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The Week in Social Analytics #138

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On campaigns and measurement 

Beyond Impressions and Reach: Connecting Campaigns to Conversions [from Marketing Profs; written by Stacy DeBroff]

“By keeping our clients’ business objectives in mind and implementing tactics that can map to those goals, we can handcraft social media and digital campaigns that change consumer behavior. And when we do that, we can dramatically prove out our value to the C-suite in a far more profound way than through reach numbers.”

How To Drive Measurable Social Media Results [from Heidi Cohen]

“But it’s difficult to yield measurable social media results on any social media network, based on AOL via Converto research. That’s because social media interaction tends to occur in the middle of the purchase funnel.

“Understand that social media is best at building awareness since it reaches a broad cross section of customers before, during and after they purchase.”

On content marketing 

Where Is Content Headed? [from B2B Marketing Insider; written by Michael Brenner]

“Storytelling and corporate social responsibility will stop being labeled buzzwords and will become business imperatives as consumers connect with the brands who do it well and who do it consistently.”

The Only Thing You Need to Know About Content Marketing Strategy [from Social Media Today; written by Lacy Boggs]

“Here’s the key: When it comes right down to it, nobody is going to care if your videos are shot on a fancy-pants video camera or your trusty iPhone — if the information is valuable and useful to them.

Action tip: Focus on creating valuable content in a variety of formats to create a content marketing plan that works for you.”

EGC is the Key Content Marketing Trend [from Convince & Convert; written by Jay Baer]

EGC = Employee Generated Content

“Consider your own experiences in the wild. If you go to Lowe’s and ask the guy in the blue vest how to work on a project, you listen and believe it more than if you just read something on their website. The personal (and personality) layer inherent in EGC matters.”

4 Types of YouTube Videos PR & Marketing Pros Should Make [from Cision; written by Teresa Dankowski]

“Video has the power to find and retain consumers, create brand recognition, boost engagement and convert sales. But what kind of videos, exactly, should your brand be posting on YouTube? Here are four types of videos PR and marketing pros should make:

  1. Tutorials
  2. Campaign Kickoffs
  3. Authentically showcase offerings
  4. Reinforce brand values”

Click through to the full article for details and examples for each type of video from brands who are already executing this style of content well.

Everything else 

Three digital marketing mega trends for 2015 [from Econsultancy; written by Ashley Friedlein]

“Let us start with the bombshell. There isn’t anything new on the digital marketing horizon for 2015 that excites me much in isolation. “

Definitely worth a read.

6 Tips To Build A Strong Social Media Customer Service Plan [from Wade Harman]

“When you are able to successfully listen as a brand, then you have succeeded in looking beyond the numbers and what the data can tell you about any one thing. It helps you to stay informed and personal with the follower and the customer, and they will always tell you what they need.”

4 steps to use metrics from a past campaign to improve a future campaign

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Everything in life is a learning experience, but sometimes it seems that social media campaigns can teach us particularly frustrating lessons. You can meticulously research best practices for campaigns in your industry across social platforms, and still get results below expectation. That doesn’t mean that campaign was a complete failure; it’s just telling you that your customers, fans, and followers don’t fit neatly into the best practice mold. 

So take this opportunity to meld any best practice suggestions with what you’ve learned to be true about your audience. How? All you need is your most recent Twitter-based campaign and these four steps to get started.

Step 1: Get your data, and decide what went well.

Hopefully you set up comprehensive tracking before you launched the start of your campaign, or took something like regular snapshots during its execution in order to track its performance. If you didn’t, don’t panic. We offer premium historical Twitter analytics that can get however much or little campaign information you need from the past into the present. Either way, once you have your data it’s time to dig in and take a look. First, the good news; what went well? Collect your best-performing tweets and set them aside until we get to step 3.


Twitter campaign

 

Pay attention to what causes spikes in your reach; did you get a boost from an influencer? Be sure to nurture your relationship with them!

Step 2: Decide what went badly, and ask yourself some honest questions.

Find the tweet that got the lowest engagement, and ask yourself some questions about why its engagement was so low:

  • Was it the time that you posted it compared to others?
  • Did it have an image?
  • Did it have hashtags?
  • How many hashtags?
  • Was there an Instagram link without an image directly uploaded to Twitter?
  • Was there a link to a blog post, but no image or hashtags?

You get the idea. Figure out the common threads between successful tweets, and figure out the common threads between your least successful tweets and base your next campaign’s content off of the former.

Step 3: Utilize specific insights from steps 1 and 2 to decide what you can do better.

From your analysis of what went well and what went not-so-well, choose a set of criteria around which you’ll plan your next campaign. Be sure to include the following:

  • Time of day: Post during the times that yielded the best results before, and avoid the least-engaged times.
  • Hashtags: Note the number used in successful tweets, which particular hashtags performed well, and identify some new ones to try out. Did you have a dedicated campaign hashtag? Test one this time around.
  • Content type (images etc): Did tweets with images perform better? What style of image? Did one style perform better on Twitter vs. Instagram? Were your images and branding cohesive?
  • Repeated post performance: Did you post the exact same tweet several times, or tweaked versions? Did you use the same content across platforms?
  • Promotion from team: Did your team help promote the campaign from their personal accounts, where appropriate? Encourage them to do so, or with different tactics in your next campaign.
  • Promotion from brand advocates: Identify who the biggest influencers and advocates around your campaign were and nurture the relationship. This will make them more likely to be an influencer in your next campaign as well.

Step 4: Plan what to measure with your next campaign.

Once you have your content plans in place, plan what you’re going to track, and how you’re going to track it. Once that campaign has ended, do a side-by-side analysis of the two campaigns to get an even clearer picture of how your fans, followers, and customers engaged with your content. If you do this with every campaign, they can only get stronger.

Written by Sarah

December 16th, 2014 at 9:02 am

How to measure a Twitter campaign with TweetReach

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You’ve planned out your Twitter campaign; you’ve strategized and you’re ready to launch. Now, how to measure the impact of those tweet? (You want solid numbers that reflect all of your hard work, after all.) You have several options with TweetReach, depending on your budget and time.

Twitter measurement doesn’t have to be a bear. [Image courtesy of the New York Public Library Digital Gallery]

Use our free snapshot reports as soon as you launch your campaign, and capture information at the end of every day. Do it ASAP to get the best info – tweets are only available for a few days. No account is required, but you can create one to save your reports- extra backups never hurt! Are you getting more participation than anticipated? Purchase a full report and capture up to 1500 tweets about your campaign. Just 20 bucks.

I want to set up everything once, not have to worry about capturing data every day.

Set up an ongoing, real-time TweetReach Pro Tracker and it will capture all your results from the beginning of your campaign to the end. And no 1500-tweet limit, so it’s great for larger conversations. Each Tracker monitors up to fifteen search queries, so you can track all iterations of your campaign hashtags (hey, people make spelling mistakes!) and keywords. You can later edit your Trackers once they’ve started, if you see participants start using their own hashtags or other keywords you also want to track.

What if I want to go back at the end and capture data for something I missed initially?

Say you notice halfway through your campaign that participants have created their own extra hashtag or started using keywords you didn’t anticipate, and you want to capture that data. Or maybe you didn’t remember to set up tracking in advance, or you just got an analytics budget. We can access any older tweets with our premium historical analytics. No matter how far back or how many tweets, we can get to anything from Twitter’s full archive, all the way back to March 2006.

Have you used TweetReach to track a campaign? How’d it go? Tell us about it in the comments!

Written by Sarah

April 30th, 2013 at 4:20 pm