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Social TV: Between and serialized Netflix

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Until now all of Netflix’s original programming has been binge-able; whole seasons released at once that fans park themselves to consume on the couch while they tweet about it. This changed with the recent release of Between, a show developed in partnership with a Canadian channel that follows the traditional one-new-episode-released-per-week formula. Episodes air on City TV in Canada then become available on Netflix several hours later.

How this affects the conversation

As expected, the biggest spike in Twitter conversation around Between so far in terms of the number of people tweeting and the subsequent reach of their tweets was the day the first episode was released, May 21st, followed by a second, smaller spike the day the second episode was released, May 28th: Between contributors Between reach exposure The most tweets, however, came the day after each episode aired:

Between tweets

And nearly all of the most retweeted tweets came from the show’s star Jennette McCurdy:

Or from Netflix’s Twitter account:

What does this tell us?

Although the overall numbers for this show are lower than around Game of Thrones or fellow Netflix original Daredevil, that’s to be expected for a small, original show without a fanbase to draw on from previous seasons (GoT) or a successful comic book universe (Daredevil, part of the Marvel Universe). It does, however, have star Jennette McCurdy’s existing fans to draw on; those who grew up watching her on iCarly or Sam and Cat are older and excited to see her take on a darker, more serious role in this sci-fi show, so it makes sense that she’s promoting her latest project to her fans and followers on Twitter, encouraging them to tune in when it’s available and even offering to tweet with her fans while they watch.

The episodes become available on Netflix at 11:30pm Eastern, which explains why more tweets around the show are made the next day; fans might be tweeting about their excitement around the latest episode the day it airs, then discussing it or live-tweeting a second viewing (or a first, if they have an early bedtime) the day after it originally airs on Canada’s City TV.

Final takeaways

The overall success of a serialized television show on Netflix vs a binge-able one remains to be seen, but they’re doing everything on the social promotion front right on Twitter, including show-specific hashtags and live-tweeting hashtags:

They could be doing a little more on other networks where their target audience has a presence: Instagram, for example. The official Netflix Instagram account has one photo referencing the show vs. much more promotion for their other original series (Marco Polo, Orange is the New Black, Daredevil, etc) , but this likely has to do with the City TV partnership and the fact that City has established their own Instagram profile for the show. Netflix could still use a third-party app to do some re-gramming, however.

Written by Sarah

June 4th, 2015 at 10:15 am

How Snapchat has evolved for brands

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We’ve written about brands on Snapchat before- covering both the basics and brands who do it well- but social media platforms evolve almost as quickly as snaps disappear from your screen, so we thought an update was due.

Let’s dive into an updated version of the basics, how use of the platform has evolved for brands, how brand content is different on Snapchat than on other channels, and some good brand examples to illustrate it all along the way.

How the basics have changed

You still have a score, and Snapchat still has a step-by-step screencapped guide to finding and adding friends. Brands will still want to concentrate on creating stories over sending individual snaps, however, and that makes the biggest basic to be sure you make your stories viewable to anyone who adds you.

Snapchat Story Settings for Brand

This way all fans have to do is add you, and they’ll be able to see any story that you create. Adding back every single fan or follower who decides to follow you on the platform and then manually sending snaps to each one of them would quickly turn into a logistical nightmare. You can also still decide who sends you snaps: Everyone, or just those you approve of as friends. Use your discretion.

And as of right now advertising on Snapchat is expensive with Discover being a slightly more affordable option, but not one that will be the right fit for every brand that doesn’t have the ability to produce a wealth of Discover-specific content.

How Snapchat is evolving

Aside from the arrival of Discover, when we wrote our first piece on Snapchat, “Our Story” was a new feature that has indeed become a regular thing. Now called “Our Stories” and found under the “Live” section, it looks like this:

Live on SnapchatIf you’re in the geographic location where an event is taking place, you have the option to add a snap to the story. This could be a fun thing for a brand to participate in, but ultimately it would get lost in the noise of the collaborative snap (unless you’re doing a sponsored version, like Bud Light). Our Stories are a fun way to see what’s happening live at an event elsewhere in the world and could give some insight into Snapchat users in different areas; particularly important if you’re looking to reach a global audience.

Other Snapchat feature updates since our first post include the ability to send cash using Snapcash, adding a fun Geofilter overlay to your images if one is available, as well as use Chat and Video Chat. Experiment with these in a way that makes sense for your brand. We haven’t heard of any big brands using these features with customers just yet, but that doesn’t mean smaller independent brands haven’t been experimenting. Limited chatting, for example, could be a fun way to add another layer of engagement in a Snapchat-based contest (see the official rules from a GE Snapchat contest as an example).

Brands are still largely using the platform to share behind-the-scenes content with a very intimate, down-to-earth feel, like these examples from Mashable, MTV, and NPR:

NPR in particular has been open about its experimentation with the platform and their intern shared her experiences in using it and learning what worked on their NPR Social Media Desk Tumblr. Here’s a great excerpt:

“Yes, it’s time-consuming to answer queries and respond to comments. But it’s also a really wonderful way to foster an engaged community. When I started addressing our followers directly, the number of snaps we receive went up hugely! The feedback really helped shape my editorial approach to the platform.”

Brands have also begun to experiment with interactive material on Snapchat; Cosmopolitan’s first Discover post was one users could customize and share.

How brand content differs on Snapchat

As you can see from the examples in the previous section, brands don’t go for polished video production on Snapchat; it’s a very informal, more intimate setting on this platform where even your more “permanent” content only lasts for 24 hours.

A brand that really presents itself differently across different platforms according to the prevailing tastes and culture of each place- and of their own target audience- is Sephora. On Snapchat they give product previews or even share little aesthetic pieces of their day, like this:

SephoraSnaps

 

On Tumblr they run a digital magazine full of high-impact product photos, interviews with celebrities and makeup artists, as well as tips, tricks, and how-tos. On Instagram they alternate between impeccably staged product shots with regrams of celebrities and well-known beauty names using or wearing their products, with fewer behind-the-scenes or selfie shots. Sephora’s Twitter shares product news and store events while repurposing those product shots, with a lot of the same content tailored differently for Facebook. Finally their Pinterest is a smorgasbord of products, how-tos, inspiration, and event-specific versions of how-tos and inspiration (prom hair, anyone?).

What’s the takeaway here? Sephora has done their homework and come up with a visual content strategy that is on brand across platforms, but also speaks to the specific aesthetics of each and the audience they’re trying to reach in each place. Tumblr is a well-executed yet accessible digital glossy, Instagram is more polished but still throws in a few behind-the-scenes shots, Pinterest has every how-to you could want categorized and organized, while Twitter and Facebook share the basic news. It makes sense then that Snapchat is a way to show a more relaxed version of their brand that gives followers and idea of the hands putting all of those other pieces together. It feels more intimate, like they’re sharing it just with you, the more dedicated fans who follow them there.

Anything else?

Yes, and it’s still a big one: Let your audience know you’re on Snapchat on every other platform you have a presence on and be sure you pick a handle that’s the same as your others or that’s simple to search for and/or figure out, like YourBrandSnaps. If they don’t know you’re there, they can’t follow you!

Oh, and have fun with it. Happy snapping!

Got any questions, or know of anything that we missed? Let us know in the comments!

Written by Sarah

June 2nd, 2015 at 11:03 am

Posted in Guides,Trends

Tagged with ,

Just do it, online: How brands can provide virtual fitness support

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Everyone’s motivational style is a little different, but everyone loves getting encouragement for the hard work they do, especially if they mostly train alone for races or other sporting events. Many fitness-related brands have figured this out and work motivational and supportive content into their visual marketing. It looks a little something like this:

MotivationalVisuals

Clockwise from top left: Tone It Up on Instagram, Clif Bar on Instagram, Lululemon on Instagram, and Nike on Instagram

All of these examples hail from Instagram, but visual marketing doesn’t just exist on image-based platforms so we’ll cover some examples from other platforms as well as pointing you to some more in-depth visual content marketing advice resources.

Types of motivational visual content

As you can see from just a few Instagram examples, different brands approach motivational images a little bit differently: Some superimpose inspiring quotes or other text over images, some pair motivational images featuring regular people or well-known athletes or fitness models with inspiring captions, some run campaigns with brand-related hashtags, and some do a mixture of all of these. What remains consistent across these images are their striking, professional quality, the minimal branding present, and the tone that intends to push the viewer farther while still feeling achievable.

Any one of these types of visual content isn’t necessarily better than any of the others; it just depends on what resonates with your particular audience. Even if your audience overlaps with the audience of all of these other brands- and that’s very possible in this space- the types of visual content that perform best for you may not necessarily look just like what performs best for Nike.

So how do you figure out what works well for you? Start with these five steps:

  1. Look at best practices in the industry— and lucky for you we have examples of brands who do this well in the next section.
  2. Plan your visual approach based on a mix of best practices and where there’s room for a new approach.
  3. Test. Test different images with text and without, posted at different times, across different networks.
  4. Measure. Use tools like our Instagram Account Checkup to measure your progress, or even our Union Metrics Social Suite if you have more resources.
  5. Plan new content based on what’s performing well.

And then? Keep testing new ideas, measuring, planning, testing again, and generally repeating these steps.

So first things first, let’s look at who does it well beyond the examples at the top of this post.

Brands who do it well

All of the brands whose Instagram accounts we featured at the top of this post do well in executing professional, motivating images to support their audience in reaching their goals- and hopefully using some of their products while doing it- across platforms.

Tone It Up has a whole Pinterest board dedicated to inspiration:

Tone it Up Pinterest

 

Nike Women has a Tumblr that taps into the fitness community on that site:

Nike Women Tumblr

 

Lululemon includes motivational, supportive images in their tweets:

Lululemon Tweet

 

 

And Clif Bar shares inspiring images from their sponsored athletes on Facebook, cross-posted from their Instagram account:

Clif Bar FB

What makes these good examples?

Inspiration is all about evoking a feeling in your audience; in this case that you empathize with the struggle audience members face in their unique fitness journeys and goals. Whether an audience member is a yoga beginner or has run three triathlons, there will still be days when they are tired or don’t believe they’ll ever make it over that next plataeu. Including these kinds of motivational, inspirational images is a form of support because it says I know that feeling, I have felt it too. But oh, look at how it can be worth it. or We’re all in this together; I believe in you. This isn’t a quick fix, this is a lifestyle. 

When you can connect with your audience on an emotional level it leads to brand loyalty from them. There’s also an aspirational element in that many of these images reflect the kind of lifestyle audience members wish they had or are working to have.

Room for improvement

So here’s where brands who aren’t yet executing an established visual content marketing plan can create one that will help them stand out. You’ve seen the best practices, so start thinking hard about your brand, its values and its target audience and start asking yourself these questions:

  1. Where is there a need for something new? A new visual presentation, perhaps; video does appear in a lot of these accounts, but it has hardly been maximized yet. A new voice or tone? There isn’t a whole lot of humor present. Would that make sense for your brand? Thinking about the common elements you see in communicating a fitness lifestyle can also show you what hasn’t been done yet.
  2. Is there a part of the fitness community that isn’t being reached? There’s one post about a visually impaired runner (we realize the irony of including that in a post about visual content marketing, but representation across audiences is important to keep in mind) but what about other disabled athletes? Consider plus-sized athletes or other underrepresented and underserved audiences; they’re hungry for quality products and brands who support them.
  3. What does your brand do that can fill that need? Even if your products don’t immediately cater to niche markets, think creatively about how your products could be used in new ways, tweaked to meet new needs, or even upgraded. Or simply how you can communicate an inclusive fitness lifestyle message across target audiences.

The bottom line

It’s about communicating that you’re supportive of your target audience’s lifestyle. Create a manifesto- like Sport England did for #ThisGirlCan- and work from it.

Written by Sarah

May 26th, 2015 at 10:50 am

Take a look at our new visual content marketing guide

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Planning a comprehensive visual content marketing strategy across social channels is overwhelming. Let us help. For free.

How?

Just download our guide to creating impactful visual content for any social channel and revel in 18 pages of research and insights.

Okay, but what does it discuss, exactly?

Our new 18-page visual content marketing guide covers best practices and tips for creating the most impactful visual content for any social media channel. From traditionally text-based channels like Twitter to channels that put photos and videos first like Instagram, Snapchat, Vine and Pinterest, as well as mixed-media channels like Tumblr and Facebook. It answers questions like how to use images or animated GIFs or videos, the technical specifications to create the most suitable visual for a particular channel, which formats shine where, and much more.

Here’s an excerpt about best practices for visuals on Twitter:

“We recommend including visual content in at least some of your tweets for a variety of reasons. First, tweets with images take up more than twice as much vertical space in the timeline as tweets without images. So you’re getting more timeline real estate by including an image than with text alone. Second, we’ve seen evidence that suggests that tweets with images in them get more engagement in the form of retweets, replies and clicks. They’re great for grabbing attention and let you say more than words on their own. “

It’s easy to see how much more attention-grabbing the tweets with images are, and yet how many tweets don’t include them.

Okay, you’ve convinced me. What was that link again?

Just go here. Happy reading.

Written by Sarah

May 21st, 2015 at 1:12 pm

Analytics and other industries: Where else can data shine?

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It’s the people that make a company what it is and nobody knows those people better than the People Operations Manager. We’ve tapped ours, Elisabeth Giammona, to write a series of posts about us, our industry, the challenges of people ops, and more. Let us know what you think in the comments or on Twitter at @UnionMetrics.

Courtesy the Found Animals Foundation on Flickr. Used with Creative Commons License.

Pictured: People Operations Assistant Manager. Image courtesy the Found Animals Foundation on Flickr. Used with Creative Commons License.

It probably doesn’t come as a shock that as an analytics provider, we love data! While we focus on measuring likes, reblogs and followers, we find it just as cool that many other industries know the value of capturing and analyzing data in their respective areas of focus. Data analytics is becoming increasingly important in areas across organizations and one that has great potential is in the field of people operations (or “human resources,” if you prefer the traditional).

Union Metrics’ products allow companies to analyze community engagement on social media, but we know that capturing engagement within an existing group or company can have important outcomes. Even though conversations about people operations goals and results are traditionally thought of as more qualitative, there are plenty of quantitative metrics that leaders can use to understand how people are working and which programs may or may not be contributing to individual and company successes.

So what types of metrics can a top-notch people operations team measure? How about starting with employee productivity, performance and retention? With insights into these critical components, a company can start to discern if employees have the tools and resources needed to effectively complete their jobs, or if adjustments to the environment or more input from managers could be helpful. These metrics provide clarity around if existing conditions are working or if it might be time to make a change to keep people and company goals on track.

Then add some metrics related to specific programs like benefits, wellness or daily perks, and you’re on your way to better understanding employee contributions, and how happy employees are in their jobs alongside which benefits are meaningful and worth keeping and which can go. Taking analytics one step further, companies can even leverage data to predict possible future outcomes and the effectiveness of new programs earlier in the research and procurement process.

What else do we like about people operations analytics? It modernizes the approach to understanding what is working and what isn’t as it relates to the human capital components of organizations, and talent is the lifeblood of any organization. This isn’t yesterday’s slow approach of annual company surveys; people operations metrics provide real-time data that allow the HR team to make meaningful decisions across an organization, rather than just relying on outdated information or hunches.

Measuring employee and team metrics might not sound as glamorous as monitoring likes around the latest and greatest cat GIF, but having data that keeps companies smart about individual and group performance can shape plans that keep employees engaged and the business running. And we are a team that loves to keep running.

Written by Sarah

May 20th, 2015 at 11:24 am

Posted in Features,Trends

Tagged with , ,

5 tips for visual branding in video on social media

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Still not recommended for your video content strategy. Image via Alexandre van de sande on Flickr; used with Creative Commons license

The rising popularity of video across social media means you’re probably doing more of it and you want to be sure your videos are as recognizable to your brand as the rest of your content is.

Designing a cohesive visual style is a lot like finding your voice in writing; it might vary a bit in tone across platforms depending on the audience you’re writing to in each place, but overall you want people to be able to recognize when it’s you. With that in mind, here are some tips for realizing a cohesive visual brand across social media channels.

1. Do your research.

Who’s your competition and what themes stand out from their visual branding? What about brands or personal brands you admire? Take a look at a few accounts and take notes on what you like about their styles- intentional or not- and think about how to apply it to your own.

2. Consider your resources.

Some of the things you identified in the previous point might be impossible if you’ve got a team of just yourself and $0 in the budget, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still tie things together. It can be as simple as choosing a few visual cues to repeat or finding a design overlay that matches your branding. See the next point for more on this.

3. Decide on a common element.

Will it be the same host in your videos every time, either by face or voice? Different hosts, but a carefully chosen background? (Like John Green’s salon on the Mental Floss YouTube channel; a very identifiable background despite different hosts.) The same filter used in post-processing along with your logo? Find a common thread that will tie your work together when someone is looking at your video content as a whole, and that makes it easily recognizable out in the wilds of the Internet.

4. Consider what you’ve already created.

If older video content (say your Vine account or first run at a YouTube channel) has low engagement and doesn’t match the new style you have in mind, you can consider editing your account page and/or removing pieces from the resources page on your website altogether and starting fresh. Otherwise on a more casual platform like Instagram you can show how your brand has evolved, visually and otherwise, over time. That highlights the authenticity to your work that can’t be manually produced.

5. Test, measure, test, repeat.

The advice we’ll almost always give: Decide what your goals are for the videos on each platform you’re going to tackle, then measure and plan new content going forward based on what’s working. Test new approaches you can think of, measure those, repeat.

Last but never least? Have fun with it. Your audience will be able to tell.

Image via Alexandre van de sande on Flickr; used with Creative Commons license.

Written by Sarah

May 5th, 2015 at 9:11 am

Bare-faced on Twitter & Instagram: Amy Schumer’s #GirlYouDontNeedMakeup

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On Tuesday a new episode of Inside Amy Schumer aired on Comedy Central, and in anticipation of this boy band parody sketch, Amy posted a no-makeup selfie on Twitter and Instagram asking her followers to share selfies of themselves without makeup on either platform with the hashtag #GirlYouDontNeedMakeup.

And the response has been as sweet as a boy band’s choreographed dance moves.

On Twitter

Since it started on Tuesday, more than 13,000 tweets have been posted with the #GirlYouDontNeedMakeup hashtag by more than 12,000 different people, for a potential reach of 40 million unique Twitter users*. Many of the most retweeted tweets came from Amy herself, Comedy Central, or big media and tech outlets like Mashable or Slate, but some came from non-celebrity hashtag participants: 

(Though of course funnyman Zach Braff did add his own somewhat inexplicable and terrifying entry.)

On Instagram

While fewer posts were made on Instagram in the same window, they still had quite the impact with a maximum potential reach of 1.5 million**. The three most popular posts with the #girlyoudontneedmakeup tag were these two from Amy and one from Comedy Central, respectively, but the rest were all from Instagram users sharing their no-makeup faces, not other branded accounts as on Twitter:

#girlyoudontneedmakeup #catyoudontneedmakeup #insideamy

A photo posted by Emily Gordon (@thegynomite) on

One of the most popular Instagram posts includes an important related hashtag, #catyoudontneedmakeup.

Have you posted your no-makeup selfie yet?

Brand takeaways

The smaller number of posts made on Instagram likely has a lot to do with the interconnected nature of Twitter as a platform with its built-in retweets vs Instagram’s third-party apps as the only option for regramming. Twitter’s constant flood of information also makes it acceptable to post original and curated content several times a day, making it more likely for others to see, share, and/or participate in a hashtag than with a more contained stream like Instagram where users are more selective with what they participate in and share.

Both of these are things to keep in mind when planning a campaign, either for a specific platform or to run across platforms; you want to play to the strengths of each.

 

*read more about how we calculate reach on Twitter here

**read about how our Instagram analytics hashtag trackers work here

Written by Sarah

April 30th, 2015 at 9:00 am

A social video guide for brands

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Putting a first generation iPod on a really old television is not a recommended video hosting platform. Image via Alexandre van de sande on Flickr; used with Creative Commons license.

Still not recommended. Image via Alexandre van de sande on Flickr; used with Creative Commons license.

So you want to get into video content marketing.

Those who are excellent at video content marketing make it look easy, leaving the uninitiated with high hopes and a crushing sense of reality once they start researching the work that goes into a well-executed and branded piece of video content. Should you be live-streaming? On Meerkat, or on Periscope? Should you be on both? What about Google Hangouts, is anyone still doing those? All the kids are on Snapchat, right? What about the more established longer-form video platforms like YouTube and Vimeo? Or Vine? And what about the social media platforms that have a video option, like Instagram and now Facebook? It can all be a little overwhelming. Let’s break it down, so you can figure out which social video platforms are right for your brand, based on your resources and goals.

First things first: What does each platform do?

Live-streaming platforms:

  • Meerkat: A live-streaming app where footage is not accessible later. Twitter pulled their official card access after launching their competing acquisition, Periscope, leaving some to speculate on Meerkat’s eventual fate.
  • Periscope: Owned by Twitter, it’s a live-streaming app with videos you can replay later. There’s a private broadcast option as well. (For a more in-depth comparison of Meerkat and Periscope, read this.)
  • Google Hangouts: Face-to-face video conversation where your broadcast is automatically recorded and uploaded to YouTube after you’re finished.

Prerecorded video platforms:

  • Vine: 6 seconds of glory, but recent research shows you only get about 3 to catch your audience’s attention, so don’t rule it out for length.
  • Instagram: Videos on Instagram are limited to 15 seconds, giving you a lot more creative room than on Vine.
  • Snapchat: Send quick snaps in video or photo form, or build bigger and longer stories using both; stories expire in 24hrs whereas snaps last for the duration set by the sender (up to 10 seconds). Recipients can replay one snap a day and they can save snaps by taking a screenshot, but it tells the sender you did so.
  • Facebook video: Facebook has recently launched their own native videos, which autoplay on the site (and the same 3-seconds-to-catch-your-audience’s-attention rule stands) but without volume. Another recent update has made their videos embeddable on other sites.
  • YouTube: The granddaddy of video, they’ve been moving into the original content space as more and more of the younger generation move away from traditional TV (and even admire YouTube personalities over celebs). YouTube offers a lot of tools for building your audience, advertising, and being part of the Google family makes it good choice for SEO rankings.
  • Vimeo: Another option for brands producing high-quality video is Vimeo, which gives you branded players and the ability to embed elsewhere as on YouTube. Here are Vimeo’s brand guidelines.

So what is each platform best for?

As more users adapt to these newer platforms and shift with changes on the established ones, they’ll come up with new and creative ways to use them. In the meantime, here are some ideas for how you can use each platform based on what we’ve seen in the wild. Choose according to your brand’s goals, the type of content you’ll be producing with the resources you have available, and first and foremost, where your audience is. Live-streaming

  • Meerkat: Livestream an event that’s part of a series to get people interested in coming next time- a conference series, or an interview with a well-known expert in your industry- but they have to buy a ticket to the next one or catch the stream in time. If an element of exclusivity works well with your brand’s audience, then this might be the best approach for you.
  • Periscope: Livestream a speech or presentation to increase your audience. Share the playback to your established audience that might have missed it, and be sure to watch it yourself to help you tweak your delivery for next time.
  • Google Hangouts: Google Hangouts function best for meetings and the recordings are often best suited for internal use or transcribing an interview. However, long pieces can be edited down into a summary and other usable pieces. It’s not a bad idea to start with longform content and repurpose it across other platforms, given you have the time and resources to do so.

Pre-recorded video 

  • Vine: Got a clever way to show a how-to or answer a question? Vine’s for you. (Econsultancy does a monthly roudup with great brand examples on Vine.)
  • Instagram: For creative that’s a little longer than 6 seconds that you want to fit into your overall visual brand, there’s Instagram. Post a clip from longer content, as mentioned above, share tips and tricks, or even produce a series of short videos like Gap did for their spring campaign.
  • Snapchat: If your target audience is young, then sending fun behind-the-scenes Snapchat stories is a great move embraced by a lot of the brands currently on the platform. Here are some other creative ways brands are using the platform, from Convince & Convert.
  • Facebook video: If your audience is dedicated to Facebook, you might want to consider making this your video content hub. If you’re already invested in YouTube, you can repurpose content from your channel for Facebook or experiment with Facebook-exclusive content. Here’s a great example of shifting strategy from PopSugar on Digiday.
  • YouTube: Your video hub- create a dedicated brand channel from which you can spin off side-channels, if that makes sense for your content strategy, brand, and resources- from which you can repurpose content into smaller, shorter videos for all the above, aforementioned networks.
  • Vimeo: ReelSEO has a great breakdown of the differences between YouTube and Vimeo for brands, depending on what your priorities are. If you’ve got the resources, consider optimizing videos for both.

What else should I know?

It’s probably worth mentioning the biggest con in live-streaming video: Not everyone is a natural in front of the camera and with the lack of editing available when you’re streaming live, well, unless you’re famous or dealing with extremely topical subject matter in an entertaining way it can be tough to find an audience. The golden rule of content applies here as it does everywhere else: Be sure you’re creating content that’s of value to your customers and making it available on the platforms where they prefer to spend their time. Put in the work to find out where that is, and what it is they want from you.

Any more questions?

Leave ‘em in the comments. Just remember to have fun; your audience can tell when you are.

Social TV: Netflix binge-watching, Daredevil and Twitter

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The prevalence of the second screen and social television have been established for some time now, but how does the conversation differ around a show when the whole season is released at once and the audience has the option to binge-watch it all in one go?

We looked at the Twitter conversation around Netflix’s recently released Daredevil to find out.

The overall conversation

345.5k tweets have been posted about Netflix’s latest original series since the beginning of April, from 137.5k contributors, for a total unique reach of 76.2 million. That’s smaller than the few days of Twitter conversation around the fourth season premiere of Game of Thrones on Twitter, but consider that Game of Thrones was working with an established fan base and audience who were anticipating the season premiere. Daredevil does have an existing fanbase from the success of other Marvel projects, Netflix originals, and of course the original comic book character to draw from, but new shows still have to prove themselves and the social conversation is becoming an increasing part of that success. Netflix and Marvel know that, so their Twitter accounts are at the forefront of the conversation, along with two of the show’s stars, Rosario Dawson and Deborah Ann Woll if you take a look at the top contributors to the Daredevil conversation:

  1. Marvel
  2. IGN
  3. AgentM
  4. Netflix
  5. EW
  6. Rosario Dawson
  7. Daredevil
  8. Deborah Ann Woll
  9. THR (The Hollywood Reporter)
  10. TVAfterDark

And these accounts consequently have some of the most popular tweets (by retweets):

As expected Game of Thrones chatter only got louder as the season progressed as each episode was released in the traditional serialized manner. With a show available all at once, what do we see? The answer that the biggest spike in the conversation happened on April 10th, the day Netflix released the full season, probably does not surprise you: Daredevil release spike

The day of release

Netflix releases new shows at midnight Pacific Time (3am Eastern) on Fridays (weekend timing makes it perfect for binge-watching), and announces that move with a tweet:

Which coincided with a spike in the conversation for that day, too:

Daredevil release day 3am spike

 

As for the conversation itself, there was some self-aware humor around binge-watching reflected in some of the most retweeted and other prominent tweets:

As well as good old-fashioned jokes that only make sense if you’re familiar with the main character—  or start watching the show to be in on it:  

Mashable and Netflix even brought Twitter’s new live-streaming sister app, Periscope, into the conversation by using it to discuss why you should binge-watch the show and to bring fans behind-the-scenes content:

A Periscope URL wound up being one of the top URLs in the overall conversation, alongside articles around the show (like the one from Entertainment Weekly in the tweet posted above) and a Netflix link to the show itself. Something for brands- and perhaps especially for entertainment brands- to take into consideration as part of a promotional content marketing plan.

Other takeaways

Whether or not you’re an entertainment brand or have anything to do with social television and the second screen at all, you still want to maximize your social listening. Daredevil caught criticism for being a show about a blind superhero that was released without a way for visually impaired fans to fully enjoy it. Netflix heard this, however, and several days later an audio description track was added for the show, along with news that the service would be expanded to its other original series.

That’s taking a blunder, really listening to your fans and followers, and fixing it in a timely manner that results in good PR. 

That’s an excellent lesson for any brand.

 

Do you binge-watch series? Do you tweet about it? Leave your thoughts in the comments! 

 

Written by Sarah

April 22nd, 2015 at 12:44 pm

3 Steps to take when your brand joins that New Social Network

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coffee in the morning

Step 0: Be sure you’re properly caffeinated. Photo via Flickr.

You’ve been paying attention to your fans and followers on your established networks and they’ve been asking why you’re not on That New Social Network, so you signed up, if only to reserve your brand’s handle. Your target audience is here, but you haven’t posted anything yet. So. . .now what? What should you do first?

Start with these three steps.

1. Research, research, and then research some more.

How are people using this space? This is likely to shift as the network becomes more established and more users join and experiment with what it has to offer, but it’s always a good idea to know the existing protocol backwards and forwards before you start posting.

Always be sure your content fits the place but is still true to your brand’s voice and core values.

2. Ask your audience: What do you want to see from us here?

How do you figure out what your audience wants from you in a specific place? Try asking them. Ask them on the new network, ask them on your established networks. Send out a survey via email, or tweet and Facebook links to a survey asking what they’d like out of your social media presence, including on the new platform.

Don’t assume you know. Ask, and listen. Then plan your new content strategy accordingly.

3. Test, measure, plan, repeat.

Experiment with different types of content, pay very close attention to the results, and base your strategy going forward on those results. What is touted as a best practice on a new network might not necessarily be what your specific audience wants to see from you in that specific place.

Don’t be afraid to take risks and try new things. Anything your audience reacts positively towards isn’t something to just repeat ad nauseam, but to analyze and figure out what about it worked and why. Then use those elements in all of your content strategy moving forward.

Written by Sarah

March 31st, 2015 at 8:08 am