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Archive for the ‘twitter’ tag

Peyton Manning vs. Tom Brady on Twitter

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The NFL NFC and AFC conference championships both played out yesterday, determining the Super Bowl matchup of the Denver Broncos vs. the Seattle Seahawks. To make things more interesting, we took a look at mentions of quarterbacks Peyton Manning of the Broncos and Tom Brady of the New England Patriots on Twitter, before, during and after they played out the AFC championship game. We were curious if the same name would come out ahead in social mentions as in the game itself. The verdict?

Tom Brady came away with about 13% of the mentions in the overall conversation, but Peyton Manning got ahead of him with 15%. And while the range of things said about professional athletes on Twitter is impressive, the two tweets below naming the QBs sum up the mood around each of their mentions pretty well.

The most retweeted tweet mentioning Brady:


And the most retweeted tweet mentioning Manning:

 

This just didn’t turn out to be Brady’s year. Better luck next time, Brady! In the meantime, we’ll keep an eye on the talk around Manning and much more as the Super Bowl approaches.

Written by Sarah

January 20th, 2014 at 4:01 pm

The Golden Globes hits an all-time high on Twitter

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The 71st Annual Golden Globes aired last night, and we were there as usual in conjunction with mhCarter Consulting and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association to help out on the red carpet and keep track of the social conversation. (Those of us at home did it with our shoes off and our beverage of choice in hand, just like Emma Thompson.)


During the 3-hour show there were 1.59 million tweets, and the awards predictions, red carpet fashion reviews, and general commentary brought the total up to 2.59 million over the course of the entire day. 875k Twitter users generated these tweets, reaching 296.4 million people overall– its biggest year on Twitter yet!

Actor Aaron Paul from Breaking Bad tweeted the most retweeted tweet of the night, with 30k retweets and 530 replies:

The most retweeted tweet from the official @GoldenGlobes Twitter account was a photo of actress Jennifer Lawrence on the red carpet, and it earned 3800 retweets and 550 replies:

Further proof that the Internet still loves Our Lady JLaw (even at the moments when she’s not sneaking up on Taylor Swift).

How does this compare to last year?

The 2013 Golden Globes saw 1.7 million tweets from 598.5k contributors, reaching 184.8 million people and earning 8.1 billion impressions.  This means tweets increased more than 1.5x this year over last year, with nearly 300k more contributors reaching over 100 million more people and doubling in total impressions.

We have to say, we’re looking forward to what the 2015 Golden Globes bring us under the returning helm of hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler.

 

 

Written by Sarah

January 13th, 2014 at 9:52 am

The Week in Social Analytics #84

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

The end-of-year wrap-ups for 2013 and predictions for what’s to come in 2014 are rolling in:

What Can 2013 Tell Us About Future Instagram Trends? [from Viral Blog; written by Rosie Scott]

This piece covers the trends on Instagram and highlight’s the platform’s high level of engagement– and what these things mean for the coming year.

Marketing Charts’ Top 10 Charts of 2013 [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

The first five charts deal with youth demographics; a fair indicator of what information marketers are interested in.

Which content marketing formats work best? [from eConsultancy; written by Graham Charlton]

A survey of content marketers asking what trends ruled the industry in 2013.

Social, Digital & Mobile in 2014 [from We Are Social; written by Simon Kemp]

Check out the whole, extensive deck or just the highlights they’ve pulled at the bottom of the post.

Social Media Marketing 2014: Where Your Audience Is [from Heidi Coehn]

Includes 5 actionable tips based on the research.

Have you come across any good wrap-up or prediction posts that we missed? Let us know!

Timeline of Instagram from 2010 to Present | INFOGRAPHIC [from Social Media Today; written by Irfan Ahmad]

“In fact, it had 1,000,000 accounts in just 2 months after its launch. After launching the Videos in June 2013, introducing Instagram Direct Message and with the power of 150 million monthly active users the social network may have established a destiny for itself that will last for many years to come.”

User Demographic Highlights From 5 Major – and Growing – Social Networks [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“The latest social networking survey [pdf] from the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project provides some insights into which online adults are most drawn to 5 key platforms – Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Twitter, and Instagram – each of which has grown in penetration over the past year. The results are both intuitive (Pinterest adoption is higher among women) and intriguing (the strong appeal of Instagram and Twitter to black Americans).”

The 6 Most Important Ways To Generate And Use Social Proof To Increase Online Sales [from Social Media Today; written by Steve Olenski]

“Basically if someone else has done it or used it and talked about it online, that’s social proof. As a B2B or B2C company, how do you go about getting people to talk about you or your product? And more importantly what do you do with that social proof once you get it?”

Written by Sarah

January 10th, 2014 at 8:59 am

Sports on social media: How fans talk tells you more than just how they feel

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There has been plenty of coverage around Monday night’s BCS Championship Game between Florida State and Auburn; everything from fan to brand reactions on Twitter. On the surface these tweets strike as funny, impassioned, angry, or incredulous– not unexpected reactions when it comes to something fans connect with as deeply as their favorite sports teams. Looking at how people talk about sports on social media like Twitter can tell us more than just which team they’re a fan of, however; it gives us insight into their actions and behaviors. And if you know what it is that a fan is doing with their spare time, then you have a better idea of how to approach them, and talk to them. For brands this is invaluable. As for fans, they get the chance of an individualized approach to putting things in front of them that they’ll want to connect with.

The Action: A favorite game gets rewatched like a favorite movie.

The Implication.

What’s the point in rewatching a sports game you already know the outcome of? It’s not that different from rewatching a favorite movie or television show, really: while you already know what’s going to happen, now you can watch to see how it happens, and gain a deeper understanding of the thing that you love. While you’re likely experiencing the same emotions of elation at a great play or sadness in a defeat, it’s also likely not as strong as when you watched the game live. It’s easier to spot a certain player’s motivations, or how a play completely unraveled, because you’re not sitting on the edge of your seat with your teeth clenched, or screaming at the ref.

For brands whose demographic includes sports fans, this is helpful information. People who save a game to rewatch it are exhibiting behavior that’s planned, thoughtful, and deeply engaging– and that’s the kind of approach any brand wanting to build a relationship with them should take when reaching out to them. That fan behavior shows the kind of loyalty companies are lucky to find in a customer. Reach out the right way, with understanding, and you stand to be rewarded.

The Action: Not holding back feelings about a new way to watch the game.

ESPN debuted their Megacast for the BCS Championship, and like all things on the Internet viewers were not shy about sharing their feelings.

The implication.

Sometimes it’s the simplest lessons that bear repeating: Listen to your audience. Obviously ESPN will never be able to make every single sports fan happy with a magical coverage design, but they can find ways to tweak their Megacast for future games by paying attention to the things their watchers are saying about it. This is also an opportunity to shine a spotlight on certain fans; if you incorporate their idea, highlight the tweet they shared it in on a future broadcast and say thank you. Nothing could spell out clearer that you do care what viewers have to say.

And some of their ideas are pretty entertaining.

Written by Sarah

January 9th, 2014 at 8:27 am

Posted in Events

Tagged with , , ,

A quick look at early #CES2014 tweets

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Speaking of events that happen this time of year, it’s CES week in Las Vegas. (You may recall that we’ve analyzed CES tweets before.) We’ll write more on this as the event continues over the next few days, but we wanted to check on what Twitter thinks about CES so far. Here’s a quick rundown of early CES tweets.

Most retweeted accounts:

  1. @Intel
  2. @CNET
  3. @PlayStation
  4. @engadget
  5. @intlCES
  6. @mashable

Most buzzed about brands:

  1. Intel
  2. Samsung
  3. Sony

Biggest celebrity endorsements:

  1. @Shaq (Monster)
  2. @NickCannon (Monster)
  3. @LeVarBurton (AMD)

There were nearly 100,000 tweets using the official #CES2014 hashtag posted yesterday (January 6) and today – the first official full day of the conference – is on track to beat that. More CES updates throughout the week, so check back in later!

Want help tracking tweets about your next conference or event? Let us know!

Written by Jenn D

January 7th, 2014 at 2:24 pm

Posted in Events

Tagged with , , ,

The Golden Globes are Sunday!

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It’s that time of year again – awards season! The 71st Golden Globe Awards are this Sunday, and as usual, we’ll be there to track the social media conversation around the event and help out on the #redcarpet.

So, we were wondering… In the days leading up to the first major awards show in Hollywood this season, which movies, TV shows and actors are Twitter and Tumblr buzzing about?

Well, Tumblr can’t get enough of Amy Poehler and Tina Fey, who are coming back for a second year as hosts of the show. Most of the top posts about the Golden Globes right now are GIFs of the comedic duo, taken mostly from the commercials for the upcoming broadcast (like this one from gillianjacobs).

After Tina and Amy, Twitter and Tumblr are both excited about Tatiana Maslany from BBC America’s Orphan Black and Jennifer Lawrence - or JLaw, if you prefer, which we do – from American Hustle. And there’s a lot of talk about Jared Leto from Dallas Buyers Club, Leonardo DiCaprio from The Wolf of Wall Street, and Bradley Cooper from American Hustle.

As far as movies and shows go, Tumblr’s favorite films right now are American Hustle12 Years a Slave, and Dallas Buyers Club. Twitter also loves Catching Fire, partly because Taylor Swift’s song from the film was nominated. And Orphan Black is wildly popular on both networks. Breaking Bad and Scandal are getting some attention on Twitter, while American Horror Story is popular on Tumblr.

Want to follow along with the conversation this week? Find @GoldenGlobes on Twitter and on Instagram, and participate in the conversation with the #GoldenGlobes tag. And stay tuned here, as we’ll update with more social data about the show next week!

Written by Jenn D

January 7th, 2014 at 11:31 am

Twitter hashtag best practices

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Hashtags are a delightful, double-edged sword. On one hand, they enable you to organize your tweets so they can be found by others interested in the same type of content. On the other hand, they can be hijacked by those looking to capitalize on the popularity of particular hashtag. With that in mind, you’ll want to go through a checklist of several hashtag best practices to get the most out of using them without wasting a good tweet on a bad hashtag.

Create your hashtag

Keep it short, relevant, and simple. If you use a really long hashtag, people won’t have as much room to add their thoughts. For example: #MMchat stands for #MarketingMondays (a Twitter chat*), but the full version is too long to use in an interactive Twitter event. You want attendees to be able to add as much as possible to the conversation.

Test your hashtag

Once you’ve come up with a snappy hashtag, you need to find out: Is it already being used? Is this particular hashtag routinely spammed by random, unrelated accounts? (If you’re using a general hashtag to increase reach on a post- which we cover in the next section- you’ll want to avoid hashtags that get spammed by unrelated accounts.) Do a quick search on Twitter to see if a hashtag is already being used and, if so, how. For example, searching #socialchat turns up that it’s already a popular hashtag in use for a tweet chat which means you’d want to pick something different for your chat or event. The general hashtag #socialmedia is fast moving and full of information, but also routinely gets spammed. You might test out using it, but know that it’s easy for your post to get lost in the flow of information.

For a more detailed look at how to maximize your hashtag use for both tweet chats (similar to Twitter parties, but reoccurring) and events such as conferences, you might want to check out these other posts:

16 ways to use Twitter to improve your next conference

7 tips to maximize your conference attendance using Twitter

Miss a conference? 5 tips for getting the most out of the hashtag on Twitter

The key to a successful Twitter party? Planning ahead.

9 tips for getting the most out of Twitter chats: As a host

10 tips for getting the most out of Twitter chats: As a participant

Get more out of a hashtag

You can extend the reach of a post by using more popular and general hashtags– in moderation. For example: If you’re talking about analytics, #measure and #msure are great hashtags to use in order to expose your post to a larger audience of people interested in data measurement. We don’t recommend using more than three hashtags in the majority of your tweets, however; too many hashtags look spammy.

Searching broader hashtags related to your industry will also help you find interesting content to learn from and share on your own accounts, in addition to surfacing interesting influencers to follow.

Hashtags are also a great way to find people who share similar interests to you outside of work, particularly with the rise of social television:

9 tips for watching TV on Twitter

Track your hashtag: Includes TweetReach-specific tips

You can track hashtags using our tools- either to get an idea of a conversation in a snapshot report (free, or a $20 full report) or monitor an ongoing conversation in a TweetReach Pro Tracker. Why would you want to do this? Hashtags can give you a great idea of the conversation around specific topics or events that are affecting the general population– or you in particular, if it’s a campaign hashtag you want to know the reach and results of.

How do you make sure you’re getting all the information you need? Check out:

Common Tracker Mistakes

What to do when your campaign hashtag gets hijacked on Twitter

In conclusion

Have a hashtag question we didn’t address? Leave it in the comments, or find us on Twitter. Happy hashtagging!

*Twitter chats, or tweet chats, are reoccurring virtual events where people meet to discuss various topics using a hashtag to connect the conversation. They’re a great way to network, and increase or share your knowledge on a topic. 

Written by Sarah

December 11th, 2013 at 11:18 am

The Week in Social Analytics #79

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Social Data Market Momentum: It’s Not About the Firehose [from Thought Experiments; written by Susan Etlinger]

“But this market, as it’s evolving, is not just a game of ‘Capture the Firehose’; it’s about taking this enormously complex, rich and challenging data set and turning it into insight that can be used to suggest trends that real people in real organizations can act on. It’s not about the firehose; it’s not even about the water. It’s about the fires the water can put out, and the things it can cause to grow.”

Nine Valuable Marketing Lessons From a Nonprofit – Charitywater.org [from KISSMetrics; written by Chloe Gray]

These lessons are equally applicable to for-profit businesses.

“Through a commitment to storytelling, beautiful design, broadcasting a unique value proposition, putting donors at the center of their strategy, and creating highly sharable content, the nonprofit has built a brand that incites the kind of loyalty, excitement, and inspiration most companies dream of.”

How To Build The Perfect Tumblr Profile For Business [from MarketingThink; written by Gerry Moran]

“Tumblr needs to be considered for every brand’s picture-perfect content marketing strategy in 2014. With native buying behavior focusing on the visual experience, brands need to be presenting their story at the multitude of customer touchpoints. This content consumption behavior demands that brands evolve into a curator and syndicator of their content assets on visual and graphical platforms like Tumblr, Instagram and Pinterest.”

4 Creative Instagram Brand Campaigns [from Business 2 Community; written by Theo Schmidt]

Check out four of the most interesting uses of Instagram for brand campaigns.

(And you can find us here on Instagram, if you’re so inclined.)

STUDY: It Only Takes 76 Seconds to Secure or Lose Brand Loyalty [from PR Newser; written by Elizabeth S. Mitchell]

“And assistance doesn’t only need to be fast — it also needs to be direct and personal. The survey revealed that 69% of consumers are more likely to be loyal to a brand that provides live, human assistance at critical moments, and 82% say their perception of a brand improves when live chat is available.”

Avoid a social crisis with one simple question [from Social Media Explorer; written by Tracey Parsons]

Before publishing something on a social account, say it out loud.

“In real time, the Out-Loud Voice litmus test it is a quick affirmation that could be the last check before something is posted online. And let’s be honest, what you post on social as a brand is very much out loud even if it is only written word. And without a doubt, most branded social media gaffes could have been prevented with this test.”

Social Business is not Dead: New charts and data reveal the real evolution of social businesses [from Brian Solis]

“Along the way, I’ve also learned that pushing for social adoption because of technology misses the point of change. The true catalyst isn’t whatever the latest trend in social media is this week. That’s reactive and almost impossible to leapfrog. The truth is that change is fueled by the affect that social media, mobile, and other forms of disruptive technologies have on customer behavior. Whether it’s B2B, B2C, B2B2C, or whatever model you prefer, as long as we’re talking about connected human beings, you can bet that social and digital in general are influencing discovery, decision-making, and impressions in every moment of truth.”

5 Tips to Help Busy Small Business Owners Better Manage their Social Media [from Eli Rose; written by Liz Jostes]

“. . .adjust your expectations to a level you can confidently maintain.”

What Do You Get With A Social Media Audit? [Top Rank Online Marketing; written by Lee Odden]

“Ultimately, the results of a social media marketing audit should reconcile the difference between the current situation and where the brand social media efforts need to be. Just like the other online marketing audits companies will perform, a social media audit is not a “one and done” situation. They should be repeated periodically as part of being accountable for the social media investment.”

B2B Experts: The Difference Between Social Media and Content Marketing [from Social Media B2B; written by Jeffrey L. Cohen]

“Your neighbor isn’t going to talk to you about those darn teenagers and their content marketing. But there’s plenty of discussion by businesses and citizens alike about social media.”

What to Do When Your Twitter Handle is Taken But Isn’t in Use [from Social Media Today; written by Deborah Sweeney]

Helpful guidelines for a 140-character crisis.

History Retweets: How Ancient Romans Created Social Media [from the Wall Street Journal; written by Tom Standage]

“Who invented social media? It wasn’t the founders of Facebook, or Twitter, or even MySpace or Friendster. Social media—the exchange of media within networks of friends and acquaintances—is much older than the Internet. A social-media environment requires two things: a certain level of literacy, and the ability to copy and deliver information cheaply and quickly. This combination first arose in the late Roman republic of the 1st century BC, more than 2,000 years ago.”

Emphasis added.

Written by Sarah

December 6th, 2013 at 9:00 am

What Black Friday sales is Twitter most excited about this year?

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As we like to do every year around this time, we’re checking into what Twitter is saying about holiday shopping, particularly around Black Friday. This past weekend- a full week before Black Friday officially starts- things were starting to really accelerate on Twitter, with an average of about 5,000 tweets an hour posted about Black Friday over the past two days. And so far this month, 780k people have posted 1.3 million tweets about the biggest shopping weekend of the year.Black Friday on Twitter

Which upcoming Black Friday sales was Twitter most excited about over the weekend? Amazon was the most talked about sale, with Walmart a close second. And so far, the product topping everyone’s wish list is the Xbox One.

We’re tracking all Black Friday tweets this week, so we’ll keep you posted!

Written by Jenn D

November 25th, 2013 at 12:12 pm

Posted in Events,Trends

Tagged with ,

In case of emergency: Airlines and crisis communication on Twitter

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What airlines should look for on Twitter and what to measure, before, during, and after a crisis

Social media is both a blessing and a curse in a time of crisis. While companies are able to rapidly disseminate information, share updates, and directly interact with the public in real time, misinformation can also spread like crazy on platforms like Twitter.

For something as high stakes as air travel, it’s important for airlines and travel companies to have a plan in place should a crisis arise, particularly during the stressful holiday travel season. We have some advice for creating just such a plan, or reassessing it if you already have one.

Image courtesy NYPL Digital Galleries

What to look for on Twitter during a crisis

First, you need to set up a monitoring plan for Twitter. Exactly what you’re looking for will depend on the nature of the crisis you’re dealing with and your communication goals around each type of crisis.

In case of common crisis

For flight delays and stranded, angry customers, for example, you’ll definitely want to focus on catching every mention of your brand on Twitter and doing everything you possibly can to make affected customers feel listened to and understood. If possible, give your customer service representatives on Twitter the power to offer reconciliations: everything from drink tickets, to discounts on future flights, full or partial refunds; even free tickets for a future flight if the situation is bad enough.

This is vital for turning an angry person who swears they will never fly with you again- whether the circumstances of the situation were under your control or not- and someone who will brag about your customer service on the same forum they just used to share their unhappiness, while remaining a customer.

In case of not-so-common crisis

If the situation is more serious- like the recent shooting that happened at Los Angeles International Airport, or a natural disaster like an earthquake- you don’t have to bother to look for misinformation; it will already be out there. Use Twitter as a way to let everyone know you’re aware of the situation, the safety of your employees and passengers, and any updates you can make on the situation, waiting as long as possible to confirm new information before you send it out while still making any corrections as necessary.

In both cases- and the rest of the time, as a general rule of thumb- you should be monitoring not only direct replies to your brand’s handle on Twitter, but also mentions of your company name in any variety of spelling imaginable, any well-known nicknames your brand has (official or not), and the airports you operate from. Depending on your resources, you might want to include the names of prominent employees, such as founders, board members and c-level executives. Something like our TweetReach Pro Trackers will allow you to do this. (We’ll talk more about what to measure in the next section.)

Go the extra mile

Monitoring mentions of the airports you operate from will be vital should a tragic incident such as the LAX shooting occur again, and the rest of the time it will give you an advantage in listening to and addressing problems you might not have caught otherwise. Is a passenger stranded, and you have room on a flight? Even if they weren’t booked on your airline, you’ve probably just won a new loyal customer. If you make someone’s day, you’ve reversed their story of a bad trip gone awry and be more likely to be the first brand on their mind the next time they travel.

What to measure on Twitter in times of crisis, and after

Now that you know what to look for, you need to have a plan in place for how to measure it. What, exactly, should you be measuring on Twitter as a crisis unfolds?

Before; or what you should have set up right now

Ideally you will already have Trackers set up to capture what we mentioned above- tweets directly to your official handle, mentions of your brand in any variety of spelling imaginable, any well-known nicknames your brand has (official or not), and the airports you operate from. If you’re not already doing that, now is the time to implement Trackers or take frequent snapshots (using something like our aptly named snapshot reports) around those terms once a situation arises and begins to unfold.

During a crisis

Often during a crisis situation, a hashtag will be born organically. If you’re being proactive about communicating via Twitter, however, don’t hesitate to create one of your own and immediately set up a Tracker to measure it, or take continual snapshots of the situation. If another hashtag emerges organically, use that one in your messaging as well and be sure you’re tracking both.

After a crisis

If everything flies by too quickly and you’re a small enough team not to have time to set up Trackers or take frequent enough snapshots of the situation, a historical option to capture the entire incident is available. This can also be used to fill in any noticeable gaps in your data once you’ve begun to look through everything you’ve gathered.

In the aftermath of the event, you might also want to track a specific news story (using specific key words from the title if it’s unique enough not to return a lot of noise, or you can track via a specific URL) that went around if it directly involved comments from your brand, or got a lot of circulation with commentary from people passing it around. This will give you a much more accurate read on the sentiment around your crisis messaging, and let you see any missed opportunities as well as highlight every win.

Go the extra mile

Once you have all of this data and you can clearly see how the situation unfolded and evaluate the strength of your response, take it a step further: What can you plan better next time, with this experience? What did you and your team do really well, that you should be sure to praise and also pass on as protocol to new team members? This knowledge can be distilled and turned into training and on-boarding materials for any new communications employees in the future.

If you’re not an airline a lot of these tactics still apply to you; if you’re a hotel, for example, you can offer to put up stranded travelers or victims of a natural disaster or other tragedy. Car rental companies and car sharing services can work out deals to get stranded people home if they don’t have far to go. Tour companies can even offer to keep stranded passengers entertained with local sites while they’re waiting for delayed travel to get sorted out.

The takeaway

The bottom line is to listen and step in where you’re needed, even if you’re not expected to.

Written by Sarah

November 19th, 2013 at 9:18 am