TweetReach Blog

Bare-faced on Twitter & Instagram: Amy Schumer’s #GirlYouDontNeedMakeup

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On Tuesday a new episode of Inside Amy Schumer aired on Comedy Central, and in anticipation of this boy band parody sketch, Amy posted a no-makeup selfie on Twitter and Instagram asking her followers to share selfies of themselves without makeup on either platform with the hashtag #GirlYouDontNeedMakeup.

And the response has been as sweet as a boy band’s choreographed dance moves.

On Twitter

Since it started on Tuesday, more than 13,000 tweets have been posted with the #GirlYouDontNeedMakeup hashtag by more than 12,000 different people, for a potential reach of 40 million unique Twitter users*. Many of the most retweeted tweets came from Amy herself, Comedy Central, or big media and tech outlets like Mashable or Slate, but some came from non-celebrity hashtag participants: 

(Though of course funnyman Zach Braff did add his own somewhat inexplicable and terrifying entry.)

On Instagram

While fewer posts were made on Instagram in the same window, they still had quite the impact with a maximum potential reach of 1.5 million**. The three most popular posts with the #girlyoudontneedmakeup tag were these two from Amy and one from Comedy Central, respectively, but the rest were all from Instagram users sharing their no-makeup faces, not other branded accounts as on Twitter:

#girlyoudontneedmakeup #catyoudontneedmakeup #insideamy

A photo posted by Emily Gordon (@thegynomite) on

One of the most popular Instagram posts includes an important related hashtag, #catyoudontneedmakeup.

Have you posted your no-makeup selfie yet?

Brand takeaways

The smaller number of posts made on Instagram likely has a lot to do with the interconnected nature of Twitter as a platform with its built-in retweets vs Instagram’s third-party apps as the only option for regramming. Twitter’s constant flood of information also makes it acceptable to post original and curated content several times a day, making it more likely for others to see, share, and/or participate in a hashtag than with a more contained stream like Instagram where users are more selective with what they participate in and share.

Both of these are things to keep in mind when planning a campaign, either for a specific platform or to run across platforms; you want to play to the strengths of each.

 

*read more about how we calculate reach on Twitter here

**read about how our Instagram analytics hashtag trackers work here

Written by Sarah

April 30th, 2015 at 9:00 am

A social video guide for brands

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Putting a first generation iPod on a really old television is not a recommended video hosting platform. Image via Alexandre van de sande on Flickr; used with Creative Commons license.

Still not recommended. Image via Alexandre van de sande on Flickr; used with Creative Commons license.

So you want to get into video content marketing.

Those who are excellent at video content marketing make it look easy, leaving the uninitiated with high hopes and a crushing sense of reality once they start researching the work that goes into a well-executed and branded piece of video content. Should you be live-streaming? On Meerkat, or on Periscope? Should you be on both? What about Google Hangouts, is anyone still doing those? All the kids are on Snapchat, right? What about the more established longer-form video platforms like YouTube and Vimeo? Or Vine? And what about the social media platforms that have a video option, like Instagram and now Facebook? It can all be a little overwhelming. Let’s break it down, so you can figure out which social video platforms are right for your brand, based on your resources and goals.

First things first: What does each platform do?

Live-streaming platforms:

  • Meerkat: A live-streaming app where footage is not accessible later. Twitter pulled their official card access after launching their competing acquisition, Periscope, leaving some to speculate on Meerkat’s eventual fate.
  • Periscope: Owned by Twitter, it’s a live-streaming app with videos you can replay later. There’s a private broadcast option as well. (For a more in-depth comparison of Meerkat and Periscope, read this.)
  • Google Hangouts: Face-to-face video conversation where your broadcast is automatically recorded and uploaded to YouTube after you’re finished.

Prerecorded video platforms:

  • Vine: 6 seconds of glory, but recent research shows you only get about 3 to catch your audience’s attention, so don’t rule it out for length.
  • Instagram: Videos on Instagram are limited to 15 seconds, giving you a lot more creative room than on Vine.
  • Snapchat: Send quick snaps in video or photo form, or build bigger and longer stories using both; stories expire in 24hrs whereas snaps last for the duration set by the sender (up to 10 seconds). Recipients can replay one snap a day and they can save snaps by taking a screenshot, but it tells the sender you did so.
  • Facebook video: Facebook has recently launched their own native videos, which autoplay on the site (and the same 3-seconds-to-catch-your-audience’s-attention rule stands) but without volume. Another recent update has made their videos embeddable on other sites.
  • YouTube: The granddaddy of video, they’ve been moving into the original content space as more and more of the younger generation move away from traditional TV (and even admire YouTube personalities over celebs). YouTube offers a lot of tools for building your audience, advertising, and being part of the Google family makes it good choice for SEO rankings.
  • Vimeo: Another option for brands producing high-quality video is Vimeo, which gives you branded players and the ability to embed elsewhere as on YouTube. Here are Vimeo’s brand guidelines.

So what is each platform best for?

As more users adapt to these newer platforms and shift with changes on the established ones, they’ll come up with new and creative ways to use them. In the meantime, here are some ideas for how you can use each platform based on what we’ve seen in the wild. Choose according to your brand’s goals, the type of content you’ll be producing with the resources you have available, and first and foremost, where your audience is. Live-streaming

  • Meerkat: Livestream an event that’s part of a series to get people interested in coming next time- a conference series, or an interview with a well-known expert in your industry- but they have to buy a ticket to the next one or catch the stream in time. If an element of exclusivity works well with your brand’s audience, then this might be the best approach for you.
  • Periscope: Livestream a speech or presentation to increase your audience. Share the playback to your established audience that might have missed it, and be sure to watch it yourself to help you tweak your delivery for next time.
  • Google Hangouts: Google Hangouts function best for meetings and the recordings are often best suited for internal use or transcribing an interview. However, long pieces can be edited down into a summary and other usable pieces. It’s not a bad idea to start with longform content and repurpose it across other platforms, given you have the time and resources to do so.

Pre-recorded video 

  • Vine: Got a clever way to show a how-to or answer a question? Vine’s for you. (Econsultancy does a monthly roudup with great brand examples on Vine.)
  • Instagram: For creative that’s a little longer than 6 seconds that you want to fit into your overall visual brand, there’s Instagram. Post a clip from longer content, as mentioned above, share tips and tricks, or even produce a series of short videos like Gap did for their spring campaign.
  • Snapchat: If your target audience is young, then sending fun behind-the-scenes Snapchat stories is a great move embraced by a lot of the brands currently on the platform. Here are some other creative ways brands are using the platform, from Convince & Convert.
  • Facebook video: If your audience is dedicated to Facebook, you might want to consider making this your video content hub. If you’re already invested in YouTube, you can repurpose content from your channel for Facebook or experiment with Facebook-exclusive content. Here’s a great example of shifting strategy from PopSugar on Digiday.
  • YouTube: Your video hub- create a dedicated brand channel from which you can spin off side-channels, if that makes sense for your content strategy, brand, and resources- from which you can repurpose content into smaller, shorter videos for all the above, aforementioned networks.
  • Vimeo: ReelSEO has a great breakdown of the differences between YouTube and Vimeo for brands, depending on what your priorities are. If you’ve got the resources, consider optimizing videos for both.

What else should I know?

It’s probably worth mentioning the biggest con in live-streaming video: Not everyone is a natural in front of the camera and with the lack of editing available when you’re streaming live, well, unless you’re famous or dealing with extremely topical subject matter in an entertaining way it can be tough to find an audience. The golden rule of content applies here as it does everywhere else: Be sure you’re creating content that’s of value to your customers and making it available on the platforms where they prefer to spend their time. Put in the work to find out where that is, and what it is they want from you.

Any more questions?

Leave ‘em in the comments. Just remember to have fun; your audience can tell when you are.

The Week in Social Analytics #151

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On community management and employee engagement 

How to Bring Humor to Community Management [from Convince & Convert; written by Jessica Gioglio]

Community managers are uniquely positioned to look at how fans respond to humor on a daily basis and test different types of responses. Consider this a mini focus group to power a broader campaign or piece of content.”

Emphasis original.

When You Define Employee Engagement, Culture Improves [from Spin Sucks; written by Maddie Grant]

“Engagement is a result, not a variable.

It is a natural byproduct of a deep alignment among four things:

  1. The employee;
  2. The work he or she does;
  3. What is valued internally; and
  4. What drives the success of the organization.

Those last two are your culture, and most organizations fail to see how important that is to engagement.”

On content marketing

11 Content Marketing Mistakes to Avoid [from Cision; written by Jim Dougherty]

“Here’s my point: a lot of the content advice that you’ll read is either too broad or too specific to be of value to most people. What I want to do in this post is to identify 11 content marketing mistakes that you should avoid. I’ll caveat that by saying that each tip needs to be specific, applicable to most and correctable.”

Pair with What to Know Before Creating a Content Marketing Strategy also from Cision.

Maximize Your Content Creation Commitment [from Convince & Convert; written by Dorie Clark]

We’re all working with a limited amount of time in our lives, so leverage your investment in content creation. 

Stats on youths 

Targeting Teens? Get on Instagram [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“There’s still plenty of room for Instagram adoption among companies. Based on recent research by GfK for Pew Research Center, the platform presents brands with a good channel on which to reach teens. The study found that 52% of US teen internet users used Instagram—the second most popular social media platform among the group after Facebook (71%).”

teens on ig

Teens & Social: What’s the Latest? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

Good read looking at two recent studies from Piper Jaffray and Pew:

“In sum, it’s probably safe to assume that Facebook-owned properties (whether Facebook or Instagram) are among the most popular with teens, with Snapchat very much in the conversation. Twitter’s position seems a little more difficult to ascertain, although it’s clearly in the top 4.”

PiperJaffray-Teens-Most-Important-Social-Network-Apr2015

Pew-Teens-Most-Frequently-Used-Social-Network-Apr2015

Written by Sarah

April 24th, 2015 at 8:07 am

A social analytics option for every budget

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You’re probably familiar with our TweetReach snapshot reports. Maybe you even have a TweetReach Pro subscription. But did you know we offer a variety of other analytics options at Union Metrics, including analytics for Instagram and Tumblr, along with our Twitter analytics? That includes free Instagram and Twitter analytics reports! We have analytics tools perfect for every budget.

Everyone, $0

We offer free analytics reporting for both Twitter and Instagram!

On Twitter, our free snapshot reports are perfect for quick insight into recent tweets. A free snapshot report will include up to 50 tweets from the past few days. It’s great to get a sense of the size and rate of a conversation, as well as what people are tweeting about. You can search for anything that appears in a tweet – a hashtag, phrase, username, URL, etc… Run a snapshot report any time here: http://tweetreach.com

On Instagram, we offer a free account checkup. Our free Instagram account checkup includes analytics on the last 30 days activity with your Instagram account. It’s great to help you see what’s working and how you can improve your Instagram account. You can refresh your report daily to get updated metrics. You can run your free Instagram account checkup here.

Account Checkup Small

Small to medium businesses, $20 – $400

We sell one-off Twitter snapshot reports for just $20 each. That will include analytics on up to 1500 tweets posted in the past days, so it’s perfect for recent events, smaller campaigns, research into conversation on a hashtag or Twitter account, and so on. Run a free snapshot report here, then you’ll get the option to purchase the full snapshot for $20.

We also have single-channel analytics plans that start at just $99 per month. That includes 2 concurrent real-time Trackers with up to 100,000 social posts* per month. At that plan level, you can pick one channel – Twitter, Instagram or Facebook. And if you select Twitter, your subscription also includes unlimited snapshot reports (normally $20 each). We offer a few plan levels, all under $400 per month, that include more Trackers and higher monthly post volumes. You can view our pricing here.

Enterprise, $500 and up

We offer a full social analytics suite for larger brands, agencies and businesses. It starts at $500 per month for 10 Trackers and 1 million social posts. Our social suite includes access to analytics for all the channels we work with (currently Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr), plus a variety of features perfect for enterprise use. Suite subscribers also get early access to new features and channels as we add them, and larger accounts will get access to a dedicated account manager. You can view our enterprise plans and pricing here.

 

*Social posts refers to the allotted post volumes each month. On Twitter, that includes all tweets, retweets and replies. On Instagram, that includes posts for a hashtag Tracker and posts plus likes for account Trackers. On Tumblr, that includes posts plus notes. If you have any questions about what volumes your topics might bring in, just let us know and we can help you pick the right plan for your needs.

Written by Jenn D

April 23rd, 2015 at 9:21 am

Social TV: Netflix binge-watching, Daredevil and Twitter

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The prevalence of the second screen and social television have been established for some time now, but how does the conversation differ around a show when the whole season is released at once and the audience has the option to binge-watch it all in one go?

We looked at the Twitter conversation around Netflix’s recently released Daredevil to find out.

The overall conversation

345.5k tweets have been posted about Netflix’s latest original series since the beginning of April, from 137.5k contributors, for a total unique reach of 76.2 million. That’s smaller than the few days of Twitter conversation around the fourth season premiere of Game of Thrones on Twitter, but consider that Game of Thrones was working with an established fan base and audience who were anticipating the season premiere. Daredevil does have an existing fanbase from the success of other Marvel projects, Netflix originals, and of course the original comic book character to draw from, but new shows still have to prove themselves and the social conversation is becoming an increasing part of that success. Netflix and Marvel know that, so their Twitter accounts are at the forefront of the conversation, along with two of the show’s stars, Rosario Dawson and Deborah Ann Woll if you take a look at the top contributors to the Daredevil conversation:

  1. Marvel
  2. IGN
  3. AgentM
  4. Netflix
  5. EW
  6. Rosario Dawson
  7. Daredevil
  8. Deborah Ann Woll
  9. THR (The Hollywood Reporter)
  10. TVAfterDark

And these accounts consequently have some of the most popular tweets (by retweets):

As expected Game of Thrones chatter only got louder as the season progressed as each episode was released in the traditional serialized manner. With a show available all at once, what do we see? The answer that the biggest spike in the conversation happened on April 10th, the day Netflix released the full season, probably does not surprise you: Daredevil release spike

The day of release

Netflix releases new shows at midnight Pacific Time (3am Eastern) on Fridays (weekend timing makes it perfect for binge-watching), and announces that move with a tweet:

Which coincided with a spike in the conversation for that day, too:

Daredevil release day 3am spike

 

As for the conversation itself, there was some self-aware humor around binge-watching reflected in some of the most retweeted and other prominent tweets:

As well as good old-fashioned jokes that only make sense if you’re familiar with the main character—  or start watching the show to be in on it:  

Mashable and Netflix even brought Twitter’s new live-streaming sister app, Periscope, into the conversation by using it to discuss why you should binge-watch the show and to bring fans behind-the-scenes content:

A Periscope URL wound up being one of the top URLs in the overall conversation, alongside articles around the show (like the one from Entertainment Weekly in the tweet posted above) and a Netflix link to the show itself. Something for brands- and perhaps especially for entertainment brands- to take into consideration as part of a promotional content marketing plan.

Other takeaways

Whether or not you’re an entertainment brand or have anything to do with social television and the second screen at all, you still want to maximize your social listening. Daredevil caught criticism for being a show about a blind superhero that was released without a way for visually impaired fans to fully enjoy it. Netflix heard this, however, and several days later an audio description track was added for the show, along with news that the service would be expanded to its other original series.

That’s taking a blunder, really listening to your fans and followers, and fixing it in a timely manner that results in good PR. 

That’s an excellent lesson for any brand.

 

Do you binge-watch series? Do you tweet about it? Leave your thoughts in the comments! 

 

Written by Sarah

April 22nd, 2015 at 12:44 pm

The Week in Social Analytics #150

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On social media marketing. 

The first step in social media marketing is not social media [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

“In your B2B business, the first priority probably isn’t Facebook. If you’re creating a marketing plan from scratch, social media might not be in your top five priorities at all. . .”

Your first priority is learning the needs of your customers and where you need to be in order to best fill them. Use social media as a tool to do the latter when and where appropriate.

Top 10 Reasons for Using Social Media [from We Are Social; written by Stephanie Weise]

The top three reasons for using social media as cited in this study are passive, expected reasons: Keeping up with friends and family, getting news, entertaining themselves in their free time. But:

“Equally telling is that only 27% of internet users say that they are using social media to share details about their daily life. By some margin, this motivation is less important to networkers than sharing opinions or photos/videos. Clearly, then, many internet users have become more comfortable using social media to publish content rather than to broadcast personal details.

Emphasis added.

7th-April-2015-Top-10-Reasons-for-Using-Social-Media-798x1024

On content marketing. 

It’s spring and that makes it as good a time as ever to clean and restructure your content strategy. These three pieces will help you decide how to tackle an audit (yes you should do a comprehensive one no matter how odious it sounds) and design a sustainable content system going forward, including maintaining a steady content queue.

And more fresh marketing stats:  

B2B Marketers on Their Most Important Go-to-Market Strategies [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“As far as content marketing goes, respondents cited product videos as the most suitable for introductory and growth phases of the product lifecycle.”

Regalix-B2B-Product-Launch-Go-to-Market-Strategies-Apr2015

Pair with Digital Video Better Be up to Millennials’ Standards and US Adults Spend 5.5 Hours with Video Content Each Day, both from eMarketer.

How Are Marketers Using Data? [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Data is changing the world. According to October 2014 research by the Economist Intelligence Unit, the greater availability and use of data in business can create a ‘virtuous circle,’ with nearly two-thirds of executives worldwide reporting that information and knowledge were being shared more quickly and freely in their companies. Even though firms still report struggles and obstacles in dealing with large quantities of data, it’s improving their businesses across a range of operational and strategic functions.”

marketing data

Written by Sarah

April 17th, 2015 at 8:53 am

Where does Union Metrics social data come from?

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Ever wondered where we get the social data we build our analytics on at Union Metrics? Here’s a quick rundown on where our data comes from and what that means to you.

Twitter

We get all our Twitter data directly from Twitter! We’ve had a relationship with Gnip since 2011, and now that Gnip has been acquired by Twitter, we have a direct relationship with Twitter. Specifically, our Pro Trackers access raw Twitter data directly through Twitter’s commercial real-time streaming API, which means full-fidelity ongoing coverage of any tweets you’re interested in. Our historical analytics are built on Twitter’s commercial historical stream, which is full access to the entire Twitter archive. And our snapshot reports use Twitter’s public Search API, which includes up to 1500 tweets from the past days. (This also means Twitter’s recent announcement about cutting off external data providers won’t impact any of the Union Metrics or TweetReach products you use and love.)

Tumblr

Our Tumblr analytics are based on full-fidelity Tumblr firehose that we commercially license through Gnip. We’ve been consuming that firehose since the summer of 2012. That means you’ll have full coverage of all posts for any blogs or keyword-based topics you want to monitor on Tumblr. We’re also a Tumblr preferred data partner, which means that Tumblr has certified us as legit.

Instagram

At this time, Instagram does not provide a commercial firehose. However, we’ve built a custom robust system that works with the public Instagram API to deliver the closest thing to a full-fidelity streaming experience you’ll find for any Instagram analytics in the market. This means you’ll have full coverage analytics in real-time for the accounts and hashtags you’re tracking.

If you have any questions at all about our data, where it comes from or how it’s treated, please don’t hesitate to ask! We’re here any time you need us.

Written by Jenn D

April 16th, 2015 at 9:41 am

Posted in Help,TweetReach Tech

Tagged with , , ,

Twitter chat etiquette: 5 rules for being the Emily Post of Twitter chats

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Cosmo didn't have anything on Twitter chats in here, so we wrote our own. [Image via Flickr; used with Creative Commons License]

Cosmo didn’t have anything on Twitter chats in here, so we wrote our own. [Image via Flickr; used with Creative Commons License]

1. Do let your followers know you’ll be tweeting a lot for the hour of the chat

It’s a common courtesy and allows your followers to mute you if they want to for the duration of the chat. Not warning them runs the risk of an unfollow.

2. Don’t speak over the guest host

Tweet chats are meant to be interactive, so feel free to share your expertise and ask questions, but it looks rude if you’re constantly talking over the person who is meant to be the expert for that chat.

3. Don’t be overly promotional

Sharing one or two relevant links is okay, but you don’t want to run the risk of being obnoxious or looking spammy. If you have more relevant links you think chatters might be interested in, wait until the chat ends and share them, or write a roundup post about the topic and share it using the chat hashtag.

4. Do ask questions

Especially if there’s something you don’t understand! Chatters love to share knowledge and resources, so don’t be shy.

5. Don’t be combative

It’s fine to be opinionated, but don’t be obstinate. Do clarify your point if someone misunderstood what you were trying to say.

Bonus: After the chat

  • Follow people you’ve engaged in conversation with, and even send some invitations to connect on LinkedIn if it feels appropriate
  • Create a Twitter list of regular chatters
  • Share resources you come across that might be relevant to the topic, before and after the chat; all you have to do is add the chat’s hashtag to your tweet
  • Invite others to join the chat you think might be interested in an upcoming topic or guest host

Most importantly? Have fun with it! Don’t be afraid to be yourself and have a sense of humor.

Want more Twitter chat resources? Check out 10 tips for getting the most out of Twitter chats: As a participant9 tips for getting the most out of Twitter chats: As a host, and learn how you can Track Twitter chats and generate transcripts with TweetReach. Related: TweetReach Pro plans start at just $99 if you want to track a recurring chat. 

Written by Sarah

April 15th, 2015 at 11:22 am

Posted in Guides

Tagged with , ,

Making the most of new Union Metrics features – projects, dashboards and insights

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If you have a current Union Metrics account, you’ve probably seen a few of our new features – upgraded dashboards, project functionality, and our brand new insight stream. These new features become incredibly powerful when used together, so read on to learn more about how you can make the most of them in your account.

First, let’s start out with a little background on the new Union Metrics features. If you know this already, skip down to the example section to see it in action.

Projects

A project can be a campaign, a client, a project – any kind of logical grouping that makes sense to you. The idea behind a project is to group multiple related Trackers together to make it easier to view your results and share access with select others. Use projects to:

  • Track competitors and measure share of voice
  • Group a client’s Trackers together
  • Organize an internal program
  • Manage user access permissions across your account

There’s more here about how to manage projects in your Union Metrics account.

Another great feature of projects is that you can invite other users into them. You can also manage their access levels, so if you’d like to invite in a client or coworker to view your Trackers, but not edit them, you can do that. It’s a great way of sharing guest access to certain Trackers without worrying about someone editing your tracked terms or seeing data they shouldn’t.

Dashboard and insights

The dashboard is the top-level view of your account. It shows you how a set of Trackers compare at a glance, and highlights the important trends in your data. It’s meant to provide a quick view into what’s going on in your account, what’s working well, and what you can do next. The dashboard helps you understand:

  • Important changes in key metrics like follower growth, engagement and potential impressions
  • What posts and hashtags are popular
  • How one account’s performance compares to others
  • Who’s active or influential in a particular community
  • Exactly what to do next to improve engagement

The best part of the new dashboard is the insight stream. It pulls out actionable, data-based insights selected to help you identify important changes in key metrics and figure out what steps to take next to improve your performance. The insight stream includes information like spikes in impressions or engagement, above-average follower growth, hashtags that perform better than normal, and the best time for you to post.

You’ll have a dashboard-level view for your full account (that’ll be one dashboard for Twitter, one for Instagram, one for Tumblr, depending on what channels you can access in your Union Metrics account). But even better, once you’ve created a project and either moved existing or set up new Trackers in it, you can view a dashboard specifically for that project. That means all the insights and overview graphs will reflect only the data in Trackers in that project. It’s perfect to quickly identify trends and key information for a particular topic.

Now, an example

So, let’s take a look at how you can make the most out of projects, dashboards and insights in your Union Metrics account. Here’s an demo account, where we’ve set up a bunch of different projects. You can see them in the following screenshot, and yours are accessible through the the projects menu in the top right corner of your account. To view the dashboard and drill into any project, just click on its name there in the drop-down menu.

Union Metrics projects

Then you’ll be taken to that project’s dashboard. You can think of it like a home page for that project – it’s an overview of everything going on in this project, an at-a-glance view of trends and key insights. In this example, we’ve selected the TV project and are viewing all the Instagram Trackers we have in the TV project. That’s four television-related Instagram accounts, which you can see in this screenshot.

Union Metrics Instagram analytics dashboard

There’s a ton of information about our TV project here. First, a quick comparison of the four Instagram accounts we’re monitoring in this project. That’s shown on the left side, with a set of graphs comparing metrics for the four accounts, plus a numerical table of that data. You can see that the @anthonybourdain Instagram account gets the most engagement of the four accounts we’re analyzing, but isn’t doesn’t post as often as the other accounts do. @comedycentral and @teamcoco post a lot more often, but to fewer followers. You can also see several big spikes in engagement in the graphs; you can hover over those spikes to get more information, as shown above.

Next, on the right side of this dashboard, you can see the insight stream, which highlights some key moments in these Trackers, followed by the what’s hot section, which shows the most popular post, publisher, hashtag and participant in this Tracker. In the insight stream, there’s a spike in followers for the @comedycentral account, as well as a few hashtags that are performing well in other Trackers. Insights are updated regularly, so anytime anything interesting happens, we’ll capture it here in the insight stream. If you scroll through the existing insights, you’ll see these two:

Screen Shot 2015-04-13 at 3.47.40 PM

These are time of day insights that show when engagement with an Instagram account happens at a different time than that account posts. Here, you can see one time of day insight for @brooklyn99fox and another for @comedycentral. It looks like both accounts get engagement later in the day, and may want to consider posting content at those times to reach their audiences when they are most active. You can click on any insight to be taken to the Tracker report that corresponds to this data, so you could drill into either of these to see a full heatmap illustrating when engagement with a particular account happens.

Instagram account engagement heatmap

Finally, you can customize your dashboard by changing the Trackers selected and displayed, as well as reordering the Tracker listing table. For example, here we wanted to remove the @anthonybourdain account from our results, since it’s not a comedy-related Instagram account. Now we’re left with three Trackers, as seen here:

Union Metrics Instagram analytics competitive analysis

Now you can see more clearly how these comedy accounts compare to each other. @comedycentral, shown in orange, has the most followers, posts most frequently, and also gets the most engagement. But the @teamcoco account has several spikes in engagement that are higher than @comedycentral’s, which are definitely worth investigating. Any time you want to see more detail, you can view the data in a particular Tracker by clicking on its name there in the table.

Want to see more?

If you’re a current Union Metrics customer and you’d like to learn more about how you can use projects in your account, our customer success team would be happy to walk you through it! Just send us a note and we’ll set up a time to go over it

And there’s more on the way to make this analysis even richer, so stay tuned. We’ll have all kind of interesting updates over the next few months, particularly for our suite subscribers. (If you’re not using our full social suite yet, why not? We should talk.)

 

Written by Jenn D

April 13th, 2015 at 4:30 pm

The Week in Social Analytics #149

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On audience and customers. 

How Much Does Customer Social Media Angst Really Matter? [from Harvard Business Review; written by Morra Aarons-Mele]

“Missteps and failure don’t damn a brand in the digital age. But failure to learn does.”

The Science of Emotions and Virality on Social Media [from Social Times; written by Kimberlee Morrison]

“The interplay of emotions is one of the largest deciders of online activity for users. Whether the story is sad, or it enrages users, there is no one simple answer to what makes content go viral. However, this study can provide significant direction to any content marketer or online marketing professional, as it details how the interplay of emotions affects users.”

Also check out Pew Internet’s latest Teens, Social Media & Technology Overview 2015 if that’s your target demographic. Spoiler alert: Facebook isn’t the teen ghost land you’ve been told it is.

On podcasting. 

7 Podcasting Best Practices [from Cision; written by Jim Dougherty]

“People don’t listen to podcasts because they are podcasts, they listen to great content that is delivered via the podcast medium. “

Plan your content, respect people’s time, and build in meaningful metrics to measure your success.

On that content darling of the moment, video. 

Best Practices for Video Marketing on Social Networks from Cisco, SAP & Bally Switzerland [from TopRank; written by Emily Bacheller]

“Tailor your video for short attention spans by keeping it under three minutes. . .The length of your video will also depend on the platforms that you intend to distribute it on. For instance, Instagram videos are just 15 seconds long, and Vine videos just 6 seconds. Before you script and create your video, determine which social platforms you’d like to play it on, and the time limits associated with videos on those channels.”

Keep in mind you can also take pieces of a longer video to share as a teaser on Instagram, or recreate a salient point of on Vine.

How Vine lost its edge [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

“It’s the tight constraints of Vine itself that mean only a relatively small amount of formats can actually work.

If you triple this running time to 15 seconds, suddenly an exponential number of storytelling formats open up, as do the creative possibilities.

You have to work so much harder to be original on Vine than you do on Instagram, and being as Vine has a much smaller audience, it’s easy to question what the point is.”

Top Social Video Advertising Metrics [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

Keep an eye on Facebook video:

“. . .while more advertisers ran video ad campaigns on YouTube (77.8%) than on Facebook (63%) last year, this year more plan to run a campaign on Facebook (87%) than on YouTube (81.5%).

Mixpo-Top-Social-Video-Advertising-Metrics-Apr2015

 

Emphasis added.

Written by Sarah

April 10th, 2015 at 8:56 am