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Archive for the ‘tweets’ tag

TweetReach Tip: Improve your snapshot report search query

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Our customers often ask the question, “What exactly can I search for on TweetReach?” We want to make sure you get the most out of your snapshot reports, so here’s everything you need to know about queries.

For all snapshot report searches, keep in mind that shorter queries work better: under 70 characters, or 6-8 words. Use the most specific terms possible to find what you’re looking for and consider if you need a particular phrase; if so put it in quotes (“peanut butter banana”) so it will appear exactly in that order. Be sure to account for misspellings or nicknames that might apply to the phrase, campaign or brand name that you’re searching for.

Our snapshot reports and Trackers work a little differently. Snapshot reports collect data from Twitter’s search API, which includes up to 1,500 tweets from the past week, and Trackers rely on the real-time, full-coverage Twitter stream from Gnip. In both, you can search for basically anything that appears in a tweet, including Twitter names, terms or phrases, hashtags, etc… You can also narrow the search for any of those things by adding a time frame, filtering for links or a particular language, and more.

Search for tweets related to an account:

  • username – search for tweets to, from and about a specific Twitter user (e.g. tweetreachapp)
  • @username – search for tweets mentioning or RTing a specific Twitter user (e.g. @tweetreachapp)
  • from:username – search only for tweets from a specific Twitter user (e.g. from:tweetreachapp)
  • to:username – search only for tweets directed to a specific Twitter user (e.g. to:tweetreachapp)

Search for tweets containing a particular term or phrase, including a #hashtag:

  • term1 term2 – search for tweets containing both term1 and term2 in any order (e.g. twitter metrics)
  • term1 OR term2 – search for tweets containing either term1 or term2 (e.g. analytics OR metrics)
  • “term1 term2” – search for tweets containing the phrase “term1 term2” (e.g. “twitter metrics”)
  • term1 -term2 – search for tweets containing term1 but not including term2 (e.g. twitter -facebook)

Put a more specific filter on your search for an account, term or phrase:

  • since:YYYY-MM-DD – search only for tweets after a specific date in UTC (e.g. since:2012-12-12)
  • until:YYYY-MM-DD – search only for tweets before a specific date in UTC (e.g. until:2012-12-12)
  • filter:links – search only for tweets containing links
  • lang:NN – to search for only tweets in a particular language (e.g. lang:en for only English tweets, more info about languages here)

For instance, let’s say you want to search for tweets that contain the words “banana metrics”, and you only want the ones with those exact words in that exact order, starting from a certain date. In that case you’d enter “banana metrics”- in the quotes to get the exact phrase- into the search bar, adding since:2012-12-12 to the query. So it would look like this:

“banana metrics” since:2012-12-12

And your report would return to you all the tweets containing the term “banana metrics” since the 12th of December, 2012. (If you want to get data about “banana metrics” from last week, you’ll have to get a quote on our Historical Analytics, available separately from reports or the Trackers that come with a TweetReach Pro subscription.)

Still have questions? We have answers!

Get more details on what you can search for in a TweetReach report in our help forums; there’s also a breakdown of what you can do with a snapshot report by question. We’ve also written on the blog about using snapshot reports to measure the reach of a Twitter account (here’s the help forum post on that as well) and the reach of a particular tweet, two options to search for.

If you still have questions don’t be afraid to drop us a line. We’re here to help!

Written by Sarah

December 10th, 2012 at 12:42 pm

Posted in Help

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TweetReach Tip: Why some tweets generate fewer impressions

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On Twitter, replies are handled differently than regular tweets. An @reply is a tweet sent to a specific user, beginning with that user’s Twitter handle. Like this:

Replies are only received by the users who follow both the sender and the receipient. The above tweet was delivered to the 6 Twitter accounts who follow both @tweetreachapp and @Melaina25, not to all of @tweetreachapp’s 4,300+ followers.

So, if there’s a contributor or tweet in your TweetReach snapshot report or Tracker that has only generated a few impressions, even though you know the account has hundreds or thousands of followers, then the tweet is most likely an @reply. The purpose of a reply is to continue a conversation between two Twitter accounts, and as such, replies are only delivered to users who follow both the Twitter accounts involved in the conversation. Twitter does this to keep your stream from getting overly cluttered with irrelevant conversations you’re not involved in. So even if an account has thousands of followers, an @reply will only appear to users who follow both the sender and recipients, and will generate as many impressions as there are common followers.

There’s more on how Twitter handles replies on their blog. Basically, using your Twitter client’s reply button or arrow will limit the people who receive your tweet to only users who follow both accounts in the discussion, even if you add a space, period or other punctuation in front of the username. If you want a tweet to be delivered to all your followers, do not use the reply button and do not start the tweet with a username.

 

Written by Jenn D

September 4th, 2012 at 9:51 am

Posted in Help

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Using TweetReach to determine the reach of a tweet

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You already know TweetReach reports are great for measuring the reach of hashtags and Twitter accounts, but how about an individual tweet? What if you want to analyze the reach of a tweet (and any retweets of or replies to that tweet)? Our reports can do that, too! In fact, that’s where our name comes from and one of the original problems we set out to solve more than three years ago. Tweet. Reach. TweetReach.

There are a few options for measuring the reach of a tweet. You can paste the entire text of the tweet into the search box. Since Twitter works best with shorter search queries that’s ideal if you have a shorter tweet. And if you have a longer tweet, you can select a few unique words or a phrase from the tweet to search for.

Let’s try it with this tweet from @Disney.

Since this is a pretty short tweet, we can search for the full tweet text (minus the URL to keep it simple): disney #DisneyFact: An estimated one million bubbles were drawn in the making of The Little Mermaid. We also included the original Twitter handle, minus the @ sign, to be sure we’re catching all attributed retweets of the original tweet. Here’s the TweetReach report for this query:

This report includes 108 total tweets, which includes the original tweet. So that’s 107 retweets. However, you can see that the original tweet only has 73 actual retweets, according to the Most Retweeted Tweets section. What’s going on?

This is where it gets a little messy. Some people will retweet a tweet with Twitter’s official RT button (we call this a new-style or automated retweet). Some will copy and paste the tweet and add “RT @username” to retweet (old-style or manual retweet). Some will modify the original tweet by adding their own commentary or abbreviating the text (modified retweet or MT). Some will simply quote the tweet without adding any RT language (quoted RT). Twitter typically only associates that first type (new-style RTs) with an original tweet to count them as retweets.

But in a TweetReach report, if a tweet starts with “RT @username”, regardless of how that retweet was generated (new-style or old-style), it will count as an official retweet. But if there’s anything in front of that retweet, such as commentary or other characters, then it will not count as a retweet, but it will show up in a report for that tweet. So that’s why the above report only shows 73 actual retweets of the original tweet, but there are 108 total tweets in the report. One of those tweets is the original tweet, 73 are official retweets, and the 34 remaining tweets are modified or quoted retweets. So the full reach of this @Disney Little Mermaid tweet and all its various retweets is 1,322,791.

A few more examples:

Search for: SFGiants amazing pic bradmangin melky cabrera 7th inning

Search for: wired “Hot New Characters Will Invigorate Game of Thrones”

Search for: tweetreachapp measure share of voice on twitter four steps

Tips for measuring the reach of a tweet:

  • Keep search queries short
  • Include handles without the @ sign
  • Put exact phrases in quotation marks
  • Select unique words for your query
  • Leave out URLs to keep it simple

And that’s how you can use a TweetReach report to analyze the reach of a tweet. Try it for yourself! And if you’re wondering what else you can search for, check our helpdesk or ask us.

PS – Have you ever tried our TweetReach Labs Retweet Rings tool? It’s a fun, animated visualizer to see how retweets spread.

Written by Jenn D

June 5th, 2012 at 12:31 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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Extreme tweets: How ESPN’s X Games social strategy paid off

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We worked with ESPN to measure Twitter’s reaction to this year’s X Games 17, held in Los Angeles, California from July 28-31, 2011. Hundreds of athletes from 17 countries competed in sports like skateboarding, motocross, BMX and rally car racing. And over the four days of the X Games, 97,200 people tweeted 188,813 times, generating an impressive reach of 37.7 million*.

How’d they do it?

“Our goal going in was to make the event as social as possible,” says Mick Kelleher, Associate Manager of Multimedia Content Strategy for the X Games. This was a big, integrated effort combining all the ESPN teams responsible for producing the X Games. The TV production team showed the #xgames hashtag frequently during the telecast, included athlete Twitter accounts in on-screen bios as well as showing athlete tweets on air. The social team used the @XGames Twitter account to keep their followers on Twitter up to date on all the events. The social integration even went all the way to the event site, where they encouraged fans attending the Games to tweet.

The results

ESPN used TweetReach Pro Trackers to comprehensively track and analyze all mentions of the X Games on Twitter for the week leading up to the event and during the event itself. As you can see below, the strong results of their social strategy speak for themselves.

The most retweeted tweet about the games was from @LilTunechi, which received 905 retweets and generated more than 3 million impressions.

One of the biggest stories to come out of this year’s X Games concerned Travis Pastrana, who broke his ankle and leg in the Moto X Best Trick competition on Thursday, but later competed – and placed fourth – in the RallyCross final on Sunday.

We analyzed tweets about several events in detail, including Moto X Best Trick, Skateboarding Big Air, BMX Park Freestyle, Rally Car Racing, Skateboard Street, and RallyCross. At one point during the RallyCross final, viewers noticed something strange; 200 people tweeted that they spotted The Stig from Top Gear walk behind Brian Deegan during an interview. Here are the big moments from one our favorite X Games 17 days. Click the image for the full size version.

Congrats to all the athletes who competed this year! Thank you for an exciting and action-packed four days at X Games 17.

*Read this for more on how we calculate reach and other metrics. And, are you interested in this kind of analysis for your media event? Let’s talk.

Written by Jenn D

August 2nd, 2011 at 5:54 pm

Posted in Events,Trends

Tagged with , , , , ,

The season finale of Game of Thrones in tweets

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Here at TweetReach, we’re big fans of the Games of Thrones franchise – the books and the HBO television show. So thought it would be fun to take a look at tweets about last night’s season finale. Here’s a word cloud made from tweets about the show, courtesy of Wordle (click on the picture for full size).

Written by Jenn D

June 20th, 2011 at 8:32 pm

Posted in Trends

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