TweetReach Blog

Quick tip for hashtags at a conference: #smx at a glance

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The Search Marketing Expo ( SMX or #smx on Twitter) kicked off yesterday in Las Vegas, and is continuing today. If you’re there now, check out our 7 tips to maximize your conference attendance using Twitter. If you couldn’t make it like us, check out our 5 tips for getting the most out of the hashtag on Twitter for a conference that you missed.

We went ahead and took some quick snapshot reports of the conversation around #smx and that brings us to our takeaway for a conference-enhancing quick tip; they’re smartly setting up different sub-hashtags for each session to go along with the conference’s main hashtag. This makes for easier tracking of particular sessions whose topics are most relevant to what your brand is interested in.

To capture a particular session in a snapshot, all you have to do is include both hashtags, like this:

#smx #13aOr include the session number and letter as a keyword in addition to the hashtag, like this:

#smx 11A

 

Either method will capture the data that you’re after to get an idea of the overall conversation. So once you have your snapshot reports, what next? What does this tell you about the overall conversation around something as a big as a conference?

We recently covered this with 3 ways to use TweetReach snapshot reports to complement real-time Twitter monitoring for your events looking at #commsweekny as an example. Just like with #commsweekny, these snapshots for #smx help you:

  1. Get the big picture quickly; what’s the overall estimated size of the conversation? Who are the top contributors and which are the most retweeted tweets?
  2. Build relationships with attendees by looking at the snapshot report’s contributors list and tweets timeline, and
  3. Easily share these stats with attendees

These insights are valuable from any perspective: someone interested in attending #smx who could not, someone who is attending, or even the team behind #smx. Additionally, with the use of session-specific hashtags or keywords, you get a more precise idea of who is influential in each topic: Session hosts will be clear, as attendees will be quoting what they have to say, and you can network with both those interested in learning more about a session’s particular topic or who are already well-versed in it. Check the session highlights and keep an eye on the main #smx feed on Twitter to hone in on the session topics most important to you, and grab some snapshots around them.

So even if you can’t afford to attend a certain conference or go TweetReach Pro to comprehensively track the conversation around it, there is still plenty of value to be found in strategic snapshot reports.

Want even more on Twitter and conferences? Here are 16 ways to use Twitter to improve your next conference

Written by Sarah

November 20th, 2014 at 11:05 am

Tracking a conversation about Facebook (and Stephen Hawking) with TweetReach Pro

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Social efforts should never live in a vacuum, and successful content marketing efforts and campaigns exist across platforms. Even ventures like launching a Facebook page can be more successful if you track how they are being discussed across other platforms; for example, people don’t just share Facebook news on Facebook, they also talk about it on Twitter.

So when The Theory of Everything- a movie about physicist Stephen Hawking’s life based on a book written by his first wife- recently premiered, and Hawking joined Facebook, we thought we’d take a look at what the conversation about the famous scientist joining Facebook looked like on Twitter. Why? It’s important to understand how your audience is talking about you in every place that they are doing so. Do they say different things about you on Facebook vs. Twitter? Do they share news of you joining a new platform like Facebook, helping you increase your reach and exposure to new potential fans and followers? These are just a few questions you can answer using something like our TweetReach Pro analytics.

How exactly do you monitor a conversation about Facebook on Twitter? Don’t worry, it’s just like setting up any other TweetReach Pro topic Tracker. Your search queries should include the hashtags you’re using on Facebook, Facebook URLs, and other terms to be sure you’re finding the full Twitter conversation about the Facebook content.

Let’s look at some highlights from our analysis below, and a few of the conclusions we drew from it.

Discussion timeline

As with most launches, the peak of the conversation around Hawking joining Facebook came right around the launch itself, then decreased until it saw a small, second peak: Stephen Hawking FB The day of the second spike, November 1st, was a Sunday, so that tells you something about this specific audience: Hawking fans spend time talking about him joining Facebook on Sunday, on Twitter, more than a week after it happens. Observing trends over time will tell you if this is an anomaly, or if Hawking fans have broader interests that bring them to Twitter on Sunday; perhaps something like #ScienceSunday.

Influencers to keep an eye on

The top ten contributors to the conversation included a lot of Spanish language accounts and one from Indonesia, which tells you Hawking fans are a global audience and not just limited to his native UK or the ties he has with the US. Hawking top contributors The most retweeted tweet also came from Spanish language Twitter account Antena3Noticias; the second and third most retweeted tweets about Hawking joining Facebook came from WIRED magazine.

Media outlets joining a discussion around your topic of interest means you can keep them in mind should you want to reach out for a story in the future. These most retweeted tweets and contributors list also tell you that in this case, you shouldn’t limit yourself to US-based media outlets either. The top URLs list confirmed this again, including links from the same Spanish language and Indonesian accounts:  Hawking top URLs

Final takeaways

This is just the insight you get from about week with a TweetReach Pro topic Tracker, looking at one specific launch. But it has already given enough information about the audience and activity times around that launch to inform a content strategy and refocus an audience profile.  The bonus takeaway is that science-related content strategies don’t have to be stuffy either: Hawking has a great sense of humor, and so does Twitter. 

Happy tracking!

Written by Sarah

November 19th, 2014 at 12:43 pm

The Week in Social Analytics #128

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

On content strategies. 

Harnessing the Power of Micro-Content [from dustn.tv; written by Dustin W. Stout]

“A good content marketing strategy incorporates regular micro-content distributed throughout social media that will keep your audience engaged.”

Read on for what makes a great micro-content strategy.

3 Unique Ways Brands Are Approaching Content Creation [from Convince and Convert; written by Jessica Gioglio]

“From offering a free place to stay in exchange for original content, to building dedicated content studios and partnering with creators, these companies are showcasing the value of re-evaluating how content is produced while aligning with brand goals and consumer interests.”

Use these examples to inspire your own strategy.

Convince Your Boss To Use Video Content Marketing [from Heidi Cohen]

“. . .video content supports sales, based on the following data about US adults from Animoto.

  1. 94% have watched a video in the last week.
  2. 73% are more likely to purchase after viewing a video. (Note: Other research showed that 53% of respondents were influenced to purchase by a YouTube video.)
  3. 83% prefer videos that are 5 minutes or less in length. (Note: Informational videos must be short to grab your audience’s attention. You must engage them within the first 20 seconds or they’re gone.)
  4. 58% believe that viewing a company video builds trust.
  5. 89% have shared an educational video.

A great roundup of research around video content marketing.

B2B-Content-Tactics-Used-2015-B2B-Content-Marketing-Benchmarks

 

via 2015’s B2B Content Marketing Benchmark survey by Content Marketing Institute and MarketingProfs

On social platforms. 

The Art of a Tweet, Part 2: Corporate Tweeting [from Social Media Today; written by Dana Strokovsky]

“Here are a few items to keep in mind when creating a social voice:

  • Content pillars
  • Filters (do’s and don’ts)
  • Categories and specific breakdown of audience
  • Platform consideration
  • Imagery guidelines”

How B2B Businesses Can Use Instagram [from Maximize Social Business; written by Jenn Herman]

“Instagram is about visually connecting with your audience. Find fun, unique, and creative ways to share your business through images and videos and you’ll be surprised at the results from your audience and customers.”

On marketing strategies. 

Fear Is The Biggest Barrier To Real-Time Communications [from Lewis PR; written by staff]

“‘This is our opportunity: we know about this real-time idea. Never as a profession have we had a bigger opportunity than right now to spread the idea of how important public relations is, throughout the organisation…The biggest barrier I see to all of this is that four letter word that begins with F. The biggest barrier is fear.’”

Watch the YouTube video directly here.

How To Execute The 80/20 Of Your Social Media Marketing [from Business 2 Community; written by Maria Peagler]

1. Identify Your Marketing Goals

Can you articulate the goals for your marketing? According to a recent survey of SMOC members, their top three business goals are:

  1. Grow their business
  2. Get more sales
  3. Develop a personal brand

Awesome! Now, exactly what is your plan for doing that?”

Top Five Questions Marketers Should Always Be Asking Themselves [from Marketing Profs; written by Preeti Upadhyaya]

“When you approach marketing decisions from your audience’s perspective, you’ll end up with much stronger, targeted messages that speak to your potential customers. And by asking these five questions every day, you will produce focused, targeted messages that convert your audience into customers.”

 

Written by Sarah

November 14th, 2014 at 9:39 am

#CometLanding: Finding influencers and more using TweetReach snapshot reports

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Yesterday, for the first time in history, humanity managed to land a robot roughly the size of a washing machine (named Philae) onto a comet moving 40k mph through space. Twitter had a lot to say about it using the #cometlanding hashtag, so we took two full snapshot reports to compare the conversation on the day of the landing to the day after.

What can comparing snapshot reports tell me?

Full snapshot reports are limited to 1500 tweets, so extremely popular Twitter conversations like those around big public events tend to max them out quickly, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t still a lot to learn from what they capture! By comparing snapshots from two days back-to-back, you get an idea of who the most influential people and organizations in the conversation are, which you can continue to monitor by taking a few more days of snapshots, either free or full (free will just give you slightly more limited data). Alternatively you can use them as research to set up a TweetReach Pro Tracker around a similar topic in the same area of interest: Now you know which accounts to monitor, and you can look at those to see what kinds of hashtags they regularly use, etc, to get the most out of your Tracker.

So what did these two snapshots tell us?

The conversation on day two almost matches that of day one in terms of intensity, telling us that Twitter’s interest in Philae’s historical landing hasn’t wavered much from that of landing day:

#cometlanding day 1

#cometlanding day 2

This tells you it’s still a popular topic to work into your content schedule! And day two is ripe for original content. The first day had a lot more original information being broadcast; the breakdown of tweets vs. retweets was almost even, whereas today has seen a lot more retweets and fewer original tweets. This helps you hypothesize about the nature of the conversation: Perhaps on day one, everyone watching tweeted about how excited they were to watch the landing, from professionals down to amateur observers. On day two, maybe excited space and science enthusiasts are sharing information with their followers from official accounts. To confirm this, simply check the tweets timeline on your snapshot reports:

#cometlanding tweets timeline day 1

 

Day one Tweets Timeline: Tweets from laypeople excited about the #cometlanding

 

#cometlanding tweets timeline day 2

 

Day two tweets timeline: More RTs of official accounts with news and photos from Philae 

What about those influencers you mentioned?

No problem. The most retweeted tweets each day both included the official Twitter account for the Philae lander.

#cometlanding most RTd day 1 #cometlanding most RTd day 2

 

While NASA is an account you might have assumed would be influential in space and science conversations, BBC news might be less expected. And perhaps you didn’t know Philae had its own account!

Still have questions?

Leave ‘em in the comments. Like what our snapshots can tell you, and interested in going further with TweetReach Pro? Join us for a demo on Thursday, November 20th at 9:00am PST, or email us to set one up sooner!

Written by Sarah

November 13th, 2014 at 10:30 am

3 things non-profits can learn from the UN’s #UNDay

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UN Day

The United Nations (UN) recently celebrated 69 years of global service, and they celebrated with an awareness campaign using the hashtags #UNDay and #happybirthdayUN across social media. While not every non-profit enjoys the name recognition and historical establishment of the UN, non-profits of any size can take some tips away from this campaign to use for their own.

1. Using #UNDay to highlight the work they consistently do.

Non-profits constantly have to prove that they are worth continuing to support- even those as established as the UN- and it can be an exhausting process to generate consistent content on a limited budget that captures attention and encourages donations, or even just sharing. The UN took #UNDay as an opportunity to remind their followers of the work they do on a daily basis to improve the world, reinforcing the need for their nearly seven decade existence.

And they did so from more than just their main account:

Using a hashtag in this way across properties is a fantastic educational opportunity; some followers might not have realized that UNICEF was formed by the UN. These also happened to be three of the most retweeted tweets using the #happybirthdayUN hashtag.

2. Tapping into related organizations to boost their potential exposure, and therefore potential engagement.

Many non-profits are small and do not have several accounts to cross-promote their mission and work from. However, they still have the opportunity to reach out to similar organizations to help them promote their campaigns (a promise to do the same for them in the future could set up a healthy reciprocal social relationship for both, and even lead to future collaborative projects that would enhance the reach of both organizations!).

Alternatively, non-profits can reach out to government officials and news organizations to help boost their message. The UN had a lot of contribution to the UN Day conversation from these types of accounts; using something like the TweetReach Pro top contributors list can highlight who helped spread the word from requests, and who spread it of their own volition. Be sure to thank both kinds of contributors!

UN Day Top Contributors

3. Using platforms other than Twitter, but not in a way that strains resources.

The UN posted to their Instagram account about #UNDay as well, but repurposed a lot of the images and copy they used on Twitter and Facebook. The best approach to cross-platform campaigns with limited resources is to start with fantastic visual content and general copy, then tweak each of those things to fit each platform the content is being shared on. 

For example, a photo from this video posted on Twitter. . .

. . .was repurposed as a still on Instagram with similar, but tailored, information on it about how they work for peace.

UN Day peace

Similarly, they used the same image in a banner for their Facebook page that discussed UN Day.

UN FB banner post change

BONUS: Tap into established hashtags like #TBT that have spread across the web.

The UN shared the same Throwback Thursday (#TBT) image on Instagram and Twitter, in slightly different ways. Using established and popular hashtags with appropriate content puts your message in front of new eyes who might not have known about your non-profit, but could now be inspired to learn more.

Written by Sarah

November 11th, 2014 at 9:08 am

Posted in Events

Tagged with , ,

The Week in Social Analytics #127

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

On platforms

You Can Put A Price On Pinterest [from Heidi Cohen]

“Pinterest users are highly active on other social media networks according to Global Web Index. As a result they don’t need the same input from family, friends and colleagues that they get from other social media platforms.”

On emotions and trust

Why trust is vital if brands are to make the most of consumer data  [from Econsultancy; written by David Moth]

“Digital technology has given marketers access to an unfathomable amount of customer data, however it should be used in a responsible manner for risk of destroying consumer trust.”

how much trust do you have in comanpanies

Four ways social media impacts emotional branding [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

  1. We build relationships with brands like we build relationships with our friends. It takes many positive interactions over a period of time.
  2. Loyalty trumps everything. If the world turns upside-down, your loyal customers will be there. So our ultimate goal is to create loyalty.
  3. It is impossible to achieve true brand loyalty in the long-term without emotional connection.
  4. Emotional connection comes when we feel a brand becomes part of our self-identity.

Funny, followers and follow back; how social cues affect our perceptions on Twitter [from Marketing Pilgrim; written by Cynthia Boris]

“But without evening knowing it, your choices are based on social proofs that you’ve picked up in a split second – unconscious cues that help you quickly decide what’s worth your time and what isn’t.”

Also covered by Digiday with Why people don’t like your brand on Twitter, in five charts.

Twitter Tone of Voice

On B2B

Understanding the Channels: An Overview of Social, Mobile, Digital and Traditional Marketing for B2B [from Forbes; written by Daniel Newman]

Marketing strategies must overlap

At some point, your marketing strategies need to converge to give you the best outcomes. For instance, if you are selling software, you can find new customers and educate or inform the existing ones about new products or updates through social media and/or the use of video in creative ways. But, if you sell farming equipment, you might split your marketing efforts into two ways – social media for educating customers, combined with traditional methods like direct mail, banner ads or TV spots to help you do the actual selling.”

The Content Habits of B2B Enterprise Marketers | Infographic [from Marketing Profs; written by Ayaz Nanji]

“More than half (53%) of B2B enterprise marketers spend fewer than two hours a day engaging with industry content. Moreover, 31% say they probably overestimate how much time they spend with this sort of content.”

Pair with B2B Content Marketing Trends for 2015 [Infographic] also from Marketing Profs.

On measurement and everything else

How #TechnologyAndStuff Became GM’s Oreo Moment [from Social Media Today; written by Mark Schaefer]

“This small victory gives me hope. If a bureaucratic company with 1,000 lawyers like GM can embrace an embarrassment and use social media in a wise and fun way, maybe there is hope for all of us! Here is what they did right:

1) In a PR crisis, they cut through the bureaucracy to let the storytellers, instead of the lawyers, run the show.

2) They responded IMMEDIATELY and set the tone for the reaction. If they had reacted in a formal or legalistic way, they would have become part of the controversy instead of part of the fun. They would have reinforced an image of being stiff and out of touch instead of being playful and cool — like their trucks.

3) Instead of focusing on the bumbling #ChevyGuy and the negative implications for the brand, they hijacked the meme with #TechnologyAndStuff which is still funny but also connects the brand to something positive. And stuff.

In a world where traditional media often pokes fun at social media mess-ups, it is refreshing to see a traditional media mess-up become a social media success story.”

Pair with Why Brands Should Stop Idolizing Oreo’s Social Media Strategy, also from Social Media Today.  

The Danger Of Focusing Expectations On A Single Metric [from Marketing Land; written by Kendall M. Allen]

“When doing our business, marketing plan and any given initiative within it justice — do we always slow down and really think through what we are trying to accomplish and why? Do we take the time to lay out the strategy and tactics, and then determine the various (operative word: various) things we should care to learn?”

What Fashion Designers & Publicists Need to Know about Product Photography [from PR Couture; written by Lori Riviere]

Quality product photography enhances a consistent brand image.

 

Written by Sarah

November 7th, 2014 at 8:33 am

3 ways to use TweetReach snapshot reports to complement real-time Twitter monitoring for your events

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For monitoring tweets about large events we always recommend creating a plan and setting up TweetReach Pro Trackers ahead of time so that you capture the full set of tweets for your analysis. That doesn’t mean, however, that our snapshot reports can’t act as a great complement to your in-depth tracking. Here are three reasons why:

1. Get the big picture quickly

Before you have time to dig into all of the information in your TweetReach Pro Tracker, you can grab a snapshot report for quick insight into the size of the conversation around an event hashtag, who the top contributors were, and which tweets were the most retweeted. Here’s a great example of a snapshot from Communications Week, which took place in New York last week:

CommsWeekNY

2. Build relationships with attendees

From the lists of top contributors and most retweeted tweets in your snapshot, make sure you’re following active event participants. You can also use these lists to engage with or thank them for their contribution to the event conversation. Pay attention to who these accounts also follow and retweet to help further build your own network on Twitter; these are good target accounts as they are likely to be a part of or interested in your industry. Building strong relationships with the right people can lead to reciprocal partnerships in the future, even if it’s just giving each other little PR boosts through retweets down the line.

To make this even easier, every Twitter username mentioned in your snapshot report is a clickable link that takes you to their Twitter account. You can also retweet or reply directly from your snapshot. Here’s an example from a snapshot of SocialMedia.org, whose summit started yesterday:

TweetReach snapshot report

 

3. Easily share stats with attendees

Since snapshot reports are so quick to run, you can easily share a snapshot report at the end of each day of your event, or even at the end of a big panel or keynote to give everyone in attendance – and those watching via Twitter – an idea of how that conversation went. Attendees can share the report with their followers, or use it in writing their own recap posts of their experiences. This also gives others interested in your event a better idea of what kind of content and conversation it produces, encouraging them to book for the next year if it lines up with their business.

Want more on event tracking with TweetReach?

Be sure you’re getting the most out of your snapshot reports by keeping things simple. And if you want more on how to track social media engagement with your events with Union Metrics, check out some of our other posts on marketing your conference across platforms: Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr, as well as marketing your conference across platforms: Snapchat and Pinterest.

Written by Sarah

November 4th, 2014 at 9:46 am

The Week in Social Analytics #126

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

On content and storytelling. 

The Five Parts to Brand Storytelling Nearly Everyone Misses [from Spin Sucks; written by Gini Dietrich]

“There are five essential parts to brand storytelling.

They include: Passion, a protagonist, an antagonist, a revelation, and the transformation.”

What Corporate Storytellers Can Learn From Fairy Tales [from Lewis PR; written by Sander van Buuren]

“A good narrative at least contains the following elements:

Setting – scene where the story takes place
Character – description of the protagonist of the story
Theme – description of what the story is about
Plot – series of events that tell the story
Conflict – struggle of the protagonist with itself or other forces
Climax – part where the conflict builds up to its peak
Resolution – end of the story when the conflict is being resolved”

Is there a “content pattern” that builds a brand? [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

“. . .if you have ever been lucky enough to have something rise up the charts for a day or two, you will attest to the fact that after a short spike in traffic, viral content rarely has a long-term effect on your business.

Instead, you need something more robust, more consistent, to build a real business around your content and YouTube revealed a plan that just might be the answer.”

The Role Content Plays In B2B Social Selling [from Marketing Land; written by Rebecca Lieb]

“Without “content,” all you have left in social sales is “social,” i.e., a platform, a forum or a social network. Devoid of content, all these channels amount to empty containers.”

How to Make Your Content Relatable and Actionable [from KISSmetrics; written by Asher Elran]

“If your content is not appealing to your audience on a personal level, it will be overlooked. Content must be relatable and actionable in order to increase user attention span. So, it is important to find out what content your audience relates to, and then create a plan to boost it across all the platforms you use.”

On social sharing.

Are You Missing These 5 Social Sharing Powerhouses? [from Heidi Cohen]

“Here are 7 key social sharing findings from The Psychology of Sharing: Why People Share Online research conducted by The New York Times Consumer Insight Group and Latitude Research.”

Why-we-share-on-social-media-via-New-York-Times-e1414414916798

On live events and real-time marketing. 

4 Powerful Ways to Integrate Social Media Into Your Live Event [from Social Media Explorer; written by David Saef]

“Your social media presence is so much more than a promotional tool for live events. If you stop using social media when the event starts, you’re cutting off the conversation far too soon and throwing away a significant community-building opportunity.”

Real-Time Marketing Is Now Right-Time Marketing [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“The definition of ‘real-time marketing’ is changing. Many now refer to it as ‘right-time marketing.’ The difference is subtle, but important: Something delivered at the right time doesn’t necessarily have to be created in real time. Even if it was developed days or weeks before, if it is delivered at the optimal moment, it feels real time.”

RTM now right time marketing

Written by Sarah

October 31st, 2014 at 8:43 am

The World Series on Twitter: #HunterPenceSigns

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Casual watchers of the World Series may have noticed some interesting signs popping up in the broadcasts of the games; signs aimed at San Francisco Giants player Hunter Pence. Giants fans may have noticed that these signs started popping up in August, and that they even have their own hashtag: #HunterPenceSigns.

We took a full snapshot report to get an idea of what the conversation around this hashtag looks like:

Hunter Pence Signs 1

Our full snapshot reports max out at 1,500 tweets, but you can see that you reach that limit in around two days with this specific hashtag. The conversation is mostly tweets and retweets, with the fewest amount of tweets being replies. This suggests it’s more about creating and sharing these jokes than critiquing them.

Hunter Pence Signs 2

 

The top contributors to the hashtag within the confines of this snapshot were San Francisco news station KTVU, and the “official” Hunter Pence Signs account. A Kansas City news station holds the top spot for most retweeted tweets, however, keeping the rivalry going in every way possible.

The above tweet was retweeted by KTVU

What does Hunter Pence himself think about all of this?

He seems to be a pretty good sport about it.  

Written by Sarah

October 28th, 2014 at 2:28 pm

The Week in Social Analytics #125

0 comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

On your customers 

Whose Story Are You Telling? [from Social Media Today; written by Tamara Dull]

Privacy is important; remember that the information you’re gathering about your customers is their life, and treat it accordingly.

What is customer experience and how do you measure it? [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

The biggest challenge marketers often face is making nebulous concepts measurable. Here’s a little help with that.

How Brands Are Falling Short With Consumers [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“. . .the Edelman survey identifies several areas in which brands can improve in order to build and maintain effective connections with consumers. For example, while 78% of respondents feel it’s important (top-2 box on a 5-point scale) that brands respond quickly to people’s concerns and complaints, just 17% feel that brands perform well in this respect. And while 59% believe it important that brands give consumers many ways to ask questions and give opinions, only 18% feel that brands are delivering in this area.”

Edelman-How-Brands-Fall-Short-With-Consumers-Oct2014

Emphasis added.

On content marketing 

6 Awesome Ways to Rejuvenate Old Content on Your Blog [from Social Media Today; written by Nick Allen]

Consistently producing high quality content requires a lot of time and resources that we don’t always have. Here are some tactics for making the most out of what you already have in your archives. Pair with How to Turn Your Old, Forgotten Content Into Your New Secret Weapon.

10 Ways To Create Contagious Content for Your Social Media Marketing [from Jeff Bullas; written by Vinay Koshay]

“The better understanding you have of the mind of your audience, the more effectively you’ll be able to create shareable content.”

How to Create a Content Marketing Strategy [from Convince & Convert; written by Jay Baer]

A 7-step presentation to help you get started.

“2. What’s Your One Thing?

What will you create in your content marketing program that sets you apart? There is an enormous glut of content (and more on the way). Will you be disproportionately useful? Will you create Youtility (I say YES!). Will you be disproportionately motivational, inspirational, or otherwise? What is the heart and soul of your content program?

Remember: give yourself permission to make the story BIGGER.

On platforms

How to Build a Unique Visual Brand on Twitter [from All Twitter; written by Lauren Dugan]

“Tweets that contain images consistently perform better than tweets without. Images make your tweet stand out because not only are they eye-catching, but they make your tweet appear larger in your follower’s timelines – a huge boon in the real-time frenzy that is Twitter.”

Yahoo ‘Letting Tumblr Be Tumblr’ Works for Social TV Marketers [from Lost Remote; written by Karen Fratti]

“…Tumblr is less immediate than Twitter or Facebook and it is more about ‘what you do,’ rather than ‘who you know.’ For this reason, it provides television marketers a place to engage on a deeper level with fans.”

On knowing the rules and facing challenges 

How to Avoid the FTC’s Ire When Advertising on Social Media [from Inc; written by Jeremy Quittner]

“Social promotions are all the rage now, but don’t get caught up in deceptive advertising schemes.”

Conquer Today’s Top B2B Content Marketing Challenges [from SHIFT Communications; written by Amanda Grinavich]

Examines the top three challenges cited in MarketingProfs’ latest B2B Content Marketing 2015 Benchmarks, Budgets & Trends report and attempts to help combat them.

Written by Sarah

October 24th, 2014 at 9:10 am