TweetReach Blog

Archive for the ‘Guides’ Category

3 ways to take advantage of social media in football stadiums

without comments

NFL Game Day

From the NFL’s official Instagram account

Many NFL and college football stadiums have built-in wifi to help fans post to their social accounts during games, but teams are still trying to figure out to take advantage of social media IN the stadium. We have three suggestions for how to get fans to increase their existing social activity, or start posting if they aren’t already.

1. Make it worth your fans’ while

Consider working with vendors to create and share some social-only deals during the game. Customers will get used to routinely checking their accounts for deals on hotdogs, drinks, merchandise and more during games. Just make sure they know about it ahead of time by promoting it across social media leading up to games and by announcing it around the stadium with physical collateral.

Want to take it a step further? Organize a contest to meet one of the players, be an official game photographer for five minutes, or take a game ball home. You could also organize social contests to win tickets to a game, or special VIP seats and treatment, increasing your reach when the winner shares their experience and tags your accounts in it! It’s also possible that a winner who is a casual fan will be motivated to invest more on tickets, merchandise, and more for future seasons because they had such a great experience.

2. Show some behind-the-scenes action

While this may, at first, seem counter intuitive- after all, if you’re posting it on social media anyone anywhere can see it, not just those in the stadium- if done correctly you can encourage more casual fans to want to be in the stadium where the behind-the-scenes action is taking place.

How? Talk to the social media teams behind each team, and see what kind of content they can work up that gives a feeling of access to what players, coaches, supporting staff, and overall teams go through leading up to a game. If the content is good enough, you can foster some serious FOMO (fear of missing out) for those not experiencing the action both in real life and on their screen; they’ll want to be the ones explaining to their buddies in the seat next to them exactly what everyone was doing that lead up to that great scoring play.

3. Be consistent

This is a major rule of playing in social in general: The more consistent you are with your content, the more your existing audience is going to stick around and engage with you, and the more new fans and followers will be encouraged to become just that in first place. If they come to your profiles in the offseason and don’t see plans for what you’re going to be doing when things start back up again, they’ll be less interested in checking back in later.

If you are posting consistent, engaging content even in the offseason- sharing how teams plan, how players train, what else goes on in keeping a stadium up and running that most fans never think about- they’ll be even more excited for official season activities to launch because they’re so much more a part of the entire process.

And it all starts with some good, strong, in-stadium wi-fi.

Written by Sarah

November 25th, 2014 at 11:02 am

Posted in Guides

Tagged with , ,

NFL fans and Instagram: 5 steps to follow fan activity

without comments

NFL fans

From the @nflfanstyle Instagram account, a good start at UGC content and fostering fan engagement

To keep your fans’ attention, you’ve got to meet them where they are, and they are definitely on Instagram. User-generated content is an important part of a robust social strategy that engages your fans and followers; it’s exciting for them to know that you’re paying attention to what they’re posting for a sports team that they love, and that they might even have a chance to be featured on an official account or win a prize from their activity.

Step 1: Follow the general #NFL hashtag on Instagram.

What kinds of content do you see? Click around on some of the photos, keeping an eye out for those that seem like they were posted (or at least taken, we’ll get to that in a minute) during a game. What do they have in common? You will want to pay attention to those that fall into two categories: Those posted from an off-site watch party such as their home, a bar, or a friend’s house, and those posted from the stadium itself.

If your aim is to boost engagement from fans who are in the stadium during games, pay attention to the captions on photos, as well as the other hashtags being used. Are they posting a photo taken in the stadium, but uploading it from a different location after the game, or even days later, because they couldn’t get service in the stadium? The hashtag #latergram is a big indicator here.

What other hashtags should you look for? That’s in the next step.

Step 2: Check out related hashtags used on those #NFL posts.

What other hashtags are people using? If you see a lot of #latergram, you know you need to do something like implement better wifi in your stadium so fans don’t have to rely on using their cellphone data or an overcrowded network that isn’t reliable. Pay attention to any other recurring hashtags from the fans you’re wanting to connect with. Is there an organic hashtag they’ve created around their favorite teams or players? Which ones are you seeing over and over? Make a note of them, because you’ll need them in the next step.

Step 3: Track and listen.

Using something like our Union Metrics for Instagram analytics, set up some monitoring around the hashtags that specifically target the fans you want to reach. Concentrate on any hashtags fans have created and spread to one another. These will give you unparalleled insight into how fans discuss teams, players, and their overall experience with being an NFL fan.

Step 4: Implement a plan to increase engagement where you want it

Now that you have an idea of what the existing conversation is like, you can make a plan for how to improve it. Would more fans post during games if you improved wifi or cell service in the stadium? Do fans seek an incentive, like contests or social-only deals that go out during a game? How else can you increase engagement from fans?

Figure out what it is, make a plan, and make it happen.

Step 5: Measure, rinse, repeat.

Once you have some benchmark numbers from your initial analysis, make sure you keep checking to see if your engagement levels are increasing with each new step that you implement, like upgrading service connections in the stadium, for example, or before, during, and after a contest. This will tell you what’s working and what’s not, to let you know what you should keep doing more of and give you new ideas for content and strategy moving forward.

Anything else?

This doesn’t just apply to the NFL either; these same steps can work for college football or any other sports you’re interested in.

Have specific questions about how to make that happen, or how you can start using our Union Metrics for Instagram analytics? Leave us a comment, or shoot us an email. We’re always happy to help!

Written by Sarah

November 24th, 2014 at 8:23 am

Quick tip for hashtags at a conference: #smx at a glance

without comments

The Search Marketing Expo ( SMX or #smx on Twitter) kicked off yesterday in Las Vegas, and is continuing today. If you’re there now, check out our 7 tips to maximize your conference attendance using Twitter. If you couldn’t make it like us, check out our 5 tips for getting the most out of the hashtag on Twitter for a conference that you missed.

We went ahead and took some quick snapshot reports of the conversation around #smx and that brings us to our takeaway for a conference-enhancing quick tip; they’re smartly setting up different sub-hashtags for each session to go along with the conference’s main hashtag. This makes for easier tracking of particular sessions whose topics are most relevant to what your brand is interested in.

To capture a particular session in a snapshot, all you have to do is include both hashtags, like this:

#smx #13aOr include the session number and letter as a keyword in addition to the hashtag, like this:

#smx 11A

 

Either method will capture the data that you’re after to get an idea of the overall conversation. So once you have your snapshot reports, what next? What does this tell you about the overall conversation around something as a big as a conference?

We recently covered this with 3 ways to use TweetReach snapshot reports to complement real-time Twitter monitoring for your events looking at #commsweekny as an example. Just like with #commsweekny, these snapshots for #smx help you:

  1. Get the big picture quickly; what’s the overall estimated size of the conversation? Who are the top contributors and which are the most retweeted tweets?
  2. Build relationships with attendees by looking at the snapshot report’s contributors list and tweets timeline, and
  3. Easily share these stats with attendees

These insights are valuable from any perspective: someone interested in attending #smx who could not, someone who is attending, or even the team behind #smx. Additionally, with the use of session-specific hashtags or keywords, you get a more precise idea of who is influential in each topic: Session hosts will be clear, as attendees will be quoting what they have to say, and you can network with both those interested in learning more about a session’s particular topic or who are already well-versed in it. Check the session highlights and keep an eye on the main #smx feed on Twitter to hone in on the session topics most important to you, and grab some snapshots around them.

So even if you can’t afford to attend a certain conference or go TweetReach Pro to comprehensively track the conversation around it, there is still plenty of value to be found in strategic snapshot reports.

Want even more on Twitter and conferences? Here are 16 ways to use Twitter to improve your next conference

Written by Sarah

November 20th, 2014 at 11:05 am

Tracking a conversation about Facebook (and Stephen Hawking) with TweetReach Pro

without comments

Social efforts should never live in a vacuum, and successful content marketing efforts and campaigns exist across platforms. Even ventures like launching a Facebook page can be more successful if you track how they are being discussed across other platforms; for example, people don’t just share Facebook news on Facebook, they also talk about it on Twitter.

So when The Theory of Everything- a movie about physicist Stephen Hawking’s life based on a book written by his first wife- recently premiered, and Hawking joined Facebook, we thought we’d take a look at what the conversation about the famous scientist joining Facebook looked like on Twitter. Why? It’s important to understand how your audience is talking about you in every place that they are doing so. Do they say different things about you on Facebook vs. Twitter? Do they share news of you joining a new platform like Facebook, helping you increase your reach and exposure to new potential fans and followers? These are just a few questions you can answer using something like our TweetReach Pro analytics.

How exactly do you monitor a conversation about Facebook on Twitter? Don’t worry, it’s just like setting up any other TweetReach Pro topic Tracker. Your search queries should include the hashtags you’re using on Facebook, Facebook URLs, and other terms to be sure you’re finding the full Twitter conversation about the Facebook content.

Let’s look at some highlights from our analysis below, and a few of the conclusions we drew from it.

Discussion timeline

As with most launches, the peak of the conversation around Hawking joining Facebook came right around the launch itself, then decreased until it saw a small, second peak: Stephen Hawking FB The day of the second spike, November 1st, was a Sunday, so that tells you something about this specific audience: Hawking fans spend time talking about him joining Facebook on Sunday, on Twitter, more than a week after it happens. Observing trends over time will tell you if this is an anomaly, or if Hawking fans have broader interests that bring them to Twitter on Sunday; perhaps something like #ScienceSunday.

Influencers to keep an eye on

The top ten contributors to the conversation included a lot of Spanish language accounts and one from Indonesia, which tells you Hawking fans are a global audience and not just limited to his native UK or the ties he has with the US. Hawking top contributors The most retweeted tweet also came from Spanish language Twitter account Antena3Noticias; the second and third most retweeted tweets about Hawking joining Facebook came from WIRED magazine.

Media outlets joining a discussion around your topic of interest means you can keep them in mind should you want to reach out for a story in the future. These most retweeted tweets and contributors list also tell you that in this case, you shouldn’t limit yourself to US-based media outlets either. The top URLs list confirmed this again, including links from the same Spanish language and Indonesian accounts:  Hawking top URLs

Final takeaways

This is just the insight you get from about week with a TweetReach Pro topic Tracker, looking at one specific launch. But it has already given enough information about the audience and activity times around that launch to inform a content strategy and refocus an audience profile.  The bonus takeaway is that science-related content strategies don’t have to be stuffy either: Hawking has a great sense of humor, and so does Twitter. 

Happy tracking!

Written by Sarah

November 19th, 2014 at 12:43 pm

3 ways to use TweetReach snapshot reports to complement real-time Twitter monitoring for your events

without comments

For monitoring tweets about large events we always recommend creating a plan and setting up TweetReach Pro Trackers ahead of time so that you capture the full set of tweets for your analysis. That doesn’t mean, however, that our snapshot reports can’t act as a great complement to your in-depth tracking. Here are three reasons why:

1. Get the big picture quickly

Before you have time to dig into all of the information in your TweetReach Pro Tracker, you can grab a snapshot report for quick insight into the size of the conversation around an event hashtag, who the top contributors were, and which tweets were the most retweeted. Here’s a great example of a snapshot from Communications Week, which took place in New York last week:

CommsWeekNY

2. Build relationships with attendees

From the lists of top contributors and most retweeted tweets in your snapshot, make sure you’re following active event participants. You can also use these lists to engage with or thank them for their contribution to the event conversation. Pay attention to who these accounts also follow and retweet to help further build your own network on Twitter; these are good target accounts as they are likely to be a part of or interested in your industry. Building strong relationships with the right people can lead to reciprocal partnerships in the future, even if it’s just giving each other little PR boosts through retweets down the line.

To make this even easier, every Twitter username mentioned in your snapshot report is a clickable link that takes you to their Twitter account. You can also retweet or reply directly from your snapshot. Here’s an example from a snapshot of SocialMedia.org, whose summit started yesterday:

TweetReach snapshot report

 

3. Easily share stats with attendees

Since snapshot reports are so quick to run, you can easily share a snapshot report at the end of each day of your event, or even at the end of a big panel or keynote to give everyone in attendance – and those watching via Twitter – an idea of how that conversation went. Attendees can share the report with their followers, or use it in writing their own recap posts of their experiences. This also gives others interested in your event a better idea of what kind of content and conversation it produces, encouraging them to book for the next year if it lines up with their business.

Want more on event tracking with TweetReach?

Be sure you’re getting the most out of your snapshot reports by keeping things simple. And if you want more on how to track social media engagement with your events with Union Metrics, check out some of our other posts on marketing your conference across platforms: Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr, as well as marketing your conference across platforms: Snapchat and Pinterest.

Written by Sarah

November 4th, 2014 at 9:46 am

4 tips for creating content that works across social channels

without comments

Every time we’ve discussed running a campaign across social media platforms, we’ve emphasized how important it is to tailor content for your audience in each particular space. The kinds of content that perform extremely well on Facebook might not have the same effect on Tumblr, and vice versa. We understand, however, that not every department has the resources to create custom content for each channel. With that in mind we offer these tips for creating content that only requires some tweaking on each platform.

1. Start with visual content.

Visual content is striking and memorable, and it works well on all social media platforms. Even on Twitter, which is typically considered more of a text-based channel, tweets with photos perform better than those that don’t. If you don’t have the time to create custom content for each channel, then start with an image with some visual impact that you can use across social media. You can pair it with different taglines or headlines in each channel (more on that shortly).

2. Choose an image that will have impact across platforms with some simple adjustments.

Keep in mind what types of images work best on each platform. Does your audience respond well to long, vertical images without faces on Pinterest, but engages more with photos that includes faces on Instagram? Work with the same image and crop or edit it so it has maximum impact in each place.

Experiment with text placement, as well. Do photos with text superimposed over them do better on Instagram, or should you leave all the text in the caption? What about on Pinterest, Twitter, or Tumblr? Pay attention to how text placement performs on different social networks, and adjust your plan for the next time.

3. Tweak your tagline for each platform.

Start with some basic copy about your campaign, and then tweak the wording so it works the best in each channel. Keep it short and snappy for Twitter, avoid using a wall of hashtags on Instagram, leave the hashtags off entirely for Facebook, and don’t let the ability to make a long post on Tumblr let you think that’s the best place for it. If you haven’t tested long-form content on Tumblr before, now might not be the best time to do so. Do what’s best for your brand and a particular campaign with the resources that you have. (After the campaign is over? Test away!)

If you have a unique campaign or event hashtag, it’s a good idea to use the same hashtag across social media platforms. But if you’re using more general hashtags to participate in existing conversations, you may want to use different hashtags on different social media sites, even if you’re pairing those tags with the same image across channels.

4. Work from industry research about visual and content copy in each place.

Definitely base your content decisions on the data you collect from your own followers’ engagement, but don’t be afraid to also use what you know more generally about what your target audience likes in each place. Here are some resources to get you started:

Coupled with your own analytics about what your current, ideal and target customers respond to in each channel, you should be receive the maximum impact with the minimum amount of work!

Got questions or examples of campaigns you’ve pulled off using similar tactics, or something we missed? Leave it in the comments. 

Written by Sarah

October 21st, 2014 at 9:10 am

Why potential reach and impressions matter on Twitter

without comments

All TweetReach reporting includes a number of engagement and listening metrics for Twitter. Two of the main metrics we provide are potential reach and impressions. Let’s talk a little more about what reach and impressions are, and why they’re so important to your Twitter strategy.

Reach is the size of the estimated potential unique audience for your tweets. TweetReach calculates reach algorithmically, based on data we’ve been collecting from Twitter for more than five years. It’s the best way of knowing how large your audience on Twitter can be, and takes unique recipients into account.

Impressions measure the size of total potential exposure. This shows you how many total timelines your tweets were delivered to, so it’s a count of the maximum total impressions possible for your tweets.

TweetReach potential reach and impressions

Both of these estimated audience metrics are essential for understanding the full impact of your tweets, especially when used alongside Twitter’s internal analytics. Here’s how.

Reach and impressions for your Twitter account

Twitter’s analytics calculate actual impressions for each of your Twitter account’s tweets. That shows how many people actually saw that tweet. TweetReach calculates total possible impressions for those tweets. Use actual impressions and potential impressions together to fully understand your impact on Twitter. The number of actual impressions received will vary from tweet to tweet and account to account, but your actual impressions will likely be between 1% and 20% of your potential impressions.

Knowing how your actual impressions compare to your potential impressions shows you exactly how well your tweets are performing, how large your audience is, and how large your audience could be. What’s the ratio of your actual impressions to potential impressions? Are your tweets on the low side? Do some perform better than others? Use this information to determine how you can improve your ratio. Which tweets are seen – and engaged with – by more people? What makes those tweets different? Maybe you used a particular hashtag or included a photo. If so, try doing more of that to see how you can activate more of your potential audience, and improve your ratio of actual to potential impressions.

Additionally, you can use other TweetReach metrics on engagement (like retweets and replies, average retweets rate) and contributors (such as contributors who have engaged the most with your content and generated the highest exposure) to understand not just how far your content is reaching, but how and with whom.

Reach and impressions for competitors’ or influencers’ accounts

While Twitter’s activity dashboard focuses on your own Twitter presence, you can use TweetReach to analyze any Twitter account, including your competitors, influencers in your industry, celebrities, or any other public Twitter account.

Start with a quick share of voice analysis. How do your reach and impressions compare to those of your closest competitor? How about other similar Twitter accounts? Remember these are potential impressions, so know that – just like for your own Twitter account – your competitors’ actual impressions will be a similarly small percentage of their potential impressions.

For a more advanced analysis, dive deeper into competitive intelligence. Run TweetReach reports or Trackers for your competitors, then take a look at the popular content and top contributors in these conversations. What Twitter accounts are engaging with your competitors? Who are they and do you follow them? What hashtags are your competitors using? Are there any new or relevant hashtags you could use? What tweets are resonating in the conversation?

Reach and impressions for hashtags, keywords or other terms

With TweetReach, you can measure more than just a Twitter account – you can measure the impact of anything in a tweet, like a hashtag, a phrase or keyword, even a URL. Twitter’s activity dashboard only includes tweets posted from your account, so you can’t use it to analyze impressions for the overall conversation around a hashtag, for example.

You’re probably using a variety of hashtags in your tweets – some for specific campaigns or events and other more general hashtags to signal participation in a particular industry or conversation. Do you know the reach of those hashtags? With TweetReach, you can understand the potential reach and impressions for any hashtag, which helps you understand the size of the conversation you’re participating in. If a hashtag has a low reach, then you’ll be able to have a large impact in a smaller space. If the hashtag’s reach is high, you’ll less likely to make a big impact in the overall conversation, but you’re participating in a more popular topic. The best Twitter strategy includes a bit of both; use a combination of specific and general hashtags in your tweets to reach the most people.

Interested in learning more about how you can use potential reach and impressions to improve your Twitter strategy? We’d be happy to show you how to use TweetReach’s Twitter analytics to better understand the full impact of your tweets. Let’s talk!

Written by Jenn D

October 16th, 2014 at 10:04 am

Posted in Guides

Tagged with , , ,

3 non-traditional use cases for TweetReach historical analytics

without comments

TR Historical 1

We’ve already looked at 5 ways to use our premium historical analytics, including an in-depth look at how to use them to build brand voice, and now we want to go over some more non-traditional use cases for them.

Even if you’re part of a more traditionally minded marketing team, these could inspire some new approaches to your content strategy. Plus, we’ve paired each of these use cases with a more traditional marketing takeaway.

1. Journalism

Use our historical analytics to see how a story broke out on Twitter, and how it spread. How did the people on the ground at the incident share information? Did local and national news sources communicate with them and contact them to be interviewed for newscasts, or did they send their own people ? How were those journalists’ social media reports different from those of civilian witnesses? A journalist who was on Twitter when a story broke and might have most of this information cataloged in screenshots already could use our historical analytics to fill in any remaining gaps in the story. New story leads or witnesses could be discovered in this way, and investigated or interviewed.

Traditional marketing takeaway: This is the same style of research you can employ to see how a social crisis broke and spread on Twitter, and help build your own crisis communication plan accordingly.

2. Comedy

Running low on material? Reach back through past periods on Twitter to rework some old jokes into something new for your next standup show or writing gig. Likewise you can look at another funny person you admire’s timeline to see how their skills developed over time, inspiring new joke styles, approaches to writing, or even just timing.

Traditional marketing takeaway: If it fits with your brand, don’t be afraid to be funny. Have you used humor in your content strategy in the past? See how those tweets performed vs. neutrally toned tweets that were conveying similar types of information. If it doesn’t fit with your brand, don’t force it.

3. Charity

Running a charity campaign on social media is tricky; you want to strike just the right balance of reaching the maximum amount of people in and just outside of your network who might be interested in contributing, without annoying them. Know of a campaign that nailed it? Use historical analytics to sample their campaign, or even study the entirety of it and model your own approach after theirs.

Traditional marketing takeaway: Use this same approach to study a past campaign that your company- or a competitor- has run either successfully or to lackluster results. What worked and what didn’t? Use that to inform how you plan and execute your next campaign in the same space.

Want to get started and learn more?

Fantastic! You can read more about our premium historical analytics here, and even request a quote. And remember, we can analyze anything and everything ever posted to Twitter, all the way back to the very first public Tweet posted in March 2006.

TR Historical 2

Written by Sarah

October 14th, 2014 at 11:39 am

3 tips to maximize video marketing using Twitter

without comments

Visual content marketing- particularly in the form of videos- is the hot topic of marketing at the moment. Videos are attention grabbing, and when done well, attention holding. They can elicit strong emotional response. Brands like Budweiser have capitalized on this with their horse-and-puppy friendship Super Bowl commercials. Most brands don’t have the same level of resources, however.

Make the most of the resources you do have and get the most out of the video content your brand shares on Twitter, with these three tips. The best part? They don’t require a multi-million dollar budget or dedicated video team to execute.

1. Tease pieces of a longer video

Drive traffic back to your YouTube channel or website by posting 6-second clips of your full video on Vine, 15-second clips on Instagram, and sharing both of those on your Twitter account. Pick the section of video that will be the most interesting to the audience on each platform, and take note of which one performs best when shared on Twitter.

2. Make a series of shorter videos leading up to a longer one

Even if what you’re planning to release is a longer video that covers different aspects of change in your business structure or that demos a product, you can still use this approach; just film quick 6-15 second clips of stand-ins acting as customers, asking the questions that your longer video will address. Tweet these with the promise that an answer is coming soon, and use them as an opening to get your customers to share their most frequent questions with you so that you can address them.

3. Use Twitter to source material for your next video

Whether you’re just getting into video marketing or your well of content ideas has run dry, Twitter can help you out. Do you host or attend any Twitter chats? Ask the attendees if there is a topic they’d like to see addressed, and plan your next video around it. Consider hosting a weekly Q&A on Twitter where you collect the best questions and have them answered in video format and shared back on Twitter. Use a unique hashtag for your Q&A so you can track the conversation over time, and so your question askers will have an easier time finding the new video answers as you post them.

The bottom line

Twitter is fantastic for amplification of your video messages, and for connecting with your audience in real-time way that isn’t possible with video comment sections.

Does your brand have a successful video content marketing strategy? What tips would you add to this list? Let us know in the comments.

Below: A quick Instagram demo of the visualization of the Union Metrics for Tumblr analytics we had on display in our suite at SXSW 2013. 

Loading

Watch reblog connections grow before your eyes: A visualization of Tumblr data powered by yours truly at Union Metrics, last #SXSWi. #TBT #ThrowbackThursday #SXSW

View on Instagram

Written by Sarah

October 9th, 2014 at 9:29 am

5 ways to use TweetReach historical Twitter analytics

without comments

Ever wanted to measure the impact of a past event or hashtag on Twitter? You can with TweetReach premium historical analytics! They’re a powerful tool for researching, planning, executing campaigns and so much more on Twitter. Here are just five ways you can utilize our historical Twitter analytics to your benefit.

Get historical twitter analytics through TweetReach

But first, where does TweetReach’s historical Twitter data come from?

At Union Metrics, we have licensed commercial access to the full historical Twitter archive from Gnip, which means we can reach all the way back to the first public tweet posted in March 2006. This goes beyond the scope of basic Twitter search and anything that can be pulled with Twitter’s public API; the information you can get from those sources is limited to data from the past few days or weeks. Our historical access includes the full archive from Twitter itself, and you can’t get that just anywhere.

The possibilities for using our historical analytics are as varied as the content on Twitter itself. And if you’ve ever used our TweetReach Pro Trackers, the analytics in our historical reporting is similar: potential reach, exposure, volume, individual tweet, hashtag, URL and contributor metrics. It’s delivered in the same detailed format as our Trackers, so you have comprehensive reporting and interactive metrics, allowing you to drill into interesting trends.

Still have questions about TweetReach historical Twitter analytics? You can read more about our historical analytics here, or send us an email to learn more.

So, how can you use our historical Twitter reporting? Here are a few ideas.

1. Nail a pitch

Are you an agency trying to win over a new client? Want to prove to your boss that you can handle bigger and better projects? Use our historical analytics to build out comprehensive proof of the performance of campaigns you’ve managed in the past, or evidence that those you managed performed better than those of your competition. It’s hard to argue against numbers.

2. Create an airtight content marketing plan

A quick Google search will provide thousands of content marketing best practices, but the bottom line is that you can only know what works best for your industry, and more specifically, for your customers, when you measure it. Do you have chunks of missing data from the performance of past campaigns? Use our historical analytics to fill in any gaps in your history of data, or to build out a history if one doesn’t already exist, either because of a lack of budget or a change in your role. Get the metrics you need to fully understand how your content performs on Twitter.

3. Plan for crisis communications

Has your company faced a crisis in the past? What about anyone else in your industry? Are there notable past social media crises you’d like to study to help model your own crisis communication plan after? Our historical analytics can give you a clear picture of what happened in the course of an entire event: who reacted when and how to which tweets. Understand which communication tactics worked, and which backfired. Use this information to build out a comprehensive crisis communication plan, should such a situation occur when you’re at the helm.

4. Conduct research

Similarly, you can use our historical analytics to understand how a past event unfolded in Twitter in order to write about it from a journalistic, academic, or other point of view. Want to know how many tweets were posted about an election last year? What hashtags were most popular at a previous conference? The top picture shared during a protest? We can search on any keywords, hashtags, usernames, URLs – anything that appears in a tweet. Use this to unearth and study conversations about past events.

5. Build your brand voice

We’ve discussed in detail how you can use our historical analytics to build a brand voice from scratch, or even learn (or rebuild) the voice of a brand you’ve recently taken over for. Once you’ve solidly established your brand’s voice, you can work on increasing your share of voice in your particular industry.

Want to learn more or run your historical Twitter analytics report? Start here.

 

Written by Sarah

September 29th, 2014 at 1:17 pm

Posted in Guides

Tagged with ,