TweetReach Blog

The Week in Social Analytics #155

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content strategy, content marketing, and storytelling. 

Content Strategy vs. Content Marketing: How to Get Buy-in From Decision Makers [from Business2Community; written by Michael Riley]

“Showing hard numbers will motivate any decision maker. You need to find ways to track how any “costs” can be tied to revenue growth. It helps to use technology and systems for keeping track of all the data.

The key three factors to track are:

  1. How much is a new customer worth to the business. LTV – Lifetime Value
  2. What converted them into a paying customer. CTA – Call to Action
  3. How much it cost to get them into that funnel. CAC – Customer Acquisition Cost

If the CAC is lower than the LTV, then your efforts are profitable and should be scaled up. It should just be common sense, and an easy decision to make, when done right.”

How to Execute a Carefully Thought-out Content Plan [from Spin Sucks; written by Nathan Ellering]

An in-depth guide on actually executing on that content plan you worked so hard to get buy-in for.

Storytelling In A Data-Driven, Cross-Device Era [from Marketing Land; written by James Green]

“Marketers should build stories that reach people with the information that matters to them wherever they engage — across different channels and devices.”

Platform-specific tips. 

5 Ways Brands Are Using Tumblr to Stand Out [from Entrepreneur; written by Nate Birt]

“Tumblr takes a blog-plus-the-kitchen-sink approach to storytelling, meaning brands have the flexibility to create their own template and engage with fans in ways that best suit their mission. As the fastest-growing network of 2014, Tumblr and its 420 million users deserve a second look. (Note for your sales team: Tumblr users have higher median incomes than those of Pinterest or Twitter users.)

Pepsi

10 practical Vine and Instagram video tips for brands [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

The most popular Vines from everyday users are just completely lo-fi, easy to make, and cost no money whatsoever. For brands it’s a good idea to do the same thing.

All the best Vines have a sense that they can be made by anyone, no matter what budget or skill level.”

As for Instagram:

Instagram is less aesthetically forgiving then Vine. Instagram users expect a slightly higher quality video and image than on Vine. But it’s also easier to make your videos look good.”

Emphasis original.

Video content marketing. 

Seven video marketing lessons learnt from #ThisGirlCan [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

“Lesson six: enjoy and share the response

In a surprising development, women starting making their own This Girl Can videos and sending them to Sport England, showing how inspired they were by the campaign.

These were then shared by the campaign team, which helped make a stronger community and strengthen the core message.”

Written by Sarah

May 22nd, 2015 at 9:15 am

Take a look at our new visual content marketing guide

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Planning a comprehensive visual content marketing strategy across social channels is overwhelming. Let us help. For free.

How?

Just download our guide to creating impactful visual content for any social channel and revel in 18 pages of research and insights.

Okay, but what does it discuss, exactly?

Our new 18-page visual content marketing guide covers best practices and tips for creating the most impactful visual content for any social media channel. From traditionally text-based channels like Twitter to channels that put photos and videos first like Instagram, Snapchat, Vine and Pinterest, as well as mixed-media channels like Tumblr and Facebook. It answers questions like how to use images or animated GIFs or videos, the technical specifications to create the most suitable visual for a particular channel, which formats shine where, and much more.

Here’s an excerpt about best practices for visuals on Twitter:

“We recommend including visual content in at least some of your tweets for a variety of reasons. First, tweets with images take up more than twice as much vertical space in the timeline as tweets without images. So you’re getting more timeline real estate by including an image than with text alone. Second, we’ve seen evidence that suggests that tweets with images in them get more engagement in the form of retweets, replies and clicks. They’re great for grabbing attention and let you say more than words on their own. “

It’s easy to see how much more attention-grabbing the tweets with images are, and yet how many tweets don’t include them.

Okay, you’ve convinced me. What was that link again?

Just go here. Happy reading.

Written by Sarah

May 21st, 2015 at 1:12 pm

Analytics and other industries: Where else can data shine?

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It’s the people that make a company what it is and nobody knows those people better than the People Operations Manager. We’ve tapped ours, Elisabeth Giammona, to write a series of posts about us, our industry, the challenges of people ops, and more. Let us know what you think in the comments or on Twitter at @UnionMetrics.

Courtesy the Found Animals Foundation on Flickr. Used with Creative Commons License.

Pictured: People Operations Assistant Manager. Image courtesy the Found Animals Foundation on Flickr. Used with Creative Commons License.

It probably doesn’t come as a shock that as an analytics provider, we love data! While we focus on measuring likes, reblogs and followers, we find it just as cool that many other industries know the value of capturing and analyzing data in their respective areas of focus. Data analytics is becoming increasingly important in areas across organizations and one that has great potential is in the field of people operations (or “human resources,” if you prefer the traditional).

Union Metrics’ products allow companies to analyze community engagement on social media, but we know that capturing engagement within an existing group or company can have important outcomes. Even though conversations about people operations goals and results are traditionally thought of as more qualitative, there are plenty of quantitative metrics that leaders can use to understand how people are working and which programs may or may not be contributing to individual and company successes.

So what types of metrics can a top-notch people operations team measure? How about starting with employee productivity, performance and retention? With insights into these critical components, a company can start to discern if employees have the tools and resources needed to effectively complete their jobs, or if adjustments to the environment or more input from managers could be helpful. These metrics provide clarity around if existing conditions are working or if it might be time to make a change to keep people and company goals on track.

Then add some metrics related to specific programs like benefits, wellness or daily perks, and you’re on your way to better understanding employee contributions, and how happy employees are in their jobs alongside which benefits are meaningful and worth keeping and which can go. Taking analytics one step further, companies can even leverage data to predict possible future outcomes and the effectiveness of new programs earlier in the research and procurement process.

What else do we like about people operations analytics? It modernizes the approach to understanding what is working and what isn’t as it relates to the human capital components of organizations, and talent is the lifeblood of any organization. This isn’t yesterday’s slow approach of annual company surveys; people operations metrics provide real-time data that allow the HR team to make meaningful decisions across an organization, rather than just relying on outdated information or hunches.

Measuring employee and team metrics might not sound as glamorous as monitoring likes around the latest and greatest cat GIF, but having data that keeps companies smart about individual and group performance can shape plans that keep employees engaged and the business running. And we are a team that loves to keep running.

Written by Sarah

May 20th, 2015 at 11:24 am

Posted in Features,Trends

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The Week in Social Analytics #154

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content marketing.

5 Dangerous Content Marketing Myths You Need to Know [from Business2Community; written by Carrie Dagenhard]

“. . .while believing the above myths can certainly put you in a bind, believing misinformation about content marketing can cost your company a large chunk of your marketing budget—and plenty of potential leads.

Emphasis original.

10 Things I Learned About Content Creation From 100 Episodes Of Podcasting [from Web.Search.Social; written by Carol Lynn Rivera]

“If you approach your content as a journey – not as a blog post or a video or a podcast – then you’ll be able to learn, grow and evolve and that will always help you improve.”

Who Needs Words When You Have Emojis? [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Instagram has jumped on the bandwagon, recently announcing that it would allow people to include emojis in hashtags. This makes sense, since nearly half of the comments and captions on the social network now contain the images, Instagram reported.”

emoji frequency

On video content marketing. 

What’s A Video View? On Facebook, Only 3 Seconds Vs. 30 At YouTube [from MarketingLand; written by Martin Beck]

“We surveyed all the major social video platforms to see what counts as a view. For Facebook and Instagram, viewing only 3 seconds of a video of any length is considered a view. For YouTube, it’s “around” 30 seconds, the service tells us. In all those cases, the overall length of a video isn’t factored in.”

Important things for your measurement purposes.

Marketing Videos Don’t Have to Cost a Fortune [from Spin Sucks; written by Tony Gnau]

“If you know you’re going to produce three marketing videos over the course of a campaign, ask your producer if they’d be willing to apply a bulk discount for bundling all three into a single contract.”

 

Written by Sarah

May 15th, 2015 at 8:33 am

How TweetReach impressions compare to Twitter impressions

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At TweetReach, we provide measures of potential reach and impressions on Twitter.

Reach is the size of the estimated potential unique audience for a set of tweets. We calculate reach algorithmically, based on data we’ve been collecting from Twitter since we launched more than five years ago. It’s a great way of estimating how large your audience on Twitter could be, and takes unique recipients into account, removing duplicates.

Impressions measure the size of total potential exposure. This shows you how many total timelines your tweets were delivered to – including multiple deliveries to the same account – so it’s a count of the maximum total impressions possible for a set of tweets.

TweetReach reach and impressions

If you’ve ever seen the analytics Twitter provides for your Twitter account, you’ve noticed they provide a count of actual impressions for each of your tweets. That impressions number shows how many people actually saw that tweet. So you may be wondering how TweetReach impressions and Twitter impressions relate to each other. What do they each mean? Which one should you use? Why are they so different?

Twitter provides actual impressions for your tweets, while TweetReach calculates total potential impressions for those tweets. You can use these numbers together to fully understand how impactful your tweets are. The number of actual impressions your tweets receive will vary from tweet to tweet and account to account, but your actual impressions will likely be between 1% and 20% of your potential impressions.

Knowing how your actual impressions compare to your potential impressions shows you exactly how well your tweets are performing, how large your activated audience is, and how large your potential audience could be. What’s the ratio of your actual impressions to potential impressions? Are your tweets on the low side? Do some tweets perform better than others? Ask yourself the following questions to help improve the ratio of actual impressions to potential impressions.

What tweets get the most impressions?

First, look at which tweets are seen – and engaged with – by the most people. What makes those tweets different from your lower-performing tweets? Maybe you used a particular hashtag or included a photo. Maybe you mentioned someone who retweeted you. Whatever it is, try doing more of that to see how you can activate more of your potential audience, and improve your ratio of actual to potential impressions. For example, we’ve found for our own content, hashtags like #smm and #measure help get our tweets in front of a receptive, responsive audience interested in social media marketing. And our tweets with an interesting photo or video get high rates of engagement. And when it comes to posts about our company, tweets using the #hiring hashtag generate a lot more impressions than an average tweet.

What tweets get the fewest impressions?

Next, look at the tweets that are performing the worst. Which ones have the fewest impressions and least engagement? Look for patterns in those tweets. Sometimes you can learn more from what’s not working than from what is working. For example, we’ve found that some of our text-only tweets get fewer impressions and lower engagement than our visual content does. But not every time – there seems to be certain types of images that work better than others for us. What do you see in your analytics?

What’s different about your outliers?

Finally, are there any tweets that get way more engagement or impressions than the rest of your tweets? Dig deeper into these tweets, in both Twitter and TweetReach. What exactly spurred that response? Twitter will tell you how many retweets, replies, clicks and favorites a tweet received, and TweetReach can tell you who retweeted or replied to you and how much amplification they contributed to that tweet. Use this information to see what caused the spike, and think about how you can try to replicate this on future tweets.

Who engages with your tweets? And how?

Finally, you can use other metrics on engagement (like retweets and replies, average retweet rate) and contributors (such as the people who have engaged the most with your content and generated the most amplification for your content) to understand not just how far your content is reaching, but how and with whom. When taken together, along with actual and potential impressions, you can more completely understand what’s working with your Twitter account and how you can improve what isn’t.

You can run a free TweetReach snapshot report here any time, on any hashtags, usernames or keywords. Try it now! Want more? Check out our comprehensive TweetReach Pro subscriptions, with real-time monitoring and analytics, starting at just $99 per month.

Written by Jenn D

May 14th, 2015 at 8:21 am

10 simple steps for taking an offline event online

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Taking a traditionally offline event online- such as a book club, wine tasting, or even a conference- can seem strange and daunting, but it’s an amazing opportunity to connect people both locally and globally over a shared interest no matter their travel resources or abilities. We’ve put together some tips for making the transition as easy as possible so you can host a seamless virtual event from anywhere!

Before the event

As event planners well know, the bulk of your work comes before the event and a virtual event is no exception.

1. Identify the common thread. While some events make it easy- the book you’ll be discussing for a book club or the wine you’ll be tasting and rating- others are a little trickier. If it’s a conference create a hub of materials like blog posts that deal with the subject matter you’ll be covering so that attendees can ask smart questions. Bonus points if they’re from virtual speakers.
2. Send personalized invitations. Invite those you know would be interested and ask them to spread the word to their networks and any other interested parties they can think of.
3. Identify influencers. Choose a few appropriate influencers to invite and send them the book or wine; alternatively you can set up a contest ahead of time to win the book, wine, or a free virtual ticket so some attendees will already be invested in the event.
4. Create a hashtag. You want one that is unique, ideally not already in use, and that isn’t too long (or your participants will have fewer characters with which to share their ideas).
5. Send reminders. Announce the time and date with several scheduled reminders across your social networks. Be sure to send personalized reminders to your influencers too!
6. Make a measurement plan. You want to know your hard work pays off, so make a plan to be able to prove it to yourself and your higher ups before the event actually happens. Read more about how to do that here.

During the event

7. Share photos. Participants love behind-the-scenes shots of your setup, and putting a face to the brand conducting an event gives everyone a more human way to connect. Encourage participants to share their own photos too.

wine tasting

The virtual experience comes with fewer allergens. Image via slack12 on Flickr; used with Creative Commons License.

8. Relax and have fun with it. Issues pop up with even the most elaborately planned events. Participants are most forgiving of snags if you’re quick to react and have a good sense of humor about it.

After the event

9. Do a post-op for next time. Review the data you collected to see what went well, what unforeseen issues might have popped up, and how you can plan better for next time.
10. Ask participants what could go better. They might have some insights that aren’t obvious from your data, but also you make them more invested in returning if they feel like they have a hand in shaping the event going forward.

Have you attended a virtual version of a typically real-world event? How did it go? Leave your experience in the comments!

Written by Sarah

May 13th, 2015 at 8:49 am

Posted in Guides

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The Week in Social Analytics #153

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On content 

The Art of Finding Your Voice With Your Social Media Content [from Mack Collier]

“While I do think it’s more about giving yourself permission to share your voice versus finding it, I do think that writing consistently helps you to refine your voice.”

The #1 Reason Why Most Content Stinks And What You Can Do About It [from Pushing Social; written by Stan Smith]

Ugh. Reader surveys, right? But:

“You have two options.

  1. Guess. Playing content marketing strategy hop-scotch is easier but wastes time and cash.
  2. Know. Ask your readers want they want and see if you are meeting their need. Takes longer. Is a bit hard on the ego but the smart way to move forward.”

How to Turn Data Into Content Ideas (and Avoid Content Marketing Flops) [from Social Media Today; written by Victoria Hoffman]

“Even the best ideas are backed by some sort of data. If you’re going to be investing time and resources into creating content, you should want to make sure that it’s going to resonate with your audience and help you achieve your content marketing goals.”

Internal Content Curation: What Most Marketers Miss [from Heidi Cohen]

Plus 10 steps to maximize your internal content curation. But wait, what is internal content curation?

Internal content curation is defined as giving new life to content that you’ve already produced and published. It has one or more of the following 3 attributes.

  • Makes content contextually relevant on one or more new platforms through the use of new headlines, images and/or excerpts.
  • Extends content into a new format by re-imagining or repackaging it.
  • Targets new audiences through distribution on new media entities and/or repromotion on the same platforms.”

Emphasis original.

On social media marketing 

Everything Marketers Want To Know About Social Media Marketing But Are Too Afraid To Ask [from Marketing Land; written by Sahil Jain]

Check out “the top questions asked by marketers at a recent social media event, along with the expert panelists’ answers.”

8 Top Instagram Accounts Marketers Need To Keep Their Eye On [from Jeff Bullas]

Don’t know who to follow in the marketing space on Instagram? Here are a few suggestions to get started. (We also humbly submit ourselves over at Union Metrics.)

Written by Sarah

May 8th, 2015 at 8:33 am

5 tips for visual branding in video on social media

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Still not recommended for your video content strategy. Image via Alexandre van de sande on Flickr; used with Creative Commons license

The rising popularity of video across social media means you’re probably doing more of it and you want to be sure your videos are as recognizable to your brand as the rest of your content is.

Designing a cohesive visual style is a lot like finding your voice in writing; it might vary a bit in tone across platforms depending on the audience you’re writing to in each place, but overall you want people to be able to recognize when it’s you. With that in mind, here are some tips for realizing a cohesive visual brand across social media channels.

1. Do your research.

Who’s your competition and what themes stand out from their visual branding? What about brands or personal brands you admire? Take a look at a few accounts and take notes on what you like about their styles- intentional or not- and think about how to apply it to your own.

2. Consider your resources.

Some of the things you identified in the previous point might be impossible if you’ve got a team of just yourself and $0 in the budget, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still tie things together. It can be as simple as choosing a few visual cues to repeat or finding a design overlay that matches your branding. See the next point for more on this.

3. Decide on a common element.

Will it be the same host in your videos every time, either by face or voice? Different hosts, but a carefully chosen background? (Like John Green’s salon on the Mental Floss YouTube channel; a very identifiable background despite different hosts.) The same filter used in post-processing along with your logo? Find a common thread that will tie your work together when someone is looking at your video content as a whole, and that makes it easily recognizable out in the wilds of the Internet.

4. Consider what you’ve already created.

If older video content (say your Vine account or first run at a YouTube channel) has low engagement and doesn’t match the new style you have in mind, you can consider editing your account page and/or removing pieces from the resources page on your website altogether and starting fresh. Otherwise on a more casual platform like Instagram you can show how your brand has evolved, visually and otherwise, over time. That highlights the authenticity to your work that can’t be manually produced.

5. Test, measure, test, repeat.

The advice we’ll almost always give: Decide what your goals are for the videos on each platform you’re going to tackle, then measure and plan new content going forward based on what’s working. Test new approaches you can think of, measure those, repeat.

Last but never least? Have fun with it. Your audience will be able to tell.

Image via Alexandre van de sande on Flickr; used with Creative Commons license.

Written by Sarah

May 5th, 2015 at 9:11 am

The Week in Social Analytics #152

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics with our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook

On saying sorry

If your brand is truly trying to connect to your customers human-to-human, you’re going to make mistakes. Here’s how to apologize in a way that’s meaningful and sincere.

How brands can say sorry like they mean it [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

This piece rounds up great apology examples and concludes with a list of  tips “that can help other companies pour water on almost any fiery situation.”

Craft a Better Apology [from Spin Sucks; written by Daniel Schiller]

“Relationships are by nature complicated, requiring constant cultivation and care. Acknowledging that with open, honest, and sincere personal communication establishes the framework for your strongest business relationships yet.”

On Snapchat

What You Are Missing About SnapChat and the Future of Storytelling? [from Social Media Today; written by James Calder]

“Look at your content and ask yourself if you are providing value and helping. That is the key to everything in social marketing.”

If we could tattoo that on this blog, we would.

5 Reasons Why Brands Should Be Using Snapchat [from Social Media Today; written by Chris Kyriacou]

“There is less pressure for Snapchat users to be perfect compared to other platforms such as Facebook, Instagram, or Pinterest. Snaps will disappear over a few seconds, and you are encouraged to add drawings or captions to the photos or videos you record.

Snapchat allows you to show off the personalized side of the brand that relates to your followers. You can build stories on Snapchat that help you feel like a friend to your audience, providing a personal insight of your brand directly to your stakeholders, avoiding a lot of ‘noise’ associated to other social media channels.”

From personal experience 

The one word journalists should add to Twitter searches that you probably haven’t considered [from Medium; written by Daniel Victor]

Not just for journalists; that piece breaks down how to conduct better Twitter searches.

Nobody Famous: What it’s like to have the social network of a celebrity, without actually being famous [from Medium; written by Anil Dash]

“I sometimes respond to people with facts and figures, showing how the raw number of connections in one’s network doesn’t matter as much as who those connections are, and how engaged they are.”

 

 

Written by Sarah

May 1st, 2015 at 9:00 am

Bare-faced on Twitter & Instagram: Amy Schumer’s #GirlYouDontNeedMakeup

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On Tuesday a new episode of Inside Amy Schumer aired on Comedy Central, and in anticipation of this boy band parody sketch, Amy posted a no-makeup selfie on Twitter and Instagram asking her followers to share selfies of themselves without makeup on either platform with the hashtag #GirlYouDontNeedMakeup.

And the response has been as sweet as a boy band’s choreographed dance moves.

On Twitter

Since it started on Tuesday, more than 13,000 tweets have been posted with the #GirlYouDontNeedMakeup hashtag by more than 12,000 different people, for a potential reach of 40 million unique Twitter users*. Many of the most retweeted tweets came from Amy herself, Comedy Central, or big media and tech outlets like Mashable or Slate, but some came from non-celebrity hashtag participants: 

(Though of course funnyman Zach Braff did add his own somewhat inexplicable and terrifying entry.)

On Instagram

While fewer posts were made on Instagram in the same window, they still had quite the impact with a maximum potential reach of 1.5 million**. The three most popular posts with the #girlyoudontneedmakeup tag were these two from Amy and one from Comedy Central, respectively, but the rest were all from Instagram users sharing their no-makeup faces, not other branded accounts as on Twitter:

#girlyoudontneedmakeup #catyoudontneedmakeup #insideamy

A photo posted by Emily Gordon (@thegynomite) on

One of the most popular Instagram posts includes an important related hashtag, #catyoudontneedmakeup.

Have you posted your no-makeup selfie yet?

Brand takeaways

The smaller number of posts made on Instagram likely has a lot to do with the interconnected nature of Twitter as a platform with its built-in retweets vs Instagram’s third-party apps as the only option for regramming. Twitter’s constant flood of information also makes it acceptable to post original and curated content several times a day, making it more likely for others to see, share, and/or participate in a hashtag than with a more contained stream like Instagram where users are more selective with what they participate in and share.

Both of these are things to keep in mind when planning a campaign, either for a specific platform or to run across platforms; you want to play to the strengths of each.

 

*read more about how we calculate reach on Twitter here

**read about how our Instagram analytics hashtag trackers work here

Written by Sarah

April 30th, 2015 at 9:00 am