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Archive for the ‘content strategy’ tag

The Week in Social #161

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It’s Friday the Thursday before an observed July 4th holiday here in the U.S., and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On storytelling.

The Secret Every Great Storyteller Knows [from Social Media Today; written by Bree Baich]

If you want to be a great storyteller, you must first and foremost be a great listener.

Digital Storytelling: How to Share Ideas in Innovative Ways [from The Buzz Bin; written by Rachel McPherson]

If you have the resources to literally immerse your audience in your content, then do it. For example, this Interactive Everest Climb from The Washington Post:

everest-promo-new

Content marketing, strategy, and inspiration from recent great campaigns and stories.

“How to” Videos – A Golden Opportunity for Brands to Generate Content [from Business2Community; written by Elizabeth Dyrsmid]

Demo your products, help your customers solve their problems, and do it all in the hot content format of the moment: video.

10 Stupidly Simple “Hacks” To Win At Content Marketing [from MarketingLand; written by Quinn Whissen]

“Content marketing is hard. But it doesn’t have to be boring.”

Read on for the author’s list of “tiny, innovative tests” that can “drive serious results”. And remember that people are lazy: Make it easy for them by creating content that will solve their problems.

Facebook content strategy is a time bomb for inbound marketing [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

“A few years ago, the major social platforms were happy to have your links to great content but now they are transforming themselves into virtual news and entertainment channels because they want you to spend time on their site, not yours.”

The landscape is changing. What do you think?

11 best social campaigns and stories from June 2015 [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

These monthly roundups from Econsultancy should go on your must reads for content marketing inspiration.

And finally, on getting that content shared, and how networks can trick us.

Five reasons people share content [from We Are Social; written by Lisa Collins]

“In his analysis of The New York Times study social media guru Jeff Bullas claims there are five reasons that we share content with others:

  1. To bring valuable and entertaining content to others
  2. To define ourselves to others
  3. To grow and nourish our relationships
  4. Self-fulfilment
  5. To get the word out about causes and brands”

So: Awe your audience. It’s that simple, and that difficult.

The Social-Network Illusion That Tricks Your Mind [from MIT Technology Review]

Meet the Majority Illusion:

Majority illussion

“They illustrate this illusion with a theoretical example: a set of 14 nodes linked up to form a small world network, just like a real social network (see picture above). They then color three of these nodes and count how many of the remaining nodes link to them in a single step.

Two versions of this setup are shown above. In the left-hand example, the uncolored nodes see more than half of their neighbors as colored. In the right-hand example, this is not true for any of the uncolored nodes.

But here’s the thing: the structure of the network is the same in both cases. The only thing that changes is the nodes that are colored.

This is the majority illusion—the local impression that a specific attribute is common when the global truth is entirely different.”

Marketers may recognize this in the form of identifying the influencers in any particular space.

Bonus read: How to Build Rapport and Pitch Media Using Twitter via SHIFT Comm.

The Week in Social #160

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On big questions, social media crisis, and the law.

Better Client Insights Begin With Why [from SHIFT Comm; written by Chel Wolverton]

“It’s important to note that while asking ‘Why?’ helps understand what the client needs, what the client needs may not always be what they want. We need to come to a mutual understanding and relationship built on trusting our experience. Our job in revealing client insights is to help them grow and prosper. Understanding ‘Why?’ helps us explain to our clients the choices we make, especially when they run contrary to their expressed desires.”

Emphasis added.

Do Social Media Crises Actually Exist? [from Social Media Explorer; written by Kat French]

Before you panic, read this:

“Heightened, alarmist language like ‘social media crisis’ creates unnecessary fear and drama around something that should be a normal part of doing business. It supports the unrealistic expectation that nothing negative will or should ever be said about your company online.

Unfortunately, managing the fallout from mistakes is a part of every business. But the odds are, unless your situation is truly unprecedented, business will soon get back to normal.”

So: Make a crisis communication plan (here’s a free tip sheet from Cision) and be prepared for the worst, but don’t panic.

Emphasis added.

What You Need to Know About the FTC’s New Social Media Ethics Q&A [from PRNewser; written by Patrick Coffee]

When in doubt, disclose. But here are some basic takeaways:

  • ‘The purchase/sale of fake ‘likes’ or followers is ‘clearly deceptive’
  • Followers participating in contests used to promote a given brand must make that fact clear (preferably by using “contest” or “sweepstakes” in the hashtag
  • The client is ultimately responsible for the individuals who post on its behalf
  • Sponsored videos should note their status in the videos themselves (information below is not good enough)

All things platform-specific

Instagram Marketing: What Instagram’s New Ad Business Means for Brands [from AdWeek; written by Francis Trapp] 

“The specializations of influencers allow brands a more refined and controlled advertising solution. The scope of aspirational categories that Instagram influencers fall into is entirely consumer-driven: From health and beauty tips, to niche diet guides and emerging fashion trends, Instagram influencers reflect what consumers want to see and want to be.

This, in turn, creates a captive market of consumers searching for the products with which they can recreate the lifestyle of an influencer.

The process is the evolved by Instagram’s ad business: The simple association between a brand and an influencer translates an unfamiliar product to an aspirational product; Instagram’s integrated external links seal the deal and make the sale.”

Just be sure you’re doing all the necessary disclosing as laid out in the FTC post above.

Emphasis added.

And finally, the best of this week on content marketing

7 Essential Roles for a Successful Content Marketing Strategy [from B2B Marketing Insider; written by Liz Bedor]

Keep these roles in mind when building a content marketing team. If you are one person performing all seven of these roles, godspeed.

Written by Sarah

June 26th, 2015 at 9:29 am

The Week in Social Analytics #155

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content strategy, content marketing, and storytelling. 

Content Strategy vs. Content Marketing: How to Get Buy-in From Decision Makers [from Business2Community; written by Michael Riley]

“Showing hard numbers will motivate any decision maker. You need to find ways to track how any “costs” can be tied to revenue growth. It helps to use technology and systems for keeping track of all the data.

The key three factors to track are:

  1. How much is a new customer worth to the business. LTV – Lifetime Value
  2. What converted them into a paying customer. CTA – Call to Action
  3. How much it cost to get them into that funnel. CAC – Customer Acquisition Cost

If the CAC is lower than the LTV, then your efforts are profitable and should be scaled up. It should just be common sense, and an easy decision to make, when done right.”

How to Execute a Carefully Thought-out Content Plan [from Spin Sucks; written by Nathan Ellering]

An in-depth guide on actually executing on that content plan you worked so hard to get buy-in for.

Storytelling In A Data-Driven, Cross-Device Era [from Marketing Land; written by James Green]

“Marketers should build stories that reach people with the information that matters to them wherever they engage — across different channels and devices.”

Platform-specific tips. 

5 Ways Brands Are Using Tumblr to Stand Out [from Entrepreneur; written by Nate Birt]

“Tumblr takes a blog-plus-the-kitchen-sink approach to storytelling, meaning brands have the flexibility to create their own template and engage with fans in ways that best suit their mission. As the fastest-growing network of 2014, Tumblr and its 420 million users deserve a second look. (Note for your sales team: Tumblr users have higher median incomes than those of Pinterest or Twitter users.)

Pepsi

10 practical Vine and Instagram video tips for brands [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

The most popular Vines from everyday users are just completely lo-fi, easy to make, and cost no money whatsoever. For brands it’s a good idea to do the same thing.

All the best Vines have a sense that they can be made by anyone, no matter what budget or skill level.”

As for Instagram:

Instagram is less aesthetically forgiving then Vine. Instagram users expect a slightly higher quality video and image than on Vine. But it’s also easier to make your videos look good.”

Emphasis original.

Video content marketing. 

Seven video marketing lessons learnt from #ThisGirlCan [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

“Lesson six: enjoy and share the response

In a surprising development, women starting making their own This Girl Can videos and sending them to Sport England, showing how inspired they were by the campaign.

These were then shared by the campaign team, which helped make a stronger community and strengthen the core message.”

Written by Sarah

May 22nd, 2015 at 9:15 am

The Week in Social Analytics #150

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On social media marketing. 

The first step in social media marketing is not social media [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

“In your B2B business, the first priority probably isn’t Facebook. If you’re creating a marketing plan from scratch, social media might not be in your top five priorities at all. . .”

Your first priority is learning the needs of your customers and where you need to be in order to best fill them. Use social media as a tool to do the latter when and where appropriate.

Top 10 Reasons for Using Social Media [from We Are Social; written by Stephanie Weise]

The top three reasons for using social media as cited in this study are passive, expected reasons: Keeping up with friends and family, getting news, entertaining themselves in their free time. But:

“Equally telling is that only 27% of internet users say that they are using social media to share details about their daily life. By some margin, this motivation is less important to networkers than sharing opinions or photos/videos. Clearly, then, many internet users have become more comfortable using social media to publish content rather than to broadcast personal details.

Emphasis added.

7th-April-2015-Top-10-Reasons-for-Using-Social-Media-798x1024

On content marketing. 

It’s spring and that makes it as good a time as ever to clean and restructure your content strategy. These three pieces will help you decide how to tackle an audit (yes you should do a comprehensive one no matter how odious it sounds) and design a sustainable content system going forward, including maintaining a steady content queue.

And more fresh marketing stats:  

B2B Marketers on Their Most Important Go-to-Market Strategies [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“As far as content marketing goes, respondents cited product videos as the most suitable for introductory and growth phases of the product lifecycle.”

Regalix-B2B-Product-Launch-Go-to-Market-Strategies-Apr2015

Pair with Digital Video Better Be up to Millennials’ Standards and US Adults Spend 5.5 Hours with Video Content Each Day, both from eMarketer.

How Are Marketers Using Data? [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Data is changing the world. According to October 2014 research by the Economist Intelligence Unit, the greater availability and use of data in business can create a ‘virtuous circle,’ with nearly two-thirds of executives worldwide reporting that information and knowledge were being shared more quickly and freely in their companies. Even though firms still report struggles and obstacles in dealing with large quantities of data, it’s improving their businesses across a range of operational and strategic functions.”

marketing data

Written by Sarah

April 17th, 2015 at 8:53 am

The Week in Social Analytics #143

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

This week it’s a lot about content marketing. 

Discomfort (And Content Marketing) Should Be at the Core of Your Communication Strategy [from Business2Community; written by Greg Hassel]

“The key to growth in 2015 for integrated marketing and communication firms and the individuals that comprise them will continue to be stepping out of traditional comfort zones. That may be embracing content marketing or it may be learning and becoming skilled in an area that’s not ‘sexy.’ But as the Leadership Now blog post states: ‘We can put ourselves into an uncomfortable position or, in time, it will be thrust upon us—and not on our terms.’”

Your 16-Point Content Publishing Checklist [from Convince & Convert; written by Arnie Kuenn]

Never hurts to have a reliable checklist to run down before a piece of content goes live.

Content Creators: Enough with the Boring [from Spin Sucks; written by Lindsay Bell]

“Learn this from Jim Henson: As a content creator, you must let go of fear. And you also must open your eyes to the world around you.

Being bombarded as we are daily with images and videos, blog posts and articles, start-ups and new high-tech gadgets, it’s easy to fall into the ‘that’s not cool, hip, innovative, edgy enough’ trap.

Don’t allow that trap to paralyze your content efforts. “

Why Your Blog Is Not Adding Business Value, and What You Can Do About It [from Marketing Profs; written by Jawad Khan]

“However, for your business blog to work effectively, you need to have a clear blogging objective that’s part of a solid content creation and promotion strategy.

If your content has real value for your readers, they will become not only loyal subscribers of your blog but also your most effective source of word-of-mouth marketing.”

Three Approaches to Effective Brand Storytelling [from Spin Sucks; written by Laura Petrolino]

“Our world is made up of stories—the stories we tell ourselves and those we hear from others. And those stories control how we view the world.

As communicators trying to create effective messages, we must understand how these stories affect our target consumer.

Also, how we can create and contribute stories to help our messaging resonate and integrate into their preexisting world view.”

9 Tips For Taking Top-Notch Smartphone Photos [from Business2Community; written by Lisa Furgison]

“Practice makes perfect and variety helps. If you take two or three shots of the same product in a different setting, you’re bound to get a slew of great pics. Eventually, you’ll have a stockpile of product shots that you can rely on.”

And a little bit about analytics. 

US CMOs Still Report Making Little Use of Marketing Analytics [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Moreover, the reported contribution of marketing analytics is not only still low, but also not improving. On a 7-point scale (where 7 represents very high contribution to performance and 1 no contribution at all), CMOs rated marketing analytics’ contribution to performance at an average of 3.2, the lowest figure since the question was first asked in August 2012.

To top it off, 7 in 10 CMOs said they do not formally evaluate the quality of marketing analytics. That figure has also not improved in the past 3 years, as two-thirds did not evaluate the quality back in February 2012.”

DukeCMOSurvey-Share-Budget-Spend-Marketing-Analytics-Feb2015

Let us know if we can help with that.

Written by Sarah

February 27th, 2015 at 8:47 am

5 ways to make the most of snapshot reports

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Our snapshot reports are a great way to get some quick analytics about a conversation or topic on Twitter, and we want to help you get the most out of them that you can! Here are five ways to make the most of your snapshots:

1. Maximize your results

Take your snapshot as soon as a tweet chat, event, or event session ends to capture the best data possible. Free snapshots include up to 50 Tweets and $20 full snapshots include up to 1,500 Tweets, both from the past couple days (up to one week back in many cases). The longer you wait to run your report, however, the better chance that you’ll miss the best data.

tweetreach #smchat

 

From our Instagram account

2. Narrow your results

Taking a snapshot of a weekly chat? Use the “since” modifier (example: #RKChat since:2015-01-30 would go in the search bar) to get results from just that day’s chat, and not any anticipatory chatter from the night before. To narrow your search in other ways to get exactly the data you want, check out this full list of advanced operators.

3. Plan your research

Running a few free reports around keywords, topics, or different hashtags can help you narrow your focus and decide which will be worth paying for a full snapshot, or even going Pro if you’ve got that option in your budget.

4. Scope out the competition

A snapshot of an account can give you a quick idea of that account’s recent activity; which tweets are the most retweeted? Is that the same kind of content you should be looking at and sharing? It’s a great jumping off point for planning your content calendar.

5. Scope out influencers

Which brands and personal brands have the best tone and approach to Twitter in your industry? Run a few snapshots to find common threads and use them to enhance your Twitter content strategy moving forward.

Give it a try! Run your own free snapshot report right now.

Written by Sarah

February 12th, 2015 at 8:36 am

The Week in Social Analytics #135

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It’s the first Friday of 2015 and time for the year’s first This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

Content Marketing

17 Ideas On How To Do Clever Content Marketing [Jeff Bullas]

Kickstart your 2015 content marketing with these ideas.

35 Tactics To Improve Your 2015 Content Marketing [Heidi Cohen]

Includes 10 big 2015 content marketing predictions.

Content Marketing Tips: Sage Advice from World Class Writers [from Social Media Today; written by Jimmy Rodela]

The #1 writing tip from some of the best-known bloggers inside and outside of the industry.

And finally, from Stanford Smith, Your 12 Point Content Marketing Strategy (Part 3 of 4) and Your 12 Point Content Marketing Strategy (Part 4 of 4).

Charts and Stats

56 Reasons Why Content Marketing Works [Michael Brenner]

  • Where Are We Coming From? Last year we created 50 Stats You Need to Know About Content Marketing, which garnered over 200,000 views. This year we’re taking it a step further, demonstrating not only why you should invest in Content Marketing, but why you need to as well.
  • Where Are We Going? Content marketing is not a tactic, it’s a long-term strategy. The best content marketers prove the value of their efforts, showing how content drives brand awareness, lead generation, engagement, and sales. The following slides will demonstrate the value of Content Marketing and how it can help build your business. We hope you can walk away with a better understanding of Content Marketing – and even convince your CEO – why this should be your number one marketing priority.”

Who’s Using Which Social Networks? [Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Only 15% of US adults say they are not a member of any social networks, finds YouGov in a newly-released survey, with this figure higher among men (18%) than women (12%).”

YouGov-US-SocNet-Adoption-by-Gender-Dec2014

Written by Sarah

January 2nd, 2015 at 9:20 am

This Week in Social Analytics #70

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Top 3 Challenges B2B Leaders Face Today | INFOGRAPHIC [from Social Media Today; written by Louis Foong]

Understanding the Direct Marketing vs. Brand Marketing Conflict [from Social Media Explorer; written by Jason Falls]

“It’s not one or the other, but one feeding the other that works best.”

Six Visual Solutions To Complex Digital Marketing/Analytics Challenges [from Occam's Razor; written by Avinash Kaushik]

On a social content strategy:

“Write about topics both of you [you + your potential customers] are interested in. If you sell smoothies, talk about food, how to develop a great palette, travel, evolution, agriculture, the future of the planet… the topics are endless.

Provide utility. Share tips on how to make my life better. Share tips on a healthy lifestyles, exercise, wellness of children, latest relevant mobile apps…. the topics are endless.

Your customers have given you permission to interrupt their day. Don’t suck at it. Be respectful of their attention. Create a warm space in their heart for your brand. Contribute something incredible, of value.

That is the only way to win big.”

avinash_ embarassing_social_strategies

avinash_incredible_social_media_strategy

 

 

How All Star Code is Getting More Young, Black Males into Tech [from Fast Company; written by Christina Chaey]

“‘A lot of people in our community have a problem admitting that to work in technology, you often are a skinny, upper-middle-class white guy,’ says Kane Sarhan, a cofounder of the apprenticeship-based education startup Enstitute and the day’s instructor. ‘These organizations aren’t just saying there’s a massive problem. They’re putting a stake in the ground and saying, There are no black people here or There are no women here.’”

New Stats Show Nearly One Fifth Of US Internet Users Are On Twitter | CHART [from AllTwitter; written by Lauren Dugan]

Can Social Media Save NASA—And The Rest Of The Science World? [from ReadWrite; written by Selena Larson]

“But this might be a great time for NASA’s huge social media following to turn their tweets into action and let Washington know: science is essential to them.”

Let’s Play 20 Questions: Social Media Measurement Style [from MetricsMan; written by Don Bartholomew]

Questions range from opinions on how social media should be addressed in education, to non-profit and B2B considerations and various measurement concerns across the board. Example:

Q10. Any suggestions to measure business impact for B2B organizations? Is there a way to understand the impact of social for B2B organizations?

A10. Most B2B companies have a focus on sales leads. Therefore demonstrating how social is helping create leads or improve lead closure rates is important. There are a lot of uses of social listening in B2B companies as well – how the company is positioned on key issues, who is talking about the company, how products and services are being discussed, etc.”

Social Media & The Law – 11 Things You Need to Know Now [from Top Rank; written by Eliza Steely]

“Essentially there are three things you can do to protect yourself online:

  • Attibute, Quote, Cite…however you have to identify your non-original material
  • Use common sense. If you don’t want someone posting that about you, don’t post it about someone else. If you’re worried about clicking “send” or “post” there’s probably a reason, so don’t do it
  • Know the rules. It’s easier to break them if you pretend they don’t exist, but doing so opens you up for litigation, and backlash in an arena where news travels fast.

A Scientific Guide to Maximizing Your Impact on Twitter, Facebook, and Other Digital Media [from Fast Company; written by Belle Beth Cooper]

“So my suggestion would be to use this guide as just that–a guide to help you work out what to test for in your own audience, so that you can see what actually works best in your specific case.”

Most Companies Believe Social’s Risks Are Avoidable, But Few Assess Them [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“When asked to rank 6 potential risks when using social media, respondents from private companies were most likely to choose negative comments about the company as the top risk, followed closely by disclosure of proprietary information. Respondents from public companies most often ranked disclosure of proprietary information as their top risk, while the exposure of personally identifiable information was the top choice for the second spot.”

Written by Sarah

October 4th, 2013 at 9:30 am