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The Week in Social Analytics #90

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Instagram – Sales Versus Engagement | Research [from Heidi Cohen]

“On Instagram, the researchers found that images showing customers wearing or using the product resulted in sales. This helped with fit and use. By contrast, attention-getting or aspirational images drove engagement (such as likes and comments.)”

How Instameets Unite Instagrammers And Brands [from Viral Blog; written by Marion aan ‘t Goor]

If your brand is looking for a fresh perspective driven by customers, you might consider sponsoring an Instameet:

“There are multiple brands that are sponsoring instameets and lending out their products (such as cameras and camera supplies) so Instagrammers can try them out.”

Coca-Cola’s Secret to Storytelling [from Social Times; written by Christie Barakat]

The company applies the “water cooler test” to determine if blog, photo and video content is compelling:

  • Does it answer the “Why should I care” test?
  • Does it surprise you?
  • Is it compelling with universal appeal?
  • Is it being measured systematically?

TV’s Approach to Firing Up Social Fan Base Applies Across Brands [from PR Newser; written by Nancy Lazarus]

“‘Give fans recognition and shine; that’s not precious to TV, it could apply to any fans out there’, said Tom Chirico, VP digital and social engagement for VH1.”

Brands, Stop Chasing New Customers and Ignoring Your Existing Ones [from Mack Collier]

“I’ve talked about this before, but you build loyalty and create fans with rewards, not incentives. Offering me products if I will switch to your company doesn’t win my loyalty to your brand, it simply gives me an incentive to take advantage of the offer. I may have to sign a 2-year contract to get all the goodies, but if you have ignored me and my business, guess what happens in 2 years? I will switch to your competitor, because they just offered me prizes and incentives for switching.

You are training your customers to leave you.”

Emphasis original.

6 Ways to Make People Love Your Brand [from Mashable; written by The Daily Muse]

“‘People don’t buy things for logical reasons,’ Zig Ziglar once famously said. ‘They buy for emotional reasons.’

Which means: In order to gain customers — and keep them for life — you’ve got to do more than introduce them to your brand, business, or product. You’ve got to make them fall in love with it.”

Click through for the full infographic on how.

Brands Slow to Respond to Complaints Posted on Social Media [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“In fact, fewer than 1 in 5 respondents said they respond to complaints within an hour. And although a slight majority do so within 24 hours, more than 1 in 5 say they rarely – if ever – respond to customer complaints made via social.”

Last Year, Social Ads Proved Highly Effective in Delivering New, Quality Audiences [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“The study reveals that social ads performed 52% better than the 4-channel average in delivering such quality users during Q4. In fact, social ads performed better than the average during each quarter of the year.”

Twitter Tips and Tricks That Don’t Work Anymore [from Business 2 Community; written by Roxanne Roark]

Split into a list of tips and tricks that do still work, and those that don’t. An important highlight from the don’t list:

“1. Add a period or really anything before someone’s Twitter handle so the tweet is public. If you don’t, the only people that can see it will be you and the person you are talking to, plus both your followers. This is no longer true and admittedly, I can’t tell you when it stopped being that way. Don’t believe me? Please let me note, these following accounts were NOT adding a period or anything in front of the Twitter handles, and to further verify, I signed in, unfollowed one of the accounts, and opened a different conversation between the account and another that I’ve never followed.”

Have any of you tested this to see if it still works or not?

Is Real-Time Marketing a Hoax? [from Social Times; written by Christie Barakat]

“Connecting with consumers in real-time requires more than industry grandstanding and knee-jerk reactions to prominent events; sensitivity, relevancy and prioritizing content is of paramount importance, and engaging narratives should first be designed according to an overarching editorial scheme. Real-time content should keep fans entertained as well as engaged, and follow a general story line that addresses an audiences varied interests.”

Written by Sarah

February 21st, 2014 at 9:15 am

Find health support just a click away

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The state of our health isn’t deemed polite conversation by most of society. Navigating the line between getting support from friends and family when you’re going through a hard time and not being the weird uncle who always talks about their colon at Christmas dinner can take some adept balancing.

Fortunately, just as social platforms can serve as support networks for those making physical changes aimed at fitness, they can also serve as support networks for those living with health issues from the temporary (How do I work out with a broken leg?) to those living with chronic illness (How do I restructure my life with this?).

Reaching out on Twitter

Building a supportive community on Twitter is one of the things that makes the platform the most worthwhile, and it can make a huge difference when a recently diagnosed person is able to surround themselves with supportive people dealing with similar health issues a few tweets away. Reaching out can start with browsing this master list of tweet chats and joining in whichever feel most comfortable; general health chats might point to more specific ones, and it’s hard not to find someone to connect with in most tweet chats. Doctors and other medical professionals sometimes host tweet chats in order to help answer questions from the general public. Building twitter lists of who participates in which chats, or is the most helpful in pointing out resources can help sort a barrage of new information.

There are also specific accounts dedicated to any number of health issues; Invisible Illness Wk, for example, connects those living with invisible illnesses in addition to raising awareness of the issues those will invisible, chronic illnesses face to those who are unfamiliar.

On other platforms

Sometimes there’s nothing more helpful than reading about someone else’s experience dealing with what you’re currently going through. Tumblr offers the same capabilities as a blog, but socially enhanced with reblogging and private messaging options, allowing one blog to draw from and connect with another easily, building up a support network without ever leaving the site.

For particular chronic illnesses, medical professionals will often point those newly diagnosed to message boards specific to a certain condition or related conditions. Inspire.com has a range of different communities that offer support, for example.

YouTube is also a popular platform for sharing experiences and getting feedback. Popular YouTuber Hank Green has shared his experience of living with a chronic illness, and the comments show many viewers grateful to see their own experiences mirrored in his video, especially from someone well-regarded and popular.

The bottom line

Ultimately social media helps connect those whose health might keep them from being able to attend a physical support group, and to supplement and organize the information and support they might receive from other sources.

Written by Sarah

February 12th, 2014 at 9:26 am

The big winner at the Super Bowl? #EsuranceSave30

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Just after the Super Bowl last night, online insurance company Esurance aired the first post-game commercial, saving 30% on their ad. (Quite the bargain at ~1.5 million dollars off the 4 million dollar game-time price!)  Esurance spokesperson John Krasinski told viewers that Esurance was passing these savings onto them: Someone who tweeted using the hashtag #EsuranceSave30 would win 1.5 million dollars.

Their promoted tweet about the contest, including a link to more details.

So how’s the campaign going? There have been more than 1.8 million tweets using the #EsuranceSave30 hashtag in just the first 12 hours. That’s more tweets than any other advertiser got around the game, that’s for sure.

Written by Sarah

February 3rd, 2014 at 10:39 am

Posted in Events

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Super Bowl XLVIII: Brands on Twitter

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On Friday we took a look at all the brand chatter on Twitter leading up to last night’s blowout Super Bowl game between the Seattle Seahawks and the Denver Broncos. The lack of action on the field turned a lot of faces toward their second screen instead, and made for some entertaining brand interactions (Marketing Land catalogued some of them).

Here’s a second look at the brands we examined on Friday- this time for activity on game day alone- and the answer to the eternal question “Is SodaStream still making Coke and Pepsi say #sorry?”

Budweiser

Budweiser’s #UpForWhatever hashtag saw 7k tweets from 6k contributors with an overall reach of 14.6 million; about 5x the activity they saw leading up to the big game. The most retweeted tweet was again from Bud Light and featured Arnold Schwarzenegger:

This tweet has seen 600 RTs so far.

Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola saw 49.4k tweets on big game day, from 41.4k Twitter users for a total reach of 32.5 million, just over three times the activity from their game day lead-up conversations. The most retweeted tweet was from the official Coke account and included their #AmericaIsBeautiful campaign hashtag and was retweeted over 5k times so far:

Doritos

Doritos aired the two winning commercials from their Crash the Super Bowl contest last night, and each saw some activity around around their respective hashtags- #TimeMachine and #CowboyKid- and the whole conversation around Doritos, including their campaign hashtag #ForTheBold, saw 16.7k tweets from 15.1k contributors for an overall reach of 14.6 million. That’s about six times the activity we saw in their game day lead-up.

The most retweeted tweet around the Doritos conversation with the #Doritos hashtag came from their official account, congratulating the Seahawks on their win:

It has seen 94 retweets so far.

Kia

The conversation around Kia last night didn’t change much from their lead-up: 1.4k tweets from 1.2k contributors, for an overall reach of 3.2 million. The most retweeted tweet actually came from some entertaining brand interaction from Xbox, based on Kia’s Matrix-themed commercial:

This tweet was part of a back-and-forth conversation from the brands, and has earned a total of 276 retweets so far.

SodaStream

SodaStream has the most activity around its name by far in the lead-up conversations we looked at last week, but yesterday saw much lower activity numbers for them: 6.6k tweets from 4.9k contributors, for a total reach of 16.4 million. It seems a little brand controversy will get you talked about leading up to an event, but not necessarily boost the conversation once the event takes place.

One of the most retweet tweets featuring their hashtag #SorryCokeAndPepsi came from the official SodaStream account, and referred to their celebrity spokesperson Scarlett Johansson:

It has seen just 23 retweets so far.

Toyota

Terry Crews and The Muppets teamed up for Toyota’s #NoRoomForBoring ad last night, and the conversation around Toyota saw a little boost in activity, if a drop in reach, from their lead-up: 12.4k tweets from 10.2k contributors, for a total reach of 14.3 million.

One of the most retweeted tweets came from the official Muppets account, and featured King Prawn Pepe doing a touchdown dance on Vine:

311 retweets for the dancing King Prawn so far, and some decent crossover exposure for Toyota.

What about brands who didn’t buy ad time?

A lot of brands who don’t buy ad time still live-tweet during big cultural events to interact with viewers and other brands; last night saw a lot of discussion between brands, riffing on the commercials and more. A standout was definitely J.C. Penney, who decided to tweet in a pair of mittens to very mixed results. The numbers, however, are in their favor: 131k tweets from 81.2k contributors, for a total reach of 36.9 million. That’s slightly more reach than Coke, who usurped SodaStream on game day, but more than twice the amount of activity.

Both of their slightly incoherent tweets saw around 20k retweets:

22.7k retweets so far.

19.2k retweets so far.

A number of other brands- even some of the big game advertisers- interacted with J.C. Penney’s tweets:

Coors Light jumped in first, getting some exposure- 7.1k retweets- on a night dominated by their competitor Bud Light.

Kia’s tweet has seen 3.1k retweets so far, while Snickers and Doritos both offered themselves as snacks to soak up any extraneous Coors Light:

Snickers has gotten 3.1k retweets so far, and Doritos 1.3k.

The Takeaways

We are living in the real-time marketing present, it would seem. The brands who saw the most activity and reach last night were the ones who were interacting like people do on Twitter around big cultural events, and inserting their brand in ways that were funny and relevant. J.C. Penney may have confused a lot of people with their decision to tweet in mittens, but it definitely got everyone talking about them. It remains to be seen whether it will help them sell any more mittens.

Watching brands interact during events like the Super Bowl has become an unexpected highlight for many viewers, especially when the action happens to be slow on the main screen.

What was your favorite social moment of the big game last night?

Written by Sarah

February 3rd, 2014 at 8:31 am

The Week in Social Analytics #87

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Stop Chasing Shiny Objects, Invest in the ‘Classics’ [from Mack Collier]

“No matter how many shiny tools you master, none of that will help you if you don’t understand your customers.”

And:

“There are two areas you need to focus on in 2014:

1 – Understanding how your customers are using these tools

2 – Understanding how customer behavior is changing because of emerging tools and technology”

Predicting The Social Future Of eCommerce For Small Business [from Viral Blog]

“It won’t be long before we’re buying certain products almost exclusively online, even if we’ve demoed them in person.”

Trust: Do We Believe Your Social Media & Content? [from Heidi Cohen]

On average, two-thirds of customers need to hear a company’s message 3 to 5 times before they believe it based on Edelman’s 2013 Trust Barometer. This ratio has remained relatively constant for the past few years.”

Emphasis orignal.

5 Tips for Creating Social Content That Stands Out [from Edelman; written by Alison Fleming]

“Find the white space that your community fills. Then, find a way to use social content to add value to your community members’ lives. Sure, you’re selling widgets too, but make content so great that people barely notice the product placement. Selling eReaders? Make an online book club. Hawking cameras? Make an online photography gallery. Social content 3.0 has a rich, deep narrative that can only be achieved through insights. Insights -> content -> engagement -> insights. Lather. Rinse. Repeat.”

6 Tips for Managing a B2B Crisis Using Social Media [from Social Media B2B; written by Allison Rice]

“But even though sites like Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn may make managing a crisis trickier, they can also help you communicate with your customers, demonstrate your commitment to them and bolster your reputation. In fact, a well-managed crisis can not only help you retain customers, but it can lead to new customers and additional deals.”

Empowering Employees with Social Media Improves Customer Relationships and Grows Revenue [from Social Media Today; written by Brian Solis]

“Organizations can no longer rely on inbound and outbound sales reps, people willing to jump through hoops and obstacles via call centers, or traditional marketing to boost awareness and demand. Customers demand engagement, in real time, and that takes human beings, training, and support.”

Here Is Your Future: 9 Experts Provide 29 Public Relations and Social Media Measurement Predictions for 2014 [from The Measurement Standard; edited by Bill Paarlberg]

“Wait a minute. How about last year’s predictions: How did those work out? As a matter of fact, many, and perhaps most, of last year’s 27 predictions came to pass. You’ll have to judge for yourself, however, which ones were actually Nostradamus-level prescient, as many were either loosely phrased (‘more Facebook commerce’) or very general (‘increasing interest in big data,’ ‘increasing mergers and acquisitions’).”

1 in 5 Social Network Users Likely to Make A Purchase Directly On A Social Network This Year [from Marketing Charts]

“Among Gen Y respondents (born 1980 through 1995), slightly more than one-quarter claimed to be either very likely (13%) or likely (14%) to make a purchase on a social network this year. That figure was matched by Gen X respondents (born 1962 through 1982), of whom 26% are likely to make a purchase.”

Men are also more likely than women to make a purchase directly on a social network (23% vs 14%).

4 Ways Twitter is Socializing TV [from Jeff Bullas]

“So what can TV teach us about how your business can use Twitter?

  • Companies and brands can use Twitter to provide valuable feedback from their customers and prospects
  • Twitter can be used to organise conversations at expos, conferences and presentations
  • It can assist in humanizing the brand that reveals the human side of the organisation
  • Twitter can include calls to action that ask people to buy, inquire or make booking”

Yahoo’s Tumblr-Based Tech And Food Sites Have Seen 10M Uniques Since Jan. 7 Launch [from TechCrunch; written by Darrell Etherington]

“Tumblr’s user base has grown 30 percent since March last year, Mayer says, and usage on mobile is faring even better, with over 50 percent growth between the same time and today.”

Written by Sarah

January 31st, 2014 at 9:11 am

TweetReach: Where our Twitter data comes from

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We use Gnip so we don’t have to send poor Merle down into the Twitter data mines.

We’ve written before about the five questions you should be asking your social analytics provider, and we wanted to make it clear what you’re getting when you choose TweetReach Pro. If you still have questions after you read this, feel free to share them in the comments below, or drop us a line. We’ll be happy to help answer them!

Does Union Metrics have access to the Twitter firehose for TweetReach?

This is a question we get fairly often, and although we address it in our help docs, we also wanted to address it here as it’s a little more complicated than it might seem. The short answer is yes. As for the long answer…

Twitter has two licensed data resellers - Gnip and Datasift - who can provide access to the full Twitter firehose to third parties. The full Twitter firehose includes full-coverage, real-time streaming access to all of the data from Twitter. In most cases, direct access to the full firehose is unnecessary, not to mention very expensive to consume and store. After all, as of last fall, Twitter has 215 million monthly active users, 100 million daily active users, and sees 500 million tweets per day.

So companies like us here at Union Metrics work with one of these data resellers, who have built powerful filtering tools on top of the Twitter firehose to provide high-quality access to the data we need. This makes it more efficient in both time and money for us provide the detailed, comprehensive Twitter analytics our customers want. We’ve elected to work with Gnip, and in fact are part of their Plugged In to Gnip partner program, which means they recognize that we can deliver you the highest quality Twitter data available through licensed access to the full Twitter firehose. This means you don’t have to worry about missing any data.

Our TweetReach Pro Trackers are built on Gnip’s real-time PowerTrack stream, meaning we have full access to all tweets as they are posted – with no rate limits! – for any keyword, hashtag or account you want to analyze. Similarly, TweetReach premium historical analytics are built on Gnip’s Historical PowerTrack product, and provide complete access to the Twitter archive, dating back to March of 2006. Both include full tweet coverage.

To sum up: TweetReach Twitter analytics are built from licensed access to the full Twitter firehose through Gnip.

What about Union Metrics’ other products?

Union Metrics is a certified Plugged In To Gnip partner, which means we have commercially licensed, full-coverage access to both Twitter and Tumblr data. That’s reliable, reputable data you can count on, both now and in the future. Here’s the breakdown of the data source for each of our products:

  • Our TweetReach Pro Trackers have Gnip PowerTrack access – that’s full coverage of all public tweets in real time for any search terms you enter. That means no missed tweets and no sampling.
  • Our TweetReach snapshot reports use the Twitter Search API, so they’re great for quick estimates of recent activity, but are limited to about 1500 tweets from the past week.
  • Our TweetReach premium historical analytics use Gnip’s Historical PowerTrack. That gives us full access to any public tweet in Twitter’s history, dating back to the very first tweet posted in March 2006.
  • Finally, with Union Metrics for Tumblr, we consume the full Tumblr firehose. That means we process 100% of all public posts, notes and other Tumblr activities.

If you have any other questions about our data access, please just ask!

Written by Sarah

January 29th, 2014 at 1:47 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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Peyton Manning vs. Tom Brady on Twitter

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The NFL NFC and AFC conference championships both played out yesterday, determining the Super Bowl matchup of the Denver Broncos vs. the Seattle Seahawks. To make things more interesting, we took a look at mentions of quarterbacks Peyton Manning of the Broncos and Tom Brady of the New England Patriots on Twitter, before, during and after they played out the AFC championship game. We were curious if the same name would come out ahead in social mentions as in the game itself. The verdict?

Tom Brady came away with about 13% of the mentions in the overall conversation, but Peyton Manning got ahead of him with 15%. And while the range of things said about professional athletes on Twitter is impressive, the two tweets below naming the QBs sum up the mood around each of their mentions pretty well.

The most retweeted tweet mentioning Brady:


And the most retweeted tweet mentioning Manning:

 

This just didn’t turn out to be Brady’s year. Better luck next time, Brady! In the meantime, we’ll keep an eye on the talk around Manning and much more as the Super Bowl approaches.

Written by Sarah

January 20th, 2014 at 4:01 pm

The Golden Globes hits an all-time high on Twitter

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The 71st Annual Golden Globes aired last night, and we were there as usual in conjunction with mhCarter Consulting and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association to help out on the red carpet and keep track of the social conversation. (Those of us at home did it with our shoes off and our beverage of choice in hand, just like Emma Thompson.)


During the 3-hour show there were 1.59 million tweets, and the awards predictions, red carpet fashion reviews, and general commentary brought the total up to 2.59 million over the course of the entire day. 875k Twitter users generated these tweets, reaching 296.4 million people overall– its biggest year on Twitter yet!

Actor Aaron Paul from Breaking Bad tweeted the most retweeted tweet of the night, with 30k retweets and 530 replies:

The most retweeted tweet from the official @GoldenGlobes Twitter account was a photo of actress Jennifer Lawrence on the red carpet, and it earned 3800 retweets and 550 replies:

Further proof that the Internet still loves Our Lady JLaw (even at the moments when she’s not sneaking up on Taylor Swift).

How does this compare to last year?

The 2013 Golden Globes saw 1.7 million tweets from 598.5k contributors, reaching 184.8 million people and earning 8.1 billion impressions.  This means tweets increased more than 1.5x this year over last year, with nearly 300k more contributors reaching over 100 million more people and doubling in total impressions.

We have to say, we’re looking forward to what the 2015 Golden Globes bring us under the returning helm of hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler.

 

 

Written by Sarah

January 13th, 2014 at 9:52 am

The Week in Social Analytics #84

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

The end-of-year wrap-ups for 2013 and predictions for what’s to come in 2014 are rolling in:

What Can 2013 Tell Us About Future Instagram Trends? [from Viral Blog; written by Rosie Scott]

This piece covers the trends on Instagram and highlight’s the platform’s high level of engagement– and what these things mean for the coming year.

Marketing Charts’ Top 10 Charts of 2013 [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

The first five charts deal with youth demographics; a fair indicator of what information marketers are interested in.

Which content marketing formats work best? [from eConsultancy; written by Graham Charlton]

A survey of content marketers asking what trends ruled the industry in 2013.

Social, Digital & Mobile in 2014 [from We Are Social; written by Simon Kemp]

Check out the whole, extensive deck or just the highlights they’ve pulled at the bottom of the post.

Social Media Marketing 2014: Where Your Audience Is [from Heidi Coehn]

Includes 5 actionable tips based on the research.

Have you come across any good wrap-up or prediction posts that we missed? Let us know!

Timeline of Instagram from 2010 to Present | INFOGRAPHIC [from Social Media Today; written by Irfan Ahmad]

“In fact, it had 1,000,000 accounts in just 2 months after its launch. After launching the Videos in June 2013, introducing Instagram Direct Message and with the power of 150 million monthly active users the social network may have established a destiny for itself that will last for many years to come.”

User Demographic Highlights From 5 Major – and Growing – Social Networks [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“The latest social networking survey [pdf] from the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project provides some insights into which online adults are most drawn to 5 key platforms – Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Twitter, and Instagram – each of which has grown in penetration over the past year. The results are both intuitive (Pinterest adoption is higher among women) and intriguing (the strong appeal of Instagram and Twitter to black Americans).”

The 6 Most Important Ways To Generate And Use Social Proof To Increase Online Sales [from Social Media Today; written by Steve Olenski]

“Basically if someone else has done it or used it and talked about it online, that’s social proof. As a B2B or B2C company, how do you go about getting people to talk about you or your product? And more importantly what do you do with that social proof once you get it?”

Written by Sarah

January 10th, 2014 at 8:59 am

Sports on social media: How fans talk tells you more than just how they feel

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There has been plenty of coverage around Monday night’s BCS Championship Game between Florida State and Auburn; everything from fan to brand reactions on Twitter. On the surface these tweets strike as funny, impassioned, angry, or incredulous– not unexpected reactions when it comes to something fans connect with as deeply as their favorite sports teams. Looking at how people talk about sports on social media like Twitter can tell us more than just which team they’re a fan of, however; it gives us insight into their actions and behaviors. And if you know what it is that a fan is doing with their spare time, then you have a better idea of how to approach them, and talk to them. For brands this is invaluable. As for fans, they get the chance of an individualized approach to putting things in front of them that they’ll want to connect with.

The Action: A favorite game gets rewatched like a favorite movie.

The Implication.

What’s the point in rewatching a sports game you already know the outcome of? It’s not that different from rewatching a favorite movie or television show, really: while you already know what’s going to happen, now you can watch to see how it happens, and gain a deeper understanding of the thing that you love. While you’re likely experiencing the same emotions of elation at a great play or sadness in a defeat, it’s also likely not as strong as when you watched the game live. It’s easier to spot a certain player’s motivations, or how a play completely unraveled, because you’re not sitting on the edge of your seat with your teeth clenched, or screaming at the ref.

For brands whose demographic includes sports fans, this is helpful information. People who save a game to rewatch it are exhibiting behavior that’s planned, thoughtful, and deeply engaging– and that’s the kind of approach any brand wanting to build a relationship with them should take when reaching out to them. That fan behavior shows the kind of loyalty companies are lucky to find in a customer. Reach out the right way, with understanding, and you stand to be rewarded.

The Action: Not holding back feelings about a new way to watch the game.

ESPN debuted their Megacast for the BCS Championship, and like all things on the Internet viewers were not shy about sharing their feelings.

The implication.

Sometimes it’s the simplest lessons that bear repeating: Listen to your audience. Obviously ESPN will never be able to make every single sports fan happy with a magical coverage design, but they can find ways to tweak their Megacast for future games by paying attention to the things their watchers are saying about it. This is also an opportunity to shine a spotlight on certain fans; if you incorporate their idea, highlight the tweet they shared it in on a future broadcast and say thank you. Nothing could spell out clearer that you do care what viewers have to say.

And some of their ideas are pretty entertaining.

Written by Sarah

January 9th, 2014 at 8:27 am

Posted in Events

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