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Archive for the ‘comedy’ tag

3 non-traditional use cases for TweetReach historical analytics

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We’ve already looked at 5 ways to use our premium historical analytics, including an in-depth look at how to use them to build brand voice, and now we want to go over some more non-traditional use cases for them.

Even if you’re part of a more traditionally minded marketing team, these could inspire some new approaches to your content strategy. Plus, we’ve paired each of these use cases with a more traditional marketing takeaway.

1. Journalism

Use our historical analytics to see how a story broke out on Twitter, and how it spread. How did the people on the ground at the incident share information? Did local and national news sources communicate with them and contact them to be interviewed for newscasts, or did they send their own people ? How were those journalists’ social media reports different from those of civilian witnesses? A journalist who was on Twitter when a story broke and might have most of this information cataloged in screenshots already could use our historical analytics to fill in any remaining gaps in the story. New story leads or witnesses could be discovered in this way, and investigated or interviewed.

Traditional marketing takeaway: This is the same style of research you can employ to see how a social crisis broke and spread on Twitter, and help build your own crisis communication plan accordingly.

2. Comedy

Running low on material? Reach back through past periods on Twitter to rework some old jokes into something new for your next standup show or writing gig. Likewise you can look at another funny person you admire’s timeline to see how their skills developed over time, inspiring new joke styles, approaches to writing, or even just timing.

Traditional marketing takeaway: If it fits with your brand, don’t be afraid to be funny. Have you used humor in your content strategy in the past? See how those tweets performed vs. neutrally toned tweets that were conveying similar types of information. If it doesn’t fit with your brand, don’t force it.

3. Charity

Running a charity campaign on social media is tricky; you want to strike just the right balance of reaching the maximum amount of people in and just outside of your network who might be interested in contributing, without annoying them. Know of a campaign that nailed it? Use historical analytics to sample their campaign, or even study the entirety of it and model your own approach after theirs.

Traditional marketing takeaway: Use this same approach to study a past campaign that your company- or a competitor- has run either successfully or to lackluster results. What worked and what didn’t? Use that to inform how you plan and execute your next campaign in the same space.

Want to get started and learn more?

Fantastic! You can read more about our premium historical analytics here, and even request a quote. And remember, we can analyze anything and everything ever posted to Twitter, all the way back to the very first public Tweet posted in March 2006.

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Written by Sarah

October 14th, 2014 at 11:39 am

Twitter’s first comedy festival: by the numbers

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Twitter and comedy are no strangers, but last week saw something unprecedented in 140 characters or less: a comedy festival held entirely on Twitter. Comedy Central’s #ComedyFest pulled in some of the biggest names that already joke on Twitter daily, in addition to those established comedians completely new to the platform, such as Mel Brooks.

#ComedyFest gave us his first- and only- tweet.

The festival officially ran April 29-May 3, and featured a variety of events, ranging from moderated discussions on comedy, to individual comedians live-tweeting Ambien trips and television shows, and even included Twitter roasts. Reach for the week peaked on the first day, April 29:

4.7k tweets from 3.3k contributors reached 28.7 million unique Twitter accounts on that day, a nice chunk of the overall 17.6k tweets from 10.3k contributors over the entire week (a little under ¼ of total tweets and ⅓ of the total contributor amounts, respectively).

Mel Brooks’s first and only tweet was the second-most retweeted on April 29, second only to one from Workaholics actor Adam DeVine.


But one of the more interesting- and certainly the newest- uses of the platform during the festival was found at the bottom of the retweet list:

#ComedyFest VINE

Cartoonist and writer Marlo Meekins used the new six-second video app Vine to create some intriguing and funny video segments during #ComedyFest, including this one of a cartoon cat running rampant across her legs and another of her throwing away the loading icon from the video. Clever and the result of careful work (one mishap while recording a Vine and you have to start over from the beginning) these show a fantastic potential future for comedic media.

While perhaps not an earth-shattering success, Twitter’s first comedy festival did see solid participation and was fantastic exposure for some up-and-coming comedians to be billed alongside the more established. While famous names might attract more followers, a space like Twitter evens the playing field when it comes to activities like live-tweeting a show via hashtag; every joke made with the hashtag ends up in the same place for interested people to scroll through, giving newbies a chance to get noticed and followed by fans and other comedians alike.

Overall, with the rise of multitasking on a second screen while watching TV in America, it makes sense to take entertainment where the people are already talking about it.

Written by Sarah

May 7th, 2013 at 3:15 pm

Posted in Events

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