TweetReach Blog

The Week in Social Analytics #131

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On Content Marketing and predictions for 2015. 

Content Marketing Minds: 13 Provocative Content Marketing Predictions for 2015 [from Social Media Today; written by Jean Spencer]

It’s that time of year; get your predictions in and plan for 2015! Pair with Your 2015 B2B Social Media Predictions Are Totally Wrong. Or Maybe They Are Totally Right! for balanced reading.

20 Content Marketing Tips Guaranteed To Yield Results [from Heidi Cohen]

Another great research roundup from Heidi Cohen.

What Do Nonprofits Want from Content Marketing? [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“While fundraising ranked as the No. 1 content marketing goal among nonprofit professionals polled in August 2013, cited by 79%, it fell far down the list this year, topped by brand recognition and customer-focused goals.”

content marketing nonprofit

Twitter: What to expect in 2015 [from Mashable; written by Seth Fiegerman]

Standalone apps? A curated timeline? See what’s in store for 2015.

On strategy. 

Finding Your Mission, Vision, Values, and Strategy [from SHIFT Communications; written by Christopher Penn]

Can you fit your corporate mission into a single tweet?

“Forced brevity tends to help create clarity, because you can’t stuff a corporate mission statement filled with jargon and meaningless words into 140 characters. Forced brevity can help to distill out what your company’s true mission and vision are.”

How to Use Brand Storylines to Spark Social Media Engagement [from Convince and Convert; written by Jeremy Miller]

“Brand Storylines shift the customer experience and plant the seeds of a relationship, because they start with a conversation. The conversation opens things up. They let you share ideas and engage your market in a dialogue. And they let you have conversations with purpose — conversations clearly linked with your brand.”

On everything else.

Blending Social Media & Traditional Marketing this Holiday Season [from LinkedIn Pulse; written by Mandy Edwards]

If your company is stuck on the traditional and you want to incorporate some social media marketing into the mix this holiday season, here’s how to marry them well.

Are Men or Women More Brand-Loyal? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

Naturally, it depends.

“So, it seems that the gender comparison not only depends on the category, but the region also. It’s also worth noting that in each country, for each gender, and for each category, a majority described themselves as being open to alternative brands rather than being loyal to specific brands. The study’s authors note that ‘In some categories, openness to alternative brands is shaped by the fact that many feel there are no trusted brands already in the category.’ So there’s that…”

IpsosFleishmanHearst-US-Brand-Loyalty-by-Category-Gender-Dec2014

Written by Sarah

December 5th, 2014 at 9:10 am

Announcing our new free Instagram account checkup & updated Instagram analytics dashboard!

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We’ve got two huge pieces of news! First, we just launched our brand new free Instagram account checkup tool. Second, we’ve released a big update to our pro Instagram analytics. Read on for more about both.

Free Instagram Account Checkup

Today we released our brand new free Instagram account checkup! Just sign in and you’ll get a quick report with stats and insights about your Instagram activity. This is our first free Instagram analytics offering, and we’re really excited about it. With our new free report, you’ll be able to answer questions like:

  • When’s the best time to post to Instagram?
  • Who are your top fans?
  • Which hashtags get the most engagement?
  • What kind of content should you post?

Get your free Instagram account checkup now! You’ll have fresh, hot insights in just two minutes.

Account Checkup Hashtag Detail

Above, an example of your hashtag insights, and below, an example of insights into the best time for you to post. Account Checkup Time to Post Detail

Updated Analytics Dashboard for Pro Subscribers

We’ve also just rolled out a big update for our paid Instagram analytics subscribers. Our new top-level dashboard includes an insight stream that automatically highlights key metrics and helps you decide exactly what to do next to improve engagement. It also includes at-a-glance Tracker comparisons and trend data across all accounts or hashtags you’re monitoring. The new additions will help you learn more about:

  • What posts, videos and hashtags are popular
  • Who’s active or influential in a particular community
  • How one Instagram account’s performance compares to others
  • Important changes in metrics like follower growth and likes or comments
  • Exactly what to do next to improve post engagement

If you’re interested in trying our professional Instagram analytics out for yourself, plans start at just $99 per month and you can learn more here.

Dashboard Overview

Please let us know if you have any questions or want to see a demo!

Written by Sarah

December 4th, 2014 at 9:02 am

The Week in Social Analytics #130

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

Since this week is a holiday week in America, we’re keep it short, sweet, and half holiday-shopping focused!

On social media marketing. 

How To Get Started With Instagram For B2B Social Media Marketing [from Business 2 Community; written by Brit Kern]

Visual content isn’t going anywhere in 2015. Use this to get you started, along with our Brands on Instagram series.

10 Common Reasons Why Content Marketing Isn’t Working for You [from KISSMetrics; written by Neil Patel]

Do your content marketing efforts seem to constantly be stalling? Try troubleshooting with these ten reasons why that might be happening.

1-how-b2b-marketers

How Coke & Denny’s React To Real-Time Events On Social Media [from MarketingLand; written by Mark Traphagen]

“Being able to respond and engage even to casual or non-obvious mentions of your brand provides opportunities to surprise and delight social media users. However, these increased opportunities are accompanied by heightened expectations from a brand’s fans.

‘The world has changed; the way we work must change,’ Miller stated.”

The Gap Between Big Data and Big Insights: Turning data into engaging stories [from Brian Solis]

“It’s not unlike saying social media, mobile, real-time, wearables, etc. They’re just buzz words. It’s what we do with them that counts.”

Emphasis added.

On holiday marketing. 

4 Things You Can Learn From Non-Profit Social Media Success [from Marketo; written by Shanna Cook]

Non-profits often pull off amazing social success with limited budgets and resources, making them a fantastic inspiration.

Five Ways to Turn New Holiday Customers Into Loyal, Year-Round Patrons [from Marketing Profs; written by Tom Caporaso]

Don’t lose them after the holiday buying cycle.

Why Fake Holidays Are Your Best Defense Against Competition This Black Friday [from Inc Magazine; written by Diana Ransom]

It might sound crazy, but it just might work for you like it worked for the woman behind cake pops. Yes, those cake pops.

Written by Sarah

November 28th, 2014 at 8:04 am

The most popular #BlackFriday hashtags (and the most mentioned brands!) on Twitter

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Whether you’re scouring for deals on social, or you’re a brand who’s trying to get the word out about them, check out these top ten hashtags around the Black Friday conversation on Twitter:

  1. #BlackFriday
  2. #CyberMonday
  3. #KohlsSweeps
  4. #deals
  5. #giveaway
  6. #sale
  7. #Samsung
  8. #Christmas
  9. #Thanksgiving
  10. #Retail

What sales are being talked about the most? Here are the ten most-mentioned brands and products so far.

  1. Amazon
  2. Walmart
  3. Apple
  4. Kohl’s
  5. Best Buy
  6. Target
  7. iPhone
  8. GalaxyS5
  9. Samsung
  10. Microsoft

Apple is definitely leading with 4 of the 10 mentions, but Kohls is running a very popular Black Friday Twitter contest.

Feel like you can’t compete with the big brands? Use the knowledge of which hashtags are the most popular to see which perform the best for your brand; it may be that popular hashtags give your content a boost, and it may be that your tweets get lost in the noise. Only testing will tell! Want another tactic? Consider creating your own holiday, rather than trying to compete with big brands that have bigger budgets and resources.

Written by Sarah

November 26th, 2014 at 12:00 pm

Union Metrics holiday support hours

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The Union Metrics support team will be around to answer all of your questions throughout the final weeks of 2014. However, please allow us a little extra time to return your calls and emails on the following dates, as we’ll be a reduced staff over the holidays.

  • Thursday, November 27 – Friday, November 28
  • Wednesday, December 24 – Friday, December 26
  • Wednesday, December 31 – Thursday, January 1

On these days, we will return all non-urgent requests within 24 hours and urgent requests as soon as possible. As always, you can get in touch with us in many ways. Email is the fastest way to get through to us during the holidays.

Happy holidays!

Holiday Support

Written by Sarah

November 26th, 2014 at 7:00 am

Posted in Help

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3 ways to take advantage of social media in football stadiums

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NFL Game Day

From the NFL’s official Instagram account

Many NFL and college football stadiums have built-in wifi to help fans post to their social accounts during games, but teams are still trying to figure out to take advantage of social media IN the stadium. We have three suggestions for how to get fans to increase their existing social activity, or start posting if they aren’t already.

1. Make it worth your fans’ while

Consider working with vendors to create and share some social-only deals during the game. Customers will get used to routinely checking their accounts for deals on hotdogs, drinks, merchandise and more during games. Just make sure they know about it ahead of time by promoting it across social media leading up to games and by announcing it around the stadium with physical collateral.

Want to take it a step further? Organize a contest to meet one of the players, be an official game photographer for five minutes, or take a game ball home. You could also organize social contests to win tickets to a game, or special VIP seats and treatment, increasing your reach when the winner shares their experience and tags your accounts in it! It’s also possible that a winner who is a casual fan will be motivated to invest more on tickets, merchandise, and more for future seasons because they had such a great experience.

2. Show some behind-the-scenes action

While this may, at first, seem counter intuitive- after all, if you’re posting it on social media anyone anywhere can see it, not just those in the stadium- if done correctly you can encourage more casual fans to want to be in the stadium where the behind-the-scenes action is taking place.

How? Talk to the social media teams behind each team, and see what kind of content they can work up that gives a feeling of access to what players, coaches, supporting staff, and overall teams go through leading up to a game. If the content is good enough, you can foster some serious FOMO (fear of missing out) for those not experiencing the action both in real life and on their screen; they’ll want to be the ones explaining to their buddies in the seat next to them exactly what everyone was doing that lead up to that great scoring play.

3. Be consistent

This is a major rule of playing in social in general: The more consistent you are with your content, the more your existing audience is going to stick around and engage with you, and the more new fans and followers will be encouraged to become just that in first place. If they come to your profiles in the offseason and don’t see plans for what you’re going to be doing when things start back up again, they’ll be less interested in checking back in later.

If you are posting consistent, engaging content even in the offseason- sharing how teams plan, how players train, what else goes on in keeping a stadium up and running that most fans never think about- they’ll be even more excited for official season activities to launch because they’re so much more a part of the entire process.

And it all starts with some good, strong, in-stadium wi-fi.

Written by Sarah

November 25th, 2014 at 11:02 am

Posted in Guides

Tagged with , ,

NFL fans and Instagram: 5 steps to follow fan activity

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NFL fans

From the @nflfanstyle Instagram account, a good start at UGC content and fostering fan engagement

To keep your fans’ attention, you’ve got to meet them where they are, and they are definitely on Instagram. User-generated content is an important part of a robust social strategy that engages your fans and followers; it’s exciting for them to know that you’re paying attention to what they’re posting for a sports team that they love, and that they might even have a chance to be featured on an official account or win a prize from their activity.

Step 1: Follow the general #NFL hashtag on Instagram.

What kinds of content do you see? Click around on some of the photos, keeping an eye out for those that seem like they were posted (or at least taken, we’ll get to that in a minute) during a game. What do they have in common? You will want to pay attention to those that fall into two categories: Those posted from an off-site watch party such as their home, a bar, or a friend’s house, and those posted from the stadium itself.

If your aim is to boost engagement from fans who are in the stadium during games, pay attention to the captions on photos, as well as the other hashtags being used. Are they posting a photo taken in the stadium, but uploading it from a different location after the game, or even days later, because they couldn’t get service in the stadium? The hashtag #latergram is a big indicator here.

What other hashtags should you look for? That’s in the next step.

Step 2: Check out related hashtags used on those #NFL posts.

What other hashtags are people using? If you see a lot of #latergram, you know you need to do something like implement better wifi in your stadium so fans don’t have to rely on using their cellphone data or an overcrowded network that isn’t reliable. Pay attention to any other recurring hashtags from the fans you’re wanting to connect with. Is there an organic hashtag they’ve created around their favorite teams or players? Which ones are you seeing over and over? Make a note of them, because you’ll need them in the next step.

Step 3: Track and listen.

Using something like our Union Metrics for Instagram analytics, set up some monitoring around the hashtags that specifically target the fans you want to reach. Concentrate on any hashtags fans have created and spread to one another. These will give you unparalleled insight into how fans discuss teams, players, and their overall experience with being an NFL fan.

Step 4: Implement a plan to increase engagement where you want it

Now that you have an idea of what the existing conversation is like, you can make a plan for how to improve it. Would more fans post during games if you improved wifi or cell service in the stadium? Do fans seek an incentive, like contests or social-only deals that go out during a game? How else can you increase engagement from fans?

Figure out what it is, make a plan, and make it happen.

Step 5: Measure, rinse, repeat.

Once you have some benchmark numbers from your initial analysis, make sure you keep checking to see if your engagement levels are increasing with each new step that you implement, like upgrading service connections in the stadium, for example, or before, during, and after a contest. This will tell you what’s working and what’s not, to let you know what you should keep doing more of and give you new ideas for content and strategy moving forward.

Anything else?

This doesn’t just apply to the NFL either; these same steps can work for college football or any other sports you’re interested in.

Have specific questions about how to make that happen, or how you can start using our Union Metrics for Instagram analytics? Leave us a comment, or shoot us an email. We’re always happy to help!

Written by Sarah

November 24th, 2014 at 8:23 am

The Week in Social Analytics #129

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

We’re deep into Q4, so a lot of this week’s content is based around what will help you plan your 2015 content marketing strategy.

On content marketing. 

Why Content Marketing Fails…and How It Can Succeed [from Cision; written by Brian Conlin]

A short list of who to blame for your failures, followed by some actionable tips to take with you into your content planning for 2015.

Copywriting: Brevity is the soul of marketing [from Marketing Experiments; written by John Tackett]

“If there is one simple takeaway from this test, from my point of view, it’s that brevity is the heart of relevance and the soul of marketing. . .Clearly communicating what you can do with a product is likely to generate more relevance and appeal for email recipients over the long run.”

The same goes for images; choose an image that clearly and simply represents what you’re trying to get across to customers.

How to Repurpose Your Content Into an Ideal SlideShare Deck [from Marketing Profs; written by Chris Brown]

“Business executives use SlideShare at a rate that’s five times greater than their rate of use for other social networks, comScore reports.

Repurposing your content for SlideShare is easy and helps you to get more mileage out of an existing investment.”

Pair with this great deck on social listening from #SMX.

Charts and stats. 

10 Stats That Will Impact Your 2015 Content Strategy [from Kapost; written by Katrina Pfannkuch]

1. Only 35% of B2B content marketers have a documented content strategy.
If you aren’t part of this 35% of B2B content marketers, what’s stopping you?

A content strategy is no longer a “someday” project for an intern; it’s what’s going to help you keep your skin in the game and increase the number of “touch points” for connecting with your target audience.

Why everything you’re doing to engage fans is wrong…in a single chart [from Marketing Pilgrim; written by Andy Beal]

Fans prefer to stay in touch using brand sites

Keep in mind this is just one chart from one survey of around 1200 people. It’s important to keep up with industry trends, but it’s  also more important to pay attention to what your customers do. If your customers are routinely contacting you on Twitter with customer service queries, then that’s where you need to be consistently.

On digital marketing and storytelling. 

Part 1: Evolving Your 2015 Comms Strategy with Digital Storytelling [from Lewis PR; written by Ruth Mathias]

 “Sixty per cent of decision-making happens before any direct contact with a brand. This means if you’re not effectively engaging your prospective customers online your competitors are already way ahead of you. Marketers need to effectively influence a buyer’s journey across every channel and touch point.”

Don’t Ask For Faster Horses: Embrace Revolutionary Change In Digital Marketing [from Marketing Land; written by David Rodnitzky]

“Rather, the point is this: ten years from now, what will people that look back at internet marketing today see as the obvious shifts in the ecosystem that most marketers missed or ignored, and how can you make sure you recognize these changes now? How do you make sure you ask for a car and not a horse?”

Emphasis added.

Written by Sarah

November 21st, 2014 at 8:33 am

Quick tip for hashtags at a conference: #smx at a glance

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The Search Marketing Expo ( SMX or #smx on Twitter) kicked off yesterday in Las Vegas, and is continuing today. If you’re there now, check out our 7 tips to maximize your conference attendance using Twitter. If you couldn’t make it like us, check out our 5 tips for getting the most out of the hashtag on Twitter for a conference that you missed.

We went ahead and took some quick snapshot reports of the conversation around #smx and that brings us to our takeaway for a conference-enhancing quick tip; they’re smartly setting up different sub-hashtags for each session to go along with the conference’s main hashtag. This makes for easier tracking of particular sessions whose topics are most relevant to what your brand is interested in.

To capture a particular session in a snapshot, all you have to do is include both hashtags, like this:

#smx #13aOr include the session number and letter as a keyword in addition to the hashtag, like this:

#smx 11A

 

Either method will capture the data that you’re after to get an idea of the overall conversation. So once you have your snapshot reports, what next? What does this tell you about the overall conversation around something as a big as a conference?

We recently covered this with 3 ways to use TweetReach snapshot reports to complement real-time Twitter monitoring for your events looking at #commsweekny as an example. Just like with #commsweekny, these snapshots for #smx help you:

  1. Get the big picture quickly; what’s the overall estimated size of the conversation? Who are the top contributors and which are the most retweeted tweets?
  2. Build relationships with attendees by looking at the snapshot report’s contributors list and tweets timeline, and
  3. Easily share these stats with attendees

These insights are valuable from any perspective: someone interested in attending #smx who could not, someone who is attending, or even the team behind #smx. Additionally, with the use of session-specific hashtags or keywords, you get a more precise idea of who is influential in each topic: Session hosts will be clear, as attendees will be quoting what they have to say, and you can network with both those interested in learning more about a session’s particular topic or who are already well-versed in it. Check the session highlights and keep an eye on the main #smx feed on Twitter to hone in on the session topics most important to you, and grab some snapshots around them.

So even if you can’t afford to attend a certain conference or go TweetReach Pro to comprehensively track the conversation around it, there is still plenty of value to be found in strategic snapshot reports.

Want even more on Twitter and conferences? Here are 16 ways to use Twitter to improve your next conference

Written by Sarah

November 20th, 2014 at 11:05 am

Tracking a conversation about Facebook (and Stephen Hawking) with TweetReach Pro

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Social efforts should never live in a vacuum, and successful content marketing efforts and campaigns exist across platforms. Even ventures like launching a Facebook page can be more successful if you track how they are being discussed across other platforms; for example, people don’t just share Facebook news on Facebook, they also talk about it on Twitter.

So when The Theory of Everything- a movie about physicist Stephen Hawking’s life based on a book written by his first wife- recently premiered, and Hawking joined Facebook, we thought we’d take a look at what the conversation about the famous scientist joining Facebook looked like on Twitter. Why? It’s important to understand how your audience is talking about you in every place that they are doing so. Do they say different things about you on Facebook vs. Twitter? Do they share news of you joining a new platform like Facebook, helping you increase your reach and exposure to new potential fans and followers? These are just a few questions you can answer using something like our TweetReach Pro analytics.

How exactly do you monitor a conversation about Facebook on Twitter? Don’t worry, it’s just like setting up any other TweetReach Pro topic Tracker. Your search queries should include the hashtags you’re using on Facebook, Facebook URLs, and other terms to be sure you’re finding the full Twitter conversation about the Facebook content.

Let’s look at some highlights from our analysis below, and a few of the conclusions we drew from it.

Discussion timeline

As with most launches, the peak of the conversation around Hawking joining Facebook came right around the launch itself, then decreased until it saw a small, second peak: Stephen Hawking FB The day of the second spike, November 1st, was a Sunday, so that tells you something about this specific audience: Hawking fans spend time talking about him joining Facebook on Sunday, on Twitter, more than a week after it happens. Observing trends over time will tell you if this is an anomaly, or if Hawking fans have broader interests that bring them to Twitter on Sunday; perhaps something like #ScienceSunday.

Influencers to keep an eye on

The top ten contributors to the conversation included a lot of Spanish language accounts and one from Indonesia, which tells you Hawking fans are a global audience and not just limited to his native UK or the ties he has with the US. Hawking top contributors The most retweeted tweet also came from Spanish language Twitter account Antena3Noticias; the second and third most retweeted tweets about Hawking joining Facebook came from WIRED magazine.

Media outlets joining a discussion around your topic of interest means you can keep them in mind should you want to reach out for a story in the future. These most retweeted tweets and contributors list also tell you that in this case, you shouldn’t limit yourself to US-based media outlets either. The top URLs list confirmed this again, including links from the same Spanish language and Indonesian accounts:  Hawking top URLs

Final takeaways

This is just the insight you get from about week with a TweetReach Pro topic Tracker, looking at one specific launch. But it has already given enough information about the audience and activity times around that launch to inform a content strategy and refocus an audience profile.  The bonus takeaway is that science-related content strategies don’t have to be stuffy either: Hawking has a great sense of humor, and so does Twitter. 

Happy tracking!

Written by Sarah

November 19th, 2014 at 12:43 pm