TweetReach Blog

Archive for the ‘Trends’ Category

Marketing the end of the world

without comments

The world may be ending tomorrow, but that doesn’t mean you can’t get a good deal out of it.

On Friday December 21st, the Mayan Long Count Calendar completes a cycle (a b’ak’tun, if you want to get technical about it) which doomsday-ers decided means the end of the world, and naturally everyone is talking about it on Twitter:

If you’ve decided putting off your holiday shopping over this was a bad idea, fear not– the deals are as varied as the doomsday prophecies. Toyo Tires is giving away prizes on their Facebook page to those who are betting the world isn’t really going to come to an end:

A countdown clock is placed beneath this Mayan-themed add, similar to the one on JetBrains’s page offering 75% off of their products (the world might not end, but this deal will!).

There are many more, and probably some we’ve missed: Lonely Planet has travel tips and a gentle nudge to buy their travel guide at the end of them,  the San Francisco Bulls are having an End-of-the-World-themed game Friday night, Old Spice released an 8-bit style game centered on saving the world, and T.G.I. Friday’s invites you to spend your apocalypse with them at their Last Friday Party.

Jello has taken a more interactive approach on Twitter, using the hashtag #funpocalypse to go along with its campaign of offering up a delicious sacrifice of Jello pudding to appease the Mayan gods and avert the apocalypse. Jello has asked Twitter followers to tweet at them what they would do from their bucket list before the world ends, and is giving away $100 to participants to accomplish the task.

Over 7 days of steadily climbing activity on this hashtag, Jello has reached 572,363 accounts, generating 718, 420 impressions. It’s a great hook for the brand right before the holidays, when many potential customers will be planning out their holiday menus, and might now be inspired to add a good old-fashioned Jello mold to the mix.

Another end-of-the-world campaign with a lot of chatter on Twitter is OkCupid’s email asking users of the dating site if they want to “die alone” and prompting them to log in to find a date for the apocalypse:

OkC users met this email with a mix of indignation and humor on Twitter- some called it dark while others made cat jokes- with tweets reaching 168,004 accounts, for a total of 188,890 impressions. Considering the email went out Wednesday evening and this report was run Thursday morning, that’s a lot of quick exposure for the brand, without even employing the use of a dedicated hashtag to prompt discussion.

One tweet from user @josephbirdsong garnered the most exposure, retweets and mentions:


One clever, themed email to users resulted in 26% of the impressions of Jello’s week-long campaign, thanks mostly to one tweet about it from a single user. Identifying social influencers like that is a big key for brands, especially when an email campaign is kept separate from social media; in fact OkC doesn’t seem to use Twitter very much, tweeting only a few times a month. With the social response from this one campaign, they might want to pay more attention to what is being said about them and join in the conversation.

Unless we all turn to ash tomorrow, that is.

Written by Sarah

December 20th, 2012 at 10:49 am

How a monkey in a coat became an overnight social media sensation

without comments

Excerpted from the Union Metrics Tumblr:

Let’s take a look at the little guy better known as the IKEA monkey, and see how posts about him spread across the social web. Here he is, in what might be the original photo posted by dzd_lisa on Instagram:

Isn’t he cute? That original Instagram photo was first posted to Tumblr by timeforinternet on Sunday night, December 9. After that, posts about the little monkey started to catch on across Tumblr and Twitter, with most activity happening on Monday, December 10.

On December 9, the day the monkey was first spotted at IKEA, there were only 71 posts about it on Tumblr. But on December 10, there were more than 1,100 new posts with 30,100 reblogs and 23,100 likes from more than 42,100 Tumblr users. On Twitter that same day, more than 55,700 tweets were posted from more than 44,100 unique Twitter accounts. Post volume on Tumblr peaked between 8:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. PST on Monday, while tweet volume on Twitter peaked between 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. PST that day.

  • Tumblr: 31,200 posts and reblogs, 42,100 participants
  • Twitter: 55,700 tweets and retweets, 44,100 participants
Read the full article with all the stats on the Union Metrics Tumblr.

 

Written by Sarah

December 13th, 2012 at 8:34 am

Your in America: Overnight Twitter sensation teaches grammar and Twitter reach

without comments

The latest Twitter account to enchant us all, seemingly overnight, is bringing delight to grammar enthusiasts everywhere: “Your In America Bot” (@YourInAmerica) swoops in on unsuspecting offenders of the English language, who are, entertainingly, mostly trying to shame others for not speaking English.

Created on November 23rd, @YourinAmerica counted just under 15k followers only five days later, with an output of fewer than 100 tweets.

How is that possible? Let’s look at the reach of the single tweet above.

Not bad. But let’s understand how almost 250,000 accounts were reached, when this account has only a fraction of that number of followers, even at the rate it has grown.

Here’s the activity breakdown for the tweet:

So actually 241 separate Twitter accounts contributed to the exposure of this one tweet, mostly by picking it up and retweeting it: 219 retweets, 12 replies, and 18 other tweets were made. On the day this tweet was published, the account had about 8,000 followers, meaning just about 3% of the follower base was able to lead to this much exposure on a single tweet.

And here’s where it really gets interesting: looking at who is doing the retweeting. @SarahSpain, ESPN1000 host, has a lot more followers than @YourinAmerica and her retweet of the original tweet is actually what generated the most exposure.

In this way, TweetReach helps you figure out who the major influencer is in the reach of this particular tweet, in way that would be much more difficult and time-consuming to figure out manually.

This gives you an idea of whom to cultivate relationships with on Twitter. If you see that one account with a lot of influence (be that a large audience or simply highly engaged followers) consistently interacts with you and/or retweets your content, you know they like what you have to say and are helping you grow your own audience.

For example, the second most retweeted tweet only had 7 retweets – compared to the original, unaltered tweet’s 207- but this is still important to note because it indicates that @alysonfooter has an engaged audience of her own. (Note that these numbers reflect the two messages that were retweeted the most– the original and one with the original message plus commentary. More retweets were also made with different commentary added to the original, which altogether add up to the total number of retweets made: 219.)

Perhaps the most interesting takeaway from @YourInAmerica, however, will be if anyone really does learn a grammar lesson. So far most of the victims seem to have deleted the offending tweet in question after falling victim to @YourInAmerica.

Written by Sarah

November 28th, 2012 at 3:28 pm

#NBCFail? More like #NBCWin! Final thoughts on NBC’s 2012 Olympic coverage

with one comment

According to Nielsen, 219.4 million viewers tuned into watch the Olympics on NBC this year. That’s roughly 70% of the US population. If you’re reading this, you were probably one of those 219 million people.

In the more than 50 million tweets posted about the Olympics from July 27 through August 12, some 92,226 tweets included the #NBCFail hashtag. These were posted by 53K different Twitter accounts, and included lots (and lots) of complaints and jokes about NBC’s tape delay, as well as some helpful workarounds for those who wanted to watch live. The first tweet we found that used the #NBCFail hashtag was this tweet from @marcslove posted on July 25, 2012 at 2:29 p.m. PDT (and not the tweet posted a day later from @stevenmarx as reported by certain other sources).

A few other good examples of the #NBCFail tweets are these from @JeremyCMorgan and @tmvogel.

On Twitter at least, people seemed to hate the tape delay, railing against it with their #NBCFail tweets. But the funny thing is, they still watched Olympic coverage on NBC. Did they ever.

A few days into the games, we were convinced that the tape delay was damaging fan participation and goodwill in the games, and NBC’s ratings would be down because of it. But it really didn’t seem to matter – NBC’s ratings were up and higher than ever. Maybe it’s because fans had no choice, and they really had to depend on NBC’s delayed coverage to see the events that mattered to them; live coverage was scarce and difficult to find. Or maybe it’s that noisy voices on Twitter simply don’t reflect larger public opinion. But, what it comes down to is the tape delay actually seems to have made more people watch…

Alan Wurtzel, President of Research and Media Development at NBCUniversal was surprised by the network’s performance, and discussed a few reasons why so many people tuned into NBC’s Olympic coverage. Specifically, he said that people who knew the results of an event “were actually more likely to watch the primetime broadcast”. If this is true, this helps explain why, in spite of a very vocal dislike of the tape delay and rampant spoilers, people still watched more Olympics than ever. If you read tweets and articles about how exciting a particular race or game was, maybe you are more likely to tune in to watch that game when it airs later. Twitter functioned like one giant commercial for NBC’s Olympic coverage.

NBC also credits some of their success to a huge increase in their digital strategy around these Olympics, including an emphasis on mobile and social media. Twitter, for example, definitely helped spread the word. More than 50 million tweets were posted by 11 million different people. Because of this, younger viewers watched more Olympics this year than ever before. NBC says both kids and teens showed double digit gains in viewers this year, which likely contributed heavily to the strong ratings. We know teens are active in social media.

So, was the tape delay really an #NBCFail? Technically, we’ll never really know, because we don’t know how NBC would have done had they aired everything live. But it certainly doesn’t look like a fail from here.

Written by Jenn D

August 14th, 2012 at 3:44 pm

Posted in Trends

Tagged with , , ,

Olympic sponsors on Twitter – the final tally

without comments

We’ve monitored and analyzed Twitter activity for the 11 official worldwide sponsors of the 2012 London Olympics for the duration of the games and have been posting summaries of their performance along the way. Now that the games are over, how did the sponsors stack up?

After leading the race for mentions on Twitter since we started tracking on July 27th, McDonald’s has run away with the gold with almost 35,000 tweets mentioning them. In the race for silver, Coca-Cola continued their lead over Team Visa from last week, accumulating over 20,000 mentions. Team Visa, with almost 19,000 mentions on Twitter since the games began, picked up the bronze.

Congratulations to the sponsors! Check out the results below. Click the image for the full-sized version.

Overall, the 11 official worldwide Olympic sponsors had more than 100,000 mentions on Twitter during the games. The most retweeted tweet mentioning an official sponsor was from gold medal winner McDonald’s at over 1,000 retweets:

The next most retweeted tweet mentioning a sponsor clocked in at 686 retweets and was from bronze medal winner Team Visa:

 

We hope you have enjoyed our analysis of tweets from the 2012 Olympic games! If you are interested in doing your own analysis of Olympics tweets, we’d be happy to help. Just let us know!

Written by Dean Cruse

August 14th, 2012 at 3:39 pm

Posted in Olympics,Trends

Tagged with , , ,

2012 London Olympics in tweets

with 2 comments

For the past two weeks, we’ve been tracking – and analyzing – tweets about the 2012 Olympics. We’ve talked about sponsors and athletes and exciting match-ups. And now, here are a few final Twitter stats from the London Olympics.

From July 27, 2012 through August 12, 2012 – opening ceremony through closing ceremony – we tracked 50,643,268 Olympics-related tweets* from 11,070,485 contributors. That’s right, 50 million tweets in just over two weeks! The largest Twitter spike included 1.2 million tweets posted in a single hour on July 27 during the first hour of the Opening Ceremony.

The most buzzed about Olympic sport was football (soccer!) with 2.8 million tweets. The most buzzed about 2012 athlete was diver Tom Daley from Great Britain with 630 thousand tweets. And the most buzzed about country in this year’s games was the United States, which ended the Olympics with 104 medals and more than 5.4 million tweets.

The most retweeted tweet of the games was this one from @TeamGB that resulted in more than 64,000 retweets:

The most retweeted Twitter accounts overall were:

If you’re interested in analysis of any Olympics-related tweets, just let us know!

*Our tracking included full-fidelity coverage of any mentions of a few dozen keywords related to the Olympics, London 2012, and official Twitter handles and hashtags, posted between 2012-07-27 00:00 UTC and 2012-08-13 07:00 UTC. Let us know if you have any questions about our methodology.

Written by Jenn D

August 13th, 2012 at 5:20 pm

Posted in Olympics,Trends

Tagged with , ,

Did Twitter just predict Paul Ryan as Mitt Romney’s running mate?

without comments

Update: Twitter was right. It’s a Romney-Ryan ticket.

It seems very likely that Mitt Romney is going to select Paul Ryan as his running mate for the Republican Presidential nomination. And it’s looking like Twitter predicted this. We hinted that we’d been tracking Republican VP Candidates with the screenshot accompanying the announcement of our new dashboard earlier this week. As you can clearly see from the updated dashboard below, Ryan started to pull away from the potential VP pack three days ago in terms of unique reach on Twitter. Of the pool of likely candidates, Ryan’s seen the greatest increase in reach over the past month, gaining a 65% increase in reach in the past 30 days. In addition, he’s seen the largest gains in both the number of total tweets and unique people talking about him recently.

So, did Twitter predict Romney’s decision correctly? Well, we’ll know soon enough, as Romney is expected to officially announce his vice presidential running mate tomorrow. We find Twitter’s potential to predict (or not) cultural and current events very interesting, so we’ll be following along and will post a more in-depth analysis next week, so more very soon.

 

 

Written by Hayes D

August 10th, 2012 at 11:10 pm

Posted in Events,Trends

Tagged with ,

Olympic sponsors on Twitter – week 2 leaderboard

with one comment

Welcome to another installment in our coverage of the 2012 London Olympics on Twitter. Last week, we posted the Sponsor Leaderboard, looking at how the official sponsors of the games had performed on Twitter after week 1 of the games.

We started tracking mentions of the 11 worldwide Olympic sponsors’ official Twitter usernames when the Olympics began, and now after two weeks of tweeting, how are they stacking up?

McDonald’s continues to lead the pack with almost 29,000 tweets mentioning them since the games began. But, look out for Coca-Cola, who has come from behind this week to surpass Team Visa and grab the silver medal place for now. Also notable, Procter & Gamble, who moved from eighth to sixth place with a 240% increase in tweets and a 29% increase in followers over the past week.

With only a few more days of Olympic activity, who will win the gold for Olympic sponsor Twitter activity? Stay tuned to find out! And, if you are interested in doing your own analysis of Olympics tweets, we’d be happy to help. Just let us know!

Check out the results below. Click the image for the full-sized version.

Written by Dean Cruse

August 10th, 2012 at 12:12 pm

Posted in Olympics,Trends

Tagged with , , ,

Ambush marketing at the Olympics – what does Twitter say?

with 5 comments

Continuing on our Olympics theme, last week we took a look at how the official worldwide Olympic sponsors were performing on Twitter with our Olympic Sponsor Leaderboard. Over $1 billion has been invested by sanctioned companies to sponsor the games and the International Olympic Committee has been adamant in cracking down on ambush marketing at these games. The rules are clear – if you’re not an official sponsor, then don’t try to advertise using any connection to the Olympics. The London Organizing Committee and the British Parliament have even criminalized ambush tactics with fines of up to $30,000 or more according to the New York Times. With “brand police” actively searching out rogue advertisers who haven’t ponied up what in some cases is close to $100 million each, how are non-sponsors taking advantage of Twitter over these few weeks to rise above the Olympic social media noise?

We took a look at the Twitter activity around four of the official Olympic sponsors and compared them to their main competitors who are not official sponsors. We tracked all mentions of the official Twitter usernames for each of the brands from July 27th through August 8th. The high level results are below. If you’re interested in more detailed analysis of the Olympics, just let us know!

To start, we looked at Adidas, an official sponsor of the Olympics and compared them to Nike, who surprising to many, is not a sponsor. Instead of spending the money to sponsor the Olympics, Nike instead has focused its efforts on its #findgreatness campaign featuring the Find Your Greatness video and TV spot highlighting aspiring athletes in cities named London from around the world (excluding the one in Great Britain). That video has now seen in excess of 4.4 million views on YouTube and continues to climb. Of course, many of Olympic athletes are sponsored by Nike (have you seen the yellow shoes?), but even with the subtle brand awareness afforded by these efforts, Adidas has used the Olympics to their advantage and outperformed Nike in terms of Twitter engagement. Since the Olympics began, Adidas has seen 50% more tweets than Nike and 100% more retweets from only 5% more Twitter users who mention them. Advantage: Sponsor Adidas.

Next up, beverages. Coca-Cola, an official sponsor of the Olympics for decades has performed quite well on Twitter this year, and was ranked 3rd in our Sponsor Leaderboard last week. Pepsi, not a sponsor of the games, has not focused on the Olympics at all, instead concentrating their Twitter promotional efforts on Summer music with their #pepsimusicnow campaign. With that and their other non-Olympic efforts, total tweets about Pepsi since the beginning of the Olympics are 62% higher than those mentioning Coke. Pepsi has seen significantly higher engagement on Twitter with almost 3x the number of replies to their tweets than Coke and 37% more Twitter users mentioning them.

Of course, follower count may have something to do with this. Pepsi has seen a 41% increase in Twitter followers over the past 3 months preceding the Olympics and now sits at over 1 million followers compared to an 8% growth in followers for Coke. Advantage: Non-sponsor Pepsi.

Moving on to fast food, long-time Olympic sponsor McDonald’s has topped rival Burger King in terms of Twitter engagement with almost 10x the tweets since the Olympics began. McDonald’s, who held first place in our Sponsor Leaderboard last week, beat Burger King in virtually every aspect of Twitter activity including tweets, retweets, replies, and Twitter users mentioning them. Burger King’s Twitter efforts over the period of the Olympics has been focused on promoting their menu items without targeting a specific campaign effort. Perhaps their strategy has been to sit it out and let the Olympic storm blow over? Their one attempt to subtly mention the games resulted in a grammatically-challenged tweet. Advantage: Sponsor McDonald’s.

Finally, we took a look at financial services. Team Visa, an official Olympic sponsor, created a new Twitter username especially for the games and has used it to their advantage to promote their sponsorship. Despite having 3x the followers on Twitter, rival Mastercard’s participation on Twitter has been dwarfed by Team Visa in every aspect of Twitter engagement. Rather than focus on the Olympics, Mastercard has instead focused its social media efforts on promoting the #dineoutday campaign, a fund raising event targeted to raise money to fund cancer research. While a great cause, in terms of Twitter engagement over the past few weeks, advantage: Sponsor Team Visa.

Overall, three of the four sponsors we tracked significantly out-performed their competitors in terms of Twitter engagement since the Opening Ceremonies on July 27th. Only Pepsi, with their massive Twitter effort, beat out Coke based on our Twitter tracking data. Of course, Twitter is but one part of a marketing campaign and these companies are spending millions of dollars outside of social media to promote their brands. And, some surveys indicate that consumers don’t even know who is sponsoring the Olympics. But, in terms of Twitter engagement specifically during the Olympic games, the sponsors’ investments seem to be paying off when compared to their direct competitors.

Written by Dean Cruse

August 8th, 2012 at 7:04 pm

Olympic sponsors race for the gold on Twitter

with 3 comments

We hope you’re enjoying our series of posts about the 2012 Olympics on Twitter. Next up, we take a look at how the official sponsors of the games are performing. Some of them, such as Coca-Cola, have supported the Olympics for decades. Coke first got involved in 1928 when a freighter delivered the United States team and 1,000 cases of Coca-Cola to the Olympic Games in Amsterdam. McDonald’s famously airlifted hamburgers to homesick American athletes in Grenoble in 1968. Other sponsors are newer, having joined since The Olympic Partners program was first introduced in 1985.

While not without controversy, the monetary effect of the sponsors on the games is massive. Olympic sponsors, partners, supporters, suppliers, and providers have invested well over $1 billion in the 2012 games. How’s that investment paying off? Clearly, these companies will measure results through increases in brand awareness, athlete mentions, and revenue. But in this, the first Twitter Olympics, how are they performing on our favorite social media network?

We’ve been tracking mentions of the 11 worldwide Olympic sponsors’ official Twitter usernames since the Olympics began, and the results for first week are below. So far, McDonald’s leads the pack with more tweets, users, and retweets mentioning them. But, Team Visa is close on their heals and relative to their smaller follower count, is outperforming them all. Click the image for the full-sized version.

We’ll take another look at the leaderboard at the end of week two. And, look for more detailed analysis about the sponsors on Twitter after the games have completed. Interested in doing your own analysis of Olympics tweets? Just let us know!

 ________________________________________________________________________________

Interested in learning more about TweetReach? Take a look at our website or contact our sales team for more.

Written by Dean Cruse

August 3rd, 2012 at 9:39 am

Posted in Olympics,Trends

Tagged with , , ,