TweetReach Blog

Archive for the ‘twitter’ tag

What Black Friday sales is Twitter most excited about this year?

without comments

As we like to do every year around this time, we’re checking into what Twitter is saying about holiday shopping, particularly around Black Friday. This past weekend- a full week before Black Friday officially starts- things were starting to really accelerate on Twitter, with an average of about 5,000 tweets an hour posted about Black Friday over the past two days. And so far this month, 780k people have posted 1.3 million tweets about the biggest shopping weekend of the year.Black Friday on Twitter

Which upcoming Black Friday sales was Twitter most excited about over the weekend? Amazon was the most talked about sale, with Walmart a close second. And so far, the product topping everyone’s wish list is the Xbox One.

We’re tracking all Black Friday tweets this week, so we’ll keep you posted!

Written by Jenn D

November 25th, 2013 at 12:12 pm

Posted in Events,Trends

Tagged with ,

In case of emergency: Airlines and crisis communication on Twitter

without comments

What airlines should look for on Twitter and what to measure, before, during, and after a crisis

Social media is both a blessing and a curse in a time of crisis. While companies are able to rapidly disseminate information, share updates, and directly interact with the public in real time, misinformation can also spread like crazy on platforms like Twitter.

For something as high stakes as air travel, it’s important for airlines and travel companies to have a plan in place should a crisis arise, particularly during the stressful holiday travel season. We have some advice for creating just such a plan, or reassessing it if you already have one.

Image courtesy NYPL Digital Galleries

What to look for on Twitter during a crisis

First, you need to set up a monitoring plan for Twitter. Exactly what you’re looking for will depend on the nature of the crisis you’re dealing with and your communication goals around each type of crisis.

In case of common crisis

For flight delays and stranded, angry customers, for example, you’ll definitely want to focus on catching every mention of your brand on Twitter and doing everything you possibly can to make affected customers feel listened to and understood. If possible, give your customer service representatives on Twitter the power to offer reconciliations: everything from drink tickets, to discounts on future flights, full or partial refunds; even free tickets for a future flight if the situation is bad enough.

This is vital for turning an angry person who swears they will never fly with you again- whether the circumstances of the situation were under your control or not- and someone who will brag about your customer service on the same forum they just used to share their unhappiness, while remaining a customer.

In case of not-so-common crisis

If the situation is more serious- like the recent shooting that happened at Los Angeles International Airport, or a natural disaster like an earthquake- you don’t have to bother to look for misinformation; it will already be out there. Use Twitter as a way to let everyone know you’re aware of the situation, the safety of your employees and passengers, and any updates you can make on the situation, waiting as long as possible to confirm new information before you send it out while still making any corrections as necessary.

In both cases- and the rest of the time, as a general rule of thumb- you should be monitoring not only direct replies to your brand’s handle on Twitter, but also mentions of your company name in any variety of spelling imaginable, any well-known nicknames your brand has (official or not), and the airports you operate from. Depending on your resources, you might want to include the names of prominent employees, such as founders, board members and c-level executives. Something like our TweetReach Pro Trackers will allow you to do this. (We’ll talk more about what to measure in the next section.)

Go the extra mile

Monitoring mentions of the airports you operate from will be vital should a tragic incident such as the LAX shooting occur again, and the rest of the time it will give you an advantage in listening to and addressing problems you might not have caught otherwise. Is a passenger stranded, and you have room on a flight? Even if they weren’t booked on your airline, you’ve probably just won a new loyal customer. If you make someone’s day, you’ve reversed their story of a bad trip gone awry and be more likely to be the first brand on their mind the next time they travel.

What to measure on Twitter in times of crisis, and after

Now that you know what to look for, you need to have a plan in place for how to measure it. What, exactly, should you be measuring on Twitter as a crisis unfolds?

Before; or what you should have set up right now

Ideally you will already have Trackers set up to capture what we mentioned above- tweets directly to your official handle, mentions of your brand in any variety of spelling imaginable, any well-known nicknames your brand has (official or not), and the airports you operate from. If you’re not already doing that, now is the time to implement Trackers or take frequent snapshots (using something like our aptly named snapshot reports) around those terms once a situation arises and begins to unfold.

During a crisis

Often during a crisis situation, a hashtag will be born organically. If you’re being proactive about communicating via Twitter, however, don’t hesitate to create one of your own and immediately set up a Tracker to measure it, or take continual snapshots of the situation. If another hashtag emerges organically, use that one in your messaging as well and be sure you’re tracking both.

After a crisis

If everything flies by too quickly and you’re a small enough team not to have time to set up Trackers or take frequent enough snapshots of the situation, a historical option to capture the entire incident is available. This can also be used to fill in any noticeable gaps in your data once you’ve begun to look through everything you’ve gathered.

In the aftermath of the event, you might also want to track a specific news story (using specific key words from the title if it’s unique enough not to return a lot of noise, or you can track via a specific URL) that went around if it directly involved comments from your brand, or got a lot of circulation with commentary from people passing it around. This will give you a much more accurate read on the sentiment around your crisis messaging, and let you see any missed opportunities as well as highlight every win.

Go the extra mile

Once you have all of this data and you can clearly see how the situation unfolded and evaluate the strength of your response, take it a step further: What can you plan better next time, with this experience? What did you and your team do really well, that you should be sure to praise and also pass on as protocol to new team members? This knowledge can be distilled and turned into training and on-boarding materials for any new communications employees in the future.

If you’re not an airline a lot of these tactics still apply to you; if you’re a hotel, for example, you can offer to put up stranded travelers or victims of a natural disaster or other tragedy. Car rental companies and car sharing services can work out deals to get stranded people home if they don’t have far to go. Tour companies can even offer to keep stranded passengers entertained with local sites while they’re waiting for delayed travel to get sorted out.

The takeaway

The bottom line is to listen and step in where you’re needed, even if you’re not expected to.

Written by Sarah

November 19th, 2013 at 9:18 am

The Week in Social Analytics #76

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Social Media Fears, Tips, and Strategies for Small Businesses [from Soshable; written by Chastity Mansfield]

An infographic that highlights the anxieties felt by many small businesses approaching social media, along with tips and strategies for successfully implementing a social program despite them.

SM sm business anxiety infographic

Full infographic at the link above.  

Saving the world through social media? How development is going digital [from The Guardian; written by Maeve Shearlaw]

“From tracking World Bank projects to Twitter conversations with Rwanda’s health minister, technology is driving innovation.”

Social media for social good. Pair with Tumblr’s effort to help with relief aid in the Philippines.

18 Social Media Marketing Tips From the Pros [from Social Media Examiner; written by Cindy King]

Strategies from pros that they use to boost their social media marketing.

The First Tweets of 16 B2B Brands (and a Few Familiar Faces) [from Ann Handley]

A look at some of the first B2B tweets is amusing, and shows just how far Twitter has come since its inception and eventual widespread adoption by businesses.

How Twitter Hijacked My Mind [from New York Magazine; written by Kathryn Schulz]

“Collectively, the people I follow on Twitter — book nerds, science nerds, journalists, the uncategorizably interesting — come pretty close to my dream community. They also function as by far the best news source I’ve ever used: more panoptic, more in-depth, more likely to teach me something, much more timely, cumulatively more self-correcting and sophisticated.”

Defending Your Personal Brand Online – When Should You Respond? [from Forbes; written by Dorie Clark]

“A study from Stanford’s Graduate School of Business indicates that bad publicity harms the reputation of established players, as you might expect. But it can actually help lesser-known figures, because it raises their brand awareness among the public.”

Social Serves Many Purposes for Restaurant Industry Marketers [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Among US restaurants in March 2013, 80% used social media—17 percentage points higher than email, which was the next most popular choice. Social’s ubiquity is likely because it’s viewed as less expensive than traditional forms of marketing.”

A Girl Who Codes [from FastCompany; written by Jillian Goodman]

“‘It showed me that if I have an idea or something that I want to make, I shouldn’t be afraid to go ahead and make it. I think computer science allows you to make your dreams come true.’”

The tech industry’s woman problem: Statistics show it’s worse than you think [from Quartz; written by Lauren Bacon]

“The numbers, while preliminary, are revealing: tech companies employ an average of 12.33% women engineers.”

The Common Sense Guide For Brands That Want to Show Support Without Looking Like Asshats [from Mack Collier]

No-nonsense advice from Mack Collier.

15 Brands Rocking Tumblr [from Mashable; written by Taylor Casti]

Mashable highlights brands who have really taken to Tumblr’s unique possibilities for connecting with customers.

3 in 10 SMBs Advertising on Twitter Seeing “Excellent” or “Extraordinary” ROI [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“. . . this year, 31.1% of those advertising on Twitter perceived their ROI as “excellent” (10-19 times spend; 18.8%) or “extraordinary” (20+ times spend; 12.3%), up from 25% of advertisers in last year’s survey and 17.1% in 2011.”

And two bonus resources:

9 Twitter Chats Every Digital Marketer Should Participate In [from Business to Community; written by Cassie Gray]

We have to add #MMchat to this list. Mondays at 8pm ET.

Which Social Media Icons and Logos Can I Print on Promo Items? [from Quality Logo Products; written by Mandy Kilinskis]

Helpful when you’re creating promo items for the next conference etc your brand plans to attend.

Written by Sarah

November 15th, 2013 at 9:48 am

The Week in Social Analytics #75

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Twitter News Consumers: Young, Mobile and Educated [Pew Research Journalism Project; written by Amy Mitchell and Emily Guskin]

“Nearly one-in-ten U.S. adults (8%) get news through Twitter, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center, in collaboration with the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Compared with the 30% of Americans who get news on Facebook, Twitter news consumers stand out as younger, more mobile and more educated.”

Ten Ways in Which Your Tumblr Blog Can Help in SEO [from Social Media Today; written by Mark Scott]

“Tumblr essentially functions as a secondary blog you can use solely for the purpose of SEO. You can send optimized links back to the main website, allowing your website’s reach to expand and incoming traffic to multiply. What makes Tumblr great for SEO is the inbuilt promotion and SEO-friendly features that it comes packed with by default.”

And here’s a response on that from JD Rucker on Soshable: Tumblr as an SEO Tool.

Our Tumblrs, Our Teenage Selves [from New York Magazine; written by Ann Friedman]

“Way back in 1977, Susan Sontag wrote that  ’industrial societies turn their citizens into image-junkies; it is the most irresistible form of mental pollution.’ And the notion has persisted. The never-ending stream of social-media images is routinely declared a symptom of our collective narcissism or intellectual weakness. Again, perhaps we can take a cue from teenage girls. They’re quite aware that they’re seen as frivolous and self-absorbed, but on a deeper level they know they’re engaged in an important project: figuring out who they are and what they want to be. If we took our Instagrams and Snapchats and reblogs half as seriously as they do, perhaps we’d reach some new insight about our adult selves, too.”

LinkedIn and Tumblr: Tips for Effective Video Marketing [from OnlineVideo.net; written by Shelley M. Johnson]

“This is the art of becoming ubiquitous as a brand. When marketing video, there are more networks to rely on than just YouTube, Twitter, and Vine. Some marketers see this as unchartered territory, but what they fail to realize is that other platforms can be just as effective, if not more.”

It’s a Wide, Wide, Wide, Wide Social Media World: 4 Things You Probably Didn’t Know [from The Measurement Standard]

“Despite being blocked in China, the major social networks still have many millions of Chinese active users who use various stratagems to access these services. Google+ has 100 million users in China, Twitter has 80 million, and YouTube has 60 million.”

The Evolution of Visual Storytelling [from The Buzz Bin; written by Erin Hurley-Brown]

“Our current students see no difference between working traditionally and digitally, they simply see them as different media. Where 10 years ago, an illustrator might have chosen to work in gouache or oils, they now choose to work traditionally or digitally, and that may switch from one assignment to the next.”

Cats Are Over: Social Media in the Post Cat Economy [from The Webby Awards]

Say it ain’t so! The Webby Awards presents their first social media report and presents the notion that we’re living in a post-cat economy. Regardless of whether you agree, it’s a great read with a lot of examples and tips from top brands in social media.

Instagram ads and the future of brand advertising [from Gigaom; written by  Om Malik]

“Systrom explained that in order for companies and their brands to be successful, they need to create Instagram-like content for the advertising campaigns. If the brands veer away from Instagram-i-ness, Systrom said they will run the risk of losing impact in a what is a very high-touch environment. The kind of ads and the number of times they will be shown to us will be key to community acceptance (or rejection) of advertising.”

Unlock the Potential of Real-Time Marketing [from Marketing Profs; written by Jenn Deering Davis]

“And there is good reason to take notice: Regardless of product or category, marketers who engage in real-time marketing can expect a 21% increase in positive brand perceptions and 18% increase in likelihood to buy (Golin Harris).

Real-time is not some marketing fad, but a natural progression of social media marketing and a great way for marketers to capitalize on the immense volume of social conversations. And a key part of unlocking the potential of real-time marketing is implementing social analytics that can help guide your media strategies.”

Do Retailers Understand Millennials? Are They Even Trying To? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Abstaining from any kind of research into this demographic – no matter how difficult it is to decipher – seems curious.”

Consumers Say They Respond to Online Ads With Actions Other Than Clicks [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Indeed, when respondents were asked how long they would generally wait until they researched a company or product whose ad they found interesting but did not click, a majority indicated they would wait longer than one hour, with a significant number doing so ‘days later.’”

Written by Sarah

November 8th, 2013 at 9:45 am

Twitter Tip: Emergency alerts

with one comment

A Twitter Quick Tip. 

Twitter now allows you to enable emergency alerts from certain participating organizations. These alerts are meant to complement, not replace, traditional emergency alerts and you can opt in or out at any point.

Red Cross Emergency Alerts

You can find the alerts page for each organization by adding /alerts to the end of their Twitter URL; for example https://twitter.com/redcross/alerts which you can see the page for above. It will prompt you to add a mobile phone to your account if you haven’t done so already.

Want more tips? Click here

Written by Sarah

October 23rd, 2013 at 10:33 am

The top travel resources on Twitter: Accounts to follow and chats to attend

with 2 comments

Whether you travel for business or pleasure, you want the best information possible to plan your trip. So where do you get it?

Twitter has a host of accounts that offer up travel advice, suggestions and more, from those on a budget to those who want the best possible luxury accommodations. Below we’ve rounded up resources so you don’t have to take the time to do the research yourself.

Suggested travel accounts to follow (hat tip to Mashable for a lot of these):

  • Jeannie Mark, aka @nomadicchick, is a freelance travel writer and blogger who shares advice on different destinations she’s found herself visiting through her wanderlust 

  • Wonder what things are like from a flight attendant’s point of view? Look no further than @Heather_Poole.

  • Independent travelers (@TravelEditor) share travel tips and travel news from the editors of IndependentTraveler.com

  • Keith Jenkins (@velvetescape) will keep you up to date on the luxury side of travel

  • Melanie Nay of @chic_travel also shares luxury lifestyles and travel experiences through her account.

  • Stacy Small, better known as @elitetravelgal, rounds out your high-end travel as a luxury travel planner

  • On the other end of the spectrum is @BudgetTravel, working to make traveling accessible to all

  • @FlightView brings you real-time flight information, which can be a lifesaver

  • Kristin Luna (@lunaticatlarge) is a guidebook author for Frommer’s; look to her account for travel experiences mixed in with her other interests and pursuits

  • Brendan van Son (@Brendanvanson) is a travel writer and photographer, and will take you with him on his non-stop adventures

  • For pictures in motion, look to travel writer and videographer Robert Reid (@reidontravel), who has written for a number of large travel publications

  • If you want more intensity in your travel, check out @Intrepid_Travel 

  • Sustainability and travel don’t have to be mutually exclusive, as @STI_travel tweets

  • Chris Christensen, the @AmateurTraveler, brings you an online travel show that highlights not only destinations, but the best ways to travel as well

If you want more than just reading the advice and resources provided by travel experts with occasional interaction, check out some tweet chats! Tweet chats give you the ability to weigh in with your own opinions and experiences, as well as ask questions of hosts, guests, and your fellow chatters. You can read through a past chat by looking at the hashtag for it, or feel free to introduce yourself and jump right in on your first one. Tweet chats are meant to be open, friendly and interactive. (Read more about how to get the most out of a tweet chat as a participant here.)

Try these out (hat tip to Travel Bites for these recommendations):

Written by Sarah

October 17th, 2013 at 11:27 am

Posted in Guides

Tagged with , ,

This Week in Social Analytics #71

with 2 comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

So You Wrote A Blog Post: How To Get The Most Juice From Twitter [from AllTwitter; written by Lauren Dugan]

“Write for your audience, not for you. So you just launched a new product. Good for you! But that news won’t entice your Twitter followers over to your blog unless you tell them why it matters to them, hopefully by showing them how it can make their lives better in some way. Everything you blog about should have your Twitter (and Facebook, and LinkedIn, etc.) audience in mind, so that your content resonates with as broad of an audience as possible.”

Could Twitter Help Fight Cord-Cutting? Here’s Proof It Can [from Forbes; written by Jeff Bercovici]

“Only 1.7% of the Twitter users in Magid’s survey expected to drop TV subscriptions in the next 12 months, versus 3% of non-users. This even though the Twitter users were on average younger — meaning they should’ve been more inclined to cord-cut, not less.”

Three Ways to Help More Women and Girls Stand Up and Take Risks [from GOOD; written by Manasa Yeturu]

“‘Where the girls at?’ I asked point-blank to a crowd of more than 60 spectators—and directly at the four judges seated in front of me. That question was how I started off my final pitch at a recent Startup Weekend. In short, it encapsulated my whole weekend—a weekend that was by, for, and created to encourage women to step up and into the startup space.”

Social Media Trends for 2014 [from Social Media Today; written by Marina Arnaout]

See which predictions you agree with, and leave your own in the comments.

Quit Trying to Market With a One Size Fits All Mindset [from Danny Brown]

“It’s all well and good having data that shows you the atypical behaviour of a demographic, based on surveys and publications from that specific market. Yet these behaviours are only as good as the situational knowledge we have about that audience.”

Don’t Abandon Social Media [Research] | How To Measure Your Invisible Social Media Audience [from Heidi Cohen]

“If you’re like most people, you probably underestimate the size of your actual social media audience because on social media, engagement doesn’t equal reach.”

Few Consumers Feel That Brands Are Connecting With Them. How Are Brands Failing? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“The biggest gap between importance and performance came in the area of “communicating openly and transparently about how products are sourced and made.” While 54% of respondents considered that an important area (top-2 box on a 5-point scale) for brands to build and maintain connections with them, just 12% on average believed that the statement applied to the brands in question.”

Written by Sarah

October 11th, 2013 at 10:33 am

This Week in Social Media Analytics #68

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Not sure if blogging is right for your brand? Try Tumblr [from Nashville Business Journal; written by Samantha Owens Pyle]

“If your brand is still not sure if blogging will help you achieve your overall marketing goals, Tumblr is a simple alternative to a fully integrated blog on your website to test your content strategy.”

4 Ways Twitter Helps SMBs [from Pamorama; written by Pam Dyer]

“2. Twitter followers are emotionally connected to SMBs
63% of people follow SMBs is to show support for that business. 85% also say that they feel more connected to an SMB after following them. This is probably why followers of SMBs are more likely to recommend and purchase from them.”

Study: Customers who follow SMBs on Twitter feel a stronger connection [from Leaders West; written by Jim Dougherty]

  • Nearly three-quarters of respondents said they were more likely to buy from a company after following them on Twitter.

  • 86% of people said they would be more likely to buy from a company if a friend recommended a follow on Twitter

  • More than 64% of people use Twitter to share POSITIVE experiences with an SMB

  • The top reason people follow SMBs on Twitter is to get product updates. #2 – to show support. #3 – to interact with them.

  • 33% of people followed an SMB based upon a Promoted Tweet.

Retract your tweets and alert everyone who retweeted misinformation with new Twitter tool [from Faves + Co; written by staff]

“Now, new Twitter tool Retwact lets you share an updated tweet to anyone who retweeted the initial tweet with misinformation.”

How to Draw Meaningful Conclusions from Social Media Metrics [from Convince & Convert; written by Stephen Monaco]

“Companies typically track “likes” and retweets, but they can also track things they rarely focus on: the qualified leads coming from social, a company’s share of a conversation, and even the amount of revenue generated from an individual social marketing initiative.

Emphasis original.

Research Reveals Most Influential Social Media in B2B Buying [from Social Media Today; written by Steve Rayson]

“1. Industry Forums Are The Most Used Social Channels

Where social media was used by B2B buyers, the social channel they used most frequently was industry forums as shown below. They also ranked industry forums as the most influential source of information in the buying process.”

7 Major Social Media Mistakes You May Be Making Without Knowing It [from Buffer; written by Belle Beth Cooper]

“One of the biggest challenges in doing this is working out exactly what to measure. After all, there are so many different elements to measure, it can be hard to work out which ones are useful and which ones we’re looking at just because they’re easy to measure.

It’s important to realize why we’re looking at these metrics in the first place, so that we can choose the right metrics to focus on.”

Click through for more details on how to define your goals and choose a good metric (or several) to measure.

The Effects of Social Media on How We Speak and Write [from Social Media Today; written by Karan Chopra]

“Social media use requires some unique adaptations, but it also provides us with a whole new way to communicate.”

Does social media make us smarter? [from The Week; written by Monica Nickelsburg]

“On any given day, the average American teenager spends more than 7.5 hours online and uses his or her cellphone 60 times. While these numbers strike fear in the hearts of parents and crotchety novelists lamenting the loss of a more meaningful existence, there are some real benefits to a technology-saturated life: Young people spend far more time consuming new information, honing verbal concision, and interacting with a diverse audience than they have at any point in history.

Emphasis added.

What Internet Users Like to Share on Social Media Sites [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“While 7 in 10 overall claim to share content, some demographic groups are more likely to engage in this behavior than others. Respondents aged under 35 are most likely to share (81%), a completely unsurprising result. Still, about 7 in 10 online users aged 35-49 said they had shared content on social media sites during the past month, as did a majority 55% of respondents aged 50-64.”

 

Written by Sarah

September 20th, 2013 at 9:50 am

Twitter Tip: User Widgets

without comments

A Twitter Quick Tip. 

Love seeing Twitter streams on other people’s websites (very handy for finding and following new accounts at a glance!) and wondering how to get your own? Twitter makes it easy for you. Just go to Settings –> Widgets –> Create new.

Having trouble or curious about the details? Here’s more information from Twitter, and some handy screenshots below.

Twitter User Widget 1

Twitter User Widget 2

Written by Sarah

September 17th, 2013 at 12:43 pm

Posted in Guides

Tagged with , , ,

This Week in Social Media Analytics #67

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

It’s a woman’s (social media) world [from Pew Research; written by Maeve Duggan]

“Historically, women have been especially avid users [of social media]. Between December 2009 and December 2012, women were significantly more likely than men to use social networking sites in nine out of ten surveys we conducted. During this period, the proportion of women who used social media sites was 10 percentage points higher than men on average. When we include earlier surveys and our latest reading (spanning May 2008 through May 2013), the average difference [in social use between genders] falls slightly to 8%. Currently, three-quarters (74%) of online women use social networking sites.”

Check out the piece for information on gender-specific use of different platforms as well. (Emphasis above added.)

How The 70/30 Rule Can Rocket Your Twitter Presence To The Top [from All Twitter; written by Lauren Dugan]

“70 percent of the time, you should tweet others’ content. 30 percent of the time, you should tweet your own, branded or promotional, content.

This means that the majority of the time, you’re looking for content to share with your followers that is not created by your brand. That could include things like interesting blog posts, news articles, photos, videos… content from around the web that’s produced by others.”

4 Things Small Businesses Must Understand About Social Marketing [from Social Media Today; written by Mark Cooper]

“Before you launch a Facebook campaign, or start tweeting incessantly, ask a simple question: What are the key objectives I want to accomplish?”

Is Little Data the Next Big Data? [from LinkedIn; written by Jonah Berger]

“Measurement is great. Without it we don’t know where we are, how we’re doing, or how to improve. But we need to be careful about how we use it. Because without realizing it, measurement determines rewards and motivation. It determines what people care about, what they work to achieve, and whether they cheat to get there. Tracking student test scores helps measure achievement, but it also encourages teachers to teach to the test.

So before you obsess over a particular metric, make sure it’s the right metric to obsess over. “

CA School District Announces It’s Doing Round-The-Clock Monitoring Of Its 13,000 Students’ Social Media Activities [from TechDirt; written by Tim Cushing]

A new precedent in security? Students can opt out by making their accounts private, but the company monitoring their activity thinks they won’t choose to. It’s unclear how they will locate all the students’ accounts in order to track them. An interesting read for sure.

Big Social Data: The Second Era Starts [from Social Media Explorer; written by Doug Kessler]

“There’s no structure. Context is buried or lost. The torrent never stops. And the sheer volumes are staggering. This kind of data challenge demands a new kind of analytics stack that doesn’t rely on neat little databases and tidy indexes.”

How To Plan And Manage A Social Marketing Strategy And Still Have Time For Dinner [from Web. Search. Social.; written by Carol Lynn Rivera]

“I’ll tell you exactly the trick I use to focus our social marketing efforts: I think of the one specific person that I’m posting something for.”

Americans More Likely to Share “Funny” Than “Important” Content on Social Media [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“In fact, American respondents were more likely than the average respondent across the 24 countries to typically share funny content (49% vs. 43%).”

The popularity of The Daily Show has been cracked.

Written by Sarah

September 13th, 2013 at 9:21 am