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Twitter chat etiquette: 5 rules for being the Emily Post of Twitter chats

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Cosmo didn't have anything on Twitter chats in here, so we wrote our own. [Image via Flickr; used with Creative Commons License]

Cosmo didn’t have anything on Twitter chats in here, so we wrote our own. [Image via Flickr; used with Creative Commons License]

1. Do let your followers know you’ll be tweeting a lot for the hour of the chat

It’s a common courtesy and allows your followers to mute you if they want to for the duration of the chat. Not warning them runs the risk of an unfollow.

2. Don’t speak over the guest host

Tweet chats are meant to be interactive, so feel free to share your expertise and ask questions, but it looks rude if you’re constantly talking over the person who is meant to be the expert for that chat.

3. Don’t be overly promotional

Sharing one or two relevant links is okay, but you don’t want to run the risk of being obnoxious or looking spammy. If you have more relevant links you think chatters might be interested in, wait until the chat ends and share them, or write a roundup post about the topic and share it using the chat hashtag.

4. Do ask questions

Especially if there’s something you don’t understand! Chatters love to share knowledge and resources, so don’t be shy.

5. Don’t be combative

It’s fine to be opinionated, but don’t be obstinate. Do clarify your point if someone misunderstood what you were trying to say.

Bonus: After the chat

  • Follow people you’ve engaged in conversation with, and even send some invitations to connect on LinkedIn if it feels appropriate
  • Create a Twitter list of regular chatters
  • Share resources you come across that might be relevant to the topic, before and after the chat; all you have to do is add the chat’s hashtag to your tweet
  • Invite others to join the chat you think might be interested in an upcoming topic or guest host

Most importantly? Have fun with it! Don’t be afraid to be yourself and have a sense of humor.

Want more Twitter chat resources? Check out 10 tips for getting the most out of Twitter chats: As a participant9 tips for getting the most out of Twitter chats: As a host, and learn how you can Track Twitter chats and generate transcripts with TweetReach. Related: TweetReach Pro plans start at just $99 if you want to track a recurring chat. 

Written by Sarah

April 15th, 2015 at 11:22 am

Posted in Guides

Tagged with , ,

The Week in Social Analytics #77

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

The Complete Guide to Tumblr Etiquette [from Mashable; written by Sara Roncero-Menendez]

“Whether you want to maximize your Tumblr experience or just want to learn how to participate in activities on this popular social network, here’s a complete guide to Tumblr etiquette.”

While more of a guide for personal Tumblr use than for brands, it still has some helpful tips on how communities within Tumblr operate; valuable information to any brand that wants to understand and connect to their customers.

How Whole Foods Has Commandeered Tumblr [from Business 2 Community; written by Tree Treacy]

“Dark Rye has a website, but also hosts an analogous Tumblr blog. This is a smart move on the part of Whole Foods for a couple of reasons. The first, of course, is that having multiple venues for content is a great way to reach a wider audience. Tumblr users who may not otherwise be keeping up with Dark Rye are much more likely to follow the online magazine’s blog more casually when it is on this blogging site.”

Your Field Guide to What it Means When Someone Complains About Your Brand Online [via Mack Collier]

“But before you can respond appropriately, you need to properly assess who you are responding to!”

How To Generate B2B Leads With Content Marketing [from Marketing Land; written by Arnie Kuenn]

“There are numerous tactics that can be leveraged to generate B2B leads with content marketing. In fact, 28 percent of B2B marketers reported using between five and nine content marketing tactics to drive leads, while 64 percent reported using more than nine. As you can see from these statistics, a successful B2B content marketing strategy includes a variety of methods and there is no one-size-fits-all solution.”

10 Surprising Social Media Statistics That Will Make You Rethink Your Social Strategy [from Fast Company; written by Belle Beth Cooper]


This demographic has grown 79% since 2012.

The 45–54 year age bracket is the fastest growing demographic on both Facebook and Google+.

For Facebook, this group has jumped 46%.

For Google+, 56%.”

India Leads Worldwide Social Networking Growth [eMarketer; written by staff]

“This year, eMarketer estimates, 1.61 billion people will log in to social networking sites at least monthly, from any electronic device. That’s a 14.2% gain on social networker numbers from 2012, and double-digit growth is expected to continue for another year. By 2017, 2.33 billion people will use social networks.”

5 forthcoming social media advances you should know about [from iMedia Connection; written by Elisabeth Crane]

“Developing Niche Platforms

Although sites like Google, LinkedIn, and Instagram are major platforms for social media in a bigger context, niche marketing has its place in social media. In fact, many of these niche platforms will be playing a role in specific interests and activities in daily life. Applications will be considered unique to the individual user, such as connecting DIY-saavy designers or those curious to start a new cause.”

Which Social and Mobile Platforms Are Older Teens Using? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

If teens are leaving Facebook, where are they going? (Older teens aren’t leaving, it seems.)

“Given all the fuss about teens leaving Facebook, GlobalWebIndex has taken a look at the most widely-used social platforms and mobile applications by 16-19-year-olds around the world. The global survey finds that Facebook remains the most commonly used social platform, with 56% of respondents claiming to have used it in the past month. Facebook’s mobile app is next, at 43% of respondents, followed closely by YouTube’s mobile app (39%) and site (35%). There are some surprises on the list.”

Written by Sarah

November 22nd, 2013 at 10:04 am