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Archive for the ‘Week in Social Media’ Category

The Week in Social #159

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

Big questions and B2B

Every marketing challenge revolves around these questions [from Seth Godin]

Great writeup on the essential questions behind marketing.

25 B2B Social Media Statistics About Platform Usage [from Social Media B2B; written by Jeffrey L. Cohen]

All the B2B specific stats from the latest social media industry report from Social Media Examiner.

On content marketing and the ubiquitous hashtag

Should you stop using hashtags in social media content? [from SHIFT Comm; written by Chris Penn]

“That said, should you change your hashtagging habits? The answer is: test for yourself. Over the next 2 months, alternate weeks. One week, use hashtags. One week, don’t use hashtags. Alternate for the next 2 months, then count up your likes, comments, shares, retewets, and favorites. See which posts get more engagement and which posts get less engagement.”

Emphasis original.

10 Simple ideas to achieve more content sharing now [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

Content Shares

Definitely worth clicking through the whole presentation.

 Platform-specific updates

7 Things You Need To Know About Twitter Auto-Play Videos [from Social Media Today; written by Sarah Matista]

Great summary of what exactly Twitter putting videos on auto-play means, from data usage to view counts and more.

 

What’s the best thing you read this week? 

 

 

Written by Sarah

June 19th, 2015 at 9:19 am

The Week in Social #158

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content and influencer marketing. 

Refresh your reading list with these recommendations from Michael BrennerTop 20 Content Marketing Blogs You Should Read Every Day and remember that when it comes to content marketing, “focus on skill, not scale” in this piece from Victoria HoffmanThe Other Half of Content Marketing (The Part You Can’t Hack).

Influence Marketing: Success Is All About Finding the Right Partner [from Social Media Today; written by Sébastien Boyer]

“Influencers need to be assessed on reach, relevance and resonance. What is the size of their following and for they have an active social media presence (Reach)? Do their posts ring true and reflect compatibility with your brand, product or service (Relevance)? Are the articles or posts receiving comments and, equally important, replies (Resonance)?”

2

“Your ideal influencer lies at the intersection of the three Rs.”

4 Ways to Find Truly Relevant Influencers for Your Marketing Campaigns [from PRNewser; written by Lauren Jung]

Popularity (read: a huge follower count) doesn’t necessarily equate influence.

“And back to my point about popularity versus influence. You might have a follower threshold you want to meet and while a certain blogger might really fit the bill, perhaps her audience size isn’t quite up to the standards you’ve set. My advice is to be open-minded AND do some digging before moving on to the next blogger. Pay attention to engagement. Her follower count might not be high but her engagement could be through the roof, which could lead to conversion that is also through the roof.”

Emphasis added.

Basically: Someone with a smaller overall following might have higher engagement in their audience, so while a brand would be reaching fewer people overall those they are reaching would be more likely to pay attention to the recommendation and actually follow through on a trial or purchase.

Bonus reads: What The Most Effective Social Media Marketers Actually Do from Heidi Cohen, and The 9 Internet Trend Charts From Mary Meeker That You Need To See.

Platform specific tips, tricks, and more. 

How cinemagraphs are helping brands break away from static content [from Econsultancy; written by Kasia Piekut]

“Often mistaken for an animated GIF, cinemagraphs are a hybrid of living photography and video in which just one or two details are being brought to life with movement.”

chopard-marketing-cinemagraph-blog-flyer

How to Make Your Instagram Game As Strong As My Five Favorite Accounts’ [from Ann Handley]

“In other words: the most successful companies advertising on Instagram won’t be the ones with the most money to spend.

They’ll be the ones that understand the inherent strengths of the platform, and use it as a place to tell stories that make people feel something.”

Bold emphasis added.

Finally if you’re still not clear on this whole live-streaming trend, read Periscope and Meerkat: what do marketers need to know? from Christopher Ratcliff, and pair with How brands can use Periscope and Meerkat which has more brand examples from both platforms.

Written by Sarah

June 12th, 2015 at 9:07 am

The Week in Social Analytics #157

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On social strategy 

The new guide to minimizing legal risks in Social Media Marketing [from {grow}; written by Kerry Gorgone]

Because “Get Out of Jail Free” cards aren’t real outside of Monopoly.

Managing Expectations Should Be Part Of Your Social Media Strategy [from Social Media Today; written by Mark Ferguson]

Set modest goals, and don’t be afraid to experiment:

“One of the good and bad things about social networks is how much information they have. Someone posts an update, you blink and you’ll miss it. This has some obvious disadvantages but one big advantage. You can experiment without major consequences. You can try various versions of tweets, updates, pins etc. to see which one works best for you. By the time you know, your failed experiments are buried under the 500 million tweets per day. There is no such thing as perfect in social media. That’s one of the beauties of it. The best time to experiment is when you start off as you have fewer followers and connections.”

Emphasis added.

Social video. Still so hot right now.

5 Mind-Boggling Video Stats and How To Use Them To Your Advantage [from social@Ogilvy; written by Justine Herz]

3) 1 in 3 viewers share a YouTube video after watching, and 700 YouTube videos are shared on Twitter alone every minute.

People like to share videos. They want something to share. Now, this ”1 in 3″ number is a bit misleading because the majority of those videos are not branded, however, the user behavior is there. People want to connect with content and tell their friends about it. We just need to give them something to connect with. If we make videos people love, find interesting, surprising, they’ll connect with it.”

Social Video Chart: Your At-A-Glance Guide To 7 Major Platforms [from MarketingLand; written by Martin Beck]

“A side-by-side feature comparison of the seven major social video players — YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Vine, Snapchat and Tumblr.”

social-video-posts-v5

Platform specific tips, tricks, and more

88 marketers you should follow on Twitter [from Convince & Convert; written by Jay Baer]

Double-check to be sure you’re following these fine people on Twitter. (You might want to be sure you’re following @tweetreachapp and @UnionMetrics while you’re at it.)

Tip: What are Facebook video ads good for? [from Social Fresh; written by Jason Keath]

“‘While video creative was not great at driving clicks to a landing page, we found that retargeting people who watched a video did improve the click-through and conversion rates. In other words, audiences that were warmed with video creative were more likely to take action on follow up campaigns.’ said Kistner.”

Emphasis added.

A Three Step Guide to Winning at Instagram [from Social Media Today; written by Andrew Hutchinson]

Image quality almost goes without saying, but you also need consistency in your visual branding. What else?

“One of the key things to remember in your images is that photography appeals to people’s aspirations – the things we want to do, the places we want to be. In the earlier examples shown from Nike, we’re inspired to go outside and smell the flowers, to get out into the elements. This is based on Nike’s in-depth knowledge of their audience – they know that these images will resonate with their followers, because they’re people who’re into running and the outdoors. How do they know this? Because they’ve done the research, they’ve built the audience personas, and they’ve tested over time. So how can you do the same?”

Emphasis added.

The Week in Social Analytics #156

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

Platform-specific tips and tricks. 

How to Add Paragraph Spacing to Your Instagram Posts’ Caption Copy [from Social Media Today; written by Jim Belosic]

A nifty trick to break up that wall of text when you have a long caption for a contest, or to really tell the story behind an image.

Beyond Cats & Bloopers: Getting Real on the Future of YouTube [from social@Ogilvy; written by David Stone]

“The reason for all this lies in YouTube’s emerging business strategy: empowering and educating creators to create better quality content makes YouTube more desirable to audiences and allows the streamer to compete with services such as Netflix and Amazon Prime.”

YouTube marketing strategy a top priority for social media marketers [from Convince & Convert; written by Jay Baer]

“Is video harder than sending a tweet? Of course, but once you have a sound Youtube marketing strategy (or a video strategy overall that might include Facebook, Instagram, and even Twitter video) it doesn’t have to be a massive production burden.”

On influencers. 

If You Want Your Content Marketing to be Great, Ask Influencers to Participate [from TopRank; written by Lee Odden]

1. Set Goals for Marketing and Influencers

In order for co-created content to be successful for marketing, specific audiences and goals should be identified.

Think about: What do you hope to achieve with an influencer content program? How will influencers benefit? More importantly, how will your customers benefit?

Think about the distinct audience that you’re after with the content being co-created and set goals specific to what your idea of success looks like. Quantify those goals as well, whether it’s to increase the reach and engagement of your brand to the influencer’s community or to inspire more leads and sales by a certain percent.

Also, set goals for the influencers. For short term projects, focus on participation quality. With longer term programs, focus on participation, marketing outcomes and the relationship.”

A 4-Step Blogger Outreach Tool for Identifying Influencers [from Convince & Convert; written by Kristen Matthews]

“A crucial part of blogger identification for marketing purposes is thinking a step past buyer personas and coming up with “influencer personas.” An influencer persona is an overarching profile and data on the types of bloggers that appeal to your target consumers.”

And finally, on UX. 

How Important Is User Experience? 9 Things You Need To Know About UX [from Business2Community; written by Jasmine Henry]

“User experience (ux) is an emerging practice that sits at the intersection of behavioral science, web development, and domain-specific knowledge. It’s a human-centric approach to understanding how people engage with technology, and how to build the best web experiences possible.”

 

Written by Sarah

May 29th, 2015 at 8:53 am

The Week in Social Analytics #155

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content strategy, content marketing, and storytelling. 

Content Strategy vs. Content Marketing: How to Get Buy-in From Decision Makers [from Business2Community; written by Michael Riley]

“Showing hard numbers will motivate any decision maker. You need to find ways to track how any “costs” can be tied to revenue growth. It helps to use technology and systems for keeping track of all the data.

The key three factors to track are:

  1. How much is a new customer worth to the business. LTV – Lifetime Value
  2. What converted them into a paying customer. CTA – Call to Action
  3. How much it cost to get them into that funnel. CAC – Customer Acquisition Cost

If the CAC is lower than the LTV, then your efforts are profitable and should be scaled up. It should just be common sense, and an easy decision to make, when done right.”

How to Execute a Carefully Thought-out Content Plan [from Spin Sucks; written by Nathan Ellering]

An in-depth guide on actually executing on that content plan you worked so hard to get buy-in for.

Storytelling In A Data-Driven, Cross-Device Era [from Marketing Land; written by James Green]

“Marketers should build stories that reach people with the information that matters to them wherever they engage — across different channels and devices.”

Platform-specific tips. 

5 Ways Brands Are Using Tumblr to Stand Out [from Entrepreneur; written by Nate Birt]

“Tumblr takes a blog-plus-the-kitchen-sink approach to storytelling, meaning brands have the flexibility to create their own template and engage with fans in ways that best suit their mission. As the fastest-growing network of 2014, Tumblr and its 420 million users deserve a second look. (Note for your sales team: Tumblr users have higher median incomes than those of Pinterest or Twitter users.)

Pepsi

10 practical Vine and Instagram video tips for brands [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

The most popular Vines from everyday users are just completely lo-fi, easy to make, and cost no money whatsoever. For brands it’s a good idea to do the same thing.

All the best Vines have a sense that they can be made by anyone, no matter what budget or skill level.”

As for Instagram:

Instagram is less aesthetically forgiving then Vine. Instagram users expect a slightly higher quality video and image than on Vine. But it’s also easier to make your videos look good.”

Emphasis original.

Video content marketing. 

Seven video marketing lessons learnt from #ThisGirlCan [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

“Lesson six: enjoy and share the response

In a surprising development, women starting making their own This Girl Can videos and sending them to Sport England, showing how inspired they were by the campaign.

These were then shared by the campaign team, which helped make a stronger community and strengthen the core message.”

Written by Sarah

May 22nd, 2015 at 9:15 am

The Week in Social Analytics #154

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content marketing.

5 Dangerous Content Marketing Myths You Need to Know [from Business2Community; written by Carrie Dagenhard]

“. . .while believing the above myths can certainly put you in a bind, believing misinformation about content marketing can cost your company a large chunk of your marketing budget—and plenty of potential leads.

Emphasis original.

10 Things I Learned About Content Creation From 100 Episodes Of Podcasting [from Web.Search.Social; written by Carol Lynn Rivera]

“If you approach your content as a journey – not as a blog post or a video or a podcast – then you’ll be able to learn, grow and evolve and that will always help you improve.”

Who Needs Words When You Have Emojis? [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Instagram has jumped on the bandwagon, recently announcing that it would allow people to include emojis in hashtags. This makes sense, since nearly half of the comments and captions on the social network now contain the images, Instagram reported.”

emoji frequency

On video content marketing. 

What’s A Video View? On Facebook, Only 3 Seconds Vs. 30 At YouTube [from MarketingLand; written by Martin Beck]

“We surveyed all the major social video platforms to see what counts as a view. For Facebook and Instagram, viewing only 3 seconds of a video of any length is considered a view. For YouTube, it’s “around” 30 seconds, the service tells us. In all those cases, the overall length of a video isn’t factored in.”

Important things for your measurement purposes.

Marketing Videos Don’t Have to Cost a Fortune [from Spin Sucks; written by Tony Gnau]

“If you know you’re going to produce three marketing videos over the course of a campaign, ask your producer if they’d be willing to apply a bulk discount for bundling all three into a single contract.”

 

Written by Sarah

May 15th, 2015 at 8:33 am

The Week in Social Analytics #153

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content 

The Art of Finding Your Voice With Your Social Media Content [from Mack Collier]

“While I do think it’s more about giving yourself permission to share your voice versus finding it, I do think that writing consistently helps you to refine your voice.”

The #1 Reason Why Most Content Stinks And What You Can Do About It [from Pushing Social; written by Stan Smith]

Ugh. Reader surveys, right? But:

“You have two options.

  1. Guess. Playing content marketing strategy hop-scotch is easier but wastes time and cash.
  2. Know. Ask your readers want they want and see if you are meeting their need. Takes longer. Is a bit hard on the ego but the smart way to move forward.”

How to Turn Data Into Content Ideas (and Avoid Content Marketing Flops) [from Social Media Today; written by Victoria Hoffman]

“Even the best ideas are backed by some sort of data. If you’re going to be investing time and resources into creating content, you should want to make sure that it’s going to resonate with your audience and help you achieve your content marketing goals.”

Internal Content Curation: What Most Marketers Miss [from Heidi Cohen]

Plus 10 steps to maximize your internal content curation. But wait, what is internal content curation?

Internal content curation is defined as giving new life to content that you’ve already produced and published. It has one or more of the following 3 attributes.

  • Makes content contextually relevant on one or more new platforms through the use of new headlines, images and/or excerpts.
  • Extends content into a new format by re-imagining or repackaging it.
  • Targets new audiences through distribution on new media entities and/or repromotion on the same platforms.”

Emphasis original.

On social media marketing 

Everything Marketers Want To Know About Social Media Marketing But Are Too Afraid To Ask [from Marketing Land; written by Sahil Jain]

Check out “the top questions asked by marketers at a recent social media event, along with the expert panelists’ answers.”

8 Top Instagram Accounts Marketers Need To Keep Their Eye On [from Jeff Bullas]

Don’t know who to follow in the marketing space on Instagram? Here are a few suggestions to get started. (We also humbly submit ourselves over at Union Metrics.)

Written by Sarah

May 8th, 2015 at 8:33 am

The Week in Social Analytics #152

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On saying sorry

If your brand is truly trying to connect to your customers human-to-human, you’re going to make mistakes. Here’s how to apologize in a way that’s meaningful and sincere.

How brands can say sorry like they mean it [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

This piece rounds up great apology examples and concludes with a list of  tips “that can help other companies pour water on almost any fiery situation.”

Craft a Better Apology [from Spin Sucks; written by Daniel Schiller]

“Relationships are by nature complicated, requiring constant cultivation and care. Acknowledging that with open, honest, and sincere personal communication establishes the framework for your strongest business relationships yet.”

On Snapchat

What You Are Missing About SnapChat and the Future of Storytelling? [from Social Media Today; written by James Calder]

“Look at your content and ask yourself if you are providing value and helping. That is the key to everything in social marketing.”

If we could tattoo that on this blog, we would.

5 Reasons Why Brands Should Be Using Snapchat [from Social Media Today; written by Chris Kyriacou]

“There is less pressure for Snapchat users to be perfect compared to other platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, or Pinterest. Snaps will disappear over a few seconds, and you are encouraged to add drawings or captions to the photos or videos you record.

Snapchat allows you to show off the personalized side of the brand that relates to your followers. You can build stories on Snapchat that help you feel like a friend to your audience, providing a personal insight of your brand directly to your stakeholders, avoiding a lot of ‘noise’ associated to other social media channels.”

From personal experience 

The one word journalists should add to Twitter searches that you probably haven’t considered [from Medium; written by Daniel Victor]

Not just for journalists; that piece breaks down how to conduct better Twitter searches.

Nobody Famous: What it’s like to have the social network of a celebrity, without actually being famous [from Medium; written by Anil Dash]

“I sometimes respond to people with facts and figures, showing how the raw number of connections in one’s network doesn’t matter as much as who those connections are, and how engaged they are.”

 

 

Written by Sarah

May 1st, 2015 at 9:00 am

The Week in Social Analytics #151

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On community management and employee engagement 

How to Bring Humor to Community Management [from Convince & Convert; written by Jessica Gioglio]

Community managers are uniquely positioned to look at how fans respond to humor on a daily basis and test different types of responses. Consider this a mini focus group to power a broader campaign or piece of content.”

Emphasis original.

When You Define Employee Engagement, Culture Improves [from Spin Sucks; written by Maddie Grant]

“Engagement is a result, not a variable.

It is a natural byproduct of a deep alignment among four things:

  1. The employee;
  2. The work he or she does;
  3. What is valued internally; and
  4. What drives the success of the organization.

Those last two are your culture, and most organizations fail to see how important that is to engagement.”

On content marketing

11 Content Marketing Mistakes to Avoid [from Cision; written by Jim Dougherty]

“Here’s my point: a lot of the content advice that you’ll read is either too broad or too specific to be of value to most people. What I want to do in this post is to identify 11 content marketing mistakes that you should avoid. I’ll caveat that by saying that each tip needs to be specific, applicable to most and correctable.”

Pair with What to Know Before Creating a Content Marketing Strategy also from Cision.

Maximize Your Content Creation Commitment [from Convince & Convert; written by Dorie Clark]

We’re all working with a limited amount of time in our lives, so leverage your investment in content creation. 

Stats on youths 

Targeting Teens? Get on Instagram [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“There’s still plenty of room for Instagram adoption among companies. Based on recent research by GfK for Pew Research Center, the platform presents brands with a good channel on which to reach teens. The study found that 52% of US teen internet users used Instagram—the second most popular social media platform among the group after Facebook (71%).”

teens on ig

Teens & Social: What’s the Latest? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

Good read looking at two recent studies from Piper Jaffray and Pew:

“In sum, it’s probably safe to assume that Facebook-owned properties (whether Facebook or Instagram) are among the most popular with teens, with Snapchat very much in the conversation. Twitter’s position seems a little more difficult to ascertain, although it’s clearly in the top 4.”

PiperJaffray-Teens-Most-Important-Social-Network-Apr2015

Pew-Teens-Most-Frequently-Used-Social-Network-Apr2015

Written by Sarah

April 24th, 2015 at 8:07 am

The Week in Social Analytics #150

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On social media marketing. 

The first step in social media marketing is not social media [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

“In your B2B business, the first priority probably isn’t Facebook. If you’re creating a marketing plan from scratch, social media might not be in your top five priorities at all. . .”

Your first priority is learning the needs of your customers and where you need to be in order to best fill them. Use social media as a tool to do the latter when and where appropriate.

Top 10 Reasons for Using Social Media [from We Are Social; written by Stephanie Weise]

The top three reasons for using social media as cited in this study are passive, expected reasons: Keeping up with friends and family, getting news, entertaining themselves in their free time. But:

“Equally telling is that only 27% of internet users say that they are using social media to share details about their daily life. By some margin, this motivation is less important to networkers than sharing opinions or photos/videos. Clearly, then, many internet users have become more comfortable using social media to publish content rather than to broadcast personal details.

Emphasis added.

7th-April-2015-Top-10-Reasons-for-Using-Social-Media-798x1024

On content marketing. 

It’s spring and that makes it as good a time as ever to clean and restructure your content strategy. These three pieces will help you decide how to tackle an audit (yes you should do a comprehensive one no matter how odious it sounds) and design a sustainable content system going forward, including maintaining a steady content queue.

And more fresh marketing stats:  

B2B Marketers on Their Most Important Go-to-Market Strategies [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“As far as content marketing goes, respondents cited product videos as the most suitable for introductory and growth phases of the product lifecycle.”

Regalix-B2B-Product-Launch-Go-to-Market-Strategies-Apr2015

Pair with Digital Video Better Be up to Millennials’ Standards and US Adults Spend 5.5 Hours with Video Content Each Day, both from eMarketer.

How Are Marketers Using Data? [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Data is changing the world. According to October 2014 research by the Economist Intelligence Unit, the greater availability and use of data in business can create a ‘virtuous circle,’ with nearly two-thirds of executives worldwide reporting that information and knowledge were being shared more quickly and freely in their companies. Even though firms still report struggles and obstacles in dealing with large quantities of data, it’s improving their businesses across a range of operational and strategic functions.”

marketing data

Written by Sarah

April 17th, 2015 at 8:53 am