miss any tweets. Snapshot reports are limited to 1500 tweets, but Trackers don’t have those limits and will capture all the tweets about your topic or event.

The best part? All tweets collected by a Tracker are archived for as long as you have a TweetReach Pro subscription, so you can drill into your data to find out how customers are interacting with your brand and/or campaign over the entire time you’ve been tracking. This is a great way to discover brand advocates, industry influencers, and see trends develop over time.

You want to track what everyone is saying during your campaign or event.
This is what Trackers were made for; with Trackers you can monitor and analyze unlimited tweets in real time, as the tweets are posted to Twitter. Each Tracker allows you to monitor up to 15 queries about your topic, which can include hashtags, a key industry phrase, and more. This will allow you to keep track of who is saying what about your event – enabling you to handle any issues as they emerge – and gives you a wealth of data to study later. You’ll be able to recognize key contributors and influencers, and plan better for your next big event. With a Tracker set up you won’t have to worry about pulling reports at different intervals to get the information you need. It will be automatically collected for you, just waiting to be analyzed.

Keep in mind that Trackers are only available through a TweetReach Pro subscription.

Historical analytics are best when:

You want to compare a current campaign to one you ran last year, or a few years ago.
With the addition of our premium historical analytics, you can now compare current campaigns to those of the past (your own or your competitors’). For the first time we have the ability to reach all the way back to tweets posted at the very beginning of Twitter in March of 2006.

Twitter isn’t just about real-time anymore: now the entirety of Twitter history is available to be analyzed and studied.

You want to research past tweets.
Research the after effects of Twitter emergencies, PR disasters, recurring events (conferences, holidays, etc), past feelings around a certain event or topic compared to now– and more. You can research how a past event or campaigned performed even if you didn’t have real-time tracking setup then. You can compare year-over-year campaign performance before you plan your next big campaign. Having that kind of information to back up the ideas you pitch to your company or client is huge, and TweetReach historical analytics makes it possible.

We’ve recently launched our historical analytics product, and we’re incredibly excited about its implications.

Want to travel back in Twitter time with historical analytics? Read more details and get a quote.

A snapshot report is best when:

You need something fast, and free.
We understand that not every marketing team has a large budget for analytics, and not every business has a marketing team in the first place. For this reason, we offer a free snapshot report that gives you an idea of the reach of your hashtag, account, tweet or any other keyword-based topic.

Hint: you can archive (with a free TweetReach account), or print and save these reports to keep a simple record of how your company or campaign is doing on Twitter. And it costs you nothing.


You want a general idea of how tweets are spreading right now.
Search for any current hashtag, username, key phrase from a tweet, or any keyword, and our snapshot report will measure the extent of your reach, exposure, the most popular tweets, and the biggest contributors to your topic. We have two versions of our snapshot report: the quick snapshot report is free, and will include up to 50 tweets. Want more? A full snapshot report is available to anyone- no subscription or account required- and includes up to 1500 tweets for just $20. With a TweetReach Pro subscription you’ll have access to bundles of free and full snapshot reports.

Keep in mind these only provide a snapshot of recent tweets. If you want to look at what was happening yesterday or a year ago, you need our premium Historical Analytics, which are available separately.

Got any questions we missed?

Check out our help forums or drop us a line. We’re here to help!

Written by Sarah

December 12th, 2012 at 12:49 pm