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The Week in Social #167

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We spend the week reading the best things we can get our eyeballs on and on Fridays we share them here with you. Leave your thoughts in the comments, or come find us on Twitter at @UnionMetrics.

On that content we just can’t quit.

Chances are you have a big backlog of great (and maybe some not-so-great) content already; why not dive into your archives to remarket the best, and update and repurpose the rest? Find more details in How to Repurpose Your Content Again and Again from Michael Peggs for Convince & Convert.

Do you think of Jon Stewart as a content marketer? No? How about a content curator? You can see it, right? If not, Heidi Cohen breaks down why he is a master curator and translates that into some tips for marketers in How To Be A Content Curation Master.

On Facebook.

Some fun research from Facebook: How do you laugh online? Turns out there are a lot of differences by age, gender, and even regionally. The Not-So-Universal Language of Laughter from Udi Weinsberg, Lada Adamic, and Mike Develin is a fun way to better understand your particular Facebook audience.

laughter heatmap FB research

In case you missed Hank Green’s Theft, Lies & Facebook Video piece, read that first, and then this response from a Facebook video product manager.

Finally, up your Facebook game with these 6 Lesser Known Facebook Features You Should Be Using from Simon Leeming.

And Snapchat.

Some new Snapchat updates will make regular users and brands alike very happy. Check them out in New Snapchat Update Introduces More Emoji, Enhanced Audience Data via Andrew Hutchinson for Social Media Today.

Snapchat3

Written by Sarah

August 14th, 2015 at 8:33 am

Our favorite social media stats and facts

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Social media changes quickly, and it can be hard to keep up with the latest usage information for the top channels. We thought we’d make it easier by rounding up our five favorite nuggets for our four favorite social networks: Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram and Facebook.

Many of these come from Union Metrics research, so feel free to check out our resources page or see how we can help you measure your efforts in each of these places, if you’re eager to see how that after-hours Tumblr queue is paying off.

Tumblr

  1. Tumblr is a night owl. 42% of all Tumblr activity takes place between 5pm and 1am ET (Source). Takeaway: Brands should try posting outside of traditional business hours to see how their content performs.
  2. Disney is by far the most popular brand on Tumblr, seeing more overall activity and stronger engagement than any other brand – nearly two times more (Source). Takeaway: Consider a Tumblr presence to join in on the fan conversation that inevitably already exists around your brand.
  3. 50% of Tumblr users have gone out and bought something they’ve seen on their dashboard (Source). Takeaway: Make it easy for your followers to buy the things you show them on their dash. With the ”Buy” button introduced last year, it’s easier than ever.
  4. Saturday and Sunday are the most active days on Tumblr (Source). Takeaway: Have a content plan for the weekends. Pay attention to when the most original content is published (bonus stat: that’s 4pm on Sunday) and see how your content performs posted at or around that time.
  5. Fandom thrives on Tumblr (Source). Takeaway: Movies and television shows should know that their fandoms are on Tumblr, and they are legion. Incorporate fan art (like Teen Wolf) or photos (like Doctor Who) into your content strategy where it makes sense. Make fans feel heard, and appreciated.

Times of Tumblr

Twitter

  1. Most customers expect a response on social media within an hour (Source). Takeaway: This is true even of nights and weekends, so brands looking to have an active Twitter presence need to be prepared for that.
  2. Tweets with images or videos in them get more engagement than tweets with text alone (Source). Takeaway: Add appropriate visuals to your tweets whenever possible, but don’t just stick any old image on there just to have one. Choose striking, meaningful visual content to catch your audience’s eye.
  3. Related to that last point? Tweets with images take up more than twice as much vertical space in the timeline (Source). Takeaway: Simply taking up more space on someone’s feed- particularly when they’re out and about, scrolling through mobile- means your tweets are much harder to simply scan and dismiss. Especially if you choose that visually arresting image we talked about.
  4. Speaking of mobile users, recent numbers show “80% of users access Twitter via their mobile device” (Source). Takeaway: This means that unless those mobile users are on wifi, they don’t have as much bandwidth to work with and they aren’t going to want to wait forever for images to download, so make sure those visually arresting images aren’t huge. If it’s a big infographic, choose one piece to show and link back to the whole thing.
  5. When a show’s stars live-tweet an episode during its airtime, they “generate 64% more discussion (ie. tweets about the show) than programs whose cast members abstain” (Source). Takeaway: Even if you’re not in TV, live-tweeting a relevant event- a webinar, a conference, a presentation or panel during an industry meetup- will make you part of a bigger discussion and introduce you to new contacts. Just be sure to use the official hashtags—  or create them.

Instagram

  1. Our own Union Metrics research recommends brands try posting outside of U.S. business hours (Source). Takeaway: Evenings and weekends are times most people have free to browse social and catch up on their streams. Brands should test posting during these times and see if they get a bump in engagement from fans and followers who are otherwise busy during the work day.
  2. Keeping up your content cadence matters more than how often you post (Source). Takeaway: Obviously you don’t want to completely flood the Instagram feed of your fans and followers, but it’s not unusual for brands to post several times a day. If you have a large queue of content for a campaign, however, and it runs dry afterward before you can plan a robust content calendar, you will start to lose followers.
  3. Content on Instagram lives longer than you probably realize (Source). Takeaway: Although most activity happens in the first several hours after a brand posts to Instagram, it’s not unusual to see low-level content for days and weeks after a post is first made. Don’t be afraid to edit old posts with newer hashtags to see if you can boost engagement on them.
  4. Brands who advertise on Instagram may continue to see increased engagement after an advertising period has ended; in one case we saw a brand with “a nearly 10% increase in engagement rates across the board, increasing the total activities received per organic post by 25% on average” (Source). Takeaway: If you’re thinking of taking the plunge and advertising on Instagram, the benefits could be longer lasting than you might have assumed.
  5. Related to the previous point, Instagram is opening up advertising to everyone this fall (Source). Takeaway: Just be sure your creative is up to snuff; Instagram users are used to high-quality, well-executed content.

 

 

Facebook

  1. Images that include people and faces perform well on Facebook (Source). Takeaway: Facebook is a place people connect with friends and family they’re close to in real life, so reflecting this ease and friendliness in your visuals helps your content resonate with those who choose to connect with your brand there.
  2. You have three seconds to get your fans’ attention in a video (Source). Takeaway: Videos need to be immediately arresting, and also perform well without sound since not everyone opts to turn it on. Shorter videos also tend to perform better than long videos on Facebook.
  3. Posts with a ton of hashtags don’t perform well on Facebook (Source). Takeaway: Your audience may love hashtags on Facebook, but it seems like most don’t, unless they’re a big popular hashtag like #TBT or popular and annual, like #NationalRunningDay. Use your discretion and test one or two on your posts to see how your audience responds. But definitely don’t leave all 30 from your Instagram post on Facebook; edit that cross-post down!
  4. 79% of all users are accessing Facebook from their mobile (Source). Takeaway: A lot of social activity is happening on people’s phones, when they’re out and about, commuting, or at home in the evenings. Be sure your content is optimized for mobile to capitalize on this audience. Think about what you want to see within the confines of a smartphone screen and how much data you have to work with.
  5. Facebook isn’t just Facebook; most people know they own Instagram, but some forget about the other entities in the Facebook ecosystem, including WhatsApp, Messenger, and Occulus (Source). Takeaway: These other apps are something to keep an eye on as the industry develops over the coming years, particularly in the private messaging space. It’s direct access to consumers, but difficult for brands to balance without coming across as creepy or intrusive.

Written by Sarah

July 28th, 2015 at 9:08 am

The Week in Social #162

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On improving your visual content marketing.

Check out these Eight examples of effective emotional video content from Econsultancy, read up on how Meerkat’s Cameo Feature Could Unite Brands and Influencers in Exciting New Ways via Adweek, and test out 4 More Photo Tips Gleaned from the 365 Full Frame Project from Geoff Livingston. meerkatgif

On Facebook.

3 Easy Facebook Insights Tips to Boost Engagement [from The Buzz Bin; written by Rosalie Morton]

Head over to the ‘Posts’ tab to see exactly when your page’s fans are online and schedule your posts for around those times. If more of your fans are online, you’ll have the ability to reach more eyes.” 

Caveat: Posting earlier in the day doesn’t mean your posts won’t show up in their timeline when they’re active later. Test different posting times- a few hours before they’re active, just before, and during- and see which gives you the best engagement.

On storytelling and content marketing.

The Minimalist Approach to Brand Storytelling [from Spin Sucks; written by Laura Petrolino]

Show, don’t tell. You want to leave enough open to let readers fill in the rest of the story themselves in a way they best connect with it.

6 Elements Of Remarkable Storytelling [from B2B Marketing Insider; written by Carla Johnson]

Basic storytelling structure applies to every story, even brand stories.

The Difference Between Content And Content Marketing [from MarketingLand; written by Rebecca Lieb]

Deciding what, exactly, counts as content and should be overseen by a content team can start to get tricky, especially at scale (think every web page, every product description, every piece of collateral, in addition to all the content going out across blogs, social, campaigns. . .you get the idea).

A very thoughtful piece on an exceedingly grey area.

10 ways for brands to succeed on Facebook

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Even though Facebook is currently the most widely-used social network on the planet with more than 1.3 billion users, it’s not always easy for brands to know how to create relevant content that reaches the widest audience. Not only is Facebook itself always changing how it displays page content, but users are constantly using Facebook in new and different ways. So here are some tips to help you make the most of Facebook.

PS – Did you know we offer Facebook analytics now? We do! Learn more here.

1. Post visual content

Visual content marketing is everywhere (we should know; we wrote an ebook about it), and Facebook is no exception. It’s why your aunt posts so many unfortunate memes that flood your News Feed. Eye-catching images make you at least pause and go, Wait, what is that? Just be sure to take your images beyond “WTF” to “whatever is useful and engaging to your particular audience”. Unless WTF is on-brand for you.

2. Post more content when your audience is around

This seems obvious but can be neglected when you’re stressed out and just need to get something posted every day. Pay attention to what Facebook Insights- or your attractive and insightful Union Metrics Facebook analytics- tell you about the time your fans spend on Facebook, and use that to help decide when to post to your page. If you post at 11am and they all log in at 6pm, are they still going to see your post on their News Feed? Test a few different times, pay attention to the engagement rates, and plan accordingly going forward.

3. Use hashtags effectively

While a ton of hashtags might work well to get your content in front of more eyeballs on Instagram, our research has shown that you should use just one or two hashtags per post on Facebook. But again, this is something you’ll have to test and gauge the response of your own audience on. Maybe they’re #triple #hashtag #threat people.

4. Boost some of your content

Which posts have gotten high organic engagement? Compare them to pull out common elements, then try posting something that includes many or all of those elements. Then boost that post to see if you can improve your reach and engagement even more. Boosting some content will help all the rest of your content get shown more often.

5. Create content that works across channels

Even with unlimited resources, it’s smart to design content you can get mileage out of across the platforms your fans, followers and customers are active on. Ideally you’ll want to create striking images that can be tweaked for maximum impact on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest, and wherever else it is that your people are.

6. Include relevant people and locations in your posts

Employee advocacy is an important part of growing your brand, and socially savvy employees will enjoy the recognition of being tagged in event photos or for writing a post. You can also mention influencers or personal brands in posts. Tagging relevant people and places will give your content the chance to earn an extra boost from being seen by the networks of those people and places, and just maybe someone new will decide to check you out.

7. Post often, but not too often

While a Facebook News Feed moves slower than a typical Twitter timeline, you can still update a few times a day without overwhelming your followers, simply based on the algorithm Facebook uses to show fans and followers new content; unless a fan has specifically updated their settings to see as many of your posts as possible, they’ll most likely only see one. You easily can post 2-3 times a day, maybe more. But in general, we advise against posting more than 5 times a day for most pages.

8. Be responsive

According to some reports, a majority of brands aren’t responsive to customer queries and complaints on their Facebook pages; be sure you’re one of the ones that is! This is an easy way to stand out from your competition, and it’s just plain good customer service. Treat it just like you would Twitter for customer questions.

9. Learn from the best

Take a look at successful Facebook pages in different industries to get new ideas for what might work for your brand. You can learn a lot by watching others (both what to do and what not to do!). Test a few different things with your audience before sticking to what works as measured by the things that matter most to you and your brand.

10. The bottom line

Work to understand which content performs best for your audience. Start with best practices but don’t be afraid to experiment. Then measure, learn, and implement what you’ve learned.

 

What’s the best branded Facebook page you’ve seen? Tell us about it in the comments! 

Written by Sarah

June 25th, 2015 at 10:27 am

The Week in Social Analytics #157

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On social strategy 

The new guide to minimizing legal risks in Social Media Marketing [from {grow}; written by Kerry Gorgone]

Because “Get Out of Jail Free” cards aren’t real outside of Monopoly.

Managing Expectations Should Be Part Of Your Social Media Strategy [from Social Media Today; written by Mark Ferguson]

Set modest goals, and don’t be afraid to experiment:

“One of the good and bad things about social networks is how much information they have. Someone posts an update, you blink and you’ll miss it. This has some obvious disadvantages but one big advantage. You can experiment without major consequences. You can try various versions of tweets, updates, pins etc. to see which one works best for you. By the time you know, your failed experiments are buried under the 500 million tweets per day. There is no such thing as perfect in social media. That’s one of the beauties of it. The best time to experiment is when you start off as you have fewer followers and connections.”

Emphasis added.

Social video. Still so hot right now.

5 Mind-Boggling Video Stats and How To Use Them To Your Advantage [from social@Ogilvy; written by Justine Herz]

3) 1 in 3 viewers share a YouTube video after watching, and 700 YouTube videos are shared on Twitter alone every minute.

People like to share videos. They want something to share. Now, this ”1 in 3″ number is a bit misleading because the majority of those videos are not branded, however, the user behavior is there. People want to connect with content and tell their friends about it. We just need to give them something to connect with. If we make videos people love, find interesting, surprising, they’ll connect with it.”

Social Video Chart: Your At-A-Glance Guide To 7 Major Platforms [from MarketingLand; written by Martin Beck]

“A side-by-side feature comparison of the seven major social video players — YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Vine, Snapchat and Tumblr.”

social-video-posts-v5

Platform specific tips, tricks, and more

88 marketers you should follow on Twitter [from Convince & Convert; written by Jay Baer]

Double-check to be sure you’re following these fine people on Twitter. (You might want to be sure you’re following @tweetreachapp and @UnionMetrics while you’re at it.)

Tip: What are Facebook video ads good for? [from Social Fresh; written by Jason Keath]

“‘While video creative was not great at driving clicks to a landing page, we found that retargeting people who watched a video did improve the click-through and conversion rates. In other words, audiences that were warmed with video creative were more likely to take action on follow up campaigns.’ said Kistner.”

Emphasis added.

A Three Step Guide to Winning at Instagram [from Social Media Today; written by Andrew Hutchinson]

Image quality almost goes without saying, but you also need consistency in your visual branding. What else?

“One of the key things to remember in your images is that photography appeals to people’s aspirations – the things we want to do, the places we want to be. In the earlier examples shown from Nike, we’re inspired to go outside and smell the flowers, to get out into the elements. This is based on Nike’s in-depth knowledge of their audience – they know that these images will resonate with their followers, because they’re people who’re into running and the outdoors. How do they know this? Because they’ve done the research, they’ve built the audience personas, and they’ve tested over time. So how can you do the same?”

Emphasis added.

The Week in Social Analytics #151

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On community management and employee engagement 

How to Bring Humor to Community Management [from Convince & Convert; written by Jessica Gioglio]

Community managers are uniquely positioned to look at how fans respond to humor on a daily basis and test different types of responses. Consider this a mini focus group to power a broader campaign or piece of content.”

Emphasis original.

When You Define Employee Engagement, Culture Improves [from Spin Sucks; written by Maddie Grant]

“Engagement is a result, not a variable.

It is a natural byproduct of a deep alignment among four things:

  1. The employee;
  2. The work he or she does;
  3. What is valued internally; and
  4. What drives the success of the organization.

Those last two are your culture, and most organizations fail to see how important that is to engagement.”

On content marketing

11 Content Marketing Mistakes to Avoid [from Cision; written by Jim Dougherty]

“Here’s my point: a lot of the content advice that you’ll read is either too broad or too specific to be of value to most people. What I want to do in this post is to identify 11 content marketing mistakes that you should avoid. I’ll caveat that by saying that each tip needs to be specific, applicable to most and correctable.”

Pair with What to Know Before Creating a Content Marketing Strategy also from Cision.

Maximize Your Content Creation Commitment [from Convince & Convert; written by Dorie Clark]

We’re all working with a limited amount of time in our lives, so leverage your investment in content creation. 

Stats on youths 

Targeting Teens? Get on Instagram [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“There’s still plenty of room for Instagram adoption among companies. Based on recent research by GfK for Pew Research Center, the platform presents brands with a good channel on which to reach teens. The study found that 52% of US teen internet users used Instagram—the second most popular social media platform among the group after Facebook (71%).”

teens on ig

Teens & Social: What’s the Latest? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

Good read looking at two recent studies from Piper Jaffray and Pew:

“In sum, it’s probably safe to assume that Facebook-owned properties (whether Facebook or Instagram) are among the most popular with teens, with Snapchat very much in the conversation. Twitter’s position seems a little more difficult to ascertain, although it’s clearly in the top 4.”

PiperJaffray-Teens-Most-Important-Social-Network-Apr2015

Pew-Teens-Most-Frequently-Used-Social-Network-Apr2015

Written by Sarah

April 24th, 2015 at 8:07 am

The Week in Social Analytics #144

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

Platform-specific pieces: 

5 Visual Storytelling Tips To Power Your Content Marketing On Facebook [from Jeff Bullas]

“. . .it’s becoming a necessity to be different. Your Facebook audience, while procrastinating their commitments ahead of them, will take out a few minutes to scroll through their News Feed. Most likely, they’ll skip anything uninteresting.

So with that in mind, you need to come up with content that’s well worth engaging with for an extended amount of time, which leads to the question:

How can your content break through the noise?

Instagram Will Top 100 Million US Users by 2018 [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Going forward, Instagram will also compete with other emerging social networks for attention among these younger demographics, and by extension, for brands’ ad dollars in reaching those demographics. However, over time, we believe Instagram’s straightforward and simple content feed has wider appeal across all demographics—no matter what age or level of digital savvy.”

emarketer Instagram

Do I need two Twitter accounts? [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

Addressed on both the “philosophical and practical” level.

On social strategy: 

How Small Businesses Should Be Using Social Media [from Social Times; written by Katherine Halek]

“What do you hope to gain from social media? If a high follower count or an overnight viral post is your idea of social success, you may learn the hard way that those things in themselves are not guaranteed to bring you more business. Instead of a one-hit wonder, your main focus should be meaningful interaction, with the end goal of building a dedicated fan base.”

On video marketing. So hot right now. 

3 Rules for Better Video Marketing [from Convince and Convert; written by Tyler Lessard]

“Online video is quickly becoming one of the most important and inventive parts of the modern marketing mix. It can seem daunting to dive into, but this report offers a good place to start for understanding how much more comprehensive video can be as a weapon in your arsenal when you approach it with a balance of strategy, integration, and measurement.

YouTube Stars More Influential Than Big-Screen Ones, Youth Say [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“There appears to be an age trend when it comes to following stars on social media, though: 13-year-olds are far more likely to follow a YouTube (59%) than TV/movie (32%) star, while the gap is closer for 14-17-year-olds (53% and 44%, respectively). Among 18-24-year-olds, slightly fewer follow YouTube (51%) than TV/movie (54%) stars.”

This has big implications for brands with certain target demographics who are looking to do celebrity partnerships.

DEFYMedia-YouTube-Stars-Influence-Youth-Mar2015

Tracking a conversation about Facebook (and Stephen Hawking) with TweetReach Pro

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Social efforts should never live in a vacuum, and successful content marketing efforts and campaigns exist across platforms. Even ventures like launching a Facebook page can be more successful if you track how they are being discussed across other platforms; for example, people don’t just share Facebook news on Facebook, they also talk about it on Twitter.

So when The Theory of Everything- a movie about physicist Stephen Hawking’s life based on a book written by his first wife- recently premiered, and Hawking joined Facebook, we thought we’d take a look at what the conversation about the famous scientist joining Facebook looked like on Twitter. Why? It’s important to understand how your audience is talking about you in every place that they are doing so. Do they say different things about you on Facebook vs. Twitter? Do they share news of you joining a new platform like Facebook, helping you increase your reach and exposure to new potential fans and followers? These are just a few questions you can answer using something like our TweetReach Pro analytics.

How exactly do you monitor a conversation about Facebook on Twitter? Don’t worry, it’s just like setting up any other TweetReach Pro topic Tracker. Your search queries should include the hashtags you’re using on Facebook, Facebook URLs, and other terms to be sure you’re finding the full Twitter conversation about the Facebook content.

Let’s look at some highlights from our analysis below, and a few of the conclusions we drew from it.

Discussion timeline

As with most launches, the peak of the conversation around Hawking joining Facebook came right around the launch itself, then decreased until it saw a small, second peak: Stephen Hawking FB The day of the second spike, November 1st, was a Sunday, so that tells you something about this specific audience: Hawking fans spend time talking about him joining Facebook on Sunday, on Twitter, more than a week after it happens. Observing trends over time will tell you if this is an anomaly, or if Hawking fans have broader interests that bring them to Twitter on Sunday; perhaps something like #ScienceSunday.

Influencers to keep an eye on

The top ten contributors to the conversation included a lot of Spanish language accounts and one from Indonesia, which tells you Hawking fans are a global audience and not just limited to his native UK or the ties he has with the US. Hawking top contributors The most retweeted tweet also came from Spanish language Twitter account Antena3Noticias; the second and third most retweeted tweets about Hawking joining Facebook came from WIRED magazine.

Media outlets joining a discussion around your topic of interest means you can keep them in mind should you want to reach out for a story in the future. These most retweeted tweets and contributors list also tell you that in this case, you shouldn’t limit yourself to US-based media outlets either. The top URLs list confirmed this again, including links from the same Spanish language and Indonesian accounts:  Hawking top URLs

Final takeaways

This is just the insight you get from about week with a TweetReach Pro topic Tracker, looking at one specific launch. But it has already given enough information about the audience and activity times around that launch to inform a content strategy and refocus an audience profile.  The bonus takeaway is that science-related content strategies don’t have to be stuffy either: Hawking has a great sense of humor, and so does Twitter. 

Happy tracking!

Written by Sarah

November 19th, 2014 at 12:43 pm

The Week in Social Analytics #77

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

The Complete Guide to Tumblr Etiquette [from Mashable; written by Sara Roncero-Menendez]

“Whether you want to maximize your Tumblr experience or just want to learn how to participate in activities on this popular social network, here’s a complete guide to Tumblr etiquette.”

While more of a guide for personal Tumblr use than for brands, it still has some helpful tips on how communities within Tumblr operate; valuable information to any brand that wants to understand and connect to their customers.

How Whole Foods Has Commandeered Tumblr [from Business 2 Community; written by Tree Treacy]

“Dark Rye has a website, but also hosts an analogous Tumblr blog. This is a smart move on the part of Whole Foods for a couple of reasons. The first, of course, is that having multiple venues for content is a great way to reach a wider audience. Tumblr users who may not otherwise be keeping up with Dark Rye are much more likely to follow the online magazine’s blog more casually when it is on this blogging site.”

Your Field Guide to What it Means When Someone Complains About Your Brand Online [via Mack Collier]

“But before you can respond appropriately, you need to properly assess who you are responding to!”

How To Generate B2B Leads With Content Marketing [from Marketing Land; written by Arnie Kuenn]

“There are numerous tactics that can be leveraged to generate B2B leads with content marketing. In fact, 28 percent of B2B marketers reported using between five and nine content marketing tactics to drive leads, while 64 percent reported using more than nine. As you can see from these statistics, a successful B2B content marketing strategy includes a variety of methods and there is no one-size-fits-all solution.”

10 Surprising Social Media Statistics That Will Make You Rethink Your Social Strategy [from Fast Company; written by Belle Beth Cooper]

“1. THE FASTEST GROWING DEMOGRAPHIC ON TWITTER IS THE 55–64 YEAR AGE BRACKET.

This demographic has grown 79% since 2012.

The 45–54 year age bracket is the fastest growing demographic on both Facebook and Google+.

For Facebook, this group has jumped 46%.

For Google+, 56%.”

India Leads Worldwide Social Networking Growth [eMarketer; written by staff]

“This year, eMarketer estimates, 1.61 billion people will log in to social networking sites at least monthly, from any electronic device. That’s a 14.2% gain on social networker numbers from 2012, and double-digit growth is expected to continue for another year. By 2017, 2.33 billion people will use social networks.”

5 forthcoming social media advances you should know about [from iMedia Connection; written by Elisabeth Crane]

“Developing Niche Platforms

Although sites like Google, LinkedIn, and Instagram are major platforms for social media in a bigger context, niche marketing has its place in social media. In fact, many of these niche platforms will be playing a role in specific interests and activities in daily life. Applications will be considered unique to the individual user, such as connecting DIY-saavy designers or those curious to start a new cause.”

Which Social and Mobile Platforms Are Older Teens Using? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

If teens are leaving Facebook, where are they going? (Older teens aren’t leaving, it seems.)

“Given all the fuss about teens leaving Facebook, GlobalWebIndex has taken a look at the most widely-used social platforms and mobile applications by 16-19-year-olds around the world. The global survey finds that Facebook remains the most commonly used social platform, with 56% of respondents claiming to have used it in the past month. Facebook’s mobile app is next, at 43% of respondents, followed closely by YouTube’s mobile app (39%) and site (35%). There are some surprises on the list.”

Written by Sarah

November 22nd, 2013 at 10:04 am

This Week in Social Analytics #44

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

Facebook to See Three in 10 Mobile Display Dollars This Year [from eMarketer]

“Both Facebook and Twitter have benefited from their use of so-called native ad formats that are seamlessly integrated within the core user experiences of their respective products. The resulting ability for both companies to deliver mobile ad impressions at much higher volume than many traditional ad publishers has helped them capture market share very quickly.”

What Does That Second Screen Mean for Viewers and Advertisers? [from AdWeek; written by Lucia Moses]

Social television does more than just give people something to collectively chatter about on a social network; it engages them emotionally:

“When people used Facebook, Twitter or GetGlue while watching TV, their emotional engagement was 1.3 times higher than that of solo TV viewers.”

This has a lot of different implications for advertisers.

Twitter Relaunches Its Twitter For Business Site With More Content, New Video [from Marketing Land; written by Matt McGee]

“Twitter has also published a new video that, in my opinion, is the most effective messaging the company has offered yet for businesses — not just why, but also how to do business on Twitter. It’s basic and meant for beginners, but there’s a lot of information packed into a little more than two minutes.”

More from Twitter Dev: Mobile app deep linking and new cards [from Twitter's Developers blog; written by Jason Costa]

A breakdown of Twitter’s new card capabilities, straight from the development team.

4 Types of Content Consumption (Research) | Content Marketing: How We Use Multiple Devices [from Heidi Cohen's blog; written by Heidi Cohen]

Social Spider-Webbing is the opposite of Investigative Spider-Webbing in that it’s extroverted. Focused on sharing and connecting, it allows viewers to connect with others (both friends and like minded individuals) while watching live events and television shows.

Overwhelmingly social spider webbing makes solitary content consumption a social activity. More than two out of five respondents use it to connect with others. About a third use it habitually. About one in four chooses social spider webbing to enhance their enjoyment of their content consumption.”

You can find the link to the full study here.

And before you ban Facebook at the office:

Social Media: Not the Productivity Killer You Thought? [from Inc; written by Francesca Louise Fenzi]

“This tiny group of social network butterflies, however, ranked as the most efficient. Employees who belonged to more than five social networks had a 1.6 percent higher sales conversion than their counterparts and a 2.8 percent lower average call time.

While the data is interesting, it’s next to impossible to determine causation. But Mike Houseman, the managing director of Evolv, posits that performance may be linked to the sociability of employees who belong to several online networks.”

Written by Sarah

April 5th, 2013 at 9:05 am