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3 ways entertainment marketers can better engage fans on social media

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This post originally appeared on MediaPost and we are pleased to be able to share it with you here!

Some of the most popular social media accounts belong to entertainment brands — celebrities, TV shows, movies, entertainment media — the list goes on. These brands have built up large, loyal followings by sharing lots of great content on social media. These brands resonate well on visually focused channels like Instagram, Tumblr and Snapchat, and on social hubs like Facebook and Twitter.

What can we learn from these successes? How can other entertainment marketers better engage fans on social media? Luckily, entertainment brands have plenty of engaging, social-ready content at their fingertips; it’s just a matter of figuring out what to share and how. If you’re working with an entertainment brand, here are three ways to more deeply engage with your fans on social media.

Provide sneak peeks for your fans

Give your followers something extra or early. Reward their loyalty by sharing content earlier on your social channels than anywhere else. Some brands post new trailers first on social channels. Others send a secret password to share new content with lucky contest winners before sharing it publicly. No matter how you decide to do it, giving your social audiences early access to new content is a great way to reward followers (and get new ones).

Sony Pictures’ Goosebumps movie recently encouraged fans to tweet to unlock a new trailer. When fans posted enough tweets to hit a volume threshold, Sony released a new full-length trailer for the movie. It was a great way to get fans excited about the film and spread the word across Twitter.

Make the most of your content exhaust

Content exhaust is anything that’s left over after a project is finished, all the extra content that’s created and discarded as you work on polishing the final product. That can be outtakes, behind the scenes stories, images from the cutting room floor, backstage video, pre-Photoshop photos, and more. What may seem mundane to those involved in a production can be extremely interesting to fans who don’t experience the entertainment business every day. Inviting your fans behind the scenes makes them feel more connected and invested in your project. And on social media, it’s completely acceptable to share less polished content, particularly on channels like Snapchat. Just because something is public doesn’t mean it has to be perfect, so don’t feel like everything you share has to have the same production values as the show or movie itself. Use the content exhaust you’re already creating to your advantage.

ABC Family does a wonderful job with Pretty Little Liars. Across the “PLL” social accounts, they’re constantly posting pictures of the cast goofing around together, attending red carpet events, even posing with signs about fans. This kind of content rewards fans for following and makes them feel included in how the show is made.

 

We do too! #PLL #Ezria #EzriaForever

A photo posted by Pretty Little Liars (@prettylittleliars) on

Go beyond the story on screen

Fans of a show or movie will want to go deeper into the story, beyond what can be shown on screen. Use social media to provide more information for them. You could share extended scenes, deeper dives into a back story, more information about real-life events that influence a story, interviews with writers and directors — anything that extends the story beyond the main screen. The more information you provide about a story, the more invested the audience will be in its outcome. A lot of fans will try to piece together this information on their own, so provide some help or participate in the conversation when you can.

True Detective on HBO does this very well. The show’s story is full of mystery already, and every week fans discuss possible clues and conspiracies across social media. On Instagram, the show shares images and short videos through the season to encourage this conversation. They could take further advantage of this by sharing more information from the show’s writer about the unusual real-life events and locations that inspire the storyline.

 

#TrueDetective

A video posted by True Detective (@truedetective) on

 

Want to measure the impact of your social media content? Take a look at all the analytics we offer at Union Metrics.

Written by Sarah

July 30th, 2015 at 8:12 am

Our Favorite Social Media Stats and Facts

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Social media changes quickly, and it can be hard to keep up with the latest usage information for the top channels. We thought we’d make it easier by rounding up our five favorite nuggets for our four favorite social networks: Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram and Facebook.

Many of these come from Union Metrics research, so feel free to check out our resources page or see how we can help you measure your efforts in each of these places, if you’re eager to see how that after-hours Tumblr queue is paying off.

Tumblr

  1. Tumblr is a night owl. 42% of all Tumblr activity takes place between 5pm and 1am ET (Source). Takeaway: Brands should try posting outside of traditional business hours to see how their content performs.
  2. Disney is by far the most popular brand on Tumblr, seeing more overall activity and stronger engagement than any other brand – nearly two times more (Source). Takeaway: Consider a Tumblr presence to join in on the fan conversation that inevitably already exists around your brand.
  3. 50% of Tumblr users have gone out and bought something they’ve seen on their dashboard (Source). Takeaway: Make it easy for your followers to buy the things you show them on their dash. With the ”Buy” button introduced last year, it’s easier than ever.
  4. Saturday and Sunday are the most active days on Tumblr (Source). Takeaway: Have a content plan for the weekends. Pay attention to when the most original content is published (bonus stat: that’s 4pm on Sunday) and see how your content performs posted at or around that time.
  5. Fandom thrives on Tumblr (Source). Takeaway: Movies and television shows should know that their fandoms are on Tumblr, and they are legion. Incorporate fan art (like Teen Wolf) or photos (like Doctor Who) into your content strategy where it makes sense. Make fans feel heard, and appreciated.

Times of Tumblr

Twitter

  1. Most customers expect a response on social media within an hour (Source). Takeaway: This is true even of nights and weekends, so brands looking to have an active Twitter presence need to be prepared for that.
  2. Tweets with images or videos in them get more engagement than tweets with text alone (Source). Takeaway: Add appropriate visuals to your tweets whenever possible, but don’t just stick any old image on there just to have one. Choose striking, meaningful visual content to catch your audience’s eye.
  3. Related to that last point? Tweets with images take up more than twice as much vertical space in the timeline (Source). Takeaway: Simply taking up more space on someone’s feed- particularly when they’re out and about, scrolling through mobile- means your tweets are much harder to simply scan and dismiss. Especially if you choose that visually arresting image we talked about.
  4. Speaking of mobile users, recent numbers show “80% of users access Twitter via their mobile device” (Source). Takeaway: This means that unless those mobile users are on wifi, they don’t have as much bandwidth to work with and they aren’t going to want to wait forever for images to download, so make sure those visually arresting images aren’t huge. If it’s a big infographic, choose one piece to show and link back to the whole thing.
  5. When a show’s stars live-tweet an episode during its airtime, they “generate 64% more discussion (ie. tweets about the show) than programs whose cast members abstain” (Source). Takeaway: Even if you’re not in TV, live-tweeting a relevant event- a webinar, a conference, a presentation or panel during an industry meetup- will make you part of a bigger discussion and introduce you to new contacts. Just be sure to use the official hashtags—  or create them.

Instagram

  1. Our own Union Metrics research recommends brands try posting outside of U.S. business hours (Source). Takeaway: Evenings and weekends are times most people have free to browse social and catch up on their streams. Brands should test posting during these times and see if they get a bump in engagement from fans and followers who are otherwise busy during the work day.
  2. Keeping up your content cadence matters more than how often you post (Source). Takeaway: Obviously you don’t want to completely flood the Instagram feed of your fans and followers, but it’s not unusual for brands to post several times a day. If you have a large queue of content for a campaign, however, and it runs dry afterward before you can plan a robust content calendar, you will start to lose followers.
  3. Content on Instagram lives longer than you probably realize (Source). Takeaway: Although most activity happens in the first several hours after a brand posts to Instagram, it’s not unusual to see low-level content for days and weeks after a post is first made. Don’t be afraid to edit old posts with newer hashtags to see if you can boost engagement on them.
  4. Brands who advertise on Instagram may continue to see increased engagement after an advertising period has ended; in one case we saw a brand with “a nearly 10% increase in engagement rates across the board, increasing the total activities received per organic post by 25% on average” (Source). Takeaway: If you’re thinking of taking the plunge and advertising on Instagram, the benefits could be longer lasting than you might have assumed.
  5. Related to the previous point, Instagram is opening up advertising to everyone this fall (Source). Takeaway: Just be sure your creative is up to snuff; Instagram users are used to high-quality, well-executed content.

 

 

Facebook

  1. Images that include people and faces perform well on Facebook (Source). Takeaway: Facebook is a place people connect with friends and family they’re close to in real life, so reflecting this ease and friendliness in your visuals helps your content resonate with those who choose to connect with your brand there.
  2. You have three seconds to get your fans’ attention in a video (Source). Takeaway: Videos need to be immediately arresting, and also perform well without sound since not everyone opts to turn it on. Shorter videos also tend to perform better than long videos on Facebook.
  3. Posts with a ton of hashtags don’t perform well on Facebook (Source). Takeaway: Your audience may love hashtags on Facebook, but it seems like most don’t, unless they’re a big popular hashtag like #TBT or popular and annual, like #NationalRunningDay. Use your discretion and test one or two on your posts to see how your audience responds. But definitely don’t leave all 30 from your Instagram post on Facebook; edit that cross-post down!
  4. 79% of all users are accessing Facebook from their mobile (Source). Takeaway: A lot of social activity is happening on people’s phones, when they’re out and about, commuting, or at home in the evenings. Be sure your content is optimized for mobile to capitalize on this audience. Think about what you want to see within the confines of a smartphone screen and how much data you have to work with.
  5. Facebook isn’t just Facebook; most people know they own Instagram, but some forget about the other entities in the Facebook ecosystem, including WhatsApp, Messenger, and Occulus (Source). Takeaway: These other apps are something to keep an eye on as the industry develops over the coming years, particularly in the private messaging space. It’s direct access to consumers, but difficult for brands to balance without coming across as creepy or intrusive.

Written by Sarah

July 28th, 2015 at 9:08 am

The Week in Social from Union Metrics #164

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We spend the week reading the best things we can get our eyeballs on and on Fridays we share them here with you. Leave your thoughts in the comments, or come find us on Twitter at @UnionMetrics.

On the serious stuff: Law and crisis communication.

At it’s crux, social media is really just the latest tool humans have for communication; the nature of human communication itself hasn’t actually changed. This works both for and against brands in the midst of a social crisis, as Andy Gilman elaborates in How Social Media Changes Crisis Communications, an interview with Geoff Livingston:

“The Internet is just a vehicle. It really starts with who you are as an organization. It doesn’t matter whether you’re a company, a nonprofit or an NGO. What are your values and your messages? You can decide ‘I don’t want this community to be my customer base,’ that’s your choice. But then you suffer the consequences for it, and it is so much easier to spread that information.”

The speed and ease of communication in the social age simply means you might be facing those consequences a lot sooner and from more people than might have heard about it in a bygone era.

And if you haven’t had time to really take in the new social guidelines from the FTC, check out Adhering to the FTC’s Updated Social Media Guidelines: 5 Tips for Brands from Kristen Sussman. Truly savvy brands will run an audit to make sure even existing content meets the new guidelines. The general rule is always “when in doubt, disclose”.  

And on content marketing and storytelling, because we just can’t get enough.

Social media marketers love to declare that things are dead, occasionally, and this week it’s poor brand storytelling. Bernadette Jiwa responded with a great piece asking Is Brand Storytelling Dead?.

“. . . a brand story is more than cleverly crafted copy. A story isn’t something you choose to tell or not to tell. It’s what people believe when they encounter you or your brand, the impressions they form and the assumptions they make at every interaction with you, both in personal and business settings. Customers are making sense of your story even when they aren’t consciously paying attention.”

Emphasis added.

Want to get inside your customers heads? Then you’ll want to read Six psychology principles that can help your content marketing, from Anna Francis for Econsultancy.

Think you’ve got everything covered in your content marketing? Couldn’t hurt to be sure you haven’t missed something obvious that could be helping, and is an easier fix to make: 5 Obvious Content Marketing Strategies Most Companies Overlook from Neil Patel. (Hint: Just throwing a stock image into a post doesn’t make it “visual content marketing”.)

Finally Katie Gaab reminds us to take time for ourselves and trust in our ideas in Speak Up: Identify Influential Ideas to Make Your Mark. Maybe make time to do a little of that this weekend.

Written by Sarah

July 24th, 2015 at 9:00 am

Union Metrics San Francisco Crafts for a Cause

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On July 2nd, Union Metrics’ San Francisco team visited our local Raising a Reader office to “Craft for a Cause,” and build educational block sets designed to inspire creative storytelling in the classroom and at home for program participants.

SF volunteer

Raising A Reader’s programs provide books and educational materials, like the block sets we assembled, designed to help caregivers encourage children to read, cultivate creativity and aid in school success by increasing literacy, especially in low income communities. Our time at Raising a Reader helped us better understand early learning and the needs of schools and families in communities around the Bay Area, and knowing the benefits of early education and the importance (and fun!) of creativity in school and eventually at work, we wanted to support this cause and provide children with tools that will aid them in their literacy journey.

The blocks that we assembled, which include photos of a diverse array of people and animals, are designed to help children and adults use their imaginations to create stories about the characters. By inventing made-up narratives of what the individuals on the blocks might be doing, even children who may not yet be able to read or caregivers who might not have access to children’s books in their native language can learn and apply the art of storytelling.

We love being part of a community as diverse as San Francisco and to have found an opportunity to assist an organization promoting such an important cause locally and around the country. Volunteering not only gives us a chance to meet our neighbors and learn about the different needs that exist for local groups, but it also gives us a chance to connect as a team on a new type of project, which is why we make community service a regular activity in both our offices. And in this case, even hone our block-making skills and uphold our values of creativity and craftsmanship!

Our volunteering program allows us to help the community and spend time with colleagues in a new way, and we are so happy to offer it as a regular team building and local activity. Here’s what some of our San Francisco teammates had to say about our work at Raising a Reader:

“I like and appreciate the volunteer work we do because it allows us the time to make a valuable contribution to those who are either in need, or whose lives we can better. The experience of volunteering at Raising a Reader more recently was great especially after understanding how it impacts the children. I remember our guide/instructor telling us about how children from low income families enter kindergarten well behind the average in their reading and language skills and as a result of already starting well behind the curve, as a result they end up remaining behind throughout their school careers. Therefore it was great to be able to make a contribution and to be able to hear about the impact of our contribution along with the contribution of others.” – Sam, Customer Success Manager

“The most beneficial aspects of the UM volunteer program for me are the perspective I gain from it and the opportunity to spend time with my colleagues outside of an office setting. It is easy to get caught up in the day-to-day grind and volunteering has served as a reminder that the minor issues I encounter pale in comparison to a lot of the major issues going on on our very own doorstep. Working with organizations like the Marin Food Bank and Raise A Reader has not only taught me a bit more about some of the adversities that others in our community face, but also given me the opportunity to take part in doing something to help!” – Steph, Product Designer

Our Austin office also recently volunteered at Austin Animal Center, so stay tuned for some adorable photos of our Austin team with local dogs and cats! (Can’t wait? Check us out on Instagram for a preview!)

Written by Sarah

July 23rd, 2015 at 8:39 am

Which Union Metrics product is right for you?

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As we’ve built out the Union Metrics Social Suite, we want to be sure we continue to provide analytics for those at a range of available resources. Along those lines, we’ve created this guide to help you find the perfect piece of UM to bring clarity to your social efforts, organized by your needs.

I have little or no budget.

Fear not my friend, we have some free tools to help you track your social efforts, even with $0 in the budget for it. As long as you plan accordingly, you should be able to cover a small Twitter campaign- a weekly chat, your own account growth, a hyper-local contest, etc- with TweetReach snapshot reports. Just make sure you run a snapshot within a couple days of your event – they can only go back 1-7 days. You get analytics on 50 tweets for free! If you do go over the allotted 50 tweets for the period you’re capturing on a free report, you can purchase a full snapshot report covering up to 1500 tweets for just $20.


The More You Know

As for Instagram, you can run a free Instagram account checkup to see which of your photos and hashtags are performing the best (plus more, like the best day and time for you to post!), and you can refresh your report once a day for updated metrics.

Account Checkup Small

I want to track an upcoming campaign on one social media channel.

Union Metrics offers single-channel analytics starting at $99 per month to monitor two accounts or topics on one social media channel. You can get analytics for Twitter, Instagram or Tumblr with one of these plans. You can keep your subscription running for new campaigns or clients (and change what you’re monitoring at any time), or you can cancel when you’re done. It’s an easy way to get the real-time analytics you need without a long-term commitment.

UM Single Channel plans

Simply pick the channel where you’ll be running your campaign, and sign up for the plan that meets your needs. We can walk you through a demo to show you exactly what you’ll be getting. We offer monthly and annual pricing.

I want to track an upcoming campaign across multiple social media.

For our larger customers or anyone wanting analytics across social media channels, the Union Metrics Social Suite is a great choice. With it you can monitor your social efforts on Twitter, Tumblr, Instagram AND Facebook, all in one place. That includes analytics for all accounts and topics you’re interested, plus cool features like our actionable insight stream.

Union Metrics Multi-Channel Detail InsightsDon’t worry, we still have different plan sizes to choose from so you can pick the one that best suits your needs, or the needs of your clients. The Social Suite starts at just $500 per month!

Why should I use Union Metrics?

Fair question. You can read more about Union Metrics and why our social media analytics are the best in the industry, let us know if you’d like a demo, or ask us any burning questions you might have.

We’re always happy to help!

Written by Sarah

July 20th, 2015 at 8:26 am

The Week in Social #163

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We spend the week reading the best things we can get our eyeballs on and on Fridays we share them here with you. Leave your thoughts in the comments, or come find us on Twitter at @UnionMetrics.

Video content marketing is the new black (still).

Brendan Gahan talks Today’s Digital Video Revolution & The Future of Brand on Brian Solis’s blog. The question to be asking isn’t who will win, Periscope or Meerkat, (Vine and Instagram video have each found their own place, after all) but how can your brand keep up with the demand for video?

Related, In A Much Sharper Vision for Online VideoMatthew Schwartz reminds us that

“. . .in order for online video to work with your audience, it must have a sharp message and purpose. Technical wizardry won’t hurt your brand or organization, but the larger goal should be figuring out how the message in the video will tie to corporate objectives, financial and otherwise. It’s a steep mountain to climb (and I’ve got my Sherpa lined up).”

In other words, if you’re going to do it, do it right. And that involves putting some real time and effort into producing quality content that’s useful for your audience. Emphasis added.

Content marketing hasn’t disappeared, however.

Everyone loves to hold up BuzzFeed as an example of content marketing success but Jonathan Crossfield brings up an important point in Why BuzzFeed Shouldn’t Blow Your Marketing Mind: Unless your business model also relies on traffic over sales, theirs isn’t the model to emulate.

In How to Dig Deep for Richer Content from Rachel Truair discusses the “content iceberg”: Most content answers obvious, surface questions. By talking to your sales team, your HR department, your suppliers, or listening to your industry at large, you can uncover more difficult, frequently asked questions customers may even be reluctant to ask. That’s that kind of question you should strive to answer clearly and have easily available for prospects to read— everything “below the iceberg”.

Data still drives everything.

As Chel Wolverton  of SHIFT reminds us, Data-driven still needs human decisions. A computer might be able to tell you that you’re getting a lot of hits on your blog from a certain forum which should mean it’s a ripe target for engagement, but only human common sense can tell you not to engage if that forum is full of people you absolutely do not want associated with your brand.

In this week’s Put A Chart On It: B2B Marketers Struggle to Generate Insights from Social Data

Regalix-B2B-Social-Marketing-Challenges-July2015

 

Notably “issues with data aren’t related to collection but rather the extraction of meaningful insights”. Fortunately we know of some analytics that come with an actionable insight stream, if you’re interested in that level of clarity.

And last but not least, Facebook’s latest updates.

Finally Marisa Sanfilippo breaks down Facebook Updates Controls for News Feed with See it First: What This Means for Marketers. The bottom line? Ask your customers to include you in their list of “up to 30 Pages, friends, and/or groups they want to see first in their News Feed.” You never get what you don’t ask for, after all.

newsfeed_preferences_home


 

Thanks for reading, and see you again next week!

Written by Sarah

July 17th, 2015 at 8:52 am

Amazon Prime Day on Twitter

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So, how big a deal was Amazon Prime Day today? There certainly was a lot of hype leading up to it. How did it turn out? Let’s see what Twitter thought.

On Wednesday, July 15, there were 252,000 tweets about Amazon Prime Day, from more than 145,000 different Twitter accounts. These tweets have generated more than 1.9 billion potential impressions and a potential unique reach of 193 million. This graph shows related tweets hour-by-hour today. New tweets came in at a rate of around 10.5k per hour.

Amazon Prime Day on Twitter

Some of the top tweets discussed the biggest or most interesting deals, while other reflected some disappointment in the sales offered. Most of the really good deals sold out quickly. Here’s a sample of the most popular Amazon Prime Day tweets.

Did you participate? What kinds of deals did you score? Did you post about Amazon Prime Day on Twitter?

And of course, if you’re interested in these kind of analytics for your event or brand, take a look at TweetReach Pro. Real-time, ongoing Twitter analytics for any hashtags, keywords, accounts on Twitter, starting at just $99 per month. For $99, you get 2 real-time Trackers, unlimited full snapshot reports, and more! Questions? Let’s talk.

Written by Jenn D

July 15th, 2015 at 2:04 pm

The Week in Social #162

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On improving your visual content marketing.

Check out these Eight examples of effective emotional video content from Econsultancy, read up on how Meerkat’s Cameo Feature Could Unite Brands and Influencers in Exciting New Ways via Adweek, and test out 4 More Photo Tips Gleaned from the 365 Full Frame Project from Geoff Livingston. meerkatgif

On Facebook.

3 Easy Facebook Insights Tips to Boost Engagement [from The Buzz Bin; written by Rosalie Morton]

Head over to the ‘Posts’ tab to see exactly when your page’s fans are online and schedule your posts for around those times. If more of your fans are online, you’ll have the ability to reach more eyes.” 

Caveat: Posting earlier in the day doesn’t mean your posts won’t show up in their timeline when they’re active later. Test different posting times- a few hours before they’re active, just before, and during- and see which gives you the best engagement.

On storytelling and content marketing.

The Minimalist Approach to Brand Storytelling [from Spin Sucks; written by Laura Petrolino]

Show, don’t tell. You want to leave enough open to let readers fill in the rest of the story themselves in a way they best connect with it.

6 Elements Of Remarkable Storytelling [from B2B Marketing Insider; written by Carla Johnson]

Basic storytelling structure applies to every story, even brand stories.

The Difference Between Content And Content Marketing [from MarketingLand; written by Rebecca Lieb]

Deciding what, exactly, counts as content and should be overseen by a content team can start to get tricky, especially at scale (think every web page, every product description, every piece of collateral, in addition to all the content going out across blogs, social, campaigns. . .you get the idea).

A very thoughtful piece on an exceedingly grey area.

4 ways branded Snapchat content is different

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Recently we looked at how Snapchat has evolved for brands, but we wanted to dig a little deeper into how exactly content on Snapchat differs for brands, and show you with more examples across different industries. After all it’s one thing to have a vague idea about the disappearing images those kids are sending and what actually goes into the stories teams are building to send to their Snapchat fans.

Still got questions? Leave ‘em in the comments! Let’s get snapping.

1. It’s more informal

While other platforms like Instagram are all about beautiful, well-staged photography- particularly product tableaus for many brands- Snapchat is more about sharing what’s happening in the moment, with quality as a lesser concern. (Possibly a result of the in-app camera being generally darker and the photos compressed to save server space.) The relaxed tone leaves viewers feeling more like an insider than someone looking at repurposed magazine shots, and that can create a sense of intimacy with a brand that can lead to customer loyalty.

2. And less aspirational

The informal feel of Snapchat means viewers aren’t expecting to see their aspirations laid out for them the way they are in places like Instagram and Pinterest. Brands who normally present a more luxurious, well-staged feel- like Sephora- tone things down on Snapchat to bring their followers of-the-moment updates. Snapchat is the sweatpants-in-the-makeup-chair-before-a-photoshoot platform.

3. Making it perfect for behind-the-scenes shares

If you have access to the latest gadgets, the coolest musicians, or the upcoming fashion line, then Snapchat is the perfect place to share behind-the-scenes moments with these people and things in way that feels very intimate (like the sweatpants makeup chair example in the last section). Even though viewers know anyone can watch a story who chooses to follow that brand on Snapchat, it still feels like a celebrity has sent a story just to you, especially if they take over an MTV rep’s phone and shoot in selfie mode.

4. But it still matches overall brand aesthetic

While it’s important not to overly stage and process your Snapchat content- which is impossible, given the previously mentioned in-app camera quality- you DO still want it to feel cohesive with the rest of your brand. Viewers can take screenshots and those will end up on the wild of the Internet, so unless it’s a strategic brand move, you don’t want to completely depart from the rest of your visual brand.

How do you do that? Let’s look at some examples more in-depth.

Brands on Snapchat: How they do it.

Beauty brand Sephora has an extensive social presence that is very cohesive and navigates the differences between each platform well; you can compare the well-staged and lit product shots and celebrity regrams on their Instagram profile, their well-executed digital magazine on Tumblr, similar product shots and information shared across their Twitter and Facebook profiles, and their extensive Pinterest presence (how-tos, inspiration) with their much more informal Snapchat presence:

 

 

NPR has a more serious expected presence as a news organization, so Snapchat is a great way for them to infuse more personality into their reporting with some behind-the-scenes tours, quick facts from various reporters, on-the-ground reporting for breaking news, and more. They’ve written extensively about their experience with Snapchat on their Social Media Desk Tumblr, with their latest intern sharing her experience with running Snapchat for a major news organization, how to engage an audience on Snapchat, and even the difference in reporting a breaking news event on different platforms (Snapchat vs. Instagram). Even if you’re not a news organization, there are some great takeaways from NPR. Particularly: Experiment, try new things, don’t be afraid to fail. It makes you more human to your audience. 

Mashable has a much lighter brand reputation, known for mixing in fun, Buzzfeed-esque posts alongside reporting from big tech events and covering product and platform updates. Their Snapchat is incredibly well-executed, utilizing all the different ways the platform has to communicate: Drawing on the screen, combining drawing with text, emojis, and more:

 

Finally GE uses Snapchat to show off a much more casual side of their brand. While their Tumblr is full of high quality images and gifs around different science and tech that you can see repurposed on their Instagram profile, while Facebook and Twitter share science and tech news of a slightly different flavor repackaged for each place, they use Snapchat to share quick science facts and encourage viewers to engage with them back on those different platforms:

Bonus: Basic updates

Recently Snapchat has released some updates that make it even easier to use. Where you used to have to hold your finger on the screen to view a snap- and if you let go, the countdown didn’t stop!- now you simply tap a snap or story to view it. Dismissing a story simply requires swiping down from the top of the screen instead of letting go, but is still an option in case you decide viewing an up-close-and-personal running of the bulls isn’t for you.

Written by Sarah

July 8th, 2015 at 3:58 pm

Posted in Guides,Trends

Tagged with ,

The Week in Social #161

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It’s Friday the Thursday before an observed July 4th holiday here in the U.S., and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On storytelling.

The Secret Every Great Storyteller Knows [from Social Media Today; written by Bree Baich]

If you want to be a great storyteller, you must first and foremost be a great listener.

Digital Storytelling: How to Share Ideas in Innovative Ways [from The Buzz Bin; written by Rachel McPherson]

If you have the resources to literally immerse your audience in your content, then do it. For example, this Interactive Everest Climb from The Washington Post:

everest-promo-new

Content marketing, strategy, and inspiration from recent great campaigns and stories.

“How to” Videos – A Golden Opportunity for Brands to Generate Content [from Business2Community; written by Elizabeth Dyrsmid]

Demo your products, help your customers solve their problems, and do it all in the hot content format of the moment: video.

10 Stupidly Simple “Hacks” To Win At Content Marketing [from MarketingLand; written by Quinn Whissen]

“Content marketing is hard. But it doesn’t have to be boring.”

Read on for the author’s list of “tiny, innovative tests” that can “drive serious results”. And remember that people are lazy: Make it easy for them by creating content that will solve their problems.

Facebook content strategy is a time bomb for inbound marketing [from {grow}; written by Mark Schaefer]

“A few years ago, the major social platforms were happy to have your links to great content but now they are transforming themselves into virtual news and entertainment channels because they want you to spend time on their site, not yours.”

The landscape is changing. What do you think?

11 best social campaigns and stories from June 2015 [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

These monthly roundups from Econsultancy should go on your must reads for content marketing inspiration.

And finally, on getting that content shared, and how networks can trick us.

Five reasons people share content [from We Are Social; written by Lisa Collins]

“In his analysis of The New York Times study social media guru Jeff Bullas claims there are five reasons that we share content with others:

  1. To bring valuable and entertaining content to others
  2. To define ourselves to others
  3. To grow and nourish our relationships
  4. Self-fulfilment
  5. To get the word out about causes and brands”

So: Awe your audience. It’s that simple, and that difficult.

The Social-Network Illusion That Tricks Your Mind [from MIT Technology Review]

Meet the Majority Illusion:

Majority illussion

“They illustrate this illusion with a theoretical example: a set of 14 nodes linked up to form a small world network, just like a real social network (see picture above). They then color three of these nodes and count how many of the remaining nodes link to them in a single step.

Two versions of this setup are shown above. In the left-hand example, the uncolored nodes see more than half of their neighbors as colored. In the right-hand example, this is not true for any of the uncolored nodes.

But here’s the thing: the structure of the network is the same in both cases. The only thing that changes is the nodes that are colored.

This is the majority illusion—the local impression that a specific attribute is common when the global truth is entirely different.”

Marketers may recognize this in the form of identifying the influencers in any particular space.

Bonus read: How to Build Rapport and Pitch Media Using Twitter via SHIFT Comm.