TweetReach Blog

Understand how Instagram content performs on Twitter using TweetReach

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The lamentations of Twitter display cards being turned off for Instagram posts may have died out, but the need to measure all aspects of a content marketing strategy has only intensified, particularly when it comes to the visual. So how can you track and measure your Instagram content’s performance on Twitter? Let us show you how, using TweetReach.

The basics of URL tracking with TweetReach

The best way to keep track via TweetReach of how an Instagram photo travels around Twitter is by tracking its URL. TweetReach Trackers can monitor up to 15 separate queries about a single campaign or topic, including one or more URLs. (Full details on setting up topic Trackers here.) Here’s an example of how to set one up for specifically tracking a single Instagram URL:

Instagram tracking

URL queries should be set up as url_contains:instagram.com/p/utBPU3D5cL or with the full URL in quotes, as in the screenshot above. (You can find more details about specific searches and URL queries here.) This will search for all tweets containing this URL or portion of URL. Be sure that you have the full URL for a particular photo you want to track, since just adding a basic Instagram address (instagram.com) would return information on every Instagram photo posted to Twitter, drowning out the results you want.

Also keep in mind that a Tracker will find all tweets that match any of your search queries and aggregate their metrics together in your Tracker, so make sure all the queries in a Tracker are related; in this case one or more Instagram photos, depending on if you want to track a single photo or a set. You can drill down into some details (usernames, hashtags, URLs, etc…) if you set up all the terms around a campaign, but summary metrics will be calculated for the entire set of tweets.

So if you really want to concentrate on the data for just your Instagram photos, consider setting up a separate Tracker for any hashtags or keywords.

What if I already have a Tracker running, and want to see how the Instagram content I’ve cross-posted is doing?

Great question! First, check the Top URLs section of your Tracker to see if any Instagram links are there:

UA Women links

 

If you don’t see any, don’t get discouraged. Clicking on the menu bar in the top right corner of that section (the three dots and three lines) will take you to a full list of URLs shared that is automatically ranked by impressions, but you can change that to reflect ranking by tweets, retweets, or contributors as you prefer.

UAWomen URLs

We recommend paying attention to how your Instagram and other visual content URLs rank depending on how you’ve sorted them. This way you can answer some questions about your content strategy so far: How many of your tweets contain Instagram URLs? Do those get retweeted more or less than those with other content type URLs? The answer to these questions can help you tweak your content strategy, including how often and how you share Instagram content via Twitter.

Find even more details

Click through on each high-ranking Instagram link to see what these high performing visual content pieces have in common. Is it a hashtag you used with all of them? The subject matter, like the inclusion of a celebrity spokesperson? It might even just be the lighting, tone (warm or cool), or absence or presence of people in the photos. Finding a common thread in your Instagram posts will let you know how to best present your content for the maximum impact on your audience.

This page will also tell you which day a link was posted when you hover over a spike in the display, letting you know if certain days of the week work better for certain content (because you should repeat these steps with every kind of content that you’re producing, from YouTube videos to blog URLs):

Instagram URL day posted

If you have fans and followers who independently share your Instagram URLs to their audiences, you’ll likely see this show up here since they can only share it after you have initially posted it. Watching the performance of a repost from your Instagram account can let you know which of your fans and followers have a strong following of their own. In time you can consider them for a brand ambassador partnership if appropriate, or see if they would be interested in using your product in a sponsored post. You can even just thank and reward them for being a dedicated follower.

The bottom line?

Keeping track of what kind of content consistently performs the best with your audience lets you know what kind of content to plan more of for the future. Knowing how your Instagram content is performing is simply one piece of that puzzle, which TweetReach can help put together.

Written by Sarah

March 10th, 2015 at 9:29 am

The Week in Social Analytics #144

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

Platform-specific pieces: 

5 Visual Storytelling Tips To Power Your Content Marketing On Facebook [from Jeff Bullas]

“. . .it’s becoming a necessity to be different. Your Facebook audience, while procrastinating their commitments ahead of them, will take out a few minutes to scroll through their News Feed. Most likely, they’ll skip anything uninteresting.

So with that in mind, you need to come up with content that’s well worth engaging with for an extended amount of time, which leads to the question:

How can your content break through the noise?

Instagram Will Top 100 Million US Users by 2018 [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Going forward, Instagram will also compete with other emerging social networks for attention among these younger demographics, and by extension, for brands’ ad dollars in reaching those demographics. However, over time, we believe Instagram’s straightforward and simple content feed has wider appeal across all demographics—no matter what age or level of digital savvy.”

emarketer Instagram

Do I need two Twitter accounts? [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

Addressed on both the “philosophical and practical” level.

On social strategy: 

How Small Businesses Should Be Using Social Media [from Social Times; written by Katherine Halek]

“What do you hope to gain from social media? If a high follower count or an overnight viral post is your idea of social success, you may learn the hard way that those things in themselves are not guaranteed to bring you more business. Instead of a one-hit wonder, your main focus should be meaningful interaction, with the end goal of building a dedicated fan base.”

On video marketing. So hot right now. 

3 Rules for Better Video Marketing [from Convince and Convert; written by Tyler Lessard]

“Online video is quickly becoming one of the most important and inventive parts of the modern marketing mix. It can seem daunting to dive into, but this report offers a good place to start for understanding how much more comprehensive video can be as a weapon in your arsenal when you approach it with a balance of strategy, integration, and measurement.

YouTube Stars More Influential Than Big-Screen Ones, Youth Say [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“There appears to be an age trend when it comes to following stars on social media, though: 13-year-olds are far more likely to follow a YouTube (59%) than TV/movie (32%) star, while the gap is closer for 14-17-year-olds (53% and 44%, respectively). Among 18-24-year-olds, slightly fewer follow YouTube (51%) than TV/movie (54%) stars.”

This has big implications for brands with certain target demographics who are looking to do celebrity partnerships.

DEFYMedia-YouTube-Stars-Influence-Youth-Mar2015

SXSW 2015 Panel Recommendations

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Every year we bring you our recommendations for panels and more you might want to attend while you’re in town for all the rest of the SXSW madness. Without further ado, here are our picks for 2015.

Visual Storytelling: The Power of Design + Data | Fri, March 13 | 2:00pm-3:00pm

Using big data to tell a story in graphics rather than in words.

Digital Disruption: Do or Die | Fri, March 13 | 5:00pm-6:00pm

What is digital disruption? What are some examples of brands using it to put older, more established brands out of business?

The Future Of Distributed Media | Sat, March 14  | 12:30pm-1:30pm

Learn from the best at creating original content to distribute across platforms: BuzzFeed.

Future15: Why the Future of Film Depends on Social Media with Union Metrics Editor-in-Chief Jenn Deering Davis | Sat, March 14 | 2pm-2:15pm

Big studios have had to change marketing tactics to reach audiences where they are, while indie films have a whole new time-and-money-saving way to market. What tactics from the former can help the latter?

How Technology Colonized Fashion Week | Sat, March 14 | 3:30pm-4:30pm

Fashion week is no longer just for the elite thanks to technology— and this has revolutionized the industry.

Future15: Social Data in the Time of Cholera with Gnip Principal Data Scientist Dr. Scott Hendrickson | Sun, March 15 | 5:15pm-5:30pm

“With social data serving as the largest archive of human behavior to ever exist, how can we turn this data into real-time warning systems? I’ll look at how social data has been used in the past, our own research and endeavors and the possibilities we see for social data in humanitarian efforts going forward.”

Behind The GIF: The Future of Online Visual Culture | Mon, March 16 | 9:30am-10:30am

“This panel will bring together an unprecedented conversation between the creators, platforms, and commentators of the evolving visual frontier of the web. We’ll tackle the latest developments in the space, and give a glimpse of what’s to come.”

image

Evolve or Die: The Traditional Agency Revolution | Mon, March 16 | 9:30am-10:30am

Mad Men days it isn’t.

IBM and Twitter: The Future of Digital Engagement | Mon, March 16  | 3:30pm-4:30pm

How do you build real engagement with fans and followers on social?

Hamburger Helper Is My Bae: Weird Brand Twitter | Mon, March 16 | 5:00pm-6:00pm

When Weird Twitter and Brand Twitter collide, we ask the important questions:

“Why am I laughing at a frozen pizza? I buy the frozen pizza, do I have to be its friend, too?”

Beyond Live, Why the L+3 Social TV Convo Matters | Tues, March 17 | 9:30am – 10:30am

Interested in the changing nature of social TV?

“The landscape is changing from measuring success by ‘trending’ to building dedicated fandoms. The fandom conversation peaks after the show airs and continues to resonate until the next episode, and even between seasons.”

Viva Album Art! | Wed, March 18 | 5pm – 6pm

“We’ll discuss how musicians can use digital media to express their stories, and invite their fans to emotionally connect with their music, using the best platforms and practices that the digital world has to offer.”

Got any great panels we missed? Leave ‘em in the comments.

Written by Sarah

March 5th, 2015 at 9:13 am

Union Metrics at SXSW 2015

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Are you coming to Austin for SXSW Interactive this year? We’d love to see you! Here’s where you can find us (and possibly score a Merle sticker):

Austin Startup Crawl | Thursday, March 12, 2015 | 5pm-1opm

Every year the Startup Crawl unofficially kicks off SXSWi and we love being a part of it! No badges required. See more details and register, here.

Startup Crawl 2015

Union Metrics team at the Pre-SXSW Startup Crawl 2014. From our Instagram Account

Mentor Session with Co-Founder and CEO Hayes Davis | Saturday, March 14, 2015 | 12:30pm-1:30pm

Our CEO and Co-Founder Hayes is available for a mentor session during SXSWi. RSVP for a slot here!

Future15: Why the Future of Film Depends on Social Media with Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief Jenn Deering Davis | Saturday, March 14, 2015 | 2pm-2:15pm

Stop by the Austin Convention Center for Co-Founder and Editor-in-Chief Jenn’s Future15 session on Why the Future of Film Depends on Social Media. See more details here.

Metrics and Mimosas SXSW Brunch | Sunday, March 15, 2015 | 11am-2pm

We’ve held our share of brunches and happy hours for SXSWi, and this one should be better than ever! Come see us at Easy Tiger for Metrics and Mimosas. Just don’t forget to RSVP! 

Want to keep up with all of our events? Bookmark this page

Written by Sarah

March 2nd, 2015 at 9:10 am

The Week in Social Analytics #143

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

This week it’s a lot about content marketing. 

Discomfort (And Content Marketing) Should Be at the Core of Your Communication Strategy [from Business2Community; written by Greg Hassel]

“The key to growth in 2015 for integrated marketing and communication firms and the individuals that comprise them will continue to be stepping out of traditional comfort zones. That may be embracing content marketing or it may be learning and becoming skilled in an area that’s not ‘sexy.’ But as the Leadership Now blog post states: ‘We can put ourselves into an uncomfortable position or, in time, it will be thrust upon us—and not on our terms.’”

Your 16-Point Content Publishing Checklist [from Convince & Convert; written by Arnie Kuenn]

Never hurts to have a reliable checklist to run down before a piece of content goes live.

Content Creators: Enough with the Boring [from Spin Sucks; written by Lindsay Bell]

“Learn this from Jim Henson: As a content creator, you must let go of fear. And you also must open your eyes to the world around you.

Being bombarded as we are daily with images and videos, blog posts and articles, start-ups and new high-tech gadgets, it’s easy to fall into the ‘that’s not cool, hip, innovative, edgy enough’ trap.

Don’t allow that trap to paralyze your content efforts. “

Why Your Blog Is Not Adding Business Value, and What You Can Do About It [from Marketing Profs; written by Jawad Khan]

“However, for your business blog to work effectively, you need to have a clear blogging objective that’s part of a solid content creation and promotion strategy.

If your content has real value for your readers, they will become not only loyal subscribers of your blog but also your most effective source of word-of-mouth marketing.”

Three Approaches to Effective Brand Storytelling [from Spin Sucks; written by Laura Petrolino]

“Our world is made up of stories—the stories we tell ourselves and those we hear from others. And those stories control how we view the world.

As communicators trying to create effective messages, we must understand how these stories affect our target consumer.

Also, how we can create and contribute stories to help our messaging resonate and integrate into their preexisting world view.”

9 Tips For Taking Top-Notch Smartphone Photos [from Business2Community; written by Lisa Furgison]

“Practice makes perfect and variety helps. If you take two or three shots of the same product in a different setting, you’re bound to get a slew of great pics. Eventually, you’ll have a stockpile of product shots that you can rely on.”

And a little bit about analytics. 

US CMOs Still Report Making Little Use of Marketing Analytics [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Moreover, the reported contribution of marketing analytics is not only still low, but also not improving. On a 7-point scale (where 7 represents very high contribution to performance and 1 no contribution at all), CMOs rated marketing analytics’ contribution to performance at an average of 3.2, the lowest figure since the question was first asked in August 2012.

To top it off, 7 in 10 CMOs said they do not formally evaluate the quality of marketing analytics. That figure has also not improved in the past 3 years, as two-thirds did not evaluate the quality back in February 2012.”

DukeCMOSurvey-Share-Budget-Spend-Marketing-Analytics-Feb2015

Let us know if we can help with that.

Written by Sarah

February 27th, 2015 at 8:47 am

4 tips for visual content marketing across platforms

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Merle coaster

From our Instagram account.

Whether you’re building or maintaining your brand voice online, cohesiveness is important. You need to create a consistent experience across social media channels, particularly in your visual content marketing tactics. To be successful in any social media channel, you need content that fits that channel. However, it’s time consuming and impractical to create brand new creative for every single social media platform you participate in. So it’s important to strike the balance between sharing carbon content copies on every social channel, and a taking a completely unique approach in each place.

If you don’t know where to start with your cross-channel content marketing, start with these four tips:

1. Know the best practices for images on each platform.

Audiences seem to like different image elements on different platforms; be sure you have the most up-to-date information about what performs well in each place. Get started with 4 tips for creating content that works across social channels (includes a list of resources for best practices on each platform) and see an example of a cross-platform campaign with The best back-to-school campaigns on Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr.

2. But your own analytics should take precedence.

If the best practice for a particular social channel tells you that photos without faces in them perform the best, but your audience engages more with photos that do have faces, then continue to include faces in your content. What your audience likes and responds to is always what you should design your content strategy around. Best practices simply give you a place to start from and something to test against.

3. Know what elements are important to tie your brand together.

Identify the elements you consider a key part of demonstrating the core values of your business and find a way to communicate that visually across platforms. Color schemes, fonts, framing, and even copy placement are all things to consider (consult your style guide, or build one). Tweak until everything feels just right, then make sure to incorporate enough in every new piece to make it clear that it’s your piece.

4. Tailor copy for every platform.

This is about visuals sure, but rarely do we post a visual without any accompanying words. Don’t just write up one caption or paragraph and paste it with the same photo everywhere you have a social presence. Tailor everything to fit what your audience has shown they like in each place. If you don’t know what that is, start testing and be sure to track your audience’s responses.

Written by Sarah

February 24th, 2015 at 9:04 am

The Week in Social Analytics #142

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

How to. 

How to Care for Your Blog When You Are Too Busy to Blog [from Social Media Today; written by Edwin Huertas]

“Learn to listen in on the sentiments and concerns of your audiences and write content that directly address these. You may not win any literary prizes, but I assure you that your audiences will be very, very interested in what you have to say. Tap into the ‘what’s in it for me’ mindset and you will always have interesting things to write about, and you won’t need to spend much time thinking about what to write.”

How to Make Better Visualizations for Your Blog [from Convince and Convert; written by Sujan Patel]

Which styles of visual content work best with which styles of written content.

On content marketing. 

Content Marketing Personalization: Build Relationships At Scale [from B2B Marketing Insider; written by Michael Brenner]

“Marketing cannot continue to be about ads. Ads we tune out. Ads we hate.”

How to Create a Call-to-Action for All of Your Content [from Spin Sucks; written by Gini Dietrich]

“You also want to think about at least one call-to-action:

  • How to place a call-to-action on every piece of owned media you create. This could be social share buttons, a subscription, or the requirement of an email address for download.
  • How to create landing pages where people download your content. These help you track the effectiveness of one particular piece of content.
  • What kinds of content can you offer in exchange for their registration data (that is, email address and phone number).
  • How to build your database: Generate leads, nurture those leads with new and interesting content, and convert those leads to customers.
  • How to bring in your sales team and integrate your efforts with them.”

B2B Content Marketing Update: Goals, Content Types, and More [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“The most commonly cited content marketing challenges are lack of resources / bandwidth to create content (60%) and understanding buyer personas and creating relevant content for each segment (54%). Roughly half also have trouble producing engaging content, coming up with a variety of content, or simply finding the time to product enough content. Lack of budget (27%) and lack of buy-in/vision (16%), though, don’t appear to be real problems.”

Regalix-Most-Important-Elements-Effective-B2B-Content-Feb2015

 Platform-specific pieces. 

There Are Only A Few, But Here’s How Early Adopters Are Using Twitter Video [from Marketing Land; written by Martin Beck]

“Three weeks after the launch of Twitter’s mobile native video feature, most brands are not using it. The best examples are direct answers in Q&As.”

Surprise! Facebook Has Changed the Rules Again For Brands [from Mack Collier]

Remember all of those images you’re supposed to be using for engagement? Don’t use those anymore.

(But we would recommend continuing to share UGC on your Facebook page, even if it does include images.)

Written by Sarah

February 20th, 2015 at 9:03 am

The power of visual storytelling on Twitter (and beyond!)

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It’s no secret that in the never-ending stream of 140-character messages that is Twitter a snappy visual can make yours stand out; Twitter themselves did a study and found that across different content categories adding an image to your tweet boosted engagement in the form of a higher retweet rate.

So simply adding photos to your tweets is a great starting place and one that we’ve discussed before as Twitter has rolled out more image-friendly updates. But if you want to take it further than just adding relevant visuals to tweets, design a way to tell a visual story on Twitter. Put together something where the pieces can stand individually- after all, your tweets will be part of your followers’ stream- but when a prospective follower or curious fan looks at your homepage, they also see a cohesive visual story that communicates your campaign or company values, whatever it is that you’re trying to get across.

What does this look like?

Starbucks is great about using their timeline to tell little mini-stories, and they incorporate their fans and followers in them by retweeting their tweets as well. A great example is a recent celebration of National Croissant Day:

Starbucks visual storytelling Twitter

 

This example also takes it further, by integrating Snapchat. (We’ll talk more about expanding to other platforms in just a bit!)

Keeping things to Twitter, look at the timelines of any major brands you admire and ask yourself what makes their presentation successful or unsuccessful; do their visuals feel cohesive? Do they work together towards telling a single story and letting you know what they can do for you? Figure out how you can answer those questions and provide value to your own fans, followers, and customers.

Take it beyond a campaign.

Twitter shouldn’t just be about selling to your audience; using it like a bullhorn to shout at your fans and followers is unlikely to result in a reciprocal, engaged relationship with them. Use your social presence to tell any number of stories about your brand. Here are some ideas to get you started:

  • Tell the story of how your company came to be
  • Tell the story of how two companies came together as one in a merger, or the story of a rebranding
  • Show off company culture: Share spontaneous images your employees take of one another and let them tell daily office stories in their own words
  • Show off company values: Share the story of a day spent volunteering, or the different charitable things employees do on their own time and how you support them
  • Tell the story of an event or anniversary of your company
  • Tell the story of a partnership of two brands or a brand and a celebrity spokesperson around a campaign

All of these are ways to show off the human side of your brand, in addition to giving your employees some storytelling power.

Take it even beyond Twitter.

Go beyond just adding a photo to your tweets and use photos to tell a story not just on Twitter but across platforms: Tailor your story so that it’s told on your Facebook timeline, on your Tumblr, across your Instagram page. You can choose different parts of your story to tell in each place, if that feels more appropriate for your brand. Don’t be afraid to experiment with your narrative as long as you stay true to your brand values and the voice you’re trying to build or strengthen. 

See an example of each for inspiration: IKEA built a catalog on Instagram last year, Charity: Water mixes in stories from their different well-building campaigns with user-generated stories on their Facebook page (also seen below), and Sephora’s Tumblr acts as a combination catalog and digital magazine repository of inspirational images, tips, and tricks for their followers.

Charity Water FB

One woman even used Pinterest to tell the story of her Imaginary Well-Dressed Toddler, which eventually expanded to a presence on other networks and a book. In that case a powerful visual story became a brand.

Test content types constantly.

Finally, use the engagement levels on the types of visual content you use- images with words superimposed on them, images without words but with captions, etc- to plan content types moving forward. And you’ll want to keep testing; your audience’s tastes will most likely shift over time.

Written by Sarah

February 18th, 2015 at 9:41 am

The Week in Social Analytics #141

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content marketing.

11 Unusual Visual Content Marketing Tips to Drive a Ton of Traffic [from Jeff Bullas dot com; written by Vinay Koshy]

A fantastic, smart, and in-depth look at ways to build out your content marketing strategy.

These Five Essential Habits of Curators Will Make You a Smarter Marketer [from Marketing Profs; written by Rohit Bhargava]

“In other words, curation adds meaning to isolated beautiful things.

Emphasis original.

On your audience. 

Attention is a Precious Commodity: Earn it and Spend it Wisely [from Brian Solis]

“That’s the elusive yet magical nature of this attention economy. And, it’s both a challenge and also an opportunity to compete in it and for it.”

Your marketing success may hinge on Gray Social Media [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

“I would like to propose today that between dark social media and light social media, there is a third category that is rich in undiscovered marketing opportunity — Gray Social Media. These are the small, still voices who are clearly telling us they’re there, but we can’t detect their quiet signals and capture the data.”

How do we make sure the smallest voices are being heard, so we don’t just cater to a noisy minority?

You Can’t Own a Conversation [from SHIFT Communication; written by Scott Monty]

The lesson here is: Don’t be so quick to spread a message that you aren’t aware of how your message might be received. Listen before you speak, always.

“No, you can’t own a conversation. But you can own relationships. And the relationships you create are your defense against missteps and critics.”

On brand values. 

The Value of Brand Values [from We Are Social; written by Simon Kemp]

“. . .what defines a compelling, ‘human’ brand?

We asked some of the world’s leading marketers the same question, and their answers consistently focused on the same traits that define popular, sociable people.”

If you make time to read one whole piece this week, make it this one.

Written by Sarah

February 13th, 2015 at 8:57 am

5 ways to make the most of snapshot reports

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Our snapshot reports are a great way to get some quick analytics about a conversation or topic on Twitter, and we want to help you get the most out of them that you can! Here are five ways to make the most of your snapshots:

1. Maximize your results

Take your snapshot as soon as a tweet chat, event, or event session ends to capture the best data possible. Free snapshots include up to 50 Tweets and $20 full snapshots include up to 1,500 Tweets, both from the past couple days (up to one week back in many cases). The longer you wait to run your report, however, the better chance that you’ll miss the best data.

tweetreach #smchat

 

From our Instagram account

2. Narrow your results

Taking a snapshot of a weekly chat? Use the “since” modifier (example: #RKChat since:2015-01-30 would go in the search bar) to get results from just that day’s chat, and not any anticipatory chatter from the night before. To narrow your search in other ways to get exactly the data you want, check out this full list of advanced operators.

3. Plan your research

Running a few free reports around keywords, topics, or different hashtags can help you narrow your focus and decide which will be worth paying for a full snapshot, or even going Pro if you’ve got that option in your budget.

4. Scope out the competition

A snapshot of an account can give you a quick idea of that account’s recent activity; which tweets are the most retweeted? Is that the same kind of content you should be looking at and sharing? It’s a great jumping off point for planning your content calendar.

5. Scope out influencers

Which brands and personal brands have the best tone and approach to Twitter in your industry? Run a few snapshots to find common threads and use them to enhance your Twitter content strategy moving forward.

Give it a try! Run your own free snapshot report right now.

Written by Sarah

February 12th, 2015 at 8:36 am