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TweetReach Tip: Find & engage influencers on Twitter with TweetReach Trackers

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We’ve already covered how to find influencers when you run a TweetReach snapshot report, but how about on a Tracker? They are set up a little differently. On a Tracker, you’ll want to check out the Top Contributors section, obviously:

Top Contributors Hadfield Tracker

In this case, we’re looking at a Tracker for Canadian astronaut and current Commander of the International Space Station (ISS) Chris Hadfield, tracking his Twitter handle @Cmdr_Hadfield. In this case, the contributors will be people who are retweeting, mentioning and talking to Commander Hadfield on Twitter. This shows you in a glance who is doing that and generating the most impressions from it.

Looking more closely at contributors is also a great way to connect with those who are influential in your industry, or about the topic (or account) you’re tracking. This shows you who to follow and talk to in a specific industry or around a certain topic. You can do this by clicking on any username anywhere in your Tracker, which will take you to our contributor detail page, which includes more information about the account and how much that person has contributed to the topic you’re tracking. It looks like this:

Contributor Detail Hadfield Tracker

You can see that this account is engaged with Commander Hadfield’s – they’re the top contributor behind Hadfield himself – and generated a respectable amount of retweets for a tweet they sent out showcasing the recent turnover in ISS command. You can also see more detailed information about the account, such as how many tweets and impressions they’ve contributed mentioning or retweeting Commander Hadfield, as well as their average retweet rate, amplification, and more.

Aside from Top Contributors, you will also want to look at the Highest Exposure and Most Retweeted tweet listing sections:

Highest Exposure Hadfield Tracker

Pictured: Tweet with the highest exposure

Most RTs Hadfield Tracker

Pictured: most retweeted tweets for this Tracker

Watch to see which users show up in your Tracker’s most popular tweet with any regularity; these are definitely people to connect with – if you aren’t already connected – because they’re interested in your content and they get a lot of attention from whatever they’re putting out into their own stream. These accounts are great to engage with by following back, having conversations with, and retweeting interesting content, if that’s appropriate for your brand or approach. You can also engage by seeing if they take part in Twitter chats, and if they’re about a relevant topic or industry, join in. This will lead you to more likeminded people to connect with.

How do you use your Trackers and reports to find influencers? Tell us your story in the comments below!

Written by Sarah

April 3rd, 2013 at 1:34 pm

TweetReach Tracker 2.0 now available to everyone!

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A few weeks ago, we released a first look at the beta version of our all-new TweetReach Tracker 2.0! Today, we’re happy to announce that the beta is now available to all TweetReach Pro subscribers.

TweetReach Tracker 2.0

If you’re currently a TweetReach Pro subscriber, the next time you view a Tracker, you can opt to see the new version. Use the links in the top right corner of your Tracker to change from the old design to the new one. For the next month or so, you will be able to toggle between the old version and the new version with those links. (And if you’re not yet a TweetReach Pro subscriber, sign up here.)

old to new

 We’ll let you know in advance before the full switchover happens and the old version becomes unavailable. In the meantime, there’s more information about what’s included in the new Tracker on our helpdesk. And please let us know if you have any questions!

 

Written by Jenn D

March 27th, 2013 at 4:14 pm

Posted in News

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Learn more about TweetReach Pro in a webinar on March 20

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Did you know you can do more with TweetReach Pro? Learn about the ongoing, full-fidelity and comprehensive metrics available through a Pro account in this short demo webinar we’re hosting Wednesday, March 20 at 11:00 a.m. PDT.

Register here.

We’ll show you how TweetReach Pro works, what’s included and answer any questions you have. And? Attendees will be eligible for a special discount coupon. See you Wednesday!

Measure more with TweetReach Pro
(Photo courtesy SMU Central University Libraries)

 

 

Written by Sarah

March 15th, 2013 at 3:20 pm

Posted in News

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Introducing TweetReach Tracker 2.0

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Today, we’re rolling out the beta version of our new Tracker interface to select TweetReach Pro customers! We can’t wait for you to see it. It includes the same full-fidelity, real-time tracking as before, but we’ve totally rethought and redesigned the Tracker look and feel. Whether you need a quick campaign summary or want to drill into the details, we think you’ll find that every part of the new Tracker puts the most relevant information right where you need it. We’ll be releasing it more widely over the next few weeks, but in the meantime, here’s a sneak peek of the new look (click for a larger version).

New Tracker Design

As you know, TweetReach Trackers provide premium real-time monitoring and comprehensive tweet coverage, and are included in TweetReach Pro subscription. And we’ve had the same Tracker design for more than two years, and it’s time for a facelift. The new look is cleaner and simpler and gives you the information you need at a glance. In addition, we’re now able to add a few more metrics to your Tracker’s summary page.

During the beta rollout, Pro subscribers will continue to have access to the previous interface, and will be able to switch between the new look and the old look. We’d love to hear your feedback as we continue to polish the new design.

Speaking of changes to TweetReach, have you seen the rest of the updates we made this week to incorporate the changes to Twitter’s API? Please let us know if you have any questions!

Written by Jenn D

March 5th, 2013 at 3:17 pm

Posted in Features,News

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Announcing our new reach algorithm

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This post was written by Union Metrics CEO and Founder Hayes Davis. 

We started TweetReach in 2009 with a simple idea: to provide a simple report that showed people the reach of tweets about any topic. Since that time, we’ve grown far beyond that simple reach report and added comprehensive tracking, as well as many other metrics and insights. But reach is still something we care a great deal about, so I wanted to tell you about some changes we’re making to the algorithm we use to calculate reach.

This is a long post, so here’s the executive summary:

  • We’ve built a new and extremely robust model for calculating reach that will replace our current algorithm.
  • Historical reach data won’t change, and newly calculated reach will change only slightly in most cases relative to historical trends.
  • This new algorithm allows us to increase our data limits across all TweetReach Pro plans.
  • These changes go into effect next week.

For those of you who are interested in learning more about how we built our new algorithm, read on.

Setting the stage

Reach is a complex metric with many definitions across vendors and industries, so let me explain how we think about reach on Twitter. For us, reach is the total number of unique Twitter accounts that received at least one tweet about a topic in some period. Knowing this helps you understand how broadly your message is being distributed on Twitter.

For most of our existence we’ve measured reach by using Twitter’s API to determine the actual Twitter IDs of users who received tweets about a topic. From that copious raw data, we then applied a dose of math and lots of computational horsepower to derive our reach measurement. While this brute force method produces a very reasonable estimate for reach, it has some serious drawbacks in terms of meeting the needs of our customers. It slows down our reporting for customers pulling data on ad-hoc periods and – while our data limits are generous relative to our competitors – it meant we had to place stricter data limits than we wanted on our TweetReach Pro plans.

In addition to these increasingly frustrating drawbacks, Twitter has announced a major set of technical changes to their API. Included in those changes are additional restrictions on the API calls we make to determine the raw data we use in our reach calculation. So instead of working around those API limits and continuing with our brute force approach, we decided it was time to get smarter.

Investigating the data

At TweetReach, one thing we have is data – lots and lots of data. This means that we have an extraordinarily large archive of information about how campaigns work on Twitter, which goes back years and is unique to us. From these data and our experience, we know that the reach of a Twitter campaign is essentially a function of the number of unique contributors (users tweeting), how large their follower bases are, and the overall number of tweets. The question is: What are the mathematical parameters of that function?

We started our investigation by looking at what we call the “potential reach” of any conversation on Twitter. This is the maximum possible reach of any conversation if all people who tweet about a topic have no followers in common.  While it provides an upper bound on reach, it’s obviously flawed; the assumption that no one has followers in common just doesn’t make common sense. It is, however, a good starting point, so we put it in a scatter plot to at least see if there was a relationship between potential reach and actual reach:

reach_vs_potential_reach_raw

The way this graph turns upward at the end shows us there’s not a clear linear relationship in this data, but there might be if we plotted this on a log-log graph.

reach_vs_potential_reach_log_log

There is a nice positive linear correlation after all. However, there are also some pretty absurd numbers. In fact, some of those “up and to the right” data points in the first graph show a potential reach above 2 billion (nearly 30% of the world’s population and more than 8x Twitter’s 250 million monthly active users). As it turns out, this is what many in our industry call “reach”. But we knew we could do better.

Enter statistics

Armed with the notion that potential reach had some value, we set out to combine that with other data to build an algorithm that could predict reach. We experimented with many different approaches that we applied to tens of thousands of data points derived from real Twitter campaigns. And after many iterations, we’ve developed an extremely robust model that explains 99.51% of the variance in reach on a Twitter campaign.

Below is another scatter plot (with a trendline) that shows our reach prediction model applied to a test data set.

reach_vs_predicted_reach

The data have a nearly 1:1 positive linear correlation, and there are no crazy outliers. This means we can predict an accurate reach with an extremely high degree of confidence without having to resort to brute-force methods.

What does this mean for our customers?

For the vast majority of our customers there will be very little noticeable impact to reach. Most of you won’t see any change at all. But a few of you will see some small changes. We will not be altering our reach calculations for historical periods, so some of you may notice your future reach increase or decrease slightly when compared to historical levels. And since no model is absolutely perfect, a small set of customers may see somewhat larger increases in reach for certain campaigns. If you have any questions at all about a change in your reach, don’t hesitate to contact our support team and we’ll be happy to take a look!

But best of all, these changes bring some significant benefits to our TweetReach Pro subscribers. The first benefit is that viewing ad-hoc periods within a TweetReach Tracker will now be much faster than before. The second, much more exciting benefit, is that we’re now able to increase our data limits for TweetReach Pro plans.

TweetReach Pro tweet volume limits

We’ll be rolling these changes out next week and we’ll be communicating with you along the way. We’re extremely excited to share the results of this work with you – our customers! If you have any questions, please let us know.

Written by Hayes D

February 28th, 2013 at 3:43 pm

Posted in News

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TweetReach Tip: Common Tracker mistakes

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Much like the double-tap method is essential for zombie eradication, double- and triple-checking your Tracker queries is essential to success with your TweetReach Pro Trackers. Be sure you aren’t making any of the following common mistakes with your Tracker setup, and you’ll get the best results possible with your Tracker.

Mistake #1: Not making the tweets you send from your own Twitter account easily trackable.

  • Put your hashtag toward the beginning of your campaign tweets. If you put it toward the end, it could get cut off in subsequent retweets. Also be sure you keep your campaign tweets to a shorter, shareable length; the “perfect tweet length appears to be around 100 characters”, according to a study by TrackSocial.
  • If you begin a tweet with someone’s Twitter handle – for example, @tweetreachapp – only that account and anyone who follows both of you will see it. Be sure to add a period or other text to the beginning of the tweet if you want to gain the largest impression possible: “.@tweetreachapp is a great tool”. You can read more about @replies and impressions on our helpdeskThe bottom line: if you want to track a tweet and get the most data about it possible, don’t start it with a Twitter handle.

Mistake #2: Small errors in your Tracker queries can keep you from getting the data you need.

  • Make sure you’ve set up the right search terms in your Tracker. For example, banana won’t capture tweets including the word bananas. And #banana will only find uses of the hashtag, but not general uses of the word banana. Add multiple queries if you need to (banana, bananas, #banana AND #bananas).
  • Make sure you spell your search terms correctly. It seems basic, but checking on this will save you from missing data. Also keep be sure to add queries to include accented characters and punctuation, as well as alternative spellings. For example: “shop ‘til you drop” and “shop til you drop”, or  dakar perú and dakar peru. 
  • Make sure you’re using the right form of your hashtag, or search for multiple hashtags if appropriate. Likewise, make sure the tweets you’re sending out have the correct hashtag, and do what you can to communicate the official version to participants. Sometimes, you may need to adapt and track audience-generated hashtags; the official form doesn’t always get the use you’re expecting.

Want more tips on improving your search queries? You can read all about it here. And if you have any questions about your Trackers, just ask!

Written by Sarah

January 30th, 2013 at 7:30 am

Posted in Help

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Which TweetReach product should I use?

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We know you’ve got different needs and different budgets, even on different days. That’s why we offer a range of TweetReach products to help you get the best return on your Twitter investment– and we’re here to help you figure out which tool to use.

We have three main products at TweetReach: our snapshot reports, Pro Trackers, and historical analytics.

A Tracker is best when:

Your topic is going to pull in a lot of tweets.
If you’re running a conference or other major event or tracking any large or popular topic where you’re anticipating a large volume of tweets to be generated, set up a Tracker beforehand to be sure you don’t miss any tweets. Snapshot reports are limited to 1500 tweets, but Trackers don’t have those limits and will capture all the tweets about your topic or event.

The best part? All tweets collected by a Tracker are archived for as long as you have a TweetReach Pro subscription, so you can drill into your data to find out how customers are interacting with your brand and/or campaign over the entire time you’ve been tracking. This is a great way to discover brand advocates, industry influencers, and see trends develop over time.

You want to track what everyone is saying during your campaign or event.
This is what Trackers were made for; with Trackers you can monitor and analyze unlimited tweets in real time, as the tweets are posted to Twitter. Each Tracker allows you to monitor up to 15 queries about your topic, which can include hashtags, a key industry phrase, and more. This will allow you to keep track of who is saying what about your event – enabling you to handle any issues as they emerge – and gives you a wealth of data to study later. You’ll be able to recognize key contributors and influencers, and plan better for your next big event. With a Tracker set up you won’t have to worry about pulling reports at different intervals to get the information you need. It will be automatically collected for you, just waiting to be analyzed.

Keep in mind that Trackers are only available through a TweetReach Pro subscription.

Historical analytics are best when:

You want to compare a current campaign to one you ran last year, or a few years ago.
With the addition of our premium historical analytics, you can now compare current campaigns to those of the past (your own or your competitors’). For the first time we have the ability to reach all the way back to tweets posted at the very beginning of Twitter in March of 2006.

Twitter isn’t just about real-time anymore: now the entirety of Twitter history is available to be analyzed and studied.

You want to research past tweets.
Research the after effects of Twitter emergencies, PR disasters, recurring events (conferences, holidays, etc), past feelings around a certain event or topic compared to now– and more. You can research how a past event or campaigned performed even if you didn’t have real-time tracking setup then. You can compare year-over-year campaign performance before you plan your next big campaign. Having that kind of information to back up the ideas you pitch to your company or client is huge, and TweetReach historical analytics makes it possible.

We’ve recently launched our historical analytics product, and we’re incredibly excited about its implications.

Want to travel back in Twitter time with historical analytics? Read more details and get a quote.

A snapshot report is best when:

You need something fast, and free.
We understand that not every marketing team has a large budget for analytics, and not every business has a marketing team in the first place. For this reason, we offer a free snapshot report that gives you an idea of the reach of your hashtag, account, tweet or any other keyword-based topic.

Hint: you can archive (with a free TweetReach account), or print and save these reports to keep a simple record of how your company or campaign is doing on Twitter. And it costs you nothing.


You want a general idea of how tweets are spreading right now.
Search for any current hashtag, username, key phrase from a tweet, or any keyword, and our snapshot report will measure the extent of your reach, exposure, the most popular tweets, and the biggest contributors to your topic. We have two versions of our snapshot report: the quick snapshot report is free, and will include up to 50 tweets. Want more? A full snapshot report is available to anyone- no subscription or account required- and includes up to 1500 tweets for just $20. With a TweetReach Pro subscription you’ll have access to bundles of free and full snapshot reports.

Keep in mind these only provide a snapshot of recent tweets. If you want to look at what was happening yesterday or a year ago, you need our premium Historical Analytics, which are available separately.

Got any questions we missed?

Check out our help forums or drop us a line. We’re here to help!

Written by Sarah

December 12th, 2012 at 12:49 pm

Announcing our new and improved TweetReach Pro dashboard

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We’re so excited to unveil our brand new TweetReach Pro dashboard!

The new dashboard allows you to quickly find overall stats for your account, compare metrics across Trackers, explore how your Trackers have been performing over the past 30 days, review recently run snapshot reports, and so much more. Plus, it looks better than ever…

A few things you can do with the new dashboard:

  • Surface Tracker stats for our four main metrics in the graph
  • Review Tracker stats for any day in the past month
  • Reorder your Trackers
  • Select and deselect Trackers to display in graph
  • Set up new Trackers
  • Drill into and edit existing Trackers
  • Explore recently-run snapshot reports
  • Run new snapshot reports
  • View overall account stats, including total all-time tweets analyzed and the number of active Trackers, snapshot reports and account users

There’s more detail about what you can do with your dashboard (and how to do it) on our helpdesk. And as always, please let us know if you have any questions.

Written by Jenn D

August 9th, 2012 at 2:37 pm

Posted in Help,News

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Trackers now have smarter URL search!

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Good news! Our TweetReach Pro Trackers now support smarter URL search with the url_contains: operator. You can add one or more URL queries to your tracked terms. A few examples:

  • url_contains:bit.ly/123abc
  • url_contains:blog.tweetreach.com/2012/08
  • url_contains:”http://tweetreach.com”
  • url_contains:tweetreach.com report

The Tracker will find any tweets that include the matched portion of the URL you include in your query. Like this:

The above url_contains:tweetreach.com query will find any mention of a tweetreach.com link, including subpages like http://tweetreach.com/plans.

A few notes on how to use this operator in your own Trackers… The url_contains: operator will find all public tweets where the URL you’re searching for has been actually pasted into the tweet, even if it’s been t.co shortened. But it will not find tweets where the URL was shortened before pasting into a tweet. Also, if you include a URL with http:// in your query, you’ll need to add quotation marks around the URL itself, like in the example above (no need to add quotes around other URL segments though; this only impacts those with the colon). You can also add other keywords to a query with a url_contains filter. Questions about any of this? Just ask!

Trackers, which monitor new and future tweets in real-time, are available in TweetReach Pro. Read more about what you can search for in a Tracker.

Written by admin

August 7th, 2012 at 1:11 pm

Posted in Guides,Help

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Introducing the new TweetReach Pro Ultimate plan

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We’re happy to announce a new TweetReach Pro plan level for our larger enterprise, agency and media customers – TweetReach Pro Ultimate! This plan level is perfect for anyone managing multiple products, clients or accounts.

Our most comprehensive and personalized plan level, TweetReach Pro Ultimate comes with:

  • 50 Trackers
  • Access to TweetReach Back, our 30-day complete historical archive
  • A dedicated account manager to help you get exactly the data you need
  • Unlimited snapshot reports
  • Unlimited users and projects
  • API access

With 50 Trackers in your account, Ultimate subscribers will be able to monitor tweets about all of your campaigns, clients, products and events, in real time. Each Tracker can monitor unlimited tweets about your topic, including up to 20 distinct search queries to be sure we’re finding all relevant tweets.

TweetReach Back is our new historical analytics option. If you missed an important event or weren’t able to set up a Tracker before campaign tweets went out, we can go back up to 30 days and analyze all tweets about your topic. This is a more comprehensive option than our simple snapshot report, with no tweet limits and in-depth metrics like you see in a Tracker. Ultimate subscribers have access to up to 24 hours of TweetReachBack analysis each month.

A dedicated account manager will be available to answer all of your questions, from setting up tweet tracking, to interpreting metrics, to helping you improve next time.

The TweetReach Pro Ultimate plan is $2,500 per month. You can subscribe to the Ultimate plan here, and if you have any questions at all, please let us know.

Written by Jenn D

March 28th, 2012 at 8:55 am

Posted in News

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