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The Week in Social Analytics #157

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On social strategy 

The new guide to minimizing legal risks in Social Media Marketing [from {grow}; written by Kerry Gorgone]

Because “Get Out of Jail Free” cards aren’t real outside of Monopoly.

Managing Expectations Should Be Part Of Your Social Media Strategy [from Social Media Today; written by Mark Ferguson]

Set modest goals, and don’t be afraid to experiment:

“One of the good and bad things about social networks is how much information they have. Someone posts an update, you blink and you’ll miss it. This has some obvious disadvantages but one big advantage. You can experiment without major consequences. You can try various versions of tweets, updates, pins etc. to see which one works best for you. By the time you know, your failed experiments are buried under the 500 million tweets per day. There is no such thing as perfect in social media. That’s one of the beauties of it. The best time to experiment is when you start off as you have fewer followers and connections.”

Emphasis added.

Social video. Still so hot right now.

5 Mind-Boggling Video Stats and How To Use Them To Your Advantage [from social@Ogilvy; written by Justine Herz]

3) 1 in 3 viewers share a YouTube video after watching, and 700 YouTube videos are shared on Twitter alone every minute.

People like to share videos. They want something to share. Now, this ”1 in 3″ number is a bit misleading because the majority of those videos are not branded, however, the user behavior is there. People want to connect with content and tell their friends about it. We just need to give them something to connect with. If we make videos people love, find interesting, surprising, they’ll connect with it.”

Social Video Chart: Your At-A-Glance Guide To 7 Major Platforms [from MarketingLand; written by Martin Beck]

“A side-by-side feature comparison of the seven major social video players — YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Vine, Snapchat and Tumblr.”

social-video-posts-v5

Platform specific tips, tricks, and more

88 marketers you should follow on Twitter [from Convince & Convert; written by Jay Baer]

Double-check to be sure you’re following these fine people on Twitter. (You might want to be sure you’re following @tweetreachapp and @UnionMetrics while you’re at it.)

Tip: What are Facebook video ads good for? [from Social Fresh; written by Jason Keath]

“‘While video creative was not great at driving clicks to a landing page, we found that retargeting people who watched a video did improve the click-through and conversion rates. In other words, audiences that were warmed with video creative were more likely to take action on follow up campaigns.’ said Kistner.”

Emphasis added.

A Three Step Guide to Winning at Instagram [from Social Media Today; written by Andrew Hutchinson]

Image quality almost goes without saying, but you also need consistency in your visual branding. What else?

“One of the key things to remember in your images is that photography appeals to people’s aspirations – the things we want to do, the places we want to be. In the earlier examples shown from Nike, we’re inspired to go outside and smell the flowers, to get out into the elements. This is based on Nike’s in-depth knowledge of their audience – they know that these images will resonate with their followers, because they’re people who’re into running and the outdoors. How do they know this? Because they’ve done the research, they’ve built the audience personas, and they’ve tested over time. So how can you do the same?”

Emphasis added.

Social TV: Between and serialized Netflix

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Until now all of Netflix’s original programming has been binge-able; whole seasons released at once that fans park themselves to consume on the couch while they tweet about it. This changed with the recent release of Between, a show developed in partnership with a Canadian channel that follows the traditional one-new-episode-released-per-week formula. Episodes air on City TV in Canada then become available on Netflix several hours later.

How this affects the conversation

As expected, the biggest spike in Twitter conversation around Between so far in terms of the number of people tweeting and the subsequent reach of their tweets was the day the first episode was released, May 21st, followed by a second, smaller spike the day the second episode was released, May 28th: Between contributors Between reach exposure The most tweets, however, came the day after each episode aired:

Between tweets

And nearly all of the most retweeted tweets came from the show’s star Jennette McCurdy:

Or from Netflix’s Twitter account:

What does this tell us?

Although the overall numbers for this show are lower than around Game of Thrones or fellow Netflix original Daredevil, that’s to be expected for a small, original show without a fanbase to draw on from previous seasons (GoT) or a successful comic book universe (Daredevil, part of the Marvel Universe). It does, however, have star Jennette McCurdy’s existing fans to draw on; those who grew up watching her on iCarly or Sam and Cat are older and excited to see her take on a darker, more serious role in this sci-fi show, so it makes sense that she’s promoting her latest project to her fans and followers on Twitter, encouraging them to tune in when it’s available and even offering to tweet with her fans while they watch.

The episodes become available on Netflix at 11:30pm Eastern, which explains why more tweets around the show are made the next day; fans might be tweeting about their excitement around the latest episode the day it airs, then discussing it or live-tweeting a second viewing (or a first, if they have an early bedtime) the day after it originally airs on Canada’s City TV.

Final takeaways

The overall success of a serialized television show on Netflix vs a binge-able one remains to be seen, but they’re doing everything on the social promotion front right on Twitter, including show-specific hashtags and live-tweeting hashtags:

They could be doing a little more on other networks where their target audience has a presence: Instagram, for example. The official Netflix Instagram account has one photo referencing the show vs. much more promotion for their other original series (Marco Polo, Orange is the New Black, Daredevil, etc) , but this likely has to do with the City TV partnership and the fact that City has established their own Instagram profile for the show. Netflix could still use a third-party app to do some re-gramming, however.

Written by Sarah

June 4th, 2015 at 10:15 am

How Snapchat has evolved for brands

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We’ve written about brands on Snapchat before- covering both the basics and brands who do it well- but social media platforms evolve almost as quickly as snaps disappear from your screen, so we thought an update was due.

Let’s dive into an updated version of the basics, how use of the platform has evolved for brands, how brand content is different on Snapchat than on other channels, and some good brand examples to illustrate it all along the way.

How the basics have changed

You still have a score, and Snapchat still has a step-by-step screencapped guide to finding and adding friends. Brands will still want to concentrate on creating stories over sending individual snaps, however, and that makes the biggest basic to be sure you make your stories viewable to anyone who adds you.

Snapchat Story Settings for Brand

This way all fans have to do is add you, and they’ll be able to see any story that you create. Adding back every single fan or follower who decides to follow you on the platform and then manually sending snaps to each one of them would quickly turn into a logistical nightmare. You can also still decide who sends you snaps: Everyone, or just those you approve of as friends. Use your discretion.

And as of right now advertising on Snapchat is expensive with Discover being a slightly more affordable option, but not one that will be the right fit for every brand that doesn’t have the ability to produce a wealth of Discover-specific content.

How Snapchat is evolving

Aside from the arrival of Discover, when we wrote our first piece on Snapchat, “Our Story” was a new feature that has indeed become a regular thing. Now called “Our Stories” and found under the “Live” section, it looks like this:

Live on SnapchatIf you’re in the geographic location where an event is taking place, you have the option to add a snap to the story. This could be a fun thing for a brand to participate in, but ultimately it would get lost in the noise of the collaborative snap (unless you’re doing a sponsored version, like Bud Light). Our Stories are a fun way to see what’s happening live at an event elsewhere in the world and could give some insight into Snapchat users in different areas; particularly important if you’re looking to reach a global audience.

Other Snapchat feature updates since our first post include the ability to send cash using Snapcash, adding a fun Geofilter overlay to your images if one is available, as well as use Chat and Video Chat. Experiment with these in a way that makes sense for your brand. We haven’t heard of any big brands using these features with customers just yet, but that doesn’t mean smaller independent brands haven’t been experimenting. Limited chatting, for example, could be a fun way to add another layer of engagement in a Snapchat-based contest (see the official rules from a GE Snapchat contest as an example).

Brands are still largely using the platform to share behind-the-scenes content with a very intimate, down-to-earth feel, like these examples from Mashable, MTV, and NPR:

NPR in particular has been open about its experimentation with the platform and their intern shared her experiences in using it and learning what worked on their NPR Social Media Desk Tumblr. Here’s a great excerpt:

“Yes, it’s time-consuming to answer queries and respond to comments. But it’s also a really wonderful way to foster an engaged community. When I started addressing our followers directly, the number of snaps we receive went up hugely! The feedback really helped shape my editorial approach to the platform.”

Brands have also begun to experiment with interactive material on Snapchat; Cosmopolitan’s first Discover post was one users could customize and share.

How brand content differs on Snapchat

As you can see from the examples in the previous section, brands don’t go for polished video production on Snapchat; it’s a very informal, more intimate setting on this platform where even your more “permanent” content only lasts for 24 hours.

A brand that really presents itself differently across different platforms according to the prevailing tastes and culture of each place- and of their own target audience- is Sephora. On Snapchat they give product previews or even share little aesthetic pieces of their day, like this:

SephoraSnaps

 

On Tumblr they run a digital magazine full of high-impact product photos, interviews with celebrities and makeup artists, as well as tips, tricks, and how-tos. On Instagram they alternate between impeccably staged product shots with regrams of celebrities and well-known beauty names using or wearing their products, with fewer behind-the-scenes or selfie shots. Sephora’s Twitter shares product news and store events while repurposing those product shots, with a lot of the same content tailored differently for Facebook. Finally their Pinterest is a smorgasbord of products, how-tos, inspiration, and event-specific versions of how-tos and inspiration (prom hair, anyone?).

What’s the takeaway here? Sephora has done their homework and come up with a visual content strategy that is on brand across platforms, but also speaks to the specific aesthetics of each and the audience they’re trying to reach in each place. Tumblr is a well-executed yet accessible digital glossy, Instagram is more polished but still throws in a few behind-the-scenes shots, Pinterest has every how-to you could want categorized and organized, while Twitter and Facebook share the basic news. It makes sense then that Snapchat is a way to show a more relaxed version of their brand that gives followers and idea of the hands putting all of those other pieces together. It feels more intimate, like they’re sharing it just with you, the more dedicated fans who follow them there.

Anything else?

Yes, and it’s still a big one: Let your audience know you’re on Snapchat on every other platform you have a presence on and be sure you pick a handle that’s the same as your others or that’s simple to search for and/or figure out, like YourBrandSnaps. If they don’t know you’re there, they can’t follow you!

Oh, and have fun with it. Happy snapping!

Got any questions, or know of anything that we missed? Let us know in the comments!

Written by Sarah

June 2nd, 2015 at 11:03 am

Posted in Guides,Trends

Tagged with ,

The Week in Social Analytics #156

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

Platform-specific tips and tricks. 

How to Add Paragraph Spacing to Your Instagram Posts’ Caption Copy [from Social Media Today; written by Jim Belosic]

A nifty trick to break up that wall of text when you have a long caption for a contest, or to really tell the story behind an image.

Beyond Cats & Bloopers: Getting Real on the Future of YouTube [from social@Ogilvy; written by David Stone]

“The reason for all this lies in YouTube’s emerging business strategy: empowering and educating creators to create better quality content makes YouTube more desirable to audiences and allows the streamer to compete with services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime.”

YouTube marketing strategy a top priority for social media marketers [from Convince & Convert; written by Jay Baer]

“Is video harder than sending a tweet? Of course, but once you have a sound Youtube marketing strategy (or a video strategy overall that might include Facebook, Instagram, and even Twitter video) it doesn’t have to be a massive production burden.”

On influencers. 

If You Want Your Content Marketing to be Great, Ask Influencers to Participate [from TopRank; written by Lee Odden]

1. Set Goals for Marketing and Influencers

In order for co-created content to be successful for marketing, specific audiences and goals should be identified.

Think about: What do you hope to achieve with an influencer content program? How will influencers benefit? More importantly, how will your customers benefit?

Think about the distinct audience that you’re after with the content being co-created and set goals specific to what your idea of success looks like. Quantify those goals as well, whether it’s to increase the reach and engagement of your brand to the influencer’s community or to inspire more leads and sales by a certain percent.

Also, set goals for the influencers. For short term projects, focus on participation quality. With longer term programs, focus on participation, marketing outcomes and the relationship.”

A 4-Step Blogger Outreach Tool for Identifying Influencers [from Convince & Convert; written by Kristen Matthews]

“A crucial part of blogger identification for marketing purposes is thinking a step past buyer personas and coming up with “influencer personas.” An influencer persona is an overarching profile and data on the types of bloggers that appeal to your target consumers.”

And finally, on UX. 

How Important Is User Experience? 9 Things You Need To Know About UX [from Business2Community; written by Jasmine Henry]

“User experience (ux) is an emerging practice that sits at the intersection of behavioral science, web development, and domain-specific knowledge. It’s a human-centric approach to understanding how people engage with technology, and how to build the best web experiences possible.”

 

Written by Sarah

May 29th, 2015 at 8:53 am

Just do it, online: How brands can provide virtual fitness support

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Everyone’s motivational style is a little different, but everyone loves getting encouragement for the hard work they do, especially if they mostly train alone for races or other sporting events. Many fitness-related brands have figured this out and work motivational and supportive content into their visual marketing. It looks a little something like this:

MotivationalVisuals

Clockwise from top left: Tone It Up on Instagram, Clif Bar on Instagram, Lululemon on Instagram, and Nike on Instagram

All of these examples hail from Instagram, but visual marketing doesn’t just exist on image-based platforms so we’ll cover some examples from other platforms as well as pointing you to some more in-depth visual content marketing advice resources.

Types of motivational visual content

As you can see from just a few Instagram examples, different brands approach motivational images a little bit differently: Some superimpose inspiring quotes or other text over images, some pair motivational images featuring regular people or well-known athletes or fitness models with inspiring captions, some run campaigns with brand-related hashtags, and some do a mixture of all of these. What remains consistent across these images are their striking, professional quality, the minimal branding present, and the tone that intends to push the viewer farther while still feeling achievable.

Any one of these types of visual content isn’t necessarily better than any of the others; it just depends on what resonates with your particular audience. Even if your audience overlaps with the audience of all of these other brands- and that’s very possible in this space- the types of visual content that perform best for you may not necessarily look just like what performs best for Nike.

So how do you figure out what works well for you? Start with these five steps:

  1. Look at best practices in the industry— and lucky for you we have examples of brands who do this well in the next section.
  2. Plan your visual approach based on a mix of best practices and where there’s room for a new approach.
  3. Test. Test different images with text and without, posted at different times, across different networks.
  4. Measure. Use tools like our Instagram Account Checkup to measure your progress, or even our Union Metrics Social Suite if you have more resources.
  5. Plan new content based on what’s performing well.

And then? Keep testing new ideas, measuring, planning, testing again, and generally repeating these steps.

So first things first, let’s look at who does it well beyond the examples at the top of this post.

Brands who do it well

All of the brands whose Instagram accounts we featured at the top of this post do well in executing professional, motivating images to support their audience in reaching their goals- and hopefully using some of their products while doing it- across platforms.

Tone It Up has a whole Pinterest board dedicated to inspiration:

Tone it Up Pinterest

 

Nike Women has a Tumblr that taps into the fitness community on that site:

Nike Women Tumblr

 

Lululemon includes motivational, supportive images in their tweets:

Lululemon Tweet

 

 

And Clif Bar shares inspiring images from their sponsored athletes on Facebook, cross-posted from their Instagram account:

Clif Bar FB

What makes these good examples?

Inspiration is all about evoking a feeling in your audience; in this case that you empathize with the struggle audience members face in their unique fitness journeys and goals. Whether an audience member is a yoga beginner or has run three triathlons, there will still be days when they are tired or don’t believe they’ll ever make it over that next plataeu. Including these kinds of motivational, inspirational images is a form of support because it says I know that feeling, I have felt it too. But oh, look at how it can be worth it. or We’re all in this together; I believe in you. This isn’t a quick fix, this is a lifestyle. 

When you can connect with your audience on an emotional level it leads to brand loyalty from them. There’s also an aspirational element in that many of these images reflect the kind of lifestyle audience members wish they had or are working to have.

Room for improvement

So here’s where brands who aren’t yet executing an established visual content marketing plan can create one that will help them stand out. You’ve seen the best practices, so start thinking hard about your brand, its values and its target audience and start asking yourself these questions:

  1. Where is there a need for something new? A new visual presentation, perhaps; video does appear in a lot of these accounts, but it has hardly been maximized yet. A new voice or tone? There isn’t a whole lot of humor present. Would that make sense for your brand? Thinking about the common elements you see in communicating a fitness lifestyle can also show you what hasn’t been done yet.
  2. Is there a part of the fitness community that isn’t being reached? There’s one post about a visually impaired runner (we realize the irony of including that in a post about visual content marketing, but representation across audiences is important to keep in mind) but what about other disabled athletes? Consider plus-sized athletes or other underrepresented and underserved audiences; they’re hungry for quality products and brands who support them.
  3. What does your brand do that can fill that need? Even if your products don’t immediately cater to niche markets, think creatively about how your products could be used in new ways, tweaked to meet new needs, or even upgraded. Or simply how you can communicate an inclusive fitness lifestyle message across target audiences.

The bottom line

It’s about communicating that you’re supportive of your target audience’s lifestyle. Create a manifesto- like Sport England did for #ThisGirlCan- and work from it.

Written by Sarah

May 26th, 2015 at 10:50 am

The Week in Social Analytics #155

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content strategy, content marketing, and storytelling. 

Content Strategy vs. Content Marketing: How to Get Buy-in From Decision Makers [from Business2Community; written by Michael Riley]

“Showing hard numbers will motivate any decision maker. You need to find ways to track how any “costs” can be tied to revenue growth. It helps to use technology and systems for keeping track of all the data.

The key three factors to track are:

  1. How much is a new customer worth to the business. LTV – Lifetime Value
  2. What converted them into a paying customer. CTA – Call to Action
  3. How much it cost to get them into that funnel. CAC – Customer Acquisition Cost

If the CAC is lower than the LTV, then your efforts are profitable and should be scaled up. It should just be common sense, and an easy decision to make, when done right.”

How to Execute a Carefully Thought-out Content Plan [from Spin Sucks; written by Nathan Ellering]

An in-depth guide on actually executing on that content plan you worked so hard to get buy-in for.

Storytelling In A Data-Driven, Cross-Device Era [from Marketing Land; written by James Green]

“Marketers should build stories that reach people with the information that matters to them wherever they engage — across different channels and devices.”

Platform-specific tips. 

5 Ways Brands Are Using Tumblr to Stand Out [from Entrepreneur; written by Nate Birt]

“Tumblr takes a blog-plus-the-kitchen-sink approach to storytelling, meaning brands have the flexibility to create their own template and engage with fans in ways that best suit their mission. As the fastest-growing network of 2014, Tumblr and its 420 million users deserve a second look. (Note for your sales team: Tumblr users have higher median incomes than those of Pinterest or Twitter users.)

Pepsi

10 practical Vine and Instagram video tips for brands [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

The most popular Vines from everyday users are just completely lo-fi, easy to make, and cost no money whatsoever. For brands it’s a good idea to do the same thing.

All the best Vines have a sense that they can be made by anyone, no matter what budget or skill level.”

As for Instagram:

Instagram is less aesthetically forgiving then Vine. Instagram users expect a slightly higher quality video and image than on Vine. But it’s also easier to make your videos look good.”

Emphasis original.

Video content marketing. 

Seven video marketing lessons learnt from #ThisGirlCan [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

“Lesson six: enjoy and share the response

In a surprising development, women starting making their own This Girl Can videos and sending them to Sport England, showing how inspired they were by the campaign.

These were then shared by the campaign team, which helped make a stronger community and strengthen the core message.”

Written by Sarah

May 22nd, 2015 at 9:15 am

Take a look at our new visual content marketing guide

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Planning a comprehensive visual content marketing strategy across social channels is overwhelming. Let us help. For free.

How?

Just download our guide to creating impactful visual content for any social channel and revel in 18 pages of research and insights.

Okay, but what does it discuss, exactly?

Our new 18-page visual content marketing guide covers best practices and tips for creating the most impactful visual content for any social media channel. From traditionally text-based channels like Twitter to channels that put photos and videos first like Instagram, Snapchat, Vine and Pinterest, as well as mixed-media channels like Tumblr and Facebook. It answers questions like how to use images or animated GIFs or videos, the technical specifications to create the most suitable visual for a particular channel, which formats shine where, and much more.

Here’s an excerpt about best practices for visuals on Twitter:

“We recommend including visual content in at least some of your tweets for a variety of reasons. First, tweets with images take up more than twice as much vertical space in the timeline as tweets without images. So you’re getting more timeline real estate by including an image than with text alone. Second, we’ve seen evidence that suggests that tweets with images in them get more engagement in the form of retweets, replies and clicks. They’re great for grabbing attention and let you say more than words on their own. “

It’s easy to see how much more attention-grabbing the tweets with images are, and yet how many tweets don’t include them.

Okay, you’ve convinced me. What was that link again?

Just go here. Happy reading.

Written by Sarah

May 21st, 2015 at 1:12 pm

Analytics and other industries: Where else can data shine?

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It’s the people that make a company what it is and nobody knows those people better than the People Operations Manager. We’ve tapped ours, Elisabeth Giammona, to write a series of posts about us, our industry, the challenges of people ops, and more. Let us know what you think in the comments or on Twitter at @UnionMetrics.

Courtesy the Found Animals Foundation on Flickr. Used with Creative Commons License.

Pictured: People Operations Assistant Manager. Image courtesy the Found Animals Foundation on Flickr. Used with Creative Commons License.

It probably doesn’t come as a shock that as an analytics provider, we love data! While we focus on measuring likes, reblogs and followers, we find it just as cool that many other industries know the value of capturing and analyzing data in their respective areas of focus. Data analytics is becoming increasingly important in areas across organizations and one that has great potential is in the field of people operations (or “human resources,” if you prefer the traditional).

Union Metrics’ products allow companies to analyze community engagement on social media, but we know that capturing engagement within an existing group or company can have important outcomes. Even though conversations about people operations goals and results are traditionally thought of as more qualitative, there are plenty of quantitative metrics that leaders can use to understand how people are working and which programs may or may not be contributing to individual and company successes.

So what types of metrics can a top-notch people operations team measure? How about starting with employee productivity, performance and retention? With insights into these critical components, a company can start to discern if employees have the tools and resources needed to effectively complete their jobs, or if adjustments to the environment or more input from managers could be helpful. These metrics provide clarity around if existing conditions are working or if it might be time to make a change to keep people and company goals on track.

Then add some metrics related to specific programs like benefits, wellness or daily perks, and you’re on your way to better understanding employee contributions, and how happy employees are in their jobs alongside which benefits are meaningful and worth keeping and which can go. Taking analytics one step further, companies can even leverage data to predict possible future outcomes and the effectiveness of new programs earlier in the research and procurement process.

What else do we like about people operations analytics? It modernizes the approach to understanding what is working and what isn’t as it relates to the human capital components of organizations, and talent is the lifeblood of any organization. This isn’t yesterday’s slow approach of annual company surveys; people operations metrics provide real-time data that allow the HR team to make meaningful decisions across an organization, rather than just relying on outdated information or hunches.

Measuring employee and team metrics might not sound as glamorous as monitoring likes around the latest and greatest cat GIF, but having data that keeps companies smart about individual and group performance can shape plans that keep employees engaged and the business running. And we are a team that loves to keep running.

Written by Sarah

May 20th, 2015 at 11:24 am

Posted in Features,Trends

Tagged with , ,

The Week in Social Analytics #154

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content marketing.

5 Dangerous Content Marketing Myths You Need to Know [from Business2Community; written by Carrie Dagenhard]

“. . .while believing the above myths can certainly put you in a bind, believing misinformation about content marketing can cost your company a large chunk of your marketing budget—and plenty of potential leads.

Emphasis original.

10 Things I Learned About Content Creation From 100 Episodes Of Podcasting [from Web.Search.Social; written by Carol Lynn Rivera]

“If you approach your content as a journey – not as a blog post or a video or a podcast – then you’ll be able to learn, grow and evolve and that will always help you improve.”

Who Needs Words When You Have Emojis? [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Instagram has jumped on the bandwagon, recently announcing that it would allow people to include emojis in hashtags. This makes sense, since nearly half of the comments and captions on the social network now contain the images, Instagram reported.”

emoji frequency

On video content marketing. 

What’s A Video View? On Facebook, Only 3 Seconds Vs. 30 At YouTube [from MarketingLand; written by Martin Beck]

“We surveyed all the major social video platforms to see what counts as a view. For Facebook and Instagram, viewing only 3 seconds of a video of any length is considered a view. For YouTube, it’s “around” 30 seconds, the service tells us. In all those cases, the overall length of a video isn’t factored in.”

Important things for your measurement purposes.

Marketing Videos Don’t Have to Cost a Fortune [from Spin Sucks; written by Tony Gnau]

“If you know you’re going to produce three marketing videos over the course of a campaign, ask your producer if they’d be willing to apply a bulk discount for bundling all three into a single contract.”

 

Written by Sarah

May 15th, 2015 at 8:33 am

How TweetReach impressions compare to Twitter impressions

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At TweetReach, we provide measures of potential reach and impressions on Twitter.

Reach is the size of the estimated potential unique audience for a set of tweets. We calculate reach algorithmically, based on data we’ve been collecting from Twitter since we launched more than five years ago. It’s a great way of estimating how large your audience on Twitter could be, and takes unique recipients into account, removing duplicates.

Impressions measure the size of total potential exposure. This shows you how many total timelines your tweets were delivered to – including multiple deliveries to the same account – so it’s a count of the maximum total impressions possible for a set of tweets.

TweetReach reach and impressions

If you’ve ever seen the analytics Twitter provides for your Twitter account, you’ve noticed they provide a count of actual impressions for each of your tweets. That impressions number shows how many people actually saw that tweet. So you may be wondering how TweetReach impressions and Twitter impressions relate to each other. What do they each mean? Which one should you use? Why are they so different?

Twitter provides actual impressions for your tweets, while TweetReach calculates total potential impressions for those tweets. You can use these numbers together to fully understand how impactful your tweets are. The number of actual impressions your tweets receive will vary from tweet to tweet and account to account, but your actual impressions will likely be between 1% and 20% of your potential impressions.

Knowing how your actual impressions compare to your potential impressions shows you exactly how well your tweets are performing, how large your activated audience is, and how large your potential audience could be. What’s the ratio of your actual impressions to potential impressions? Are your tweets on the low side? Do some tweets perform better than others? Ask yourself the following questions to help improve the ratio of actual impressions to potential impressions.

What tweets get the most impressions?

First, look at which tweets are seen – and engaged with – by the most people. What makes those tweets different from your lower-performing tweets? Maybe you used a particular hashtag or included a photo. Maybe you mentioned someone who retweeted you. Whatever it is, try doing more of that to see how you can activate more of your potential audience, and improve your ratio of actual to potential impressions. For example, we’ve found for our own content, hashtags like #smm and #measure help get our tweets in front of a receptive, responsive audience interested in social media marketing. And our tweets with an interesting photo or video get high rates of engagement. And when it comes to posts about our company, tweets using the #hiring hashtag generate a lot more impressions than an average tweet.

What tweets get the fewest impressions?

Next, look at the tweets that are performing the worst. Which ones have the fewest impressions and least engagement? Look for patterns in those tweets. Sometimes you can learn more from what’s not working than from what is working. For example, we’ve found that some of our text-only tweets get fewer impressions and lower engagement than our visual content does. But not every time – there seems to be certain types of images that work better than others for us. What do you see in your analytics?

What’s different about your outliers?

Finally, are there any tweets that get way more engagement or impressions than the rest of your tweets? Dig deeper into these tweets, in both Twitter and TweetReach. What exactly spurred that response? Twitter will tell you how many retweets, replies, clicks and favorites a tweet received, and TweetReach can tell you who retweeted or replied to you and how much amplification they contributed to that tweet. Use this information to see what caused the spike, and think about how you can try to replicate this on future tweets.

Who engages with your tweets? And how?

Finally, you can use other metrics on engagement (like retweets and replies, average retweet rate) and contributors (such as the people who have engaged the most with your content and generated the most amplification for your content) to understand not just how far your content is reaching, but how and with whom. When taken together, along with actual and potential impressions, you can more completely understand what’s working with your Twitter account and how you can improve what isn’t.

You can run a free TweetReach snapshot report here any time, on any hashtags, usernames or keywords. Try it now! Want more? Check out our comprehensive TweetReach Pro subscriptions, with real-time monitoring and analytics, starting at just $99 per month.

Written by Jenn D

May 14th, 2015 at 8:21 am