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The Week in Social Analytics #138

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On campaigns and measurement 

Beyond Impressions and Reach: Connecting Campaigns to Conversions [from Marketing Profs; written by Stacy DeBroff]

“By keeping our clients’ business objectives in mind and implementing tactics that can map to those goals, we can handcraft social media and digital campaigns that change consumer behavior. And when we do that, we can dramatically prove out our value to the C-suite in a far more profound way than through reach numbers.”

How To Drive Measurable Social Media Results [from Heidi Cohen]

“But it’s difficult to yield measurable social media results on any social media network, based on AOL via Converto research. That’s because social media interaction tends to occur in the middle of the purchase funnel.

“Understand that social media is best at building awareness since it reaches a broad cross section of customers before, during and after they purchase.”

On content marketing 

Where Is Content Headed? [from B2B Marketing Insider; written by Michael Brenner]

“Storytelling and corporate social responsibility will stop being labeled buzzwords and will become business imperatives as consumers connect with the brands who do it well and who do it consistently.”

The Only Thing You Need to Know About Content Marketing Strategy [from Social Media Today; written by Lacy Boggs]

“Here’s the key: When it comes right down to it, nobody is going to care if your videos are shot on a fancy-pants video camera or your trusty iPhone — if the information is valuable and useful to them.

Action tip: Focus on creating valuable content in a variety of formats to create a content marketing plan that works for you.”

EGC is the Key Content Marketing Trend [from Convince & Convert; written by Jay Baer]

EGC = Employee Generated Content

“Consider your own experiences in the wild. If you go to Lowe’s and ask the guy in the blue vest how to work on a project, you listen and believe it more than if you just read something on their website. The personal (and personality) layer inherent in EGC matters.”

4 Types of YouTube Videos PR & Marketing Pros Should Make [from Cision; written by Teresa Dankowski]

“Video has the power to find and retain consumers, create brand recognition, boost engagement and convert sales. But what kind of videos, exactly, should your brand be posting on YouTube? Here are four types of videos PR and marketing pros should make:

  1. Tutorials
  2. Campaign Kickoffs
  3. Authentically showcase offerings
  4. Reinforce brand values”

Click through to the full article for details and examples for each type of video from brands who are already executing this style of content well.

Everything else 

Three digital marketing mega trends for 2015 [from Econsultancy; written by Ashley Friedlein]

“Let us start with the bombshell. There isn’t anything new on the digital marketing horizon for 2015 that excites me much in isolation. “

Definitely worth a read.

6 Tips To Build A Strong Social Media Customer Service Plan [from Wade Harman]

“When you are able to successfully listen as a brand, then you have succeeded in looking beyond the numbers and what the data can tell you about any one thing. It helps you to stay informed and personal with the follower and the customer, and they will always tell you what they need.”

4 steps to use metrics from a past campaign to improve a future campaign

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Everything in life is a learning experience, but sometimes it seems that social media campaigns can teach us particularly frustrating lessons. You can meticulously research best practices for campaigns in your industry across social platforms, and still get results below expectation. That doesn’t mean that campaign was a complete failure; it’s just telling you that your customers, fans, and followers don’t fit neatly into the best practice mold. 

So take this opportunity to meld any best practice suggestions with what you’ve learned to be true about your audience. How? All you need is your most recent Twitter-based campaign and these four steps to get started.

Step 1: Get your data, and decide what went well.

Hopefully you set up comprehensive tracking before you launched the start of your campaign, or took something like regular snapshots during its execution in order to track its performance. If you didn’t, don’t panic. We offer premium historical Twitter analytics that can get however much or little campaign information you need from the past into the present. Either way, once you have your data it’s time to dig in and take a look. First, the good news; what went well? Collect your best-performing tweets and set them aside until we get to step 3.


Twitter campaign

 

Pay attention to what causes spikes in your reach; did you get a boost from an influencer? Be sure to nurture your relationship with them!

Step 2: Decide what went badly, and ask yourself some honest questions.

Find the tweet that got the lowest engagement, and ask yourself some questions about why its engagement was so low:

  • Was it the time that you posted it compared to others?
  • Did it have an image?
  • Did it have hashtags?
  • How many hashtags?
  • Was there an Instagram link without an image directly uploaded to Twitter?
  • Was there a link to a blog post, but no image or hashtags?

You get the idea. Figure out the common threads between successful tweets, and figure out the common threads between your least successful tweets and base your next campaign’s content off of the former.

Step 3: Utilize specific insights from steps 1 and 2 to decide what you can do better.

From your analysis of what went well and what went not-so-well, choose a set of criteria around which you’ll plan your next campaign. Be sure to include the following:

  • Time of day: Post during the times that yielded the best results before, and avoid the least-engaged times.
  • Hashtags: Note the number used in successful tweets, which particular hashtags performed well, and identify some new ones to try out. Did you have a dedicated campaign hashtag? Test one this time around.
  • Content type (images etc): Did tweets with images perform better? What style of image? Did one style perform better on Twitter vs. Instagram? Were your images and branding cohesive?
  • Repeated post performance: Did you post the exact same tweet several times, or tweaked versions? Did you use the same content across platforms?
  • Promotion from team: Did your team help promote the campaign from their personal accounts, where appropriate? Encourage them to do so, or with different tactics in your next campaign.
  • Promotion from brand advocates: Identify who the biggest influencers and advocates around your campaign were and nurture the relationship. This will make them more likely to be an influencer in your next campaign as well.

Step 4: Plan what to measure with your next campaign.

Once you have your content plans in place, plan what you’re going to track, and how you’re going to track it. Once that campaign has ended, do a side-by-side analysis of the two campaigns to get an even clearer picture of how your fans, followers, and customers engaged with your content. If you do this with every campaign, they can only get stronger.

Written by Sarah

December 16th, 2014 at 9:02 am

FX’s ‘Archer’ nails it with social media

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Archer’s 4th season premieres on FX on January 17th, but fans going through withdrawal have had something special to keep them occupied while waiting for the new episodes – FX set up some very entertaining social media accounts for three of the show’s main characters. In honor of the upcoming new season, we thought we’d take a closer look at this fantastic social campaign.

ISIS Head of HR Pam Poovey graces both Twitter and Facebook with her presence; Secret Agent Sterling Archer, whose Facebook page is the main page for the show, also has his own Twitter account; and the world’s most unsettling Head of Applied Research, Dr. Algernop Krieger is on Facebook and Twitter.

What’s notable about Archer’s social media is the amount of work put into these accounts. They all interact with each other in the voices of the characters. Some updates include new creative content that has been created explicitly for Twitter and Facebook; others include stills from past episodes of the show.

It’s not just snippets of text; it’s Pam taking a selfie in a Three Wolf Moon-inspired shirt.

The best part? This isn’t a social media campaign run by a faceless agency. Pam Poovey’s Twitter account is run by none other than the actress who voices her, Amber Nash, and voice talent Lucky Yates runs Krieger’s accounts. This makes the banter between those accounts so much more enjoyable; the actors get to have fun inhabiting their characters and taking them out for verbal runs at each other between episodes.

Tweets are often also automatically posted to Facebook. At least one fan seems to prefer to see different content on the separate platforms (danger zone!).



Sometimes posts will show up on Twitter that aren’t on Facebook, however:

This is probably related to the specific nature of the content. According to the Archer Live! Tour, the actors have been asked to tone it down a little to better fit within the norms of the social platforms.

The accounts post similar content to both Twitter and Facebook, but now try to fit the content to the appropriate channel. For example, the Archer Facebook page and the Archer Twitter account both responded to a tweet from Lucky Yates as Krieger, but the content was formatted differently for each site. On Twitter: 

And the Facebook version:


This is an improved use of both platforms, since early tweets from Pam that also went to Facebook would simply cut off on a longer message, with a link to her profile to read the rest. Adapting the content to fit each specific platform is a smarter way to manage a transmedia campaign across multiple channels. Fans don’t necessarily want to switch from one network to another to read the full conversation.

While the accounts don’t respond to fans who reply to them, that hasn’t hurt the engagement at all. Fans use the #ArcherFX hashtag along with the characters and the channel’s official Twitter account, and more than a million people were reached through thousands of tweets during first two weeks of January leading up to the season premiere. Activity spiked on Saturday, January 12th, the night of the last Archer Live! Tour date. This final show of the four-city tour took place at Irving Plaza in New York City, and you can read a great recap of it on Uproxx, if you’re interested.

This sort of integrated social TV campaign is a great example of what many shows have started to do both between and during seasons. It’s an effective way to engage and reward loyal fans of the show by sharing behind-the-scenes content, while simultaneously drawing in new fans who might be intrigued by what they see and want to tune in to the new season.

Giving the voice actors the freedom to run social accounts for the characters they’ve been portraying for years is also ingenious. It feels more authentic for fans, who can tell when something is written in Pam or Krieger’s voice, which leads to higher engagement rates and increased enthusiasm for the upcoming season.

FX knows their audience well, and is doing great work in social media by participating in the conversation about their show – in the characters’ voices – where their fans are having that conversation. And it’s completely awesome. Definitely not babytown frolics.

Written by Sarah

January 16th, 2013 at 11:28 am

Posted in Trends

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