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The Week in Social Analytics #102

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Instagram Ads Are Getting Instant Recall: Taco Bell and Hollister seeing picture-perfect results [from AdWeek; written by Christopher Heine]

“Taco Bell saw a 29 percentage point gain in ad recall for the April rollout of its breakfast menu, per data from Instagram’s user panel that pits a control group against a test group. The fast-food chain’s promos sometimes got engagement rates 400 percent higher compared to its organic posts. According to Union Metrics, Taco Bell’s Instagram following—currently at 411,000—jumped 45 percent during its monthlong ad campaign. The data company also reports that Instagram advertisers—including Michael Kors and Ben & Jerry’s—are averaging 60 percent higher engagement rates for their organic posts in the three days following their paid promos.”

Pair with these other great reads around Instagram this week:

The Value and Meaning of Community In Marketing [from Danny Brown; written by Tinu Abayomi-Paul]

“[Communities] are made up of people I go out of my way to advise, assist, appreciate and attend to when I can – not just when it’s required by the community manager/leader hat I have on that day. And I worry about this concept because there’s this false impression that a community is an entity that can be owned.

Like a thing.

Instead of a gathered group of humans.”

A great connection piece in the ongoing discussion about businesses and humanity. Pair with: How to Speak Like a Human (and Why It Matters) and Mass Personalization Through Digital.

Women Trust Word-of-Mouth Recommendations From Their Friends | Infographic [from Social Times; written by Kimberlee Morrison]

“As for what women sought advice about, 79 percent would ask a friend about food and beverage items, and 28 percent would buy or strongly consider buying something after talking to a friend. Trips and travel were second with 68 percent and third was home furnishing at 61 percent. Nineteen percent of those inquiring about home furnishings would buy or consider buying something immediately after chatting with a friend.

So perhaps when designing social media campaigns, consider seeking testimonials from your most-active users and fans. Their word means a lot.”

Small Business: Are You Using Social Media Photographs? [from Heidi Cohen]

Great tips for using images across social platforms, and tailored to each one.

How American Adults Spend Their Time Online [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Social networks account for the single largest share of consumers’ time online, per the data.”

We’re Using Twitter, Facebook Less, Instagram, Tumblr More, Says Data | STUDY [from All Twitter; written by Shea Bennett]

“In the meantime, Instagram goes from strength-to-strength, registering an incredible 25 percent grow in active usage since Q3 2013.

Tumblr (+22 percent) and Pinterest (+7 percent) also registered solid gains.”

Why We Favorite Tweets, According To Science [from Buzzfeed; written by Charlie Warzel]

A great breakdown of the myriad reasons why we favorite tweets. Pair with our piece on why brands should favorite tweets.

You can access the full study here.

How to Handle Twitter Trolls on Your Business Account [from Social Media Today; written by Matthew Y]

Dealing with negative comments is very different from dealing with trolls.

YouTube: How to Amplify Your Content With Social [from Social Times; written by Christie Barakat]

“To amplify your content using social, YouTube suggests you focus on Top Fans, Google+ Hangouts on Air, leverage all marketing channels and Google+. To be sure you’re leading productive community discussions, start by recognizing your community, develop relationships with top contributors and engage your them on and off YouTube.”

Pinterest Promoted Pins: What You Need To Know [from Edelman Digital; written by Andra Pintiliuc]

“In order to keep promoted pins as relevant as possible and ensure a seamless experience for the user, Pinterest will be taking a ‘Consultative Approach’ to ad selling by working closely with advertisers to understand what type of content resonates with their audience. These recently introduced promoted pins won’t show up in a user’s home feed or within their own pin boards, but rather through searches where they can be bought on a CPC basis and users are organically searching within their favorite categories. Keeping inspiration at the forefront, Pinterest manually selected the advertiser partners and will be working with the brands closely to ensure authenticity is maintained with their content.”

Written by Sarah

May 16th, 2014 at 9:38 am

Automotive social media marketing: Who’s doing it right, what to measure, and more

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Over the last few years we’ve watched the handwringing over social media and its usefulness evolve into campaigns with large social tie-ins, and stand-alone social campaigns. One of the industries that embraced this early- with both success and failure- was the automotive industry. Cars are seen as a necessary purchase for many households, particularly in cities where no reliable public transportation exists.

While Millennials are buying fewer cars right now, that doesn’t mean they won’t be doing so in a future of improved economic prospects. Smart automotive companies are targeting the next generation of car buyers on the social networks where they hang out.

Who has done it right?

One of the earliest and most comprehensive social campaigns came from Ford- an overall early social media embracer- and was centered around the launch of their new Ford Fiesta in 2009. It was successful enough that they’ve “remixed” the campaign for the 2014 Fiesta. The key to Ford’s success in this campaign was reaching out to their target customers where they were already hanging out- in this case, courting successful YouTubers- and giving them content for compelling storytelling: a car to use and take on adventures, and give honest reviews about. This strategy was designed to benefit both Ford and the vloggers, and it did, as per this Businessweek article discussing the campaign’s results:

“Fiesta got 6.5 million YouTube views and 50,000 requests for information about the car—virtually none from people who already had a Ford in the garage. Ford sold 10,000 units in the first six days of sales. The results came at a relatively small cost. The Fiesta Movement is reputed to have cost a small fraction of the typical national TV campaign.”

YouTubers don’t just spend time on YouTube either; they use platforms like Twitter to increase their exposure, find new viewers and subscribers, and connect with fans new and old– along with other YouTubers and brands.

Reason enough to remix it.

Other notable campaigns include an effort from AutoTrader, who put the fate of a car hanging over the Thames in Twitter’s hands, and more recently Toyota, who partnered with The Muppets around their latest movie Muppets Most Wanted to let the public know their Toyota Highlander has #NoRoomForBoring. Launched around this year’s Super Bowl, the ad campaign featured massive social tie-ins, with related tweets and posts to Instagram from both companies.

 

From Toyota’s Instagram.

From The Muppet’s Instagram.

We took a look at their Super Bowl results after the game (along with other brands), and partnering with lovable, family friendly Muppets was definitely a wise choice for Toyota. They’ve continued the brand partnership and campaign through the premiere of Muppets Most Wanted.

How do I plan this?

Before you start planning a social campaign, there are important questions to ask yourself. These will help you figure out what you’re going to measure as well (which we’ll get to in a minute):

  • Who is my target audience? Specific demographics tend to spend more time on specific platforms. Do the research and go where your people are.

  • Where do they hang out? Obviously whichever platform that is, is where you’ll want to be. If you’re a luxury vehicle brand, you might want to use Instagram to show off stunning visuals of your vehicles, tapping into the aspirational among Instagram users.

  • How do they talk in that space? Pay attention to how your target audience speaks to their friends, to brands, and just about brands. The golden rule of social media marketing is always listen first.

  • How do you, as a customer, like to be approached? Everyone has had good and bad customer experiences. Reflecting on your own can help in building a good experience for others.

Once you’ve answered those questions, plan to:

  • Talk to your audience and with them, not at them. This is why listening is so important.

  • Present your content in a beautiful and compelling way. Looking and listening can also inform the storytelling you’ll be doing on any platform. It should be high-quality, compelling, useful, and beautiful in form and function. When you’re approaching someone on a space they use for social interaction with their friends and family, be respectful of their time and attention so they won’t resent your presence and think of it as an unwanted invasion.

  • Involve your audience. The successful campaigns we referenced earlier have been interactive and smartly researched. The campaigns involving user-generated content that have backfired didn’t take the time to understand the audience they would be involving– and the audience shot back.

What should I measure?

There is no one right answer to this, because every company’s goals are different, as are the goals of every campaign. A lot of this is going to depend on how you answered the questions in the previous section; certain tactics will be more successful with different demographic groups and on different platforms.

Twitter is “especially appealing to 18-29-year-olds”, but there are “no significant differences by gender, household income or education” according to Pew Research via Marketing Charts. The same survey found Instagram to be especially appealing to women of the same age group. Do your research and use demographic information like this to tailor your campaign message for each platform, speaking to your target audience in the platform’s native language and to whomever you’re trying to reach there.

Further, look at what kinds of storytelling do best on each platform and let that inform your measurement goals: Will visuals on Instagram help raise brand awareness, while you tailor your message for Twitter to bring in sales? The most important question to answer is: What does success look like to you and your brand? That will tell you what you need to be measuring. For example:

  • If brand awareness is your goal, share of voice measurement will be important to monitor before, during and after your campaign 
  • If you’re looking to drive sales, bring your sales team onboard to decide what success will look like and how you’ll measure the traffic driving it
  • If you want to gain new fans and followers, share of voice will be important alongside paying attention to the reach of your campaign; don’t just concentrate on vanity metrics like the number of followers you have (though these are good baseline indicators).
  • If you want to see how a new Twitter campaign has improved over past campaigns, you’ll need historical Twitter data.

Need more references and help? Check out The 5 Easy Steps To Measure Your Social Media Campaigns, or shoot us an email to see how we can help. We’re always here.

Written by Sarah

March 26th, 2014 at 12:11 pm

Find health support just a click away

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The state of our health isn’t deemed polite conversation by most of society. Navigating the line between getting support from friends and family when you’re going through a hard time and not being the weird uncle who always talks about their colon at Christmas dinner can take some adept balancing.

Fortunately, just as social platforms can serve as support networks for those making physical changes aimed at fitness, they can also serve as support networks for those living with health issues from the temporary (How do I work out with a broken leg?) to those living with chronic illness (How do I restructure my life with this?).

Reaching out on Twitter

Building a supportive community on Twitter is one of the things that makes the platform the most worthwhile, and it can make a huge difference when a recently diagnosed person is able to surround themselves with supportive people dealing with similar health issues a few tweets away. Reaching out can start with browsing this master list of tweet chats and joining in whichever feel most comfortable; general health chats might point to more specific ones, and it’s hard not to find someone to connect with in most tweet chats. Doctors and other medical professionals sometimes host tweet chats in order to help answer questions from the general public. Building twitter lists of who participates in which chats, or is the most helpful in pointing out resources can help sort a barrage of new information.

There are also specific accounts dedicated to any number of health issues; Invisible Illness Wk, for example, connects those living with invisible illnesses in addition to raising awareness of the issues those will invisible, chronic illnesses face to those who are unfamiliar.

On other platforms

Sometimes there’s nothing more helpful than reading about someone else’s experience dealing with what you’re currently going through. Tumblr offers the same capabilities as a blog, but socially enhanced with reblogging and private messaging options, allowing one blog to draw from and connect with another easily, building up a support network without ever leaving the site.

For particular chronic illnesses, medical professionals will often point those newly diagnosed to message boards specific to a certain condition or related conditions. Inspire.com has a range of different communities that offer support, for example.

YouTube is also a popular platform for sharing experiences and getting feedback. Popular YouTuber Hank Green has shared his experience of living with a chronic illness, and the comments show many viewers grateful to see their own experiences mirrored in his video, especially from someone well-regarded and popular.

The bottom line

Ultimately social media helps connect those whose health might keep them from being able to attend a physical support group, and to supplement and organize the information and support they might receive from other sources.

Written by Sarah

February 12th, 2014 at 9:26 am