TweetReach Blog

Finding fans and influencers on Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr

0 comments

One of the strongest forms of recommendation is still good old fashioned word of mouth, and the best way to cultivate that is to establish and strengthen relationships with your fans, followers, and brand advocates. The trouble is that they don’t usually take the time to message you announcing that they are going to recommend you to everyone now, so it’s up to you to pay attention to everyone discussing your brand— and that can be overwhelming.

The good news is, we’re here to help! And if you pay attention to the full conversation around your brand, it’s easy to pick out and identify the fans and followers who are acting as your brand advocates, as well as influencers in your industry that you want to keep an eye on and engage in conversation when appropriate. Let us show you how.

On Twitter

There are many different monitoring tools to choose from on Twitter, but we will admit to being wildly biased and preferring the ones we’ve built: Free and paid, full snapshot reports ($20) and our comprehensive tracking with TweetReach Pro Trackers (available at a variety of price points). Now the following is what you can do with them.

There are several different ways to find influencers around a particular topic with a snapshot report:

  1. Run a free snapshot report and check out the top contributors to the conversation, be it about a topic keyword, hashtag, or account. It’s that easy.
  2. Run a full report around that same topic keyword, hashtag, or account to get a fuller picture of that conversation and consequently, the top contributors.
  3. Run two reports around an event using a keyword topic or hashtag and compare them. Here’s an example from the #CometLanding.

With TweetReach Pro Trackers, you can look in several places to see who influencers are around a particular keyword topic or hashtag, and who your brand advocates might be if they keyword topic has to do with your brand, or it’s a Tracker around your Twitter account. Look at:

  1. Contributors: Test different time frames to see if the same people are always at the top of the list.
  2. Most Retweeted: Do the same people always talk about you and get retweeted by their followers more than anyone else who follows you? Congratulations, you have just identified a brand advocate!
  3. Top URLs: Does someone tweet about your blog posts and share them frequently? That might show up here.

On Instagram

Again you have a choice of metrics providers, and again we are biased when we suggest our own tools (be sure you’re asking the right questions while you’re shopping). We understand not everyone has a lot of resources, however, and are happy to be able to offer you a free option in our Instagram account checkup and more comprehensive tracking options with our Instagram analytics.

Now here’s how you can find those who are already supporting you on Instagram.

Instagram Summary Data

 

Above: An example of our Instagram analytics dashboard. 

With our free account checkup, the Top Fans section makes it easy: These are your three biggest fans who have engaged with your content the most over the last 30 days. Be sure you’re at the very least following them back, and reciprocate the engagement with their posts where appropriate. Keep an eye on total fans too, because someone might be lurking just out of the top three who is an important fan and potential brand advocate.

With our premium Instagram analytics, you can set up a hashtag tracker or an account tracker. With a hashtag tracker you’ll want to pay attention to the top publishers as well as the publisher summary. Are any of these people also in the top ten posts? If you narrow the tracker down to different time frames, are the same people always in top publishers? That’s who you want to pay attention to.

Account trackers are similar; pay attention to top participants and the participant summary in the same way described above. Clicking through to see participant details will tell you more about that particular follower, and whether or not it would be appropriate to engage with them. (When it wouldn’t be: They’re a minor using social, they’re a spam account, etc. Use your discretion for what’s appropriate for your brand.)

On Tumblr

Tumblr does give you built-in analytics, and much like those that Twitter gives you, using ours alongside them compliments what you can learn about your audience while taking your knowledge deeper in certain aspects.

Our Tumblr analytics offer both topic tracking and blog tracking. With topic tracking you want to look at popular contributors as well as top curators, to see who is contributing to a certain conversation the most. If someone who appears in either of those two sections also appears in the top ten most popular posts, then that’s someone you really want to follow and pay attention to at the very least, and consider a deeper relationship with- brand advocate, short-term collaboration partner etc- if that makes sense.

With blog trackers, you want to look at the top curators. These are the people who are consistently liking and reblogging your content. Are they adding commentary when they do? Is it praise, constructive criticism? Engage them in a dialogue about it if it’s appropriate.

The bottom line

Enthusiastic fans will be discussing your brand whether you’re there to listen or not, but many stop once they realize no one is paying attention. Brand advocates are built from nurtured relationships. Take the time to find them and connect in a way that’s appropriate and mutually beneficial.

Still have questions? Ask ‘em in the comments. Don’t be shy. 

Written by Sarah

April 7th, 2015 at 8:39 am

The Week in Social Analytics #148

0 comments

It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On brand voice 

Why Denny’s Sounds Like a Chill Teenager on Social Media [from Entrepreneur; written by Kate Taylor]

“Purcer and Dillon say that over the last two years, the biggest change the brand has made is uncovering the unique ‘ecosystems’ of the different social channels.

‘There is a unified thread that binds them together, [but] we are slightly different in tone and in personality on each, given the users of each,’ says Dillon.”

On content marketing 

How Content Marketers Can Tell Better, More Strategic Stories [from TopRank; written by Brooke Furry]

“Your number one job is to answer the top questions your customers have. With today’s ease of content creation, we don’t need more content – we need more relevant content.”

Pair with How to Create and Repurpose Content That Customers Really Want also from TopRank.

Better Social Media Marketing comes from Personalized Social Media Strategy [from Soshable; written by JD Rucker]

Two important points from this piece:

“Personalization requires that you toss out preconceived ideas.”

And

“Just because something is a best practice doesn’t mean it’s best for everyone.”

How to Make an Explainer Video: Learn the Step-by-Step Production Process [from Social Media Today; written by Juan Jose Mendez]

If you’re looking for a step-by-step explainer on video production, this is a good place to start.

The Science Behind Quality Content: A New Study [from Ann Handley]

“Based on its proprietary algorithm, Acrolinx gave each company a ‘content impact score’ using a 100-point scale to give each company—a measure of how effective the writing is. A score of 72 or higher signifies content that’s effective.”

acrolinx-global-content-quality-scores-2015

“Among other findings of the analysis:

  • Retail businesses exceeded the benchmark for content quality, on average scoring 73.2, followed by B2B tech with an average of 71.2; telecoms lagged with a 66.2 average.
  • From a global perspective, Germany and America tied, scoring the highest for content quality: 70.2 each, on average.”

On scheduling and planning 

Crisis Communications: Have a Plan for Success [from Spin Sucks; written by Gini Dietrich]

“So the first thing we did is talk through the difference between an issue and a crisis.

An issue:

  • Is not harmful to an organization’s reputation;
  • Does not affect the bottom line;
  • Can almost always be avoided;
  • Can escalate into a crisis, if not handled immediately; and
  • Is a blip in the 24/7 news cycle.

A crisis, on the other hand:

  • Has long-term repercussion on an organization’s reputation;
  • Generates a loss of money…generally lots of it; and
  • Can always be avoided.

Most of us face issues every day…they are things that can be avoided and can be managed fairly efficiently and easily.

When they escalate into crises, though, is when we let the events get the better of us.”

Shh. . .What We Learned From Silence [from Social Media Explorer; written by Matt Hollowell]

“But let’s prioritize shutting up over contributing noise. And let’s be okay with the silence. Because that silence…it’s where the real inspiration happens.”

On the human element 

B2B Marketers Are Humans, Too [from Convince and Convert; written by Bryan Bartlett]

No matter who you’re selling to, your audience is a human person who enjoys being interacted with as a human person. Change that only when the robots really come.

The One Element Most Marketers Forget About Social Media [from Heidi Cohen]

“As a marketer, you can never forget that your social media community consists of real people who have their own lives, dreams and needs. They aren’t tallies to be collected.

Your social media community must help people achieve their personal goals before they’re ready to even think about taking actions that will aid your objectives and business.

Start by appreciating that they are human and pay it forward.”

Written by Sarah

April 3rd, 2015 at 9:13 am

3 Steps to take when your brand joins that New Social Network

0 comments

coffee in the morning

Step 0: Be sure you’re properly caffeinated. Photo via Flickr.

You’ve been paying attention to your fans and followers on your established networks and they’ve been asking why you’re not on That New Social Network, so you signed up, if only to reserve your brand’s handle. Your target audience is here, but you haven’t posted anything yet. So. . .now what? What should you do first?

Start with these three steps.

1. Research, research, and then research some more.

How are people using this space? This is likely to shift as the network becomes more established and more users join and experiment with what it has to offer, but it’s always a good idea to know the existing protocol backwards and forwards before you start posting.

Always be sure your content fits the place but is still true to your brand’s voice and core values.

2. Ask your audience: What do you want to see from us here?

How do you figure out what your audience wants from you in a specific place? Try asking them. Ask them on the new network, ask them on your established networks. Send out a survey via email, or tweet and Facebook links to a survey asking what they’d like out of your social media presence, including on the new platform.

Don’t assume you know. Ask, and listen. Then plan your new content strategy accordingly.

3. Test, measure, plan, repeat.

Experiment with different types of content, pay very close attention to the results, and base your strategy going forward on those results. What is touted as a best practice on a new network might not necessarily be what your specific audience wants to see from you in that specific place.

Don’t be afraid to take risks and try new things. Anything your audience reacts positively towards isn’t something to just repeat ad nauseam, but to analyze and figure out what about it worked and why. Then use those elements in all of your content strategy moving forward.

Written by Sarah

March 31st, 2015 at 8:08 am

The Week in Social Analytics #147

0 comments

It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content marketing

How to Overcome Content Marketing Struggles [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“In order to overcome resource, strategy and budget issues, marketers should consider having someone directly responsible for an overall content marketing strategy, as well as auditing, reusing and repurposing content.”

The 10 New Rules Of Visual Content Marketing [from Jeff Bullas]

8. The Law of Consistency 

Apart from engaging customers, the role of visual content is to reinforce your brand. For that to happen, your content needs to have consistency.

This isn’t strictly a new law, but it’s worth reinforcing. We’re not referring to publishing visual content consistently. It’s more about elements in your visuals that tell your target market that the visual is from your company – even if you’re not linked or tagged in it.

You can do this by using the same:

  • Fonts and colours as your website
  • Images in your company’s social media accounts and profile page headers
  • Design element like a background, banner, or logo.

Video Content Marketing: Pros, Cons, Examples and Best Practices [from TopRank Online Marketing Blog; written by James Anderson]

“Video has to be done right to be effective.”

Do YouTubers Fuel Purchase Intent Among Teens? [from eMarketer; written by staff]

Normally when you see a headline that ends in a question, you know it can immediately be answered with “no”. In this case, however, the answer is a resounding “yes”:

“YouTubers also had a much bigger influence on purchase intent among teens, as 63% said they would try a product or brand suggested by a YouTuber. In comparison, fewer than half of respondents said the same about recommendations from a TV or movie star.”

emarketer youtube

On social for events and making the most of social employees

Planning an Event? Don’t Get Skimpy With Your Social Media [from Marketing Profs; written by Joe Matthews]

“. . .to truly develop real-time, online buzz for an event, marketers must seek out genuine, nonintrusive ways for the brand to be included in the event content being shared to social. This means marketers need an event marketing strategy that taps into existing social habits of the audience.”

The Social Media Opportunity Most Businesses Miss (Do You?) [from Heidi Cohen]

Employees are the major social media opportunity most businesses overlook.

. . .

Change how you view your employees. See them as real people who have their own relationships, needs and interests beyond your business. Further, they’re experienced social media users who engage with their family and friends on a variety of networks.”

Emphasis original.

On campaigns

How to Create an Unforgettable Integrated Campaign [from Convince and Convert; written by Jessica Gioglio]

Not everyone has Oreo’s resources, but it’s always inspiring to see a clever and well-executed campaign across platforms and in the real world.

9 Word-of-Mouth Campaigns That Rocked [from Cision; written by Jim Dougherty]

“In 2015, social networks have demonstrably changed the word-of-mouth distribution model. Forty-seven percent of all U.S. adults use Facebook daily, 25 times the number of total daily social media users a decade earlier. While Jonah Berger’s research in Contagious: Why Things Catch On indicates that face-to-face word-of-mouth is more effective than social media word-of-mouth, social media is not an insignificant contributor to word-of-mouth ‘buzz.’”

Written by Sarah

March 27th, 2015 at 8:54 am

3 signs it’s time for your brand to check out That New Social Network

0 comments

It seems like there’s a new, hot social network The Kids Today are talking about just about every day. So how do you know when it’s time for your brand to check it out and seriously considering joining? After all, you don’t want to sink time and resources into something that loses steam inside of a few weeks.

Look for the following signs before you decide to sign up.

 

Photo via SEO on Flickr. Used with permission of the Creative Commons License.

A talking statue is not one of the signs, sadly. Photo via SEO on Flickr. Used with permission of the Creative Commons License.

 

1. You notice your customers or target audience discussing The New Network on other, established social networks.

Here it’s very important to pay attention to how they’re discussing it; if you just count the number of mentions without noticing that everyone is making fun of the new network rather than praising it, well, you might be making a huge mistake in joining.

Tone can and will shift over time though. It’s not too distant of a memory that brands didn’t take any social networks seriously, and now they’re the backbone of many a big brand campaign. The key here is to listen to what your customers and target audience want from you.

Which brings us to our next point.

2. Your customers or target audience are flat out asking you why you aren’t there, or when you’re joining.

One request to join a new obscure network can be just that, but if you’re repeatedly seeing your fans and followers on your established networks asking why they don’t see you on their new favorite network, it’s definitely time to consider joining. They’ll only ask for so long before they’ll look for someone else in that space who can fill their needs.

3. When the competition is there.

This can be a balancing act, depending on the resources you have compared to the resources your competitor has. If they have 10x the budget and staff that you do, they obviously will be more equipped to establish a strategic presence on every network. If your team is already overworked and understaffed, then new networks are at the bottom of the to-do list.

Don’t ignore the first two signs though; they can act as a warning signal that your customers or target audience may be shifting their time spend to another network. It can be frustrating to redistribute resources to uncharted territory- especially if you feel like you’re just hitting your groove where you already are- but the alternative is watching your competition snap up your customers because you were too slow to adapt.

Bonus: When the competition isn’t there.

If you are the brand that has the resources (or a small team that has the masochism), moving into uncharted territory can make you the undisputed king of it as it is more widely adopted. Just be sure to pay attention to how your customers and target audience are using the new network and be responsive to their needs.

The bottom line?

The cardinal rules of social media always apply: Listen first, and always work to solve problems and provide value in any space that you occupy. 

Written by Sarah

March 26th, 2015 at 9:19 am

Posted in Guides

Tagged with ,

Monitoring tweets about the Brazilian 2014 presidential election: A TweetReach case study

0 comments

Brazilian 2014 presidential electionLast fall, Medialogue, a digital agency based in Brazil, was tasked with monitoring social conversation about the 2014 Brazilian Presidential election for the Aécio Neves campaign and supporting the efforts of the Brazilian Social Democracy Party. Medialogue selected Union Metrics’ TweetReach Twitter analytics to support this effort.

The Brazilian 2014 presidential election was a record-breaking event for the country on social media, even compared to the 2010 election, on which Medialogue also worked. The sheer volume of conversation on social media surpassed all estimates based on the previous national election, generating more than 40 million total tweets. However, by using TweetReach to sort through the noise, Medialogue was able to make informed social media recommendations back to their client.

Click here to read our full case study about how Medialogue used TweetReach to measure millions of tweets about the election.

Image source: Economist, Brazil’s presidential election: A riven country

Written by Jenn D

March 24th, 2015 at 7:23 am

The Week in Social Analytics #146

0 comments

It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On social media platforms and best practices 

9 Social Media Rules That Are Meant To Be Broken [from Business 2 Community; written by Zoe Summers]

Know the rules thoroughly before you take smart risks breaking the right ones.

Actionable Tips for Finding the Right Social Media Platform [from Eli Rose Social Media; written by Kristin Zaslavsky]

“On any platform, consistency is key. If you can’t regularly schedule solid content on a social media platform, it may not be worth your time, money or sanity to be there just to be there.”

On brand personality 

#51: Putting More “You” in Your Business—A Guide to Building Brand Personality [from Amy Porterfield]

“Believe it or not, there is even an industry term for this way of infusing your brand with personality. Marketing analysts call it the “personality differentiator.” Here’s what it can do for your business:

  1. It demonstrates why you are different from others who provide very similar products or services.
  2. It engages your audience capturing their interest and drawing them into your message.
  3. It establishes an ongoing rapport between you and your audience, creating a bond that will help you convert leads into clients when the time is right.
  4. It proves there is more to you and your brand than just facts, figures, and fancy technology. It shows you actually have heart.
  5. It transforms your message from boring to fascinating, increasing both the impact of your message as well as the quality of the opportunities your messaging generates.”

On content marketing

Visual Marketing Key in Helping Brands Attract Teens [from eMarketer; written by staff]

Teens spend more time on visually based platforms like Snapchat and Instagram, but that doesn’t mean that Facebook is going to instantly disappear.

“[Facebook is a] long way from being replaced by the younger group. Right now, they’re just not going to spend a lot of time there.

Facebook did what Myspace was trying to do. Facebook allows you to stay in touch with your friends and family in an easy way. It’s hard to imagine something coming along that’s going to get that mass and that will do it in a more effective way than how Facebook is doing it now.”

Are brands the saviours of long-form content? [from Econsultancy; written by Michael Hewitt]

“Long-form content, particularly in the guise of investigative journalism, is a dying art. The instantaneous information age has left news publishers cutting budgets for investigative journalists, focusing instead on cheaper quick-fire click-bait, short-form stories and listicles. What little investigative journalist remains is usually reserved to more niche publications.

Too many news publications have wrongly assumed that incredibly connected and time-poor audiences have no desire for long-form content. They’re wrong.

Are brands going to replace genuine investigative journalism? Probably not. There is arguably too much self-interest for branded investigative content to be taken seriously enough by audiences. However, they are certainly capable of filling the gap for long-form that mainstream publishers leave behind in the pursuit of replicating Buzzfeed and Shortlist.”

Video Considered Difficult – but Effective – Content Marketing Tactic [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Some 59% of respondents cited video as among their most difficult content types to create, ahead of webinars/online events (50%) and research/white papers (50%). But almost half of respondents (46%) reported videos to be among the most effective content types used, second only to articles and case studies (54%).”

Ascend2-Most-Effective-Difficult-Content-Marketing-Types-Mar2015

The Week in Social Analytics #145

0 comments

It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content strategy 

Five more examples of interesting content from ‘boring’ businesses [from Econsultancy; written by Dan Brotzel]

Are you an “apparently unsexy business”? That doesn’t mean your content has to be boring. Get inspired by those who have already done it right.

Why Snapchat Should be the Inseparable Addition to Social Media Strategies [from Social Times; written by Rohan Ayyar]

“The value of a marketing platform for a brand can be gauged to a certain extent by asking these questions:

  1. Who are its primary users?
  2. How popular is it with them?
  3. Do these users fit the bill as your brand’s target audience?
  4. What is the closest alternative to target these users?

Now consider this:

Snapchat has a median user age of 18 years, with the majority of its users between 13 and 25 years of age. Facebook on the other hand, has an average user age of 40 years. The last few years in fact, have seen a sharp decline in teen users on Facebook.”

On visual content marketing 

4 Ways to Dramatically Improve Your Social Media Photos [from Convince & Convert; written by Jay Baer]

A great breakdown of photography basics in a fun and funny presentation. Bonus points for a Myspace reference.

10 Ways to Create Beautiful Content: Storytelling, Visuals and More [from Social Media Today; written by Julia McCoy]

Add DIY Videos to Your Content Pieces. Following the same approach, don’t hesitate to post videos that complement your written ideas and basically convey a very simple message: “I’m the author, I’m real, I’m here for you, my readers!” Whether you choose to record Skype interviews or combine text, images and music in simple programs such as Animoto to reach your audience, uncomplicated DIY videos will help you amplify your messages and boost their realness and overall power of seduction.”

An In-Depth Guide on How to Create Awesome Visual Content That Gets Noticed [from Jeff Bullas]

“. . .let’s be honest for a minute. At the end of the day, the meat is still what matters the most. This means that if the core message that your publication/post conveys is subpar, no amount of great visuals will make it popular.

If, on the other hand, you do know that what you’re publishing is worth of your audience’s time, good visuals can be the difference between making the piece mildly well received vs. making it a true hit.”

Emphasis added.

On stats 

US Instagram User Estimates, by Age Group, 2013-2019 [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“While eMarketer doesn’t forecast last year’s 60% growth rate being matched in the years to come, the platform should maintain double-digit growth until 2018, when it will exceed 100 million US users and reach almost one-third of the US internet population.”

eMarketer-US-Instagram-User-Estimates-by-Age-2013-2019-Mar2015

Written by Sarah

March 13th, 2015 at 9:07 am

Introducing the new TweetReach Pro insight stream and dashboard!

0 comments

Today, we’re excited to announce a new and improved TweetReach Pro dashboard! The new dashboard includes our brand new Twitter analytics insight stream, as well as updated Tracker comparisons and much more. The new TweetReach Pro dashboard will help you better understand:

  • Important changes in follower growth, engagement and potential impressions
  • What Tweets, hashtags and URLs are popular
  • How one Twitter account’s performance compares to others
  • Who’s active or influential in a particular community
  • Exactly what to do next to improve post engagement

New TweetReach dashboard

The details on your new Twitter insights

We’re really excited about the brand new insight stream, which features a number of actionable data-based insights built to help you identify important changes in your metrics and decide what steps to take next to improve your Twitter performance. The insight stream includes information like spikes in impressions or retweets, above-average follower growth, and the best time for you to post to get more engagement.

We’ve also upgraded the Tracker overview in your dashboard, which allows you to more easily compare Trackers at a glance. See how different Twitter accounts or topics measure up, who’s getting more engagement when, when potential reach and impressions spike, and more.

Finally, we’ve added an all-new what’s hot section that highlights popular elements in your Trackers, including the most retweeted Tweet, most influential contributor and most popular hashtag and URL. Use these highlights to easily see what’s trending across your Trackers.

To see the new dashboard and insights, log into your TweetReach Pro account now! There’s also more information on our help desk. And if you don’t already use TweetReach Pro, there’s more information here on our Twitter analytics, which start at just $99 per month.

Want insights across social channels?

And now you can access our insights and dashboard for any of the social media channels we analyze, which includes Instagram and Tumblr. This makes it even easier to track your social media campaigns across platforms and quickly see what’s working and what isn’t. Interested in learning more about our full social suite? Let’s talk!

Written by Sarah

March 11th, 2015 at 12:11 pm

Understand how Instagram content performs on Twitter using TweetReach

0 comments

The lamentations of Twitter display cards being turned off for Instagram posts may have died out, but the need to measure all aspects of a content marketing strategy has only intensified, particularly when it comes to the visual. So how can you track and measure your Instagram content’s performance on Twitter? Let us show you how, using TweetReach.

The basics of URL tracking with TweetReach

The best way to keep track via TweetReach of how an Instagram photo travels around Twitter is by tracking its URL. TweetReach Trackers can monitor up to 15 separate queries about a single campaign or topic, including one or more URLs. (Full details on setting up topic Trackers here.) Here’s an example of how to set one up for specifically tracking a single Instagram URL:

Instagram tracking

URL queries should be set up as url_contains:instagram.com/p/utBPU3D5cL or with the full URL in quotes, as in the screenshot above. (You can find more details about specific searches and URL queries here.) This will search for all tweets containing this URL or portion of URL. Be sure that you have the full URL for a particular photo you want to track, since just adding a basic Instagram address (instagram.com) would return information on every Instagram photo posted to Twitter, drowning out the results you want.

Also keep in mind that a Tracker will find all tweets that match any of your search queries and aggregate their metrics together in your Tracker, so make sure all the queries in a Tracker are related; in this case one or more Instagram photos, depending on if you want to track a single photo or a set. You can drill down into some details (usernames, hashtags, URLs, etc…) if you set up all the terms around a campaign, but summary metrics will be calculated for the entire set of tweets.

So if you really want to concentrate on the data for just your Instagram photos, consider setting up a separate Tracker for any hashtags or keywords.

What if I already have a Tracker running, and want to see how the Instagram content I’ve cross-posted is doing?

Great question! First, check the Top URLs section of your Tracker to see if any Instagram links are there:

UA Women links

 

If you don’t see any, don’t get discouraged. Clicking on the menu bar in the top right corner of that section (the three dots and three lines) will take you to a full list of URLs shared that is automatically ranked by impressions, but you can change that to reflect ranking by tweets, retweets, or contributors as you prefer.

UAWomen URLs

We recommend paying attention to how your Instagram and other visual content URLs rank depending on how you’ve sorted them. This way you can answer some questions about your content strategy so far: How many of your tweets contain Instagram URLs? Do those get retweeted more or less than those with other content type URLs? The answer to these questions can help you tweak your content strategy, including how often and how you share Instagram content via Twitter.

Find even more details

Click through on each high-ranking Instagram link to see what these high performing visual content pieces have in common. Is it a hashtag you used with all of them? The subject matter, like the inclusion of a celebrity spokesperson? It might even just be the lighting, tone (warm or cool), or absence or presence of people in the photos. Finding a common thread in your Instagram posts will let you know how to best present your content for the maximum impact on your audience.

This page will also tell you which day a link was posted when you hover over a spike in the display, letting you know if certain days of the week work better for certain content (because you should repeat these steps with every kind of content that you’re producing, from YouTube videos to blog URLs):

Instagram URL day posted

If you have fans and followers who independently share your Instagram URLs to their audiences, you’ll likely see this show up here since they can only share it after you have initially posted it. Watching the performance of a repost from your Instagram account can let you know which of your fans and followers have a strong following of their own. In time you can consider them for a brand ambassador partnership if appropriate, or see if they would be interested in using your product in a sponsored post. You can even just thank and reward them for being a dedicated follower.

The bottom line?

Keeping track of what kind of content consistently performs the best with your audience lets you know what kind of content to plan more of for the future. Knowing how your Instagram content is performing is simply one piece of that puzzle, which TweetReach can help put together.

Written by Sarah

March 10th, 2015 at 9:29 am