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Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

#CES 2015 on Instagram and Tumblr

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On Tuesday we looked at the conversation around early #CES2015 tweets, but this year for the first time we also wanted to look at the conversation on other networks.

Curious?

See how the early conversations on Tumblr and Instagram differ from the conversation on Twitter, and leave your thoughts in the comments.

 

MBUSA Instagram CES 2015

Photo from Mercedes-Benz USA Instagram account.

 

Written by Sarah

January 8th, 2015 at 8:53 am

Posted in Events

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A quick look at early #CES2015 tweets

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The 2015 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) has officially kicked off in Vegas, and we wanted to take a look at the early chatter around it on Twitter (like we did last year), specifically yesterday and so far today, the first full day of the conference.

 Most retweeted tweets

3 of the 10 most retweeted tweets so far this year are about products, but not gaming consoles or the latest smart glasses; they’re about cars.

The tweet from 2Wired2Tired is so far the most retweeted of all around #CES2015 and it’s unusual that it’s not from a tech reporter, tech blog, or brand, but just someone with an interest in tech.

Other brands and products mentioned in the top ten most retweeted tweets were a smart belt to curb overeating, Intel promoting their keynote (and the future of wearable tech), Lenovo’s first wearable, and Intel’s new chip.

Top Contributors

So far it’s the tech blogs driving the conversation- not brands- just like we saw back in 2011:

  1. CNET
  2. Mashable
  3. TechCrunch
  4. Samsung Mobile
  5. Intel

Top Hashtags

Two of the big tech blogs have created their own CES-specific hashtags this year, further driving the conversation:

  1. #CES2015
  2. #CES
  3. #CEScrunch (TechCrunch’s hashtag)
  4. #MashCES (Mashable’s hashtag)
  5. #IoT (Internet of Things)

We’ll be keeping an eye on the CES conversation as it grows- 222.9k tweets so far today and yesterday- and changes over the next few days, even taking a look at the chatter over on Instagram and Tumblr for the first time. Stay tuned!

Want help tracking tweets about your next conference or event? Let us know!

Written by Sarah

January 6th, 2015 at 11:51 am

Posted in Events

Tagged with , , ,

#CometLanding: Finding influencers and more using TweetReach snapshot reports

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Yesterday, for the first time in history, humanity managed to land a robot roughly the size of a washing machine (named Philae) onto a comet moving 40k mph through space. Twitter had a lot to say about it using the #cometlanding hashtag, so we took two full snapshot reports to compare the conversation on the day of the landing to the day after.

What can comparing snapshot reports tell me?

Full snapshot reports are limited to 1500 tweets, so extremely popular Twitter conversations like those around big public events tend to max them out quickly, but that doesn’t mean there isn’t still a lot to learn from what they capture! By comparing snapshots from two days back-to-back, you get an idea of who the most influential people and organizations in the conversation are, which you can continue to monitor by taking a few more days of snapshots, either free or full (free will just give you slightly more limited data). Alternatively you can use them as research to set up a TweetReach Pro Tracker around a similar topic in the same area of interest: Now you know which accounts to monitor, and you can look at those to see what kinds of hashtags they regularly use, etc, to get the most out of your Tracker.

So what did these two snapshots tell us?

The conversation on day two almost matches that of day one in terms of intensity, telling us that Twitter’s interest in Philae’s historical landing hasn’t wavered much from that of landing day:

#cometlanding day 1

#cometlanding day 2

This tells you it’s still a popular topic to work into your content schedule! And day two is ripe for original content. The first day had a lot more original information being broadcast; the breakdown of tweets vs. retweets was almost even, whereas today has seen a lot more retweets and fewer original tweets. This helps you hypothesize about the nature of the conversation: Perhaps on day one, everyone watching tweeted about how excited they were to watch the landing, from professionals down to amateur observers. On day two, maybe excited space and science enthusiasts are sharing information with their followers from official accounts. To confirm this, simply check the tweets timeline on your snapshot reports:

#cometlanding tweets timeline day 1

 

Day one Tweets Timeline: Tweets from laypeople excited about the #cometlanding

 

#cometlanding tweets timeline day 2

 

Day two tweets timeline: More RTs of official accounts with news and photos from Philae 

What about those influencers you mentioned?

No problem. The most retweeted tweets each day both included the official Twitter account for the Philae lander.

#cometlanding most RTd day 1 #cometlanding most RTd day 2

 

While NASA is an account you might have assumed would be influential in space and science conversations, BBC news might be less expected. And perhaps you didn’t know Philae had its own account!

Still have questions?

Leave ‘em in the comments. Like what our snapshots can tell you, and interested in going further with TweetReach Pro? Join us for a demo on Thursday, November 20th at 9:00am PST, or email us to set one up sooner!

Written by Sarah

November 13th, 2014 at 10:30 am

3 things non-profits can learn from the UN’s #UNDay

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UN Day

The United Nations (UN) recently celebrated 69 years of global service, and they celebrated with an awareness campaign using the hashtags #UNDay and #happybirthdayUN across social media. While not every non-profit enjoys the name recognition and historical establishment of the UN, non-profits of any size can take some tips away from this campaign to use for their own.

1. Using #UNDay to highlight the work they consistently do.

Non-profits constantly have to prove that they are worth continuing to support- even those as established as the UN- and it can be an exhausting process to generate consistent content on a limited budget that captures attention and encourages donations, or even just sharing. The UN took #UNDay as an opportunity to remind their followers of the work they do on a daily basis to improve the world, reinforcing the need for their nearly seven decade existence.

And they did so from more than just their main account:

Using a hashtag in this way across properties is a fantastic educational opportunity; some followers might not have realized that UNICEF was formed by the UN. These also happened to be three of the most retweeted tweets using the #happybirthdayUN hashtag.

2. Tapping into related organizations to boost their potential exposure, and therefore potential engagement.

Many non-profits are small and do not have several accounts to cross-promote their mission and work from. However, they still have the opportunity to reach out to similar organizations to help them promote their campaigns (a promise to do the same for them in the future could set up a healthy reciprocal social relationship for both, and even lead to future collaborative projects that would enhance the reach of both organizations!).

Alternatively, non-profits can reach out to government officials and news organizations to help boost their message. The UN had a lot of contribution to the UN Day conversation from these types of accounts; using something like the TweetReach Pro top contributors list can highlight who helped spread the word from requests, and who spread it of their own volition. Be sure to thank both kinds of contributors!

UN Day Top Contributors

3. Using platforms other than Twitter, but not in a way that strains resources.

The UN posted to their Instagram account about #UNDay as well, but repurposed a lot of the images and copy they used on Twitter and Facebook. The best approach to cross-platform campaigns with limited resources is to start with fantastic visual content and general copy, then tweak each of those things to fit each platform the content is being shared on. 

For example, a photo from this video posted on Twitter. . .

. . .was repurposed as a still on Instagram with similar, but tailored, information on it about how they work for peace.

UN Day peace

Similarly, they used the same image in a banner for their Facebook page that discussed UN Day.

UN FB banner post change

BONUS: Tap into established hashtags like #TBT that have spread across the web.

The UN shared the same Throwback Thursday (#TBT) image on Instagram and Twitter, in slightly different ways. Using established and popular hashtags with appropriate content puts your message in front of new eyes who might not have known about your non-profit, but could now be inspired to learn more.

Written by Sarah

November 11th, 2014 at 9:08 am

Posted in Events

Tagged with , ,

3 ways to use TweetReach snapshot reports to complement real-time Twitter monitoring for your events

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For monitoring tweets about large events we always recommend creating a plan and setting up TweetReach Pro Trackers ahead of time so that you capture the full set of tweets for your analysis. That doesn’t mean, however, that our snapshot reports can’t act as a great complement to your in-depth tracking. Here are three reasons why:

1. Get the big picture quickly

Before you have time to dig into all of the information in your TweetReach Pro Tracker, you can grab a snapshot report for quick insight into the size of the conversation around an event hashtag, who the top contributors were, and which tweets were the most retweeted. Here’s a great example of a snapshot from Communications Week, which took place in New York last week:

CommsWeekNY

2. Build relationships with attendees

From the lists of top contributors and most retweeted tweets in your snapshot, make sure you’re following active event participants. You can also use these lists to engage with or thank them for their contribution to the event conversation. Pay attention to who these accounts also follow and retweet to help further build your own network on Twitter; these are good target accounts as they are likely to be a part of or interested in your industry. Building strong relationships with the right people can lead to reciprocal partnerships in the future, even if it’s just giving each other little PR boosts through retweets down the line.

To make this even easier, every Twitter username mentioned in your snapshot report is a clickable link that takes you to their Twitter account. You can also retweet or reply directly from your snapshot. Here’s an example from a snapshot of SocialMedia.org, whose summit started yesterday:

TweetReach snapshot report

 

3. Easily share stats with attendees

Since snapshot reports are so quick to run, you can easily share a snapshot report at the end of each day of your event, or even at the end of a big panel or keynote to give everyone in attendance – and those watching via Twitter – an idea of how that conversation went. Attendees can share the report with their followers, or use it in writing their own recap posts of their experiences. This also gives others interested in your event a better idea of what kind of content and conversation it produces, encouraging them to book for the next year if it lines up with their business.

Want more on event tracking with TweetReach?

Be sure you’re getting the most out of your snapshot reports by keeping things simple. And if you want more on how to track social media engagement with your events with Union Metrics, check out some of our other posts on marketing your conference across platforms: Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr, as well as marketing your conference across platforms: Snapchat and Pinterest.

Written by Sarah

November 4th, 2014 at 9:46 am

The World Series on Twitter: #HunterPenceSigns

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Casual watchers of the World Series may have noticed some interesting signs popping up in the broadcasts of the games; signs aimed at San Francisco Giants player Hunter Pence. Giants fans may have noticed that these signs started popping up in August, and that they even have their own hashtag: #HunterPenceSigns.

We took a full snapshot report to get an idea of what the conversation around this hashtag looks like:

Hunter Pence Signs 1

Our full snapshot reports max out at 1,500 tweets, but you can see that you reach that limit in around two days with this specific hashtag. The conversation is mostly tweets and retweets, with the fewest amount of tweets being replies. This suggests it’s more about creating and sharing these jokes than critiquing them.

Hunter Pence Signs 2

 

The top contributors to the hashtag within the confines of this snapshot were San Francisco news station KTVU, and the “official” Hunter Pence Signs account. A Kansas City news station holds the top spot for most retweeted tweets, however, keeping the rivalry going in every way possible.

The above tweet was retweeted by KTVU

What does Hunter Pence himself think about all of this?

He seems to be a pretty good sport about it.  

Written by Sarah

October 28th, 2014 at 2:28 pm

Union Metrics events: SXSW 2015 and Digital Hollywood

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Sometimes we leave the office, and we like to let you know what we’re up to when we do. Here’s what’s on our calendars right now.

SXSW 2015

Panels have been announced for SXSW 2015 and we wanted to thank everyone who voted for ours! Co-Founder Jenn Deering Davis’ panel proposal How the future of independent film depends on social media has been accepted as a Future15 for SXSW Film and we are all excited!

Jenn Audience SXSWi 2013The audience at Jenn’s talk at SXSWi 2013

Digital Hollywood

SXSW is still a few months away, but Digital Hollywood is happening right now in LA. Catch Director of Customer Success Jenna Broughton on Thursday, October 23rd at the Marketing Primetime Hollywood Content – Using Twitter, Facebook, Smartphone and Tablets session from 11am to 12:20pm.

Will you be at Digital Hollywood this week or SXSW in the spring? Let us know in the comments, and come say hi in person!

Written by Sarah

October 23rd, 2014 at 9:00 am

Union Metrics at Austin Startup Week 2014

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Austin Startup Week kicked off yesterday, and we were excited to be a part of the Built In Austin Startup Career Fair!

Built In Austin ASW14

Miss us? Don’t worry, you can catch us again on Thursday morning at the Austin Open Coffee Club and again that evening at the Startup Crawl. We’ll be in the lobby of the Omni hotel downtown from 5-10pm, so be sure to stop by our table and say hi, drop off a resume, talk analytics, and grab a Merle sticker.

Wondering what positions are open? We’re currently hiring for a Data Engineer,  Full Stack Engineer, Support Engineer, and Inbound Sales Rep, all in Austin. Feel free to read more about the company and the team here, and we’ll see you on Thursday!

 

Written by Sarah

October 7th, 2014 at 12:48 pm

10+ Takeaways from the Social Shake-Up 2014

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The Social Shake-Up (TSSU) 2014 went down in Atlanta, Georgia, last week and we sent our Content Marketing Specialist Sarah Parker to check it out. She came back with new connections and a bunch of fantastic insights! We’ve pulled together her favorite insights from each of the panels, discussions, and keynotes from her two days at TSSU 2014 for your benefit.

The Social Shake-Up | Day One

Day one’s opening conversation with Brian Solis covered the changing digital landscape, and how it is more important than ever to put people first.

Many highlights of the two-day conference were captured by the talented people behind Ludic Creatives.

Two of the standout sessions on day one covered visual marketing and the art and science of storytelling. We already shared a quick tip on crisis communication picked up in the visual marketing session, but what other memorable information was there? Here are five of day one’s big takeaways:

  1. Choose organic hashtags over branded hashtags. Find a way to incorporate your brand message with an already popular or trending hashtag; just be sure you double and triple check the meaning of that hashtag before you use it.
  2.  Use the newsroom approach. Oreo’s Super Bowl Oreo Moment happened because they were prepared and they had set up a command center to quickly capitalize on the big game’s moments and execute content. Build your own version of this to maximize on big social moments, but don’t force your way in to a conversation that doesn’t make sense for your brand.
  3.  Take a content selfie. Measure how your content is performing beyond vanity metrics to those that really impact your business and your business goals.
  4.  Make your information bite-size. Long form content can easily get lost in a world of short attention spans; break off smaller bits of the longer content you have for easily-digestible tweets and more.
  5.  Consistent brand personality is important. But that doesn’t mean that your brand’s personality can only strike one note. Human personalities cover the spectrum from the serious to the silly and it’s possible for brands to pull this off if they put their voice in the right hands.

The Social Shake-Up | Day Two

Day two’s morning keynote from Jeremiah Owyang covered the collaborative economy and what it means for the future of business. Where does social fit into all of this?

How else would we communicate about all the pieces of The Honeycomb?  Day two’s sessions included a case study from Coca-Cola on real-time analysis and storytelling, social audience targeting, and a panel discussion on crisis communication. Here are five of the day’s big takeaways: 

  1. Listening to the existing conversation around your brand gives you openings to become a part of it. Brands should look for these serendipitous openings, but also be strategic in when and how they join conversations. For example, the sentiment around Coke’s #AmericaIsBeautiful big game advertisement on social media was ultimately positive, because the marketing team released the behind-the-scenes videos of the making of the commercial once the backlash against it started. This helped turn the conversation around.
  2. Show your audience that you’re listening by actually addressing their concerns. Coke was sponsoring an event with a health-focused track that was unhappy with their presence, so Coke replaced their opening promotional, sponsor speech with a video interview from their lead scientist addressing the health concerns that had been aired to them on Twitter.
  3. Audience targeting methods will vary depending on your industry. Luxury markets focus on keeping organic followers, because they want those who come to them to stay. Any outreach will be very targeted, because it’s about reaching the right people over the most people possible. This isn’t true for non-luxury brands. Research and emulate the approach of other brands in your field, then test slightly different approaches to see what works for your brand.
  4. Target lookalike audiences: What do your best customers look like? Build out that profile, then target those that look just like them on previously untapped platforms.
  5. Never leave out a platform in your monitoring of a crisis. You never know where people prefer to receive- or distribute- their information.

 The closing keynote on day two from Baratunde Thurston conveyed with humor that digital storytelling doesn’t, in fact, have to be boring. 

Want more?

Check out the posts published on Social Media Today about various aspects of TSSU 2014 from networking to other attendee’s takeaways, as well as the conversation on Twitter. Don’t have time to dig through the whole hashtag? Here’s a Storify from Insightpool, sponsor of the opening night party.

Where you at The Social Shake-Up? Leave your highlights and takeaways in the comments!

Written by Sarah

September 24th, 2014 at 3:25 pm

Crisis Communication Quick Tip from the #SocialShakeup

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We sent our Content Marketing Specialist Sarah A. Parker to The Social Shake-Up in Atlanta, and in her first session she caught this great tip from Andrea Harrison of Rebel Mouse (paraphrased) for crisis communication strategies:

Buy promoted tweets based on the keywords associated with the crisis; that way the first thing people see when they search Twitter for more information is your apology tweet.

That means your first step is still, obviously, to write an apology.

Are you at The Social Shake-Up? If you spot Sarah, be sure to say hi!

Want more on crisis communication tactics on Twitter? Here are 3 ways DiGiorno reacted well to their recent Twitter crisis, as well as some specific tips for airlines and cruise lines dealing with a crisis (part one and part two). 

Written by Sarah

September 16th, 2014 at 11:51 am