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Archive for the ‘TweetReach tip’ tag

TweetReach Tip: How to isolate specific dates in a Tracker

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To isolate specific dates in your TweetReach Tracker, simply click on the calendar icon in the upper right hand corner of your screen, and specify the date range that you want.

Tracker Date Range

 

That’s it!

Still got a question? Let us know! Or find us on Twitter

Written by Sarah

October 8th, 2013 at 12:29 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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TweetReach Tip: How to isolate specific dates in a snapshot report

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If you want tweets from a specific date range in your TweetReach snapshot report, you need to use the since and until operators:

since:YYYY-MM-DD - search only for tweets after a specific date in UTC (e.g. since:2010-03-30)
until:YYYY-MM-DD - search only for tweets before a specific date in UTC (e.g. until:2010-03-30)

Want to see it in action? Go here to see an example. And learn more about everything you can search for, including other operators, here.

Still got a question? Let us know! Or find us on Twitter

Written by Sarah

October 1st, 2013 at 12:53 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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TweetReach Tip: Searching for tweets from a specific account

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If you set up a TweetReach snapshot report or Tracker to search for @username, that will only return mentions and retweets of that Twitter account. So, that might be what you’re looking for. But if you’d like to see tweets to and from that account, add in the from:username query, like this:

@username OR from:username

This will make sure we pull all mentions, retweets, and replies to your Twitter handle, as well as tweets from your account. That’s the best way to see the full set of interactions with a particular account. Want to see it in action? Here’s an example.

Still got a question? Let us know! Or find us on Twitter

Written by Sarah

September 26th, 2013 at 1:18 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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TweetReach Tip: Find & engage influencers on Twitter with TweetReach Trackers

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We’ve already covered how to find influencers when you run a TweetReach snapshot report, but how about on a Tracker? They are set up a little differently. On a Tracker, you’ll want to check out the Top Contributors section, obviously:

Top Contributors Hadfield Tracker

In this case, we’re looking at a Tracker for Canadian astronaut and current Commander of the International Space Station (ISS) Chris Hadfield, tracking his Twitter handle @Cmdr_Hadfield. In this case, the contributors will be people who are retweeting, mentioning and talking to Commander Hadfield on Twitter. This shows you in a glance who is doing that and generating the most impressions from it.

Looking more closely at contributors is also a great way to connect with those who are influential in your industry, or about the topic (or account) you’re tracking. This shows you who to follow and talk to in a specific industry or around a certain topic. You can do this by clicking on any username anywhere in your Tracker, which will take you to our contributor detail page, which includes more information about the account and how much that person has contributed to the topic you’re tracking. It looks like this:

Contributor Detail Hadfield Tracker

You can see that this account is engaged with Commander Hadfield’s – they’re the top contributor behind Hadfield himself – and generated a respectable amount of retweets for a tweet they sent out showcasing the recent turnover in ISS command. You can also see more detailed information about the account, such as how many tweets and impressions they’ve contributed mentioning or retweeting Commander Hadfield, as well as their average retweet rate, amplification, and more.

Aside from Top Contributors, you will also want to look at the Highest Exposure and Most Retweeted tweet listing sections:

Highest Exposure Hadfield Tracker

Pictured: Tweet with the highest exposure

Most RTs Hadfield Tracker

Pictured: most retweeted tweets for this Tracker

Watch to see which users show up in your Tracker’s most popular tweet with any regularity; these are definitely people to connect with – if you aren’t already connected – because they’re interested in your content and they get a lot of attention from whatever they’re putting out into their own stream. These accounts are great to engage with by following back, having conversations with, and retweeting interesting content, if that’s appropriate for your brand or approach. You can also engage by seeing if they take part in Twitter chats, and if they’re about a relevant topic or industry, join in. This will lead you to more likeminded people to connect with.

How do you use your Trackers and reports to find influencers? Tell us your story in the comments below!

Written by Sarah

April 3rd, 2013 at 1:34 pm

TweetReach Tip: Find & engage influencers on Twitter with TweetReach snapshot reports

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You can do a lot with your TweetReach snapshot reports and Trackers, and one of the most important and often underutilized tricks is identifying and then interacting with your biggest influencers on Twitter. How? It’s pretty simple:

  1. Run a TweetReach snapshot report
  2. Check out your contributors

That’s it. It’s that easy! Here are some screenshots from a report we ran about Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield:

Top contributors shows you the top Twitter accounts talking about Col. Hadfield. @Gizmodo earned the highest number of impressions from their tweets about the astronaut, @NewsBreaker garnered the most retweets, and @csa_asc (the Canadian Space Agency) generated the most mentions. (You can find a breakdown of a snapshot report here if you need one.)

What do these numbers mean? Exposure is the total number of times a tweet is delivered to Twitter streams, or the overall number of impressions generated. A high exposure means that account has a lot of followers, and tweets from that account were delivered to lots of other Twitter accounts. NewsBreakers got the most retweets, meaning many of that account’s followers found the Hadfield-centered tweet interesting enough to pass along to their followers. Finally, the Canadian Space Agency Twitter handle was mentioned in the most tweets about Col. Hadfield.

If you run regular snapshot reports and notice that you have repeat top contributors, those are definitely accounts you want to engage with,  if you aren’t already doing so. And remember, you can save your TweetReach reports if you create a free account, or download PDFs or CSVs for later reference.


Don’t just limit yourself to your top contributors either; be sure to look at the full list of contributors. Paying attention to everyone who is talking about you or your brand will let you see who is retweeting your content and generating impressions. These people might not be able to generate as many impressions as an account like Gizmodo because they have fewer followers, but having lots of followers isn’t necessarily as important as being able to influence others. Not everyone following Gizmodo will be interested in everything they retweet or talk about, but someone with a lot of pull with his or her followers – even if there are only 200 – may actually have more followers paying attention, possibly even clicking through and reading a link, or ultimately purchasing something. If that kind of person is consistently in your contributors list, you should be engaging with him or her.

How do you engage? Follow these accounts and talk to them when it’s natural. Do they take part in Twitter chats? If it’s relevant, join in. This will lead you to more likeminded people to connect with. Do they share interesting content? Retweet or reply to it; start a conversation.

On a related note, looking closely at contributors is also a great way to connect with those who are influential in your industry, or about the topic you’re tracking. Then later, if you want to join into that conversation, you know who to talk to.

So that’s how to do this with a snapshot report. How’s it different with a Tracker? We’ll cover that in our next post. Stay tuned, and as always, comment with any questions!

Written by Sarah

March 28th, 2013 at 1:03 pm

TweetReach Tip: Common Tracker mistakes

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Much like the double-tap method is essential for zombie eradication, double- and triple-checking your Tracker queries is essential to success with your TweetReach Pro Trackers. Be sure you aren’t making any of the following common mistakes with your Tracker setup, and you’ll get the best results possible with your Tracker.

Mistake #1: Not making the tweets you send from your own Twitter account easily trackable.

  • Put your hashtag toward the beginning of your campaign tweets. If you put it toward the end, it could get cut off in subsequent retweets. Also be sure you keep your campaign tweets to a shorter, shareable length; the “perfect tweet length appears to be around 100 characters”, according to a study by TrackSocial.
  • If you begin a tweet with someone’s Twitter handle – for example, @tweetreachapp – only that account and anyone who follows both of you will see it. Be sure to add a period or other text to the beginning of the tweet if you want to gain the largest impression possible: “.@tweetreachapp is a great tool”. You can read more about @replies and impressions on our helpdeskThe bottom line: if you want to track a tweet and get the most data about it possible, don’t start it with a Twitter handle.

Mistake #2: Small errors in your Tracker queries can keep you from getting the data you need.

  • Make sure you’ve set up the right search terms in your Tracker. For example, banana won’t capture tweets including the word bananas. And #banana will only find uses of the hashtag, but not general uses of the word banana. Add multiple queries if you need to (banana, bananas, #banana AND #bananas).
  • Make sure you spell your search terms correctly. It seems basic, but checking on this will save you from missing data. Also keep be sure to add queries to include accented characters and punctuation, as well as alternative spellings. For example: “shop ‘til you drop” and “shop til you drop”, or  dakar perú and dakar peru. 
  • Make sure you’re using the right form of your hashtag, or search for multiple hashtags if appropriate. Likewise, make sure the tweets you’re sending out have the correct hashtag, and do what you can to communicate the official version to participants. Sometimes, you may need to adapt and track audience-generated hashtags; the official form doesn’t always get the use you’re expecting.

Want more tips on improving your search queries? You can read all about it here. And if you have any questions about your Trackers, just ask!

Written by Sarah

January 30th, 2013 at 7:30 am

Posted in Help

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TweetReach Tip: Why some tweets generate fewer impressions

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On Twitter, replies are handled differently than regular tweets. An @reply is a tweet sent to a specific user, beginning with that user’s Twitter handle. Like this:

Replies are only received by the users who follow both the sender and the receipient. The above tweet was delivered to the 6 Twitter accounts who follow both @tweetreachapp and @Melaina25, not to all of @tweetreachapp’s 4,300+ followers.

So, if there’s a contributor or tweet in your TweetReach snapshot report or Tracker that has only generated a few impressions, even though you know the account has hundreds or thousands of followers, then the tweet is most likely an @reply. The purpose of a reply is to continue a conversation between two Twitter accounts, and as such, replies are only delivered to users who follow both the Twitter accounts involved in the conversation. Twitter does this to keep your stream from getting overly cluttered with irrelevant conversations you’re not involved in. So even if an account has thousands of followers, an @reply will only appear to users who follow both the sender and recipients, and will generate as many impressions as there are common followers.

There’s more on how Twitter handles replies on their blog. Basically, using your Twitter client’s reply button or arrow will limit the people who receive your tweet to only users who follow both accounts in the discussion, even if you add a space, period or other punctuation in front of the username. If you want a tweet to be delivered to all your followers, do not use the reply button and do not start the tweet with a username.

 

Written by Jenn D

September 4th, 2012 at 9:51 am

Posted in Help

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TweetReach Tip: Measuring the reach of a Twitter account

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Want to measure the reach of a particular Twitter account? Great – you’ve come to the right place! Our TweetReach snapshot reports can measure the reach of any public Twitter account in just a few seconds. And depending on exactly which tweets you want to include in your analysis, we have a few tips for writing your search queries.

From and About

The From and About report is our most often run report and measures all tweets to, from and about an account. Use this query:

@username OR from:username

This report will return all mentions of that Twitter account (including all types of retweets, replies and mentions), as well as all tweets from that Twitter account. This is the most comprehensive set of reach stats for a Twitter account, and covers all activity with and about an username. We call this the From and About report, because it returns data both from a Twitter account, as well as about a Twitter account. Here’s an example From and About report.

About

The About report will include all mentions, replies and retweets of an account. Use this query with the @ symbol:

@username

This report will let you know how many people are talking about a certain Twitter account, and the ways they’re talking about it (retweets, replies and mentions). It will not include original tweets posted from the account. We call this the About report, since it only returns tweets about an account from other Twitter users. Here’s an example About report.

From

The From report will return only tweets from that account. Use this query with the from: operator:

from:username

This reports is useful for measuring the impact of an individual Twitter account without the noise of mentions and other users’ interaction, and it’s great for learning more about the kinds of tweets that account is posting. We call this the From report, since it only includes tweets from that Twitter account. Here’s an example From report.

From and Retweet

Finally, sometimes you want to know only about an account’s tweets and any retweets of those tweets. The From and Retweet report uses this query:

from:username OR “RT @username”

This report will return tweets from an account, as well as any retweets of that account. This is useful for measuring the impact of an account’s tweets and its retweets, without including other mentions or replies. We call this the From and Retweet report, since it only includes original tweets and retweets. Here’s an example From and Retweet report.

Written by Jenn D

August 21st, 2012 at 12:21 pm

Posted in Help

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Today’s TweetReach Tip: When tweets are available for analysis

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One of the questions we’re often asked is when tweets are available for analysis (and how long they’re accessible). We hear a lot of questions like:

  • Can I get tweets from last month? What about last year?
  • I have an event coming up – what’s the best way to measure those tweets?
  • What if I want to analyze only tweets from the past two days?
  • Can I track tweets for a month or longer?

So, here’s our answer to those questions. We have several different ways at TweetReach to access tweets, depending on when they were posted and how many tweets there are. First, we just need to know the answer to one question: when were your tweets posted? 

My tweets will be posted in the future

If your tweets will be posted anytime in the future, then we have the most flexibility for reporting. Anytime you can plan ahead for your Twitter tracking, it will be both easier and cheaper to get the tweet analytics you need. If your tweets will be posted in the future, whether it’s later today or not until next month, we have two ways to measure those tweets:

  1. Set up a Tracker before tweets are posted
  2. Run a snapshot report after tweets are posted

TweetReach Tracker will capture all tweets in real time, as they are posted to Twitter. So this means you need to set it up before tweets start going out. Trackers are perfect for longer or higher-volume campaigns, as well as for more in-depth metrics. Trackers don’t have any tweet or time limits*, so they can track as many tweets as you want, for as long as you want. We have some customers who have been tracking – and archiving – their tweets for two years! Trackers are available through TweetReach Pro.

The other option is to run a snapshot report after your event or campaign is over and all relevant tweets have been posted. A snapshot report will include basic Twitter analytics for up to 1,500 tweets from the past 7-10 days (whichever comes first). Snapshot reports are great for smaller, lower-volume, or shorter campaigns. You can run a snapshot report anytime at tweetreach.com. The first 50 tweets are free, and the full snapshot is $20.

So, set up a Tracker before your event if you’re expecting more than 1,500 tweets or want to track them for more than a week. Run a snapshot report after your event if you’re expecting fewer than 1,500 tweets over a week or less.

My tweets were posted in the past week

If the time period for your tweets is within the past few daysrun a one-time snapshot report. A snapshot TweetReach report will include up to 1,500 tweets from the past 7-10 days. This varies a little from query to query, but most are around a week. You can also limit these snapshots to specific dates from the past week using date filters. A snapshot including up to 50 tweets is free, and a full snapshot will be $20.

My tweets were posted more than a week ago

If the tweets were posted within the past month, then we can access those tweets through a custom TweetReach historical report. This works best for a single day or few day period from the past month, but can include tweets for up to 30 days back from today. These historical reports range in price, depending on the length of time and number of tweets being analyzed, but start at $200, and include full coverage of all tweets from your time period.

Contact us to discuss your specific needs and we can give you a precise quote. TweetReach Back is really best for Twitter analytics emergencies – when a client or coworker absolutely needs numbers and didn’t remember to tell you until now.

*Our lower-level TweetReach Pro plans have some soft tweet limits, but most people will never reach those limits. Please check with us if you want to know about these limits or if you plan on tracking a high-volume event.

Written by Jenn D

June 13th, 2012 at 11:47 am

Posted in Help

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