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3 Steps to take when your brand joins that New Social Network

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coffee in the morning

Step 0: Be sure you’re properly caffeinated. Photo via Flickr.

You’ve been paying attention to your fans and followers on your established networks and they’ve been asking why you’re not on That New Social Network, so you signed up, if only to reserve your brand’s handle. Your target audience is here, but you haven’t posted anything yet. So. . .now what? What should you do first?

Start with these three steps.

1. Research, research, and then research some more.

How are people using this space? This is likely to shift as the network becomes more established and more users join and experiment with what it has to offer, but it’s always a good idea to know the existing protocol backwards and forwards before you start posting.

Always be sure your content fits the place but is still true to your brand’s voice and core values.

2. Ask your audience: What do you want to see from us here?

How do you figure out what your audience wants from you in a specific place? Try asking them. Ask them on the new network, ask them on your established networks. Send out a survey via email, or tweet and Facebook links to a survey asking what they’d like out of your social media presence, including on the new platform.

Don’t assume you know. Ask, and listen. Then plan your new content strategy accordingly.

3. Test, measure, plan, repeat.

Experiment with different types of content, pay very close attention to the results, and base your strategy going forward on those results. What is touted as a best practice on a new network might not necessarily be what your specific audience wants to see from you in that specific place.

Don’t be afraid to take risks and try new things. Anything your audience reacts positively towards isn’t something to just repeat ad nauseam, but to analyze and figure out what about it worked and why. Then use those elements in all of your content strategy moving forward.

Written by Sarah

March 31st, 2015 at 8:08 am

NFL fans and Instagram: 5 steps to follow fan activity

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NFL fans

From the @nflfanstyle Instagram account, a good start at UGC content and fostering fan engagement

To keep your fans’ attention, you’ve got to meet them where they are, and they are definitely on Instagram. User-generated content is an important part of a robust social strategy that engages your fans and followers; it’s exciting for them to know that you’re paying attention to what they’re posting for a sports team that they love, and that they might even have a chance to be featured on an official account or win a prize from their activity.

Step 1: Follow the general #NFL hashtag on Instagram.

What kinds of content do you see? Click around on some of the photos, keeping an eye out for those that seem like they were posted (or at least taken, we’ll get to that in a minute) during a game. What do they have in common? You will want to pay attention to those that fall into two categories: Those posted from an off-site watch party such as their home, a bar, or a friend’s house, and those posted from the stadium itself.

If your aim is to boost engagement from fans who are in the stadium during games, pay attention to the captions on photos, as well as the other hashtags being used. Are they posting a photo taken in the stadium, but uploading it from a different location after the game, or even days later, because they couldn’t get service in the stadium? The hashtag #latergram is a big indicator here.

What other hashtags should you look for? That’s in the next step.

Step 2: Check out related hashtags used on those #NFL posts.

What other hashtags are people using? If you see a lot of #latergram, you know you need to do something like implement better wifi in your stadium so fans don’t have to rely on using their cellphone data or an overcrowded network that isn’t reliable. Pay attention to any other recurring hashtags from the fans you’re wanting to connect with. Is there an organic hashtag they’ve created around their favorite teams or players? Which ones are you seeing over and over? Make a note of them, because you’ll need them in the next step.

Step 3: Track and listen.

Using something like our Union Metrics for Instagram analytics, set up some monitoring around the hashtags that specifically target the fans you want to reach. Concentrate on any hashtags fans have created and spread to one another. These will give you unparalleled insight into how fans discuss teams, players, and their overall experience with being an NFL fan.

Step 4: Implement a plan to increase engagement where you want it

Now that you have an idea of what the existing conversation is like, you can make a plan for how to improve it. Would more fans post during games if you improved wifi or cell service in the stadium? Do fans seek an incentive, like contests or social-only deals that go out during a game? How else can you increase engagement from fans?

Figure out what it is, make a plan, and make it happen.

Step 5: Measure, rinse, repeat.

Once you have some benchmark numbers from your initial analysis, make sure you keep checking to see if your engagement levels are increasing with each new step that you implement, like upgrading service connections in the stadium, for example, or before, during, and after a contest. This will tell you what’s working and what’s not, to let you know what you should keep doing more of and give you new ideas for content and strategy moving forward.

Anything else?

This doesn’t just apply to the NFL either; these same steps can work for college football or any other sports you’re interested in.

Have specific questions about how to make that happen, or how you can start using our Union Metrics for Instagram analytics? Leave us a comment, or shoot us an email. We’re always happy to help!

Written by Sarah

November 24th, 2014 at 8:23 am

This Week in Social Analytics #36

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

Game Over: Twitter Mentioned In 50% Of Super Bowl Commercials, Facebook Only 8%, Google+ Shut Out [from MarketingLand; written by Matt McGee]

“According to my count, Twitter was mentioned in 26 of 52 national TV commercials — that’s 50 percent of the spots that aired during CBS’ game coverage. Facebook was mentioned in only four of those commercials — about eight percent. Google+, which is reportedly the No. 2 social network in the world, wasn’t mentioned at all.”

Time-Saving Tips for Social Media Marketing [from Social Media Today; written by Chris Street]
Do you use these tactics? Or do you employ others?

5 Bad Social Media Analytics [from Business 2 Community; written by Dr. Angela Hausman]

“Of course, there are lots of bad social media analytics used when evaluating your social media marketing campaign. Commonly, they’re used either because they’re easy to measure or because someone THINKS they have some meaning in evaluating the success of your social media marketing. Here are just 5 examples of really BAD social media analytics.”

Murder, Execution & Other Strategic Plans for Ambitious CMOs [from Social Media Explorer; written by Barry Feldman]

Kill what isn’t working for your company.

Social Media is like coffee. . . [from Web Analytics Demystified; written by Eric T. Peterson]

“* Footnote: I cannot live without coffee, nor would I try … but I know some people who can.”

And a bonus long read, full of culture & history: The Wheel of the Devil: On Vine, gifs, and the power of the loop [from The Machine Starts; written by Chris Baraniuk]

“While visual loops have been in existence for centuries, they have arguably enjoyed special attention over the last hundred years. In this essay I want to consider the purpose and power of the loop. I also intend to propose that the reign of the loop is greatly empowered by digital media, and that today loops have enriched culture while offering new perspectives on the nature of reality.”

This Week in Social Analytics #28

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It’s back! This Week in Social Analyticsreturns to fill your Fridays with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

Abiding fixation: U.S. social media use clocks 121 billion minutes [from The Chicago Tribune; written by Salvador Rodriguez]

Twitter, Tumblr, Google Plus and Pinterest had their U.S. numbers grow by whopping percentages.

Top 7 Social Media Fails of 2012 (And What You Can Learn From Them) [from The Daily Egg; written by Sherice Jacob]

The Takeaway: Never leave a #hashtag unattended. Especially if you’re a large chain with questionable practices and even more questionable ingredients. Research any upcoming events or abbreviations that may conflict with your chosen hashtag, campaign or announcement.

Got Social Data? Must Transform Analytics Operations [from ClickZ; written by Stephanie Miller]

At the end of the day, what we need to do is figure out (and focus on) the business problem we are trying to solve. Are we looking for insight on where to put more capacity for our operations or data center? Are we looking for the next product to launch? Are we looking for new markets to enter? Are we looking to validate the value of our current product mix? The management of data must always be in service to the business objectives.

Social Media Analytics: The Whole is Greater than the Sum of its Parts [from Wired; written by Rado Kotorov]

The key to solving the social media data conundrum is embracing the concept, “the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.” Rather than reinventing the wheel or making risky, costly investments, companies can use their existing knowledge and technologies in new combinations to gain valuable insights from social media.

Twitter Adds More Keyword Targeting Options And Trending Topic Matching for ‘Promoted Tweets’ [from TechCrunch; written by Alexia Tsotsis]

‘For instance, if you sell bacon, you can now keep your campaigns more than six degrees apart from Kevin Bacon by using ‘Kevin’ as a negative keyword,’ the Twitter blog explained in its characteristically humorous fashion.

Tumblr, Demystified: Eight Things You Didn’t Know [from CNBC; written by Cadie Thompson]
8 stats and facts about the company from CEO David Karp, such as, “On average, Tumblr users spend more time on Tumblr browsing content than Facebook users spend on Facebook, according to Comscore data”.

Written by Sarah

December 14th, 2012 at 9:21 am

How a monkey in a coat became an overnight social media sensation

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Excerpted from the Union Metrics Tumblr:

Let’s take a look at the little guy better known as the IKEA monkey, and see how posts about him spread across the social web. Here he is, in what might be the original photo posted by dzd_lisa on Instagram:

Isn’t he cute? That original Instagram photo was first posted to Tumblr by timeforinternet on Sunday night, December 9. After that, posts about the little monkey started to catch on across Tumblr and Twitter, with most activity happening on Monday, December 10.

On December 9, the day the monkey was first spotted at IKEA, there were only 71 posts about it on Tumblr. But on December 10, there were more than 1,100 new posts with 30,100 reblogs and 23,100 likes from more than 42,100 Tumblr users. On Twitter that same day, more than 55,700 tweets were posted from more than 44,100 unique Twitter accounts. Post volume on Tumblr peaked between 8:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. PST on Monday, while tweet volume on Twitter peaked between 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. PST that day.

  • Tumblr: 31,200 posts and reblogs, 42,100 participants
  • Twitter: 55,700 tweets and retweets, 44,100 participants
Read the full article with all the stats on the Union Metrics Tumblr.

 

Written by Sarah

December 13th, 2012 at 8:34 am