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This Week in Social Analytics #65

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

College Students Apathetic About Brands’ Social Media Marketing Efforts [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Also interesting: 46% reported wanting more straightforward messages in advertising, while only 5% felt that ads should be more interactive. 32% do want ads to be more entertaining.”

How Small Businesses Can Attract Talent Using Social Media [from Social Media Today; written by Marilyn Vinch]

“With all the tools available today, the recruitment process has grown to a point in which it’s no longer about chasing candidates but is instead about attracting the right talent. By investing your time in developing a strong digital presence, you will make your company visible to job seekers who might be looking exactly for what you’re offering.”

SMB Followers on Twitter Looking for Updates, Interaction [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“The study stresses the positive nature of these interactions, though, noting that 70% of followers retweeted because they liked the SMB’s content, 64% have mentioned an SMB to share a positive experience, and 54% have @replied to share a positive experience.”

Twitter’s Vine Grows To 40 Million Users, Despite Instagram [from ViralBlog; written by Igor Beuker]

Social stats on Vine, Instagram, Pinterest and Foursquare, plus how social CEOs are.

Twitter Hires Commerce Chief to Add Shopping Via Tweets [from Bloomberg; written by Jon Erlichman & Douglas MacMillan]

“‘It makes a lot of sense for Twitter, since a lot of online advertising is commerce related, and as a platform, they should be able to integrate more closely with online retailers,’ said Colin Sebastian, an analyst at Robert W. Baird & Co. in San Francisco.”

63% Of Brands Have Multiple Twitter Accounts, Compared To 7% In 2011 [from AllTwitter; written by Allison Stadd]

“. . .out of 253 top brands in the U.S. and U.K. . . .two thirds had multiple accounts on Twitter.”

Including customer service accounts, deal feeds, brand portfolio accounts, job listings and more.

Link to Statista here

The TV Revolution Will Be Tweeted [from US News & World Report; written by Tierney Sneed]

“When Twitter talks about its expansion into the TV industry, the company stresses that its approach is not about ‘disruption’ – a common term in the tech world – but ‘synergy.’ Unlike other Internet media companies, Twitter has made no plans – publicly anyway – to produce content meant to compete with television. Rather than seeking out a bigger slice of the television pie, Twitter says it wants to make the pie bigger for everyone: for television, for its advertisers, and of course, for Twitter.”

Tumblr Partners Bloggers With Designers for Fashion Week [from Mashable; written by Lauren Indvik]

“In addition to the invitations, Tumblr has partnered 20 NYC-based bloggers with 18 designers and two unspecified organizations for two-week ‘apprenticeships’ leading up to the shows. The nature of the apprenticeships vary; most often (we expect) bloggers will be invited to document show preparations via photographs and GIFs. The goal is to give bloggers deeper access to the designers and the people they work with, hopefully forging relationships that will spark further collaborations, said Valentine Uhovski, Tumblr’s fashion evangelist.”

 

Written by Sarah

August 30th, 2013 at 9:49 am

The MTV VMAs on Twitter & Tumblr

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While perhaps less flooded with music programming than it was in the past, MTV still delivers on pop culture touch points, as the chatter around last night’s Video Music Awards (VMAs) shows. A large number of viewers took to Twitter and Tumblr to talk about what was happening on their TV screens– or the live-stream that MTV conveniently provided, an appropriate nod to viewers who have grown up in the digital age.

Twitter

So what was the activity breakdown? Twitter saw 3.9 million tweets from 1.3 million contributors.  One Direction, current kings of pop, provided the most retweeted tweet from member Niall Horan:

1D VMA Tweet

 That one tweet saw 55,664 retweets and 2,130 replies.

1D wasn’t the only act to get buzz, however; Miley Cyrus, Ariana Grande, Macklemore and Justin Timberlake also saw a lot of mentions.

MTV’s Twitter account was the number one contributor to the conversation, followed by Perez Hilton, MTV Spain, People Magazine and MTV News. Top hashtags included #vmas, #vma, #instarazzi, #the2020experience, and #MTV. #Instarazzi perhaps points to celebrity Instagram posts, either directly from the celeb themselves or an Instagram shot of them from someone else. Two of Justin Timberlake’s Instagram shots were in the top five tweeted URLs of the evening.

Tumblr

Over on Tumblr, 1.1 million contributors generated 2.1 million posts earning 1.9 million likes– that’s huge for Tumblr in a live viewing. The most reblogged post was this one (possibly NSFW if you have delicate sensibilities or don’t enjoy seeing a large, superimposed image of Billy Ray Cyrus on anything) with 84,735 reblogs and 60.483 likes. 1D and Miley Cyrus were most buzzed about on Tumblr as well as Twitter, with Lady Gaga, Taylor Swift, and ‘N Sync joining them.

‘N Sync’s reunion performance capped off Justin Timberlake’s VMA medley.

Going by top tags on Tumblr, Rihanna was also a popular artist mention of the evening, along with two specific members of 1D; top retweeter Niall Horan and perpetual fan favorite Harry Styles.

Top tags:

  1. vmas
  2. vma
  3. miley cyrus
  4. one direction
  5. mtv
  6. harry styles
  7. lady gag
  8. niall horan
  9. rihanna
  10. nsync

MTV’s Tumblr was also the top contributor to the topic, but put out most of its posts on the subject prior to the show rather than choosing a live-blog approach.

Did you watch the VMAs? Better yet did you post about it on Twitter or Tumblr?

Fine print: This includes all Twitter and Tumblr activity posted during the day of 8/25/13 (EDT), using a set of VMA-related keywords. Most buzzed-about musicians determined by the most popular tweets (by retweets) and posts (by notes).

GIF credit: Uproxx

Written by Sarah

August 26th, 2013 at 2:56 pm

Posted in Events

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This Week in Social Analytics #64

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Social Networking Is the No. 1 Online Activity in the U.S. [from Statista; written by Felix Richter]

“On average, Americans spent 37 minutes per day with services such as Facebook, Twitter or LinkedIn in the past year.”

15 Common Mistakes in Social Media Marketing [from Jeff Bullas dot com; written by Susanna Gebauer]

“Social media and content marketing are not quick and easy solutions for business success. Take the time necessary to develop your online reputation and understand that it’s not a one, lane road. Social media engagement is a multi-way highway that requires precision, stamina and awareness.

Remember also, it helps to enjoy the ride.“ 

Brand Marketers Put More Emphasis on Social, Mobile, Video [from eMarkter; written by staff]

“When it comes to specific tactics that will see growth, US brand marketers, in particular, will double down on social media, mobile and video this year, with 70%, 69% and 64%, respectively, increasing their use of these tactics. Far fewer respondents planned to put more dollars to rich media and display, and in fact, display advertising will see the largest percentage of marketers decreasing their investment.”

Emphasis added.

Infographic: The Fiercest Women in Tech (and Why We Need More Like Them) [from New Relic; written by Thea Lamkin]

“In this infographic, we hear from some of the IT industry’s most influential players on how women can find their place in a traditionally male-dominated sphere, and how companies can bring more high-performing women on board.

Not only do companies benefit from having women in leadership roles, but greater diversity overall can make a team more intelligent, more profitable and more relevant.”

Six ideas to get more women involved in the tech sector [from The Guardian; written by Catherine de Lange]

“This lack of visibility of women in the workplace and the classroom – the lack of role models, champions and mentors – is perhaps one of the most cited barriers to getting more women in tech. According to research conducted in 2008 by Catalyst that surveyed women working in the hi-tech sector, women most often pointed to a lack of role models similar to themselves, not having a mentor or champion and being excluded from important networks of decision-makers as the biggest barriers to career advancement.”

How a Tumblr post kept a family from losing their home [from The Daily Dot; written by Fernando Alfonso III]

A little feel-good Tumblr story for your Friday.

Diesel Goes to Tumblr to Cast Ad Campaign [from Women's Wear Daily; written by Rachel Brown]

‘I wanted to find people who reflected the diversity of the creative community today and not just the typical model. I wanted the campaign to showcase a variety of characters, people who are beautiful in their own unique way,’ said Formichetti.”

How to Use Tumblr for Your Business [from Social Media Examiner; written by Jayson DeMers]

A great introductory guide for those just getting started with Tumblr for their business.

Top 21 Brands Getting The Most Out of Tumblr [from Search Engine Journal; written by Albert Costill]

Still not sure how to get started on Tumblr? Check out how these brands are approaching this amazingly creative platform.

Twitter roles out ‘related headlines’ section on embedded tweets [from Faves + Co; written by staff]

“According to Twitter developers, they believe this new feature will help more people discover the backstory of where a particular tweet originated and, perhaps, more important for publishers, drive clicks to articles and grow an outlet’s audience.”

How to choose a hashtag [from Twitter's blog; written by Gordon MacMillan]

“It begins with the basics: asking why you’re using a hashtag, with a reminder that good hashtags should be memorable, so that your customers will easily recall them.”

A step-by-step guide to choosing a campaign hashtag, from Twitter themselves.

 

Written by Sarah

August 23rd, 2013 at 11:59 am

Twitter Tip: Authorized apps

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A quick Twitter Tip that serves as a reminder to periodically check on and purge which apps you’ve authorized on Twitter, and make any necessary changes.

Twitter Settings
 To check, go to your Twitter Settings from the drop down menu you can access by clicking on the gear icon.

Authorized Apps

By selecting Apps on the menu on the lefthand side of your screen, you’ll see a list of all the apps you’ve authorized to have some degree of access to your Twitter account. Check to see if there are any that look suspicious, or that you’d just like to revoke access to because you no longer use it. You can also check on the level of access any apps have- read only, read and write, etc- and change it if necessary, by revoking access and reinstating it, being careful in the level of access you allow (most apps allow you to check boxes saying they can or cannot post on your behalf, etc).

You might want to set a calendar reminder to periodically check on which apps have been authorized and do a little cleaning.

Like this tip? Check out the rest we’ve shared. Or share your own in the comments below. 

Written by Sarah

August 22nd, 2013 at 10:48 am

This Week in Social Media Analytics #63

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Simple Errors in Social Marketing Alienate UK Users [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Basic errors like poor spelling or grammar in social media marketing messages are the best way to alienate UK consumers, according to July 2013 research from Disruptive Communications.”

Marketing Is Not A Bad Word In Social Business [from Business2Community; written by Michael Brito]

“Becoming a social business with no vision for where it’s going to take you is like investing thousands of dollars building your first dream home and never moving in to enjoy it. It’s a waste of time otherwise. I look at social business strategy as an enabler.”

New England Colleges With Biggest Social Media Reach [from GoLocalProv; written by staff]

“Colleges today are serving the most mobile and social customers in the world, many of whom are using multiple mobile devices to network and collaborate,” Afshar writes in the Huffington Post article accompanying his new ranking. “Today, social networking is the most popular use of the web. A 2012 study noted that students are choosing colleges with social media clout. A survey of 7,000 high school students revealed that university social media accounts influenced their selections.

Emphasis added.

Using Twitter To Predict (And Hopefully Avoid) Food Poisoning [from Social Times; written by Mary C. Long]

“After four months of stalking over 23,000 restaurant-going New Yorkers and gathering data on 480 likely cases of food-poisoning , the researchers behind nEmesis ranked the frequented restaurants based on the likelihood of getting sick after eating there.

When compared to inspection data provided by the New York City Department of Health, the guys behind nEmesis found their results showed an overlap of one third.

If a nEmesis app is developed, it could save us regular people from popping up in an episode of Kitchen Nightmares, as well as leaving food inspectors no excuse but to get tech-savvy. Fast.

Emphasis added. Fascinating application for the ongoing discussion of Twitter and health.

Twitter Is Testing Out A New ‘TV Trending’ Box At The Top Of Your Timeline [from TechCrunch; written by Ingrid Lunden]

“. . .the company appears to be is testing out a new feature where links to popular TV shows appear as Twitter cards at the top of your Timeline, complete with related Tweet data and show information.”

Marktr [written by Tumblr staff]

If you’re a business on Tumblr and not following the Marktr blog, we recommend you start. It’s fantastic insight from Tumblr’s Sales and Brand Strategy team.

Written by Sarah

August 16th, 2013 at 9:17 am

What to do when your campaign hashtag gets hijacked on Twitter

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Be thankful that at least you are not this train conductor. (Image credit: NYPL Digital Gallery)

You’ve planned a Twitter campaign, and you’ve launched it. Now you’re monitoring the conversation. People are using the hashtag! But wait, they are not using it to talk about what you were hoping they would; they have run wild and taken your hashtag with them! We’ve seen it happen before.

So what can you do? Abandoning Twitter isn’t really an option.

Obviously it’s a social media best practice to have an emergency policy in place, but every situation is unique and entirely impossible to predict. So take a deep breath, and bookmark these tips for how to deal with this kind of situation on the Twitter battlegrounds:

1. Monitor the ongoing incident: ideally you will already have this set up to track how your campaign is doing, but it’s possible users will have altered your hashtag into something else that you should also be tracking. Check out this post we wrote on Using TweetReach to monitor a social media crisis.

2. To respond, or not to respond? This is tricky. If you have a corporate policy in place you’re expected to follow, obviously it’s in your best interest to do that. Call in everyone in your company who can help you, but start thinking about and answering these questions on your own:

- Will responding do any good? There is a big difference between someone reaching out with a genuine complaint that you’re able to help with, and people en masse trolling your account. In the first case you obviously want to respond and make it right as quickly as possible. In the second case it might be better not to respond at all. Individually replying to every hashtag joke skewering and mocking your campaign might only serve to keep the incident fresh in the eyes of the public and tech news. Sometimes silence is the best policy to let it blow over quickly. Other times approaching the situation with a good sense of humor can win over some (but never all) of the haters.

- Should we consider a Twitter sabbatical? It might be best to lay low for several days to a week or so.

- Should we apologize? This depends on the context of the highjacking of your hashtag: are people just trying to be funny, or are they using it as an opportunity to point out a practice about your company that they don’t like? Address it accordingly.

3. Learn from it: If you’ve set everything up to monitor it beforehand, plus made the necessary adjustments once the incident took off, you should have everything you need to learn from the situation. Did a bad sentiment toward your brand already exist that your PR team should have been aware of? Was it just a complete fluke? Use the experience to craft a more in-depth social media crisis policy.

Overall? Don’t panic too much. It will be yesterday’s news soon enough, and chances are a little controversy won’t be enough to shake your most loyal brand advocates.

Written by Sarah

August 6th, 2013 at 9:29 am

This Week in Social Media Analytics #61

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

The Teacher’s Guide to Social Media [from Mashable; written by Eric Larson]

Some common sense advice, plus some great resources for teachers looking to connect with students and parents in the social realm.

Social Media and Consumer Empowerment Don’t Match, Study [from SocialBarrel; written by Neal Lasta]

 ”According to a study conducted by the Journal of Consumer Research, once a consumer is empowered, it gets very hard to influence him or her through social media.”

Link to purchase full study in the quote above.

Mobile Tops Desktop for Social Sharing [from eMarkter; written by eMarketer staff]

“Twitter was well represented for sharing media and publishing content, and nearly as common a platform for consumer brand info as Facebook.”

Mark Twain’s 10-Sentence Course on Branding and Marketing [from MarketingProfs; written by Tom Bentley]

1. Many a small thing has been made large by the right kind of advertising.

Seth Godin remarked that today’s publishing, with its instant electronic availability, has made the physical book a trophy of sorts, a kind of souvenir. Twain was 100 years ahead of Seth.”

Entertaining- it is filled with a lot of Twain zingers, after all- and applicable.

3 Social Media Questions Every Brand Should Ask Itself [from Fast Company; written by Hayes Davis]

“Brands often look for absolutes on social media–i.e., customers either love them or hate them. Don’t fall into the sentiment trap and look only at compliments or complaints; mine the entire conversations for trends. Are there hidden messages that might not even be directed at your brand that can tell you a lot about underlying consumer wants and needs? Sometimes there is a larger story in what customers are implicitly saying.”

Our CEO wrote this, so we might be a little biased, but we think it’s a great piece.

Tweets power “the shortest NASCAR race in history” in ad from never.no, Sprint and Leo Burnett [from The Drum; written by Jennifer Faull]

“Billed as ‘the shortest race in NASCAR history’, the 60-second ‘race’ asked fans to Tweet their favourite driver’s car number, along with the hashtag #Sprint60. Each Tweet increased the driver’s speed, pushing them faster along the track as viewers watched the progress live.”

We Are Social launches Siemens’ global recruitment campaign via Tumblr [from Campaign; written by Lynsey Barber]

“‘Tumblr is increasingly popular with a young audience, and people are already sharing and commenting on content on the platform, so it was the natural choice for this campaign.’”

Creating a Meaningful Tumblr Campaign [from ClickZ; written by Tessa Wegert]

“The success of Tumblr campaigns depends on the ability of brand marketers to make their ads and blogs as interesting as the user-generated content they’ll ultimately sit alongside.”

Great examples of some recent Tumblr campaigns.

Written by Sarah

August 2nd, 2013 at 9:44 am

How to use advanced Twitter search queries: Part 2

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We wager our solution is more effective than sending out these guys. (Image credit: NYPL Digital)

Since our first post on How to use advanced Twitter search queries is one of our most popular posts, we thought we’d break down some more advanced queries we didn’t cover in that writeup. Here are a few more of our favorite advanced Twitter search queries. And let us know if you have a question you don’t see answered here!

Specific phrase or term

Much like on Google, when you want to return results on an exact phrase- especially something that has a common word or popular slang expression in it that might return a lot of noise otherwise- be sure to put it in quotes.

“term1 term2” – search for tweets containing the phrase “term1 term2” (e.g. “aging hippies”)

This way you’ll only get back tweets talking specifically about aging hippies, with those words in that exact order. Without the quotes, you might get results about hippies aging wine or something else irrelevant to what you’re actually looking for.

Tweets containing links

This search filter comes in handy if you’re looking for people who are sharing articles they’ve found or are talking about a specific URL – say an article in the news, or a blog post you’ve recently put out that’s getting a lot of chatter. It’s also a great way to track link shares for a Twitter contest.

filter:links – search only for tweets containing links (e.g. CNN filter:links)

You can add this filter to any search terms to return only tweets that include those terms and a URL.

Tweets in a particular language

Let’s say you’ve run a free TweetReach report with your test query to see what kind of results you’re getting (something we absolutely recommend doing so you can tweak what you need to) and it’s returned a lot of tweets that aren’t in a language that you speak. Or let’s say you want information on a specific event or campaign, like Dia de los Muertos from those who speak Spanish. Use:

lang:NN – to search for only tweets in a particular language (e.g. Nutella lang:en for only English tweets about Nutella)

or

“dia de los muertes” lang:es – Find tweets in spanish about “dia de los muertes”

When added to a search query, the language filter will narrow your results to tweets in that language. Not all languages are supported on Twitter, so check this list to see which are and to get more information about languages on Twitter in general.

And more…

These are just a few we didn’t go over in the first post, so here’s the full list of advanced Twitter search operators if you’re interested in more. And we’ll repeat our advice from last time– Twitter handles fairly simple queries really well, but tends to break with longer and more complex queries. We recommend that you only add in a few advanced operators per query and try to limit the total number of keywords and characters in a search query. Keep it under 5-8 words and 60 characters and you should be fine.

Again, if you ever have any questions about search queries and how to get exactly the data you need from Twitter, just ask us! We’re big Twitter search nerds and can help you figure out even the trickiest search queries.

Written by Sarah

July 30th, 2013 at 8:54 am

This Week in Social Analytics #60

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

The Real Data on Facebook vs. Google+ (And Other Social Networks | Infographic) [from Social Media Today; written by Augie Ray]

Includes an excellent breakdown of all the G+ studies that have been done in the past few months, plus a series of infographics- interactive and static- showing usage by demographics across platforms. Fantastic breakdown overall!

 Social Network Growth

 

Study: Fortune 500 are getting better in Social Media [from The Strategy Web; written by Martin Meyer-Gossner]

“Twitter is used in eight out of the top 10 companies (Apple, Chevron, Exxon, Ford Motors, General Electric, General Motors, Phillips 66, and Wal-Mart). All these companies offer frequently status updates on Twitter. Just Berkshire Hathaway and Valero Energy are missing out. Interestingly enough, Facebook has got most followers on Twitter.”

How Social Media is Used in Education | Infographic [from Best Master's in Education]

A Social Media Pilot Program [for Education] in Portland Oregon, lead to:

  • 50% increase in grades
  • 1/3 reduction in chronic absenteeism: the school met its adequate yearly progress goal for absenteeism for the first time in its history
  • 20% of students school-wide were completing extra assignments for no credit
  • 35% improvement of chronic absenteeism by texting “WAKE UP” or “RUNNING LATE” messages through “TEXTS ON TIME” Program which didn’t cost the school anything

SM in Education

See more about how schools are using social media in education at the link above. 

How B2B Decision Makers are Using Social [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Twitter is ‘primarily a consumption channel,’ per the researchers, with the main activity among those using it at least in some part for business reasons being reading others’ tweets (86% of users). Still, 58% have retweeted something they’ve read, 55% have posted a tweet, 54% have responded to a tweet and 42% have sought support for a product.”

The New Social Media Measurement Standards On Slideshare [from The Measurement Standard; written by KD Paine]

Do you agree with these measurement standards? What would you change?

Written by Sarah

July 26th, 2013 at 10:51 am

Why you should use lists on Twitter

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A Twitter Quick Tip. 

Setting up Twitter lists can seem like an imposing task, but they’re a great tool to organize a range of things: resources for your industry, thought leaders to learn from, customers to keep track of, industry verticals, comedians for when you need a break– whatever you can dream up.

If you’re just getting started, you might want to check out other users’s public lists. You can subscribe to these (and they’ll show up at the bottom of your lists so other people will know which lists you’re subscribed to) and get an idea of what works for you on a list and what doesn’t. Best of all? You don’t have to be following someone to put them in a list. A lot of thought leaders, for example, would be people who tweet at high volumes and could flood your feed. Keep them to a list and you can learn from them in a way that isn’t overwhelming, then follow the ones who provide the most value to you. (It’s also a great way to keep track of competitors; and yes, you can make a list private, which you might want to do with that one.)

Twitter's Twitter Lists

 

Twitter’s Twitter Lists: it’s getting a little meta in here. 

How do you use Twitter lists?

Written by Sarah

July 23rd, 2013 at 9:44 am

Posted in Guides

Tagged with , , , ,