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3 ways to take advantage of social media in football stadiums

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NFL Game Day

From the NFL’s official Instagram account

Many NFL and college football stadiums have built-in wifi to help fans post to their social accounts during games, but teams are still trying to figure out to take advantage of social media IN the stadium. We have three suggestions for how to get fans to increase their existing social activity, or start posting if they aren’t already.

1. Make it worth your fans’ while

Consider working with vendors to create and share some social-only deals during the game. Customers will get used to routinely checking their accounts for deals on hotdogs, drinks, merchandise and more during games. Just make sure they know about it ahead of time by promoting it across social media leading up to games and by announcing it around the stadium with physical collateral.

Want to take it a step further? Organize a contest to meet one of the players, be an official game photographer for five minutes, or take a game ball home. You could also organize social contests to win tickets to a game, or special VIP seats and treatment, increasing your reach when the winner shares their experience and tags your accounts in it! It’s also possible that a winner who is a casual fan will be motivated to invest more on tickets, merchandise, and more for future seasons because they had such a great experience.

2. Show some behind-the-scenes action

While this may, at first, seem counter intuitive- after all, if you’re posting it on social media anyone anywhere can see it, not just those in the stadium- if done correctly you can encourage more casual fans to want to be in the stadium where the behind-the-scenes action is taking place.

How? Talk to the social media teams behind each team, and see what kind of content they can work up that gives a feeling of access to what players, coaches, supporting staff, and overall teams go through leading up to a game. If the content is good enough, you can foster some serious FOMO (fear of missing out) for those not experiencing the action both in real life and on their screen; they’ll want to be the ones explaining to their buddies in the seat next to them exactly what everyone was doing that lead up to that great scoring play.

3. Be consistent

This is a major rule of playing in social in general: The more consistent you are with your content, the more your existing audience is going to stick around and engage with you, and the more new fans and followers will be encouraged to become just that in first place. If they come to your profiles in the offseason and don’t see plans for what you’re going to be doing when things start back up again, they’ll be less interested in checking back in later.

If you are posting consistent, engaging content even in the offseason- sharing how teams plan, how players train, what else goes on in keeping a stadium up and running that most fans never think about- they’ll be even more excited for official season activities to launch because they’re so much more a part of the entire process.

And it all starts with some good, strong, in-stadium wi-fi.

Written by Sarah

November 25th, 2014 at 11:02 am

Posted in Guides

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Sports on social media: How fans talk tells you more than just how they feel

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There has been plenty of coverage around Monday night’s BCS Championship Game between Florida State and Auburn; everything from fan to brand reactions on Twitter. On the surface these tweets strike as funny, impassioned, angry, or incredulous– not unexpected reactions when it comes to something fans connect with as deeply as their favorite sports teams. Looking at how people talk about sports on social media like Twitter can tell us more than just which team they’re a fan of, however; it gives us insight into their actions and behaviors. And if you know what it is that a fan is doing with their spare time, then you have a better idea of how to approach them, and talk to them. For brands this is invaluable. As for fans, they get the chance of an individualized approach to putting things in front of them that they’ll want to connect with.

The Action: A favorite game gets rewatched like a favorite movie.

The Implication.

What’s the point in rewatching a sports game you already know the outcome of? It’s not that different from rewatching a favorite movie or television show, really: while you already know what’s going to happen, now you can watch to see how it happens, and gain a deeper understanding of the thing that you love. While you’re likely experiencing the same emotions of elation at a great play or sadness in a defeat, it’s also likely not as strong as when you watched the game live. It’s easier to spot a certain player’s motivations, or how a play completely unraveled, because you’re not sitting on the edge of your seat with your teeth clenched, or screaming at the ref.

For brands whose demographic includes sports fans, this is helpful information. People who save a game to rewatch it are exhibiting behavior that’s planned, thoughtful, and deeply engaging– and that’s the kind of approach any brand wanting to build a relationship with them should take when reaching out to them. That fan behavior shows the kind of loyalty companies are lucky to find in a customer. Reach out the right way, with understanding, and you stand to be rewarded.

The Action: Not holding back feelings about a new way to watch the game.

ESPN debuted their Megacast for the BCS Championship, and like all things on the Internet viewers were not shy about sharing their feelings.

The implication.

Sometimes it’s the simplest lessons that bear repeating: Listen to your audience. Obviously ESPN will never be able to make every single sports fan happy with a magical coverage design, but they can find ways to tweak their Megacast for future games by paying attention to the things their watchers are saying about it. This is also an opportunity to shine a spotlight on certain fans; if you incorporate their idea, highlight the tweet they shared it in on a future broadcast and say thank you. Nothing could spell out clearer that you do care what viewers have to say.

And some of their ideas are pretty entertaining.

Written by Sarah

January 9th, 2014 at 8:27 am

Posted in Events

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