TweetReach Blog

Tracking Vine, Instagram, and Snapchat with TweetReach

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We’ve briefly discussed before that you can track anything cross-posted to Twitter from an account on another social platform - a Vine video or Instagram photo – by using TweetReach, but we wanted to give some more specific tips about how these different platforms work together so you can get the best results possible for anything you’re tracking.

As always, let us know if you still have questions by leaving them in the comments, or shooting us an email.

TweetReach and Vine

Since Vine is a Twitter app and TweetReach is made to measure Twitter, you might think the easiest way to measure a Vine would be to track a particular tweet it was embedded in, but tracking the unique URL of the Vine itself will get you better results; if it gets picked up or shortened anywhere else on Twitter we should still be able to grab it.

With snapshot reports, all you need to do is put the URL of the Vine in the search box, like with this Vine of a panda from the San Diego Zoo. (For more details on what you can search in a snapshot report, see this.)

Vine TR report

And your returned report will look a little something like this.

Remember, however, that snapshots return limited results; even a full report purchased for $20 will only return results for up to 1500 tweets (reports will always tell you at the top if there are enough tweets to warrant purchasing a full report) so if it’s a wildly popular Vine that has been shared widely, your report won’t cover all of those shares. But if you don’t have a big budget or just want to get an idea of the scope of a single Vine, a snapshot is perfect for your needs.

For those with a bigger budget, TweetReach Pro can track a Vine as one of the queries in a Tracker; just be sure you use the URL of the specific Vine you want for the best results rather than its title. Just putting the word “Vine” will give you a Tracker filled with much more useless noise than with the information that you want. Always be as specific as possible with your search terms! 

TweetReach and Instagram

While Instagram revoked display cards for Twitter, never fear, you can still track any Instagram photo cross-posted to Twitter by its unique URL, or by any unique hashtags you may have paired with it. You can track both and compare results; it’s possible that someone saw your tweet and picked up a hashtag for their own use, perhaps purposefully for a contest, or as an organic use of online language.

Instagram tracking

For a full breakdown of how to track Instagram with a TweetReach Pro Tracker, see this post. For running a quick snapshot report, it will be the same as with Vines above: Simply plug in the URL of the Instagram photo you’re wanting to track, and you’ll get an idea of the spread of that particular Instagram photo on Twitter shortly.

TweetReach and Snapchat

Snapchat is a little bit trickier to track, simply because anything from the site will be a screenshot that someone has taken of a snap or a story and shared. If the screenshot of a snap was directly uploaded to Twitter, all you have to do is track that particular tweet; best results will be by tracking a specific hashtag tweeted with it (for example, #PatriotSnapsWhatUp for the snap below), but you can also search the specific wording of the tweet in quotes.

Is that everything?

That’s all we’ve got for now. Got any questions? Check out our help page for more details on what you can track with TweetReach and how, or leave any additional questions in the comments!

Written by Sarah

June 30th, 2015 at 8:37 am

Posted in Guides

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The Week in Social #160

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On big questions, social media crisis, and the law.

Better Client Insights Begin With Why [from SHIFT Comm; written by Chel Wolverton]

“It’s important to note that while asking ‘Why?’ helps understand what the client needs, what the client needs may not always be what they want. We need to come to a mutual understanding and relationship built on trusting our experience. Our job in revealing client insights is to help them grow and prosper. Understanding ‘Why?’ helps us explain to our clients the choices we make, especially when they run contrary to their expressed desires.”

Emphasis added.

Do Social Media Crises Actually Exist? [from Social Media Explorer; written by Kat French]

Before you panic, read this:

“Heightened, alarmist language like ‘social media crisis’ creates unnecessary fear and drama around something that should be a normal part of doing business. It supports the unrealistic expectation that nothing negative will or should ever be said about your company online.

Unfortunately, managing the fallout from mistakes is a part of every business. But the odds are, unless your situation is truly unprecedented, business will soon get back to normal.”

So: Make a crisis communication plan (here’s a free tip sheet from Cision) and be prepared for the worst, but don’t panic.

Emphasis added.

What You Need to Know About the FTC’s New Social Media Ethics Q&A [from PRNewser; written by Patrick Coffee]

When in doubt, disclose. But here are some basic takeaways:

  • ‘The purchase/sale of fake ‘likes’ or followers is ‘clearly deceptive’
  • Followers participating in contests used to promote a given brand must make that fact clear (preferably by using “contest” or “sweepstakes” in the hashtag
  • The client is ultimately responsible for the individuals who post on its behalf
  • Sponsored videos should note their status in the videos themselves (information below is not good enough)

All things platform-specific

Instagram Marketing: What Instagram’s New Ad Business Means for Brands [from AdWeek; written by Francis Trapp] 

“The specializations of influencers allow brands a more refined and controlled advertising solution. The scope of aspirational categories that Instagram influencers fall into is entirely consumer-driven: From health and beauty tips, to niche diet guides and emerging fashion trends, Instagram influencers reflect what consumers want to see and want to be.

This, in turn, creates a captive market of consumers searching for the products with which they can recreate the lifestyle of an influencer.

The process is the evolved by Instagram’s ad business: The simple association between a brand and an influencer translates an unfamiliar product to an aspirational product; Instagram’s integrated external links seal the deal and make the sale.”

Just be sure you’re doing all the necessary disclosing as laid out in the FTC post above.

Emphasis added.

And finally, the best of this week on content marketing

7 Essential Roles for a Successful Content Marketing Strategy [from B2B Marketing Insider; written by Liz Bedor]

Keep these roles in mind when building a content marketing team. If you are one person performing all seven of these roles, godspeed.

Written by Sarah

June 26th, 2015 at 9:29 am

10 ways for brands to succeed on Facebook

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Even though Facebook is currently the most widely-used social network on the planet with more than 1.3 billion users, it’s not always easy for brands to know how to create relevant content that reaches the widest audience. Not only is Facebook itself always changing how it displays page content, but users are constantly using Facebook in new and different ways. So here are some tips to help you make the most of Facebook.

PS – Did you know we offer Facebook analytics now? We do! Learn more here.

1. Post visual content

Visual content marketing is everywhere (we should know; we wrote an ebook about it), and Facebook is no exception. It’s why your aunt posts so many unfortunate memes that flood your News Feed. Eye-catching images make you at least pause and go, Wait, what is that? Just be sure to take your images beyond “WTF” to “whatever is useful and engaging to your particular audience”. Unless WTF is on-brand for you.

2. Post more content when your audience is around

This seems obvious but can be neglected when you’re stressed out and just need to get something posted every day. Pay attention to what Facebook Insights- or your attractive and insightful Union Metrics Facebook analytics- tell you about the time your fans spend on Facebook, and use that to help decide when to post to your page. If you post at 11am and they all log in at 6pm, are they still going to see your post on their News Feed? Test a few different times, pay attention to the engagement rates, and plan accordingly going forward.

3. Use hashtags effectively

While a ton of hashtags might work well to get your content in front of more eyeballs on Instagram, our research has shown that you should use just one or two hashtags per post on Facebook. But again, this is something you’ll have to test and gauge the response of your own audience on. Maybe they’re #triple #hashtag #threat people.

4. Boost some of your content

Which posts have gotten high organic engagement? Compare them to pull out common elements, then try posting something that includes many or all of those elements. Then boost that post to see if you can improve your reach and engagement even more. Boosting some content will help all the rest of your content get shown more often.

5. Create content that works across channels

Even with unlimited resources, it’s smart to design content you can get mileage out of across the platforms your fans, followers and customers are active on. Ideally you’ll want to create striking images that can be tweaked for maximum impact on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest, and wherever else it is that your people are.

6. Include relevant people and locations in your posts

Employee advocacy is an important part of growing your brand, and socially savvy employees will enjoy the recognition of being tagged in event photos or for writing a post. You can also mention influencers or personal brands in posts. Tagging relevant people and places will give your content the chance to earn an extra boost from being seen by the networks of those people and places, and just maybe someone new will decide to check you out.

7. Post often, but not too often

While a Facebook News Feed moves slower than a typical Twitter timeline, you can still update a few times a day without overwhelming your followers, simply based on the algorithm Facebook uses to show fans and followers new content; unless a fan has specifically updated their settings to see as many of your posts as possible, they’ll most likely only see one. You easily can post 2-3 times a day, maybe more. But in general, we advise against posting more than 5 times a day for most pages.

8. Be responsive

According to some reports, a majority of brands aren’t responsive to customer queries and complaints on their Facebook pages; be sure you’re one of the ones that is! This is an easy way to stand out from your competition, and it’s just plain good customer service. Treat it just like you would Twitter for customer questions.

9. Learn from the best

Take a look at successful Facebook pages in different industries to get new ideas for what might work for your brand. You can learn a lot by watching others (both what to do and what not to do!). Test a few different things with your audience before sticking to what works as measured by the things that matter most to you and your brand.

10. The bottom line

Work to understand which content performs best for your audience. Start with best practices but don’t be afraid to experiment. Then measure, learn, and implement what you’ve learned.

 

What’s the best branded Facebook page you’ve seen? Tell us about it in the comments! 

Written by Sarah

June 25th, 2015 at 10:27 am

Announcing the updated Union Metrics Social Suite: Now with multi-channel analytics AND Facebook!

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At Union Metrics, we strive to build the best social media analytics possible and we are so excited to finally share with you the latest result of our work: the addition of multi-channel reporting and Facebook page analytics to the Union Metrics Social Suite!

Union Metrics Multi-Channel Detail Trackers by Channel

If you’ve been a regular user of TweetReach or our Instagram or Tumblr analytics and have been thinking of upgrading, there’s never been a better time! Now you can have everything you need to monitor your social efforts and strategize for the future in one seamless place; these updates are only available in the Union Metrics Social Suite.

If you want to learn more, join us for a webinar onThursday, June 25, where we’ll demo the new functionality and show you how you can use our multi-channel reporting to improve your social media strategy. Or email us to talk to our sales team right now.

Want more details on what’s included? Keep reading!

Multi-channel dashboard

Our new multi-channel analytics provide a holistic view into campaign performance across social media channels, in one easy-to-read dashboard. To provide answers to our customers’ biggest social media questions, we now bring you insights across all the social channels you monitor. You can:

  • Compare content across channels to see what’s working where
  • Identify spikes in engagement across social media to uncover trends
  • Easily measure share of voice and benchmark against competitors
  • And so much more!

Union Metrics Facebook Analytics Tracker Overview Short

Facebook analytics

We’ve also added another social media channel to our offering – Facebook! Starting today, Social Suite subscribers can now access Facebook analytics in their account and pull all their most important social media analytics into one place. You can:

  • Learn which posts are performing the best – and why
  • Understand the impact of paid and organic activity on your page’s success
  • Analyze fan growth and demographics to better know your audience
  • Create more relevant content that generates more engagement

Learn more at unionmetrics.com and please let us know if you have any questions!

Written by Sarah

June 23rd, 2015 at 9:21 am

4 things for personal fitness brands to consider in building their brand

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We’ve looked at how brands provide virtual support for fans and followers of all levels looking to live an active lifestyle, and wanted to look at how personal brands approach the same audiences.

It’s challenging to connect to an audience across levels of interest and ability that might be drawn to a personal brand for different reasons; everything from just liking how the person behind the brand presents themselves, to respecting their work ethic, sense of humor, a combination of all three, or something else entirely.

There are takeaways for non-personal brands here too, the least of which is understanding how personal brands operate if you’re a traditional brand looking to partner with one in a current or future campaign.

 

1. Show shared values.

Increasingly customers want to spend their money on brands who share the same values as they do; a 2013 Edelman brandshare study said “92 percent of people want to do business with companies that share their beliefs”. This is somewhat easier to achieve as a personal brand- after all, your audience is relating to you as a person rather than a logo or a corporate entity- but that also makes the stakes higher if your audience discovers you aren’t authentically living up to your values.

Decide what’s most important to you as a personal brand that you want to communicate to your audience and design creative ways to share that, both visually and with written content. (What does that look like? We’ll cover it with some examples in #4.)

2. Choose carefully who you partner with in a campaign or sponsorship deal.

Shared values become even more important when brands and personal brands are looking to partner up for a campaign or in a sponsorship deal; either risks alienating their audience if that audience feels the partnership isn’t born of genuine, shared values. (That’s when the term “sellout” starts getting thrown around a lot.)

Both brands and personal brands should do their research to vet each other out as a good match on a campaign or sponsorship deal, figure out where their audiences overlap, and especially what parts of their audiences don’t overlap so they can discover how best to reach each of these segments with inspiring content of value for them.

3. Add a personal touch.

The advantage of being a personal brand is that it’s automatically more, well, personal. You’re free to let thoughts and feelings shine through, particularly during tough training sessions, setbacks, and winning moments that come with living an athletic lifestyle. Personal brands can communicate this in ways that are difficult for traditional brands to master. After all you’re just one person, talking to your audience about the same issues they deal with during their own athletic journey.

Use this to your advantage and be authentic without oversharing unnecessary personal details.

4. Look at who does it well.

We mentioned Tone It Up as a great example of an inspiring lifestyle and fitness brand in the previous post, and the two women behind it are an even better example of personal brands coming together to create a bigger brand with a strong community they’ve inspired behind it.

Separate from their Tone It Up Instagram account, they have a joint personal account that shares photos of the two of them shopping for healthy foods for a week’s worth of meal preparations, celebrating big moments in the community, behind-the-scenes shots for upcoming TIU events, and just being themselves and relating to their followers over common interests and indulgences, like in this image:

TIU wine

Image via karenakatrina on Instagram. 

The TIU brand is the two women behind it, and they work to make themselves as relatable as possible while still posting images that keep their community inspired.

A similar approach comes from Kelly Roberts of Run, Selfie, Repeat. Her blog is all about her personal experiences with running and she’s very open and honest about every missed run, every difficult run, and her tactics for getting through those tough moments (a lot of selfies and singing Taylor Swift). She’s currently asking her community of fans and followers to help her get on the cover of Runner’s World.

Run Selfie RepeatImage via kellykkroberts on Instagram

For an example of a professional athlete with a well-executed personal brand, look no further than ballerina Misty Copeland, a soloist with the American Ballet Theater. Her recent partnership with Under Armor in the I Will What I Want campaign is a fantastic example of shared values and inspiration in action.

On her Instagram account, she reposts images from collaborators and her community, a great way to further engage with fans and followers and share across audiences (remember that overlap we mentioned earlier? Here’s a great way to reach across it).

Misty CopelandImage via mistyonpointe on Instagram 

The bottom line?

Personal brands have an edge over traditional brands in connecting with their fans and followers over shared values around a fitness lifestyle, but the stakes are also higher if the audience ever feels like they were mislead about the authenticity of those values. Personal brands should share what honestly inspires them, and never be afraid to share difficult moments in their athletic journeys. These serve to make the audience feel like they can really connect with the person they’re following behind the “brand” because they’ve had the same experiences.

Written by Sarah

June 22nd, 2015 at 11:10 am

The Week in Social #159

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

Big questions and B2B

Every marketing challenge revolves around these questions [from Seth Godin]

Great writeup on the essential questions behind marketing.

25 B2B Social Media Statistics About Platform Usage [from Social Media B2B; written by Jeffrey L. Cohen]

All the B2B specific stats from the latest social media industry report from Social Media Examiner.

On content marketing and the ubiquitous hashtag

Should you stop using hashtags in social media content? [from SHIFT Comm; written by Chris Penn]

“That said, should you change your hashtagging habits? The answer is: test for yourself. Over the next 2 months, alternate weeks. One week, use hashtags. One week, don’t use hashtags. Alternate for the next 2 months, then count up your likes, comments, shares, retewets, and favorites. See which posts get more engagement and which posts get less engagement.”

Emphasis original.

10 Simple ideas to achieve more content sharing now [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

Content Shares

Definitely worth clicking through the whole presentation.

 Platform-specific updates

7 Things You Need To Know About Twitter Auto-Play Videos [from Social Media Today; written by Sarah Matista]

Great summary of what exactly Twitter putting videos on auto-play means, from data usage to view counts and more.

 

What’s the best thing you read this week? 

 

 

Written by Sarah

June 19th, 2015 at 9:19 am

Union Metrics employee exchange: How the other half lives

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It’s the people that make a company what it is and nobody knows those people better than the People Operations Manager. We’ve tapped ours, Elisabeth Giammona, to write a series of posts about us, our industry, the challenges of people ops, and more. Let us know what you think in the comments or on Twitter at @UnionMetrics. PS – We’re always hiring! You can see our open jobs here

We count ourselves as pretty lucky to have offices in two of the coolest cities around – Austin and San Francisco. In cities known for their tech innovation, it doesn’t get much better than these two! But there are some challenges to having two offices, and while we spend a lot of time on technological solutions to help our distributed team communicate (Slack, always-on video portals, and so on), we like to connect in person when we can.

UMEEP 2

At Trudy’s for dinner in Austin (via the Union Metrics Instagram).

We want to help employees get to know each other better and provide an in-person experience that lets people see the variety of roles and responsibilities that different colleagues tackle every day. Since each office has its own mix of engineering, product, marketing and customer-facing roles, being able to meet team members in person not only helps build camaraderie, but increases the understanding of all the functions that allow Union Metrics to create new products and keep our customers happy and engaged.

To make sure people from both offices are able to meet and work together on a regular basis, we started a monthly employee exchange program where an employee from Austin and an employee from San Francisco travel to the opposite office for a few days. Employees get to spend time with colleagues they normally only see through Slack and video portals, as well as get an in-person view of how the other office is set up (a good chance to judge the other office’s feng shui).

We think it’s important for employees to connect with colleagues that they normally wouldn’t cross paths with through work alone; through these interactions, everyone can better understand what others do, and even identify common areas and think about new ways to tackle problems. Ultimately our goal as a company is for in-person time together to provide a better sense of what different people and teams work on and how each individual’s work contributes to our company goals.

We don’t force everyone to stay in the office on exchange, however! On the social side, exchangers get to partake in the local coffee scene, enjoy a change in weather (at least during most parts of the year), and since San Francisco and Austin are great dining cities, also enjoy a couple of great meals- and a drink or two- with colleagues. We are a passionate group when it comes to food and beverages and have some favorite places we love to take visitors when they’re in town. Read on to see some of our top food and drink picks for SF and ATX, and let us know where you recommend!

UMEEP 1

At happy hour in San Francisco (via Union Metrics on Instagram).

San Francisco

  • Pastries – Pinkie’s is just across the street and their treats defy times of day, so that even if you get a bacon and cheddar brioche for breakfast, you’ll be ready for a Fluffernutter bar by lunch.
  • Sandwiches – The creative sandwiches at Deli Board keep the shop busy all day. Deli Board doesn’t cut corners or skimp on any toppings, so you can expect a great roll to start with, homemade hot sauce if you are daring, and then generous portions of meat and veggies in unusual combinations.
  • Sports bars – San Francisco and the surrounding area have a lot of sports teams, and during a big sports night, we like Golden Gate Tap Room where wings are readily available in multiple flavors.

Austin

  • Barbecue – San Francisco is known for a lot of great food, but barbecue isn’t usually on that list, so visitors to Austin would be smart to indulge in some real BBQ at least once. We recommend County Line.
  • Breakfast tacos – Some folks are squarely in the Torchy’s camp and some are die-hard Taco Deli fans. We leave it up to the visitors to decide on their favorite, but no visitor to Austin should leave without trying a breakfast taco (or five).. Many visitors find themselves drastically missing them once they leave.
  • Tex-Mex – While there may be a lot of great Mexican food in San Francisco, Tex-Mex is in a category all its own. We like to take visitors to Trudy’s and introduce them to the Mexican Martini.

Learn more about what it’s like to work at Union Metrics here!

Written by Sarah

June 16th, 2015 at 10:23 am

The Week in Social #158

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content and influencer marketing. 

Refresh your reading list with these recommendations from Michael BrennerTop 20 Content Marketing Blogs You Should Read Every Day and remember that when it comes to content marketing, “focus on skill, not scale” in this piece from Victoria HoffmanThe Other Half of Content Marketing (The Part You Can’t Hack).

Influence Marketing: Success Is All About Finding the Right Partner [from Social Media Today; written by Sébastien Boyer]

“Influencers need to be assessed on reach, relevance and resonance. What is the size of their following and for they have an active social media presence (Reach)? Do their posts ring true and reflect compatibility with your brand, product or service (Relevance)? Are the articles or posts receiving comments and, equally important, replies (Resonance)?”

2

“Your ideal influencer lies at the intersection of the three Rs.”

4 Ways to Find Truly Relevant Influencers for Your Marketing Campaigns [from PRNewser; written by Lauren Jung]

Popularity (read: a huge follower count) doesn’t necessarily equate influence.

“And back to my point about popularity versus influence. You might have a follower threshold you want to meet and while a certain blogger might really fit the bill, perhaps her audience size isn’t quite up to the standards you’ve set. My advice is to be open-minded AND do some digging before moving on to the next blogger. Pay attention to engagement. Her follower count might not be high but her engagement could be through the roof, which could lead to conversion that is also through the roof.”

Emphasis added.

Basically: Someone with a smaller overall following might have higher engagement in their audience, so while a brand would be reaching fewer people overall those they are reaching would be more likely to pay attention to the recommendation and actually follow through on a trial or purchase.

Bonus reads: What The Most Effective Social Media Marketers Actually Do from Heidi Cohen, and The 9 Internet Trend Charts From Mary Meeker That You Need To See.

Platform specific tips, tricks, and more. 

How cinemagraphs are helping brands break away from static content [from Econsultancy; written by Kasia Piekut]

“Often mistaken for an animated GIF, cinemagraphs are a hybrid of living photography and video in which just one or two details are being brought to life with movement.”

chopard-marketing-cinemagraph-blog-flyer

How to Make Your Instagram Game As Strong As My Five Favorite Accounts’ [from Ann Handley]

“In other words: the most successful companies advertising on Instagram won’t be the ones with the most money to spend.

They’ll be the ones that understand the inherent strengths of the platform, and use it as a place to tell stories that make people feel something.”

Bold emphasis added.

Finally if you’re still not clear on this whole live-streaming trend, read Periscope and Meerkat: what do marketers need to know? from Christopher Ratcliff, and pair with How brands can use Periscope and Meerkat which has more brand examples from both platforms.

Written by Sarah

June 12th, 2015 at 9:07 am

The Week in Social Analytics #157

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On social strategy 

The new guide to minimizing legal risks in Social Media Marketing [from {grow}; written by Kerry Gorgone]

Because “Get Out of Jail Free” cards aren’t real outside of Monopoly.

Managing Expectations Should Be Part Of Your Social Media Strategy [from Social Media Today; written by Mark Ferguson]

Set modest goals, and don’t be afraid to experiment:

“One of the good and bad things about social networks is how much information they have. Someone posts an update, you blink and you’ll miss it. This has some obvious disadvantages but one big advantage. You can experiment without major consequences. You can try various versions of tweets, updates, pins etc. to see which one works best for you. By the time you know, your failed experiments are buried under the 500 million tweets per day. There is no such thing as perfect in social media. That’s one of the beauties of it. The best time to experiment is when you start off as you have fewer followers and connections.”

Emphasis added.

Social video. Still so hot right now.

5 Mind-Boggling Video Stats and How To Use Them To Your Advantage [from social@Ogilvy; written by Justine Herz]

3) 1 in 3 viewers share a YouTube video after watching, and 700 YouTube videos are shared on Twitter alone every minute.

People like to share videos. They want something to share. Now, this ”1 in 3″ number is a bit misleading because the majority of those videos are not branded, however, the user behavior is there. People want to connect with content and tell their friends about it. We just need to give them something to connect with. If we make videos people love, find interesting, surprising, they’ll connect with it.”

Social Video Chart: Your At-A-Glance Guide To 7 Major Platforms [from MarketingLand; written by Martin Beck]

“A side-by-side feature comparison of the seven major social video players — YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Vine, Snapchat and Tumblr.”

social-video-posts-v5

Platform specific tips, tricks, and more

88 marketers you should follow on Twitter [from Convince & Convert; written by Jay Baer]

Double-check to be sure you’re following these fine people on Twitter. (You might want to be sure you’re following @tweetreachapp and @UnionMetrics while you’re at it.)

Tip: What are Facebook video ads good for? [from Social Fresh; written by Jason Keath]

“‘While video creative was not great at driving clicks to a landing page, we found that retargeting people who watched a video did improve the click-through and conversion rates. In other words, audiences that were warmed with video creative were more likely to take action on follow up campaigns.’ said Kistner.”

Emphasis added.

A Three Step Guide to Winning at Instagram [from Social Media Today; written by Andrew Hutchinson]

Image quality almost goes without saying, but you also need consistency in your visual branding. What else?

“One of the key things to remember in your images is that photography appeals to people’s aspirations – the things we want to do, the places we want to be. In the earlier examples shown from Nike, we’re inspired to go outside and smell the flowers, to get out into the elements. This is based on Nike’s in-depth knowledge of their audience – they know that these images will resonate with their followers, because they’re people who’re into running and the outdoors. How do they know this? Because they’ve done the research, they’ve built the audience personas, and they’ve tested over time. So how can you do the same?”

Emphasis added.

Social TV: Between and serialized Netflix

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Until now all of Netflix’s original programming has been binge-able; whole seasons released at once that fans park themselves to consume on the couch while they tweet about it. This changed with the recent release of Between, a show developed in partnership with a Canadian channel that follows the traditional one-new-episode-released-per-week formula. Episodes air on City TV in Canada then become available on Netflix several hours later.

How this affects the conversation

As expected, the biggest spike in Twitter conversation around Between so far in terms of the number of people tweeting and the subsequent reach of their tweets was the day the first episode was released, May 21st, followed by a second, smaller spike the day the second episode was released, May 28th: Between contributors Between reach exposure The most tweets, however, came the day after each episode aired:

Between tweets

And nearly all of the most retweeted tweets came from the show’s star Jennette McCurdy:

Or from Netflix’s Twitter account:

What does this tell us?

Although the overall numbers for this show are lower than around Game of Thrones or fellow Netflix original Daredevil, that’s to be expected for a small, original show without a fanbase to draw on from previous seasons (GoT) or a successful comic book universe (Daredevil, part of the Marvel Universe). It does, however, have star Jennette McCurdy’s existing fans to draw on; those who grew up watching her on iCarly or Sam and Cat are older and excited to see her take on a darker, more serious role in this sci-fi show, so it makes sense that she’s promoting her latest project to her fans and followers on Twitter, encouraging them to tune in when it’s available and even offering to tweet with her fans while they watch.

The episodes become available on Netflix at 11:30pm Eastern, which explains why more tweets around the show are made the next day; fans might be tweeting about their excitement around the latest episode the day it airs, then discussing it or live-tweeting a second viewing (or a first, if they have an early bedtime) the day after it originally airs on Canada’s City TV.

Final takeaways

The overall success of a serialized television show on Netflix vs a binge-able one remains to be seen, but they’re doing everything on the social promotion front right on Twitter, including show-specific hashtags and live-tweeting hashtags:

They could be doing a little more on other networks where their target audience has a presence: Instagram, for example. The official Netflix Instagram account has one photo referencing the show vs. much more promotion for their other original series (Marco Polo, Orange is the New Black, Daredevil, etc) , but this likely has to do with the City TV partnership and the fact that City has established their own Instagram profile for the show. Netflix could still use a third-party app to do some re-gramming, however.

Written by Sarah

June 4th, 2015 at 10:15 am