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Understand how Instagram content performs on Twitter using TweetReach

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The lamentations of Twitter display cards being turned off for Instagram posts may have died out, but the need to measure all aspects of a content marketing strategy has only intensified, particularly when it comes to the visual. So how can you track and measure your Instagram content’s performance on Twitter? Let us show you how, using TweetReach.

The basics of URL tracking with TweetReach

The best way to keep track via TweetReach of how an Instagram photo travels around Twitter is by tracking its URL. TweetReach Trackers can monitor up to 15 separate queries about a single campaign or topic, including one or more URLs. (Full details on setting up topic Trackers here.) Here’s an example of how to set one up for specifically tracking a single Instagram URL:

Instagram tracking

URL queries should be set up as url_contains:instagram.com/p/utBPU3D5cL or with the full URL in quotes, as in the screenshot above. (You can find more details about specific searches and URL queries here.) This will search for all tweets containing this URL or portion of URL. Be sure that you have the full URL for a particular photo you want to track, since just adding a basic Instagram address (instagram.com) would return information on every Instagram photo posted to Twitter, drowning out the results you want.

Also keep in mind that a Tracker will find all tweets that match any of your search queries and aggregate their metrics together in your Tracker, so make sure all the queries in a Tracker are related; in this case one or more Instagram photos, depending on if you want to track a single photo or a set. You can drill down into some details (usernames, hashtags, URLs, etc…) if you set up all the terms around a campaign, but summary metrics will be calculated for the entire set of tweets.

So if you really want to concentrate on the data for just your Instagram photos, consider setting up a separate Tracker for any hashtags or keywords.

What if I already have a Tracker running, and want to see how the Instagram content I’ve cross-posted is doing?

Great question! First, check the Top URLs section of your Tracker to see if any Instagram links are there:

UA Women links

 

If you don’t see any, don’t get discouraged. Clicking on the menu bar in the top right corner of that section (the three dots and three lines) will take you to a full list of URLs shared that is automatically ranked by impressions, but you can change that to reflect ranking by tweets, retweets, or contributors as you prefer.

UAWomen URLs

We recommend paying attention to how your Instagram and other visual content URLs rank depending on how you’ve sorted them. This way you can answer some questions about your content strategy so far: How many of your tweets contain Instagram URLs? Do those get retweeted more or less than those with other content type URLs? The answer to these questions can help you tweak your content strategy, including how often and how you share Instagram content via Twitter.

Find even more details

Click through on each high-ranking Instagram link to see what these high performing visual content pieces have in common. Is it a hashtag you used with all of them? The subject matter, like the inclusion of a celebrity spokesperson? It might even just be the lighting, tone (warm or cool), or absence or presence of people in the photos. Finding a common thread in your Instagram posts will let you know how to best present your content for the maximum impact on your audience.

This page will also tell you which day a link was posted when you hover over a spike in the display, letting you know if certain days of the week work better for certain content (because you should repeat these steps with every kind of content that you’re producing, from YouTube videos to blog URLs):

Instagram URL day posted

If you have fans and followers who independently share your Instagram URLs to their audiences, you’ll likely see this show up here since they can only share it after you have initially posted it. Watching the performance of a repost from your Instagram account can let you know which of your fans and followers have a strong following of their own. In time you can consider them for a brand ambassador partnership if appropriate, or see if they would be interested in using your product in a sponsored post. You can even just thank and reward them for being a dedicated follower.

The bottom line?

Keeping track of what kind of content consistently performs the best with your audience lets you know what kind of content to plan more of for the future. Knowing how your Instagram content is performing is simply one piece of that puzzle, which TweetReach can help put together.

Written by Sarah

March 10th, 2015 at 9:29 am

SXSW 2015 Panel Recommendations

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Every year we bring you our recommendations for panels and more you might want to attend while you’re in town for all the rest of the SXSW madness. Without further ado, here are our picks for 2015.

Visual Storytelling: The Power of Design + Data | Fri, March 13 | 2:00pm-3:00pm

Using big data to tell a story in graphics rather than in words.

Digital Disruption: Do or Die | Fri, March 13 | 5:00pm-6:00pm

What is digital disruption? What are some examples of brands using it to put older, more established brands out of business?

The Future Of Distributed Media | Sat, March 14  | 12:30pm-1:30pm

Learn from the best at creating original content to distribute across platforms: BuzzFeed.

Future15: Why the Future of Film Depends on Social Media with Union Metrics Editor-in-Chief Jenn Deering Davis | Sat, March 14 | 2pm-2:15pm

Big studios have had to change marketing tactics to reach audiences where they are, while indie films have a whole new time-and-money-saving way to market. What tactics from the former can help the latter?

How Technology Colonized Fashion Week | Sat, March 14 | 3:30pm-4:30pm

Fashion week is no longer just for the elite thanks to technology— and this has revolutionized the industry.

Future15: Social Data in the Time of Cholera with Gnip Principal Data Scientist Dr. Scott Hendrickson | Sun, March 15 | 5:15pm-5:30pm

“With social data serving as the largest archive of human behavior to ever exist, how can we turn this data into real-time warning systems? I’ll look at how social data has been used in the past, our own research and endeavors and the possibilities we see for social data in humanitarian efforts going forward.”

Behind The GIF: The Future of Online Visual Culture | Mon, March 16 | 9:30am-10:30am

“This panel will bring together an unprecedented conversation between the creators, platforms, and commentators of the evolving visual frontier of the web. We’ll tackle the latest developments in the space, and give a glimpse of what’s to come.”

image

Evolve or Die: The Traditional Agency Revolution | Mon, March 16 | 9:30am-10:30am

Mad Men days it isn’t.

IBM and Twitter: The Future of Digital Engagement | Mon, March 16  | 3:30pm-4:30pm

How do you build real engagement with fans and followers on social?

Hamburger Helper Is My Bae: Weird Brand Twitter | Mon, March 16 | 5:00pm-6:00pm

When Weird Twitter and Brand Twitter collide, we ask the important questions:

“Why am I laughing at a frozen pizza? I buy the frozen pizza, do I have to be its friend, too?”

Beyond Live, Why the L+3 Social TV Convo Matters | Tues, March 17 | 9:30am – 10:30am

Interested in the changing nature of social TV?

“The landscape is changing from measuring success by ‘trending’ to building dedicated fandoms. The fandom conversation peaks after the show airs and continues to resonate until the next episode, and even between seasons.”

Viva Album Art! | Wed, March 18 | 5pm – 6pm

“We’ll discuss how musicians can use digital media to express their stories, and invite their fans to emotionally connect with their music, using the best platforms and practices that the digital world has to offer.”

Got any great panels we missed? Leave ‘em in the comments.

Written by Sarah

March 5th, 2015 at 9:13 am

4 tips for visual content marketing across platforms

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Merle coaster

From our Instagram account.

Whether you’re building or maintaining your brand voice online, cohesiveness is important. You need to create a consistent experience across social media channels, particularly in your visual content marketing tactics. To be successful in any social media channel, you need content that fits that channel. However, it’s time consuming and impractical to create brand new creative for every single social media platform you participate in. So it’s important to strike the balance between sharing carbon content copies on every social channel, and a taking a completely unique approach in each place.

If you don’t know where to start with your cross-channel content marketing, start with these four tips:

1. Know the best practices for images on each platform.

Audiences seem to like different image elements on different platforms; be sure you have the most up-to-date information about what performs well in each place. Get started with 4 tips for creating content that works across social channels (includes a list of resources for best practices on each platform) and see an example of a cross-platform campaign with The best back-to-school campaigns on Twitter, Instagram and Tumblr.

2. But your own analytics should take precedence.

If the best practice for a particular social channel tells you that photos without faces in them perform the best, but your audience engages more with photos that do have faces, then continue to include faces in your content. What your audience likes and responds to is always what you should design your content strategy around. Best practices simply give you a place to start from and something to test against.

3. Know what elements are important to tie your brand together.

Identify the elements you consider a key part of demonstrating the core values of your business and find a way to communicate that visually across platforms. Color schemes, fonts, framing, and even copy placement are all things to consider (consult your style guide, or build one). Tweak until everything feels just right, then make sure to incorporate enough in every new piece to make it clear that it’s your piece.

4. Tailor copy for every platform.

This is about visuals sure, but rarely do we post a visual without any accompanying words. Don’t just write up one caption or paragraph and paste it with the same photo everywhere you have a social presence. Tailor everything to fit what your audience has shown they like in each place. If you don’t know what that is, start testing and be sure to track your audience’s responses.

Written by Sarah

February 24th, 2015 at 9:04 am

The power of visual storytelling on Twitter (and beyond!)

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It’s no secret that in the never-ending stream of 140-character messages that is Twitter a snappy visual can make yours stand out; Twitter themselves did a study and found that across different content categories adding an image to your tweet boosted engagement in the form of a higher retweet rate.

So simply adding photos to your tweets is a great starting place and one that we’ve discussed before as Twitter has rolled out more image-friendly updates. But if you want to take it further than just adding relevant visuals to tweets, design a way to tell a visual story on Twitter. Put together something where the pieces can stand individually- after all, your tweets will be part of your followers’ stream- but when a prospective follower or curious fan looks at your homepage, they also see a cohesive visual story that communicates your campaign or company values, whatever it is that you’re trying to get across.

What does this look like?

Starbucks is great about using their timeline to tell little mini-stories, and they incorporate their fans and followers in them by retweeting their tweets as well. A great example is a recent celebration of National Croissant Day:

Starbucks visual storytelling Twitter

 

This example also takes it further, by integrating Snapchat. (We’ll talk more about expanding to other platforms in just a bit!)

Keeping things to Twitter, look at the timelines of any major brands you admire and ask yourself what makes their presentation successful or unsuccessful; do their visuals feel cohesive? Do they work together towards telling a single story and letting you know what they can do for you? Figure out how you can answer those questions and provide value to your own fans, followers, and customers.

Take it beyond a campaign.

Twitter shouldn’t just be about selling to your audience; using it like a bullhorn to shout at your fans and followers is unlikely to result in a reciprocal, engaged relationship with them. Use your social presence to tell any number of stories about your brand. Here are some ideas to get you started:

  • Tell the story of how your company came to be
  • Tell the story of how two companies came together as one in a merger, or the story of a rebranding
  • Show off company culture: Share spontaneous images your employees take of one another and let them tell daily office stories in their own words
  • Show off company values: Share the story of a day spent volunteering, or the different charitable things employees do on their own time and how you support them
  • Tell the story of an event or anniversary of your company
  • Tell the story of a partnership of two brands or a brand and a celebrity spokesperson around a campaign

All of these are ways to show off the human side of your brand, in addition to giving your employees some storytelling power.

Take it even beyond Twitter.

Go beyond just adding a photo to your tweets and use photos to tell a story not just on Twitter but across platforms: Tailor your story so that it’s told on your Facebook timeline, on your Tumblr, across your Instagram page. You can choose different parts of your story to tell in each place, if that feels more appropriate for your brand. Don’t be afraid to experiment with your narrative as long as you stay true to your brand values and the voice you’re trying to build or strengthen. 

See an example of each for inspiration: IKEA built a catalog on Instagram last year, Charity: Water mixes in stories from their different well-building campaigns with user-generated stories on their Facebook page (also seen below), and Sephora’s Tumblr acts as a combination catalog and digital magazine repository of inspirational images, tips, and tricks for their followers.

Charity Water FB

One woman even used Pinterest to tell the story of her Imaginary Well-Dressed Toddler, which eventually expanded to a presence on other networks and a book. In that case a powerful visual story became a brand.

Test content types constantly.

Finally, use the engagement levels on the types of visual content you use- images with words superimposed on them, images without words but with captions, etc- to plan content types moving forward. And you’ll want to keep testing; your audience’s tastes will most likely shift over time.

Written by Sarah

February 18th, 2015 at 9:41 am

5 ways to make the most of snapshot reports

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Our snapshot reports are a great way to get some quick analytics about a conversation or topic on Twitter, and we want to help you get the most out of them that you can! Here are five ways to make the most of your snapshots:

1. Maximize your results

Take your snapshot as soon as a tweet chat, event, or event session ends to capture the best data possible. Free snapshots include up to 50 Tweets and $20 full snapshots include up to 1,500 Tweets, both from the past couple days (up to one week back in many cases). The longer you wait to run your report, however, the better chance that you’ll miss the best data.

tweetreach #smchat

 

From our Instagram account

2. Narrow your results

Taking a snapshot of a weekly chat? Use the “since” modifier (example: #RKChat since:2015-01-30 would go in the search bar) to get results from just that day’s chat, and not any anticipatory chatter from the night before. To narrow your search in other ways to get exactly the data you want, check out this full list of advanced operators.

3. Plan your research

Running a few free reports around keywords, topics, or different hashtags can help you narrow your focus and decide which will be worth paying for a full snapshot, or even going Pro if you’ve got that option in your budget.

4. Scope out the competition

A snapshot of an account can give you a quick idea of that account’s recent activity; which tweets are the most retweeted? Is that the same kind of content you should be looking at and sharing? It’s a great jumping off point for planning your content calendar.

5. Scope out influencers

Which brands and personal brands have the best tone and approach to Twitter in your industry? Run a few snapshots to find common threads and use them to enhance your Twitter content strategy moving forward.

Give it a try! Run your own free snapshot report right now.

Written by Sarah

February 12th, 2015 at 8:36 am

Using Twitter lists to understand your audience

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2015 is well underway and it’s a great time to take a look at how your content is performing with your audience across the board, and admit some hard truths if things aren’t resonating as well as you’d hoped in the rosy plans you made at the end of 2014. If January has been slow with your audience it’s not a reason to give up. It is a reason to utilize a Twitter feature that’s been around for a while in a whole new way: Twitter lists. (Completely new to Twitter lists? Here’s a guide from Twitter themselves.)

To Do List by John Schultz via Flickr

This may seem overwhelming at first, but putting in the work now can help keep track of various customer segments- and competition- going forward. Image used with permission via Creative Commons License. Via John Schultz on Flickr.

 

How do I organize these lists?

This will take some time, but it’s worth it, since keeping up with your entire Twitter stream every day (never mind retaining all of that information about everyone you follow) is impossible. What should these lists look like? Start with these general categories, and then make more specific lists that uniquely fit your brand and your customers:

  • Customers: A list to frequently check in on regarding purchases, and to interact with regularly
  • Former customers: Consider breaking this down into smaller lists; why did they leave? Did they have the budget for just one campaign with you? Did they go to your competitor? Monitor that list to see if they’re unhappy with your competitor too (some people can never be pleased), or if your competitor offers something you don’t.
  • Influencers: A list to retweet great content from, and interact with regularly; important people to build respectful relationships with
  • Competitors: An easy way to keep an eye on what your competition is up to so you don’t get blindsided with new developments in your market
  • Tweet chat attendees: Do you attend a lot of Twitter chats around your industry? Consider individual lists for those you interact with regularly in specific chats
  • Employees: An easy way to find everyone’s handle if you’re celebrating their hire, anniversary, or highlighting great work that they do
  • Businesses you work with: A list makes it easy to help share their announcements, big wins, etc; they’re more likely to do the same for you in return!
  • Brand advocates: Customers you definitely want to interact with regularly, and reward in a way that makes sense for your brand

Before you start making these lists, be sure you know if you want them to be public or private. Choosing to make a list of influencers in your industry public could be a smart move, as it inspires a little healthy competition between influencers, but you might want to keep a list of your competitor’s customers private so they don’t feel like you’re intruding on them, and your own customers private so your competitors don’t have a handy list to poach from.

How do private lists work?

When you add someone to a public list on Twitter, they are notified about it. Private lists, however, are only accessible to you and anyone that you add to them will not be notified that you are following them via a list. No one else can see them either.

Anything else?

It’s okay to have overlap on these lists; everyone doesn’t have to fit neatly onto a single list. This is also a reason you’ll want to make some of your lists private. If you add one customer to the customer list, the brand advocate list, and two Twitter chat lists, that could be a little overwhelming for them. Always err on the side of being cautious when you communicate with your customers. You want to be friendly and responsive, but never make them feel like you’re stalking them. Don’t be creepy.

Written by Sarah

January 26th, 2015 at 9:34 am

Posted in Guides

Tagged with ,

Quick Twitter analytics with TweetReach snapshot reports

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Here’s a brief primer on TweetReach snapshot reports – great for quick Twitter analytics on recently posted tweets.

Our free Twitter analytics snapshots include up to 50 tweets posted in the past few days. And our full snapshot reports include Twitter analytics on up to 1500 tweets from the past week (whichever comes first) for just $20. Both are perfect for fast insight into recent Twitter activity around anything – a hashtag, phrase, tweet, account, keyword, or any combination. You can run TweetReach snapshot reports any time, for any topic, on tweetreach.com.

Use our snapshot reports to learn more about:

  • Hashtag analytics – How has a hashtag been used recently? How large is the conversation around a hashtag? How are the main influencers using a Twitter hashtag?
  • Twitter account analytics – How far are your tweets reaching? Who is retweeting and engaging with your account?
  • Competitor analysis – How do multiple Twitter accounts compare to each other? Who has the largest reach on Twitter? Who’s getting more engagement?
  • Quick research – What kinds of things were people tweeting about a particular keyword, phrase or hashtag?
  • Tweet analytics – How far did a particular tweet spread? Who was retweeting or quoting a tweet? Who was responsible for the most impressions?

Try it now! You’ll have results in seconds.

And if you like our snapshot reports, you can now get more of them than ever before! TweetReach Pro subscription plans now include unlimited full snapshot reports, and start at just $99 per month. Learn more and sign up now.

Written by Jenn D

January 19th, 2015 at 1:47 pm

Want to analyze older or historical tweets? We can help!

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At Union Metrics, we can access any tweets in Twitter’s history for TweetReach analytics reporting! So if you’re interested in understanding the impact of tweets about a past campaign or project, we can help. Use this guide to see which TweetReach product you need, depending on when your tweets were posted.

When were the tweets posted?

Recently

If the tweets you’re interested in were posted in the past week, try running a snapshot report. Snapshot reports are great for recent, smaller events. Free snapshots include up to 50 recent tweets, and our full $20 snapshots will include up to 1500 tweets from the past few days (usually up to a week).

A while ago

If the tweets are more than one week old, you’ll need our premium historical analytics. With our historical Twitter analytics, we access the full Twitter archive and can analyze any public tweets that have ever been posted, dating back to March 2006. Pricing starts at $199 and is based on report duration and total tweet volume. Request a quote or more information here.

In the future

If the tweets haven’t been posted yet, set up a Tracker with our TweetReach Pro Twitter analytics subscriptions. That starts at just $99 per month, which includes real-time, ongoing monitoring for two topics, hashtags, keywords or accounts and up to 100,000 tweets per month. You just need to set up your Tracker before tweets start going out, and we can capture them all. You can see full pricing here.

Learn more

If you’d like to learn more about our premium historical analytics, let’s talk! Email us if you have any questions or read more on our website.  You may also want to read this post on how to take advantage of our historical Twitter analytics.

Old Skool Tweet

 

Image via Iain Farrell on Flickr 

Written by Jenn D

January 9th, 2015 at 10:01 am

Posted in Guides,Help

Tagged with , ,

4 steps to use metrics from a past campaign to improve a future campaign

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Everything in life is a learning experience, but sometimes it seems that social media campaigns can teach us particularly frustrating lessons. You can meticulously research best practices for campaigns in your industry across social platforms, and still get results below expectation. That doesn’t mean that campaign was a complete failure; it’s just telling you that your customers, fans, and followers don’t fit neatly into the best practice mold. 

So take this opportunity to meld any best practice suggestions with what you’ve learned to be true about your audience. How? All you need is your most recent Twitter-based campaign and these four steps to get started.

Step 1: Get your data, and decide what went well.

Hopefully you set up comprehensive tracking before you launched the start of your campaign, or took something like regular snapshots during its execution in order to track its performance. If you didn’t, don’t panic. We offer premium historical Twitter analytics that can get however much or little campaign information you need from the past into the present. Either way, once you have your data it’s time to dig in and take a look. First, the good news; what went well? Collect your best-performing tweets and set them aside until we get to step 3.


Twitter campaign

 

Pay attention to what causes spikes in your reach; did you get a boost from an influencer? Be sure to nurture your relationship with them!

Step 2: Decide what went badly, and ask yourself some honest questions.

Find the tweet that got the lowest engagement, and ask yourself some questions about why its engagement was so low:

  • Was it the time that you posted it compared to others?
  • Did it have an image?
  • Did it have hashtags?
  • How many hashtags?
  • Was there an Instagram link without an image directly uploaded to Twitter?
  • Was there a link to a blog post, but no image or hashtags?

You get the idea. Figure out the common threads between successful tweets, and figure out the common threads between your least successful tweets and base your next campaign’s content off of the former.

Step 3: Utilize specific insights from steps 1 and 2 to decide what you can do better.

From your analysis of what went well and what went not-so-well, choose a set of criteria around which you’ll plan your next campaign. Be sure to include the following:

  • Time of day: Post during the times that yielded the best results before, and avoid the least-engaged times.
  • Hashtags: Note the number used in successful tweets, which particular hashtags performed well, and identify some new ones to try out. Did you have a dedicated campaign hashtag? Test one this time around.
  • Content type (images etc): Did tweets with images perform better? What style of image? Did one style perform better on Twitter vs. Instagram? Were your images and branding cohesive?
  • Repeated post performance: Did you post the exact same tweet several times, or tweaked versions? Did you use the same content across platforms?
  • Promotion from team: Did your team help promote the campaign from their personal accounts, where appropriate? Encourage them to do so, or with different tactics in your next campaign.
  • Promotion from brand advocates: Identify who the biggest influencers and advocates around your campaign were and nurture the relationship. This will make them more likely to be an influencer in your next campaign as well.

Step 4: Plan what to measure with your next campaign.

Once you have your content plans in place, plan what you’re going to track, and how you’re going to track it. Once that campaign has ended, do a side-by-side analysis of the two campaigns to get an even clearer picture of how your fans, followers, and customers engaged with your content. If you do this with every campaign, they can only get stronger.

Written by Sarah

December 16th, 2014 at 9:02 am

How to track share of voice and the competition across platforms

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We’ve talked before about how to track your share of voice in the industry on Twitter (and how to increase it), but how do you monitor your share of voice and the competition across platforms? Here are some steps to get you started doing just that. Have questions or something we didn’t cover here? Leave it in the comments, find us on Twitter, or email us!

 First: Identify keywords for your industry

If you’re in marketing, for example, start with broader terms like “marketing” and then look at the more specific terms you’re interested in, such as “social media marketing” and “content marketing”. Who is talking about these things? What hashtags go with them? (We’ll get more into this one in the next step.)

Marketing

Make a list of these keywords and hashtags to set up your tracking with. You don’t have to come up with them off the top of your head, either; searching one in Twitter’s search bar, for example, will turn up the top tweets associated with that term and show you with other terms and hashtags those top tweeters are using. This helps you narrow down your list much quicker!

#contentmarketing

Alternatively, you can start or supplement by browsing the timelines of big names in your industry and seeing what keywords and hashtags they use.

Second: Ask, are these keywords and hashtags the same across platforms?

Popular hashtags are rarely the same across all platforms, with the exception of big ones like #TBT. The group of people you might want to be found alongside in an audience member’s search result might be using #smm on Twitter, something else entirely on Tumblr, and nothing like that at all on Instagram, because your competitors are using that particular platform to show off their company culture. Do your due diligence in research to find out what exactly you need to be tracking in each place.

#contentmarketing Ig

Who is using this hashtag on Instagram? Is it your competitor, or those in a different industry?

And don’t worry too much if it isn’t obvious at first; you can always adjust as you keep going. This is just to get started!

Third: Set up trackers for benchmark numbers

To know what your share of voice is you’re going to need some starting numbers to work from, or benchmarks. Set up a tracking system- something like our TweetReach Pro Trackers would work wonderfully to keep an eye on several conversations- to capture the conversation around the key terms and hashtags you identified earlier, then monitor these over time and compare how often your brand appears in conversation versus that of your competitors.

TR Tracker content marketing

TweetReach Pro doesn’t just cover Twitter conversations either; it can keep track of content posted on Twitter from other platforms, like links shared from Tumblr or Instagram photos. If you do want a comprehensive suite to track your keywords and hashtags in each place, we can help with that.

Fourth: Analyze and recalibrate

Once you have a good chunk of data to work with, ask yourself some questions, such as:

  • Are you using the popular hashtags you already identified to their full potential in the posts you’re making across platforms?
  • Who else is regularly using these hashtags; are you already following them? Do you engage them in conversations? (Start doing this if you aren’t already!)
  • What about your competitors’ strategy can you emulate; a certain posting style, or frequency? Test this alongside what your results tell you that you’re doing well.

If you’re using TweetReach Pro, you can find the answer to which other popular hashtags to use and who the top contributors are in the conversation- to include in your conversation- in their respective sections of the Tracker:

SM Analytics Top Hashtags

Are you tracking and using these hashtags?

SM Analytics Top Contributors

Are you following, listening to and engaging with these top contributors to the conversation you’re monitoring?

Additionally you can see how active these influencers are on other platforms, and how they’re contributing to the conversation in each place. A personal brand might have a strong following on Twitter, but only use Instagram for photos of family, friends and hobbies.

One more thing

Don’t have the budget to go TweetReach Pro? If you time it right, you can compare free or full snapshot reports from regular intervals to get at least a slice of the conversation. While real-time, ongoing analytics that can encompass an entire conversation are more comprehensive and will give you much richer data, small slices give you a starting point!

Written by Sarah

December 9th, 2014 at 10:24 am