TweetReach Blog

Archive for the ‘tumblr’ tag

The Week in Social Analytics #111

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

The 8 best brands on Tumblr [from iMedia Connection; written by Brad Brief

“Part of [brands'] hesitation [to use Tumblr] could be linked to the level of commitment that a Tumblr campaign requires. To use it, and use it well, brands must provide new, interesting, and engaging content on an ongoing basis.”

Finding Tumblr’s Place In Your Social Strategy [from MarketingLand; written by Ric Dragon]

“If you do the online ethnography for your important segments, you’d do well to know if they are represented on Tumblr.  If your company sells micro-oscillator widgets that go into industrial machinery, no, this might not be the place for you. If you are consumer-oriented in any way, though, you should take a look.”

Instagram is ready to take its shot [from Fortune; written by Jessi Hempel]

“That’s true in part because Instagram has helped spawn a powerful new social phenomenon: Just as Kodak’s invention of a roll of film made it easy for almost anyone to take photographs a century ago, Instagram’s invention of a social feed paired with easy-to-use editing tools makes everyone capable of creating and sharing nuanced, edited pictures today. And that photo sharing has empowered people in powerful, unexpected ways—even those not named Kardashian or Bieber.”

The Kinds of Photos Instagram Followers Want to “Like” [from Social Media Today; written by Alexandra Jacopetti]

“Instagram is arguably the social media platform with the most opportunity for brands, but don’t post what the CEO had for lunch.”

That doesn’t mean that food is off limits; just tap into the big communities wisely. Like Dunkin Donuts and Oreo did to announce their partnership:

How brands can be brilliant at Vine [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

“Beyond the differences in length and available tools, Vine and Instagram video remain able to operate in the same space, whilst remaining unique in their own way, with brands tending to choose one or the other platform based on its own audience, content and tone of voice.”

As always, choose the platform where you audience spends their time and that fits your brand voice the best.

10 Reasons to Use Vine to Help You Build Your Brand [from Mashable; written by Bob Cargill]

“Vine presents brands with an innovative, surprisingly powerful way to take advantage of the fact that visual content performs well on social media.”

Does social media influence purchasing decisions? [from SHIFT Comm; written by Chris Penn]

“The big picture conclusion here is that while the Gallup and SHIFT polls showed that social media has influence in the minds of the consumer, the data you should be paying attention to most is your own. Pay attention to the statistical and methodological validity of data you see in the news, absolutely, but pay even closer attention to the things that influence your business first and foremost.”

A simple tip for improving your brand tone of voice guidelines [from Econsultancy; written by David Moth]

Consumers expect a consistent tone of voice from brands. Here’s how to lay out consistent ground rules for achieving that.

6 in 10 B2B Execs Agree That Social Business Has Created Value [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“The authors note that B2B companies are leveraging social business in a number of ways, including social data analysis to aid in product development.”

Quiz: Can You Tell What Makes a Good Tweet? [from the New York Times; written by Mike BostockJosh Katz and Nilkanth Patel]

A little informative Friday fun.

Turning ‘Likes’ Into a Career: Social Media Stars Use Instagram, Twitter and Tumblr to Build Their Career [from the New York Times; written by Sheila Marikar]

“In an era of new economies, this may be one of the most curious: the network that has sprung up to help the follower-laden stars of Instagram, Vine, Pinterest and other social media services make money by connecting them with brands wanting to advertise to their audiences. People like Mr. Lachtman and his co-founder, Rob Fishman, run what may be seen as a parallel universe to Hollywood, one in which shares and likes matter more than box-office sales and paparazzi shots. Here, authenticity — a word that comes up often in this arena — trumps a Photoshop-perfect facade or publicist-approved message.”

Written by Sarah

July 18th, 2014 at 9:18 am

Marketing your conference across platforms: Twitter, Instagram, and Tumblr

with one comment

We recently discussed 3 dos and don’ts for running a campaign across platforms, but what about marketing a conference or similar event across platforms? Successfully marketing an event requires tailoring your message for each platform, just as with any successful campaign. We’ll break down some of the specific uses for each platform here, playing to their individual strengths and making note of what to keep in mind based on how each works and interacts with the others.

Twitter

We’ve covered 16 ways to use Twitter to improve your next conference and 7 tips to maximize your conference attendance using Twitter, so what’s different when you’re adding other platforms to the mix?

When building your communication plan for your conference you want to keep in mind the strengths of each platform to plan which content you’re going to disseminate where; Twitter’s strength lies in it being the ultimate real-time tool. Use Twitter to broadcast quick updates and reminders throughout your event, such as:

  • Remind everyone of the official hashtag
  • Make announcements and reminders of keynotes, session start times, and any other events like a cocktail hour or party 
  • Let everyone know if a session, talk, or cocktail hour has been delayed, canceled or moved to a different location
  • Make suggestions about where attendees can head for meals or drinks offsite, tagging the handles of those businesses where applicable
  • Introduce speakers by their handles
  • Thank speakers, organizers, and any companies that have provided staff for catering or bars (and be sure to mention their handles too)
  • Answer any questions from attendees, and resolve any problems they bring to light quickly

Also be sure to prominently and consistently use and track the official hashtag you’ve created for your conference, which will tell you everything that went well and everything you can improve for the next time.

SXSWV2V Twitter

Instagram

Instagram is new territory for many marketers, which is why we’ve written a series for those new to the platform over on our Union Metrics Tumblr. Specifically for events you’ll want to check out how to effectively use hashtags, the nuances of sharing to other platforms via Instagram, and even the different moves personal brands should make there (in case you’re an event attendee in the future, wanting to promote yourself and connect with other attendees and organizers).

So whether you’re established on Instagram when you decide to market your event there, or you’ve decided to make the conference the official launch of your Instagram presence, there are a few things to keep in mind. Instagram’s purely visual nature is a strength for any brand looking to tell a succinct story in photographic terms. However, the single-track feed on mobile means that too many posts can easily overwhelm your followers, so established brands with a large following who know only a portion of that following will be present at an event will want to consider setting up a side account if you plan on frequent event updates.

With that in mind, some of the ways to use Instagram at a conference include:

  • To show off the conference venue, including what the weather in the host city is like
  • Share photos of sites to see around the host city
  • Tap into other big communities on Instagram by showing off the #food available on and offsite of your conference (be sure to tag any offsite restaurants and bars that have an Instagram presence, and follow their accounts)
  • Post reminders about meetups in other cities leading up to the conference, or after it, like this one from SXSW V2V
  • Share engaging photo reminders of deadlines for submitting speaker applications, getting a discount on event passes, and more
  • Post photos of keynote speakers, tagging their Instagram accounts with permission so that attendees can get a better idea of who they are
  • Post photos to highlight your event organizers, staff, and even regular attendees to give a behind-the-scenes look at everything that goes into the work of organizing and executing a conference (and tag their accounts too, where appropriate, or at least follow them)

Bonus: If you’re short on resources, use the snappy photo reminders around deadlines as a starting point to share the same reminder across platforms, tweaking the message for each. For example, hashtags don’t seem to increase engagement on Facebook, so if you’re going to use the sharing buttons native to Instagram, wait to post all of your hashtags in the first comment. They’ll work the same way for categorization and discovery across Instagram as when you put them in your initial photo caption, but they won’t clutter your post across platforms. 

SXSW V2V Ig

Tumblr

More and more brands have been experimenting with marketing on Tumblr and seeing some fantastic results. The built-in social aspect allows for amplification of announcements and photo recaps of any event or conference in  a way that’s not possible with traditional blogging platforms. A brand hosting an event on Tumblr might use the platform to:

  • Go into more detail about deadlines and what’s required on applications for speakers, but be sure to put it all behind a cut and underneath a snappy visual (maybe a version of the same one you used on Instagram!) 
  • Use the photo post-type collage option to show off the mood of the event, the venue, official accommodations, shots of the host city, past event parties and attendees, speakers and more (Tumblr automatically builds a collage as you upload multiple photos in one post)
  • Do a series using each of the ideas above, or pull a few of each type into one post for a photo overview. Pull these from Instagram or post a mix of Instagram photos and those from other sources
  • Use embedded video posts to show clips from the speakers you’re featuring, or a video summary of a past event; even a video tour of the host city
  • Video post types will also host SlideShares of presentations using their embed codes, perfect for recaps and previews of sessions and topics from speakers
  • Link to articles or blog posts from event speakers, or quote things past speakers have said using the quote post-type
  • If past event attendees have written up their experiences, link to those as well, or quote excerpts from what they had to say

Remember that Tumblr’s reblogging feature is what makes it so powerful; be sure to reblog anything appropriate or related to your conference from the Tumblrs of your upcoming or past speakers, regular attendees, organizers and more. Doing so will only encourage them to reblog you, amplifying your message to their audiences and possibly tapping new audience members. 

Conference Speaker on Tumblr

Example of a post from a speaker that SXSW V2V could reblog– if they had a Tumblr. 

After all, if they follow your speakers and attendees, it’s likely that they’re interested in the type of event you’re putting on.

The bottom line

Play to each platform’s strengths, and put in the work ahead of time to figure out where your attendees spend the most time. If you have limited resources, put your work into those places. Anything else after that will be a bonus.

Oh, and one more bonus tip: All of these platforms use hashtags, so search each one for any hashtags you can think of that are related to your conference or event to see how people are already talking about it in each place. Keep that tone and style in mind as you plan your approach, or use it to tailor and rethink your approach if you already have a presence there.

Got any questions, or have any ideas or examples of great conference execution across platforms that we’ve missed? Leave it in the comments!

Written by Sarah

July 9th, 2014 at 12:28 pm

The Week in Social Analytics #108

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Gallup released a poll recently reporting that consumers aren’t that influenced by social media, but a closer look at the methodology reveals some problems:

Gallup’s Buzzy Social Media Report Appears ‘Deeply Flawed’: 2012 called and wants its data back [from Adweek; written by Christopher Heine]

“And Gallup told Adweek that some of the surveys were completed through snail mail, though the company would not say how many. While of course there’s nothing inherently wrong with conducting research this way, it’s difficult to imagine those respondents being on par with normal social media consumption. Brands employ social marketing to reach people who are actually there—not those who are not.

Emphasis added.

While the methodology of the Gallup poll is certainly questionable, ClickZ did get some good takeaways from it, in the form of actionable marketing lessons:

3 Social Media Marketing Takeaways From Gallup’s Study [from Clickz; written by Ashley Zeckman]

“Customers are people, not numbers. They want to be engaged and have trust in your brand before they’ll make a purchasing decision.

We also need to recognize that while there is a significant amount of value in utilizing social media as a marketing channel, we need to be realistic about what we will gain by interacting socially. We may not see immediate gratification (a conversion or purchase) but we’re spending time interacting where are customers are spending their time, and working to build trust in the process.”

Emphasis added.

This week also kicked off with some great pieces on storytelling: Storytelling For Business: The Only Difference Between You And The Competition Is The Story You Tell from Web.Search.Social, written by Carol Lynn Rivera, and Breaking Out of Boring: Tell Unexpected Stories from Ann Handley.

Word-of-Mouth Proves Highly Influential for Millennial Women [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Results from the survey of 1,100 American Millennial women without children also indicate that 93% have purchased a product after hearing about it from a family member of friend.

That’s a reflection of the trust they put in those recommendations: 89% said they trust recommendations from a friend, peer or family member more than from a brand.”

Why Brands Don’t Respond on Social Media [from Social Times; written by Richard Dumas]

“. . .while more than 68 percent of businesses recognize social media as a necessary service channel, 60 percent of companies are not formally supporting social customer care.”

You need to be where your customers are.

Your Customers Control Your Brand [from Spin Sucks; written by Gini Dietrich]

“While you can help motivate your customers to talk about you in a good way, ultimately they are the ones who control the message.

Your canned messages are no longer enough.

Yes, the things you, your executive team, your sales team, and your employees are saying about the brand should be consistent.

But you also have to be open to listening to how your customers describe your organization, your products, or your services.

If they perceive it differently than you do, it’s time to rethink your messaging and your brand positioning.”

Are You Ready For Multi-Platform Social Media Use? [from Heidi Cohen]

“Therefore, use a mix of different social media platforms with tailored messages to ensure your marketing reaches your target prospects where and when they spend their time.”

Getting Started Guide: Tumblr for Small Businesses [from Business2Community; written by Taylor Loren]

A great guide for small businesses just getting started on Tumblr.

Written by Sarah

June 27th, 2014 at 9:13 am

The Week in Social Analytics #107

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

7 best practices for using GIFs and cinemagraphs for business [from The Next Web; written by Brian Honigman]

“Don’t create this media just for the sake of doing it, but look to create GIFs and cinemagraphs that sync with your campaigns, as well as your consistent product or service offerings.”

How You Can Use Instagram in Your Business [Business 2 Community; written by Renee Shupe]

“Inject some personality into your marketing efforts. Even businesses that provide services or create products that are not ‘pretty’ enough for Instagram can use the service to their advantage by showcasing their human side. Simple photos of you and your team in action will be interesting to many users, especially if they are accompanied by a fun or thought-provoking caption. It’s also good to show your business engaging in charitable work. You could even post photos of your employees or clients along with brief profiles.”

Pinterest Vs Instagram: Visual Content Marketing [from Heidi Cohen]

Check what your competitors are doing on Pinterest and Instagram. What are they doing that’s successful that you’re not? Also check out the top performers on each platform. Take note of ideas that are worth adapting and making your own.”

The minimalist’s guide to boosting brands’ Instagram engagement [from The Next Web; written by Eric Dahan]

“A brand’s greatest challenge is communicating a sincere message to its followers with each and every Instagram post. A successful grassroots campaign prioritizes quality over quantity; therefore, while multiple hashtags will naturally yield higher potential reach, one or two incentive hashtags will generate better follower engagement.”

Should My Brand Be Active on Tumblr? [from Social Media Today; written by Margaret Murphy]

Visibility. Tumblr incorporates tagging and blog categorization to help users find the subjects they’re interested in. Many blogs garner so much attention online that they have even led to book deals. Have you ever heard of the book ‘Stuff White People Like’? How about ‘Humans of New York’? These both started as Tumblrs.”

Social Brands: The Future Of Marketing In 127 Slides [from Viral Blog; written by Igor Beuker]

“Don’t chase social channels like race dogs on steroids. Certainly not based on reach. Claim your domain, go big, go niche or go home.

The brands that will succeed in the future won’t just give back to communities; they’ll actively build and nurture communities.”

Millennials Lead the Way in Sharing Product and Service Info on Social Media [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Millennials were 22% more likely than the rest of the respondents to report having shared a link to a product or service on social media (39% vs. 32%), and 52% more likely to have posted a picture of a product or service (38% vs. 25%). “

5 Grammar Rules You Can Break on Social Media [from Likeable Media; written by Theresa Braun]

You’ve got to learn the rules in order to responsibly break them.

Welcome to the Era of Surround Storytelling [Edelman Digital; written by Jimmie Stone and Kendra Eash]

“How exactly do we show up differently and tell a brand story that still makes sense in this incredibly windy, fragmented environment?”

Written by Sarah

June 20th, 2014 at 9:16 am

3 dos and don’ts for running a campaign across platforms

with one comment

Every social media platform has its own way of operating that stems from its users reasons for being there; the same person might use Twitter mostly for professional work connections and news, Facebook for family updates, Instagram to connect with friends, and Tumblr to keep up with the fandoms around their favorite shows, for example. If that person matches the ideal customer for a brand and that brand wants to run a social campaign across most or all of those platforms to reach that person, they need to tailor their message for each place.

How? Get started with these do’s and don’ts.

1. Don’t: discount a platform because you think you know what people are there for.

Do: The research to see how conversations form around things that matter to your brand. Instagram, for example, is often thought of as a place where people simply share photos with friends and family, but that’s not necessarily the case. Big events like the World Cup have enormous conversations happening around them on the photo-sharing site, and smart brands like Adidas have caught onto that.

Our Instagram analysis* showed that Adidas was a top publisher around the World Cup conversation on Instagram, and they received 22.7k actions (likes and comments) on their 5 World Cup related posts, earning 6.3 million impressions. That’s a big return on a relatively small effort, especially considering fan-run sports accounts and even official soccer athlete accounts are making anywhere from 14-128 posts related to the World Cup.

 2. Don’t: assume you know how to talk the talk.

Do: Listen first, then join the conversation respectfully. Tumblr, for example, has many different communities that all have different ways of speaking to each other, making jokes, and presenting information, all of which is part of the larger Tumblr community and culture. What works well in Twitter or Facebook advertising will not work well here; the users are part of a larger creative community and they respond well to brands who take the time to understand how Tumblr really operates (or they’re smart enough to hire and work with someone who does).

Denny’s, for example, has an extremely popular Tumblr that users have responded well to because it speaks in the language of Tumblr. It isn’t just an attempt to ape it.

Denny's Tumblr

3. Don’t: Be afraid to experiment.

Do: Learn from and build on your failures and successes alike. FIFA has a Twitter account for their official match ball. While normally inanimate objects spontaneously get their own parody Twitter accounts following a big cultural event with social coverage (Pharrell’s hat following the GRAMMY’s, for example), FIFA decided to give their match ball its own autonomy and hashtag early.

Running a quick free TweetReach report shows that the conversation and engagement around #ballin is already good, and there’s still more than a month of World Cup matches left to go. While something like a snapshot report gives a good idea of the general success of the account relative to the hashtag- it’s not just a bunch of people using the term in other, World Cup unrelated ways- more in-depth monitoring could tell FIFA what was successful and unsuccessful in their approach specific to Twitter, and help them plan better for next time. (You can read more about how to monitor a Twitter campaign with TweetReach here.)

So what does this mean for campaigns, exactly?

The bottom line is that you have to tailor your message to fit in each place, and that can only be done by taking the time to understand how the conversation around what your audience is interested in operates. Adidas looked at how sports fans use Instagram, Denny’s hired someone familiar with the culture of Tumblr and gave them the freedom to do it right, and FIFA is experimenting with giving their match ball its own voice.

After you’ve decided on the messaging for each platform- visual for Instagram and Tumblr, with different wording and approach on Twitter, for example- build goals based on how the audience you aim to reach in each place talks to one another about you or your industry. Are you there to increase your share of voice in the industry (here’s more on how to measure share of voice, and how to grow it), or to build engagement with your existing fans, while hopefully earning new ones? Your goals for the same campaign might be different for each platform, which increases the necessity for tailored messages in each place. 

The basic approach is the same in each place, however: Research, plan, test, measure, rinse, and repeat.

 

*Interested in our Union Metrics for Instagram analytics? Learn more here

Written by Sarah

June 18th, 2014 at 7:58 am

The Week in Social Analytics #101

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

The Surprising Data Behind How Often Brands Should Post On Instagram [from Forbes; written by Jeff Bercovici]

 ”Union Metrics also looked at activity around paid content — ie. advertising — on Instagram, and found that it’s remarkably effective as a tool for driving follower acquisition and engagement. One big brand saw a 32% increase in followers after a 30-day paid campaign, translating into tens of thousands of new followers, plus a corresponding 25% increase in engagements on organic, non-paid posts. That suggests that followers obtained through paid promotion are as valuable as or more valuable than those acquired for free — another reversal of conventional wisdom, if it holds up on a wider scale.”

Want to learn more? Download our full Instagram whitepaper here.

10 Actionable Research Based Instagram Marketing Tips [from Heidi Cohen]

93% of prestige brands have a presence on Instagram, up from 63% in July 2013 according to L2 Think Tank research.”

Emphasis original. Pair with another great piece from Heidi this week: 10 Small Business Marketing Lessons You Need Regardless of Size.

10 Kinds of Stories to Tell with Data [from Harvard Business Review; written by Tom Davenport]

“Narrative is—along with visual analytics—an important way to communicate analytical results to non-analytical people. . .What’s needed is a framework for understanding the different kinds of stories that data and analytics can tell. If you don’t know what kind of story you want to tell, you probably won’t tell a good one.”

7 Ingredients for Employee Social Advocacy [from Convince and Convert; written by Jay Baer]

“. . .employee social media advocacy gives you Authenticity, Trustworthiness, and Reach. But, getting there isn’t a snap. There are many steps involved in creating and maintaining an effective program of this type.”

Click through for the full SlideShare.

The best crowdsourced social media campaigns [from iMedia Connection; written by Drew Hubbard]

Examples of the best crowsourced social campaigns in recent memory. Do you have one to add? Or a failed attempt everyone can learn from?

Over 100 B2B Content Marketing Statistics for 2014 [from TopRank Online Marketing Blog; written by Lee Odden]

This roundup covers everything from “insourcing vs. outsourcing to the most effective tactics”, but we pulled B2B content marketing and social media tactics here:

B2B content marketers use an average of 6 social media platforms

  • 91% of B2B marketers use LinkedIn to distribute content
  • 85% of B2B marketers use Twitter to distribute content
  • 81% of B2B marketers use Facebook to distribute content
  • 73% of B2B marketers use YouTube to distribute content
  • 55% of B2B marketers use Google+ to distribute content
  • 40% of B2B marketers use SlideShare to distribute content
  • 34% of B2B marketers use Pinterest to distribute content
  • 22% of B2B marketers use Instagram to distribute content
  • 22% of B2B marketers use Vimeo to distribute content
  • 16% of B2B marketers use Flickr to distribute content
  • 15% of B2B marketers use StumbleUpon to distribute content
  • 14% of B2B marketers use Foursquare to distribute content
  • 14% of B2B marketers use Tumblr to distribute content
  • 14% of B2B marketers use Vine to distribute content”

On Being Useful [from Social Media Explorer; written by Tracey Parsons]

Excellent follow-up piece on the discussion on the balance brands need to strike between being human and being useful; shows examples of brands who strive to be useful in a human way.

The Ecommerce Brand’s Guide To Pinterest [from Social Fresh; written by Julie Bee]

If you’re an ecommerce brand that has already set up a Pinterest Business Page and gotten verified, then this article tells you where to go next.

How 4 Brands Embraced Tumblr’s New Mobile Design [from AdWeek; written by Garett Sloane]

“‘Tumblr is a place where brands can breathe,’ the company said in today’s mobile redesign announcement. ‘We’re once again stretching the canvas for brands and marketers to create a mobile identity that is truly representative of their brand.’”

Pair with Tumblr declares war on the internet’s identity crisis from The Verge.

Twitter’s Marketing Problem [from stratechery; written by Ben Thompson]

The headline takes away from the interesting potential ideas for Twitter’s future in this article:

“So why not embrace the complexity? Instead of trying to teach new users how to built a curated follower list, build the lists for them. Don’t call them lists, though; embrace Twitter’s TV connection and make them ‘channels.’ Big basketball game? Go to the basketball channel, populated not with the biggest celebrities but with the best and most entertaining tweeters. Build similar channels for specific teams in all sports. Do the same for Apple, Google, and technology; liberals, conservatives, and politics in general; have channels for the Oscars, the Olympics and so on and so forth. And make them good, devoid of the crap that pollutes most hashtags and search results. If the ideal Twitter experience is achieved with a curated list, then provide curated lists and an easy way to switch among them.

Now you have a value prop: easily join the conversation about what is happening in the areas you care about, without the months-long process of building a perfectly customized Twitter feed. Oh, and by the way Ad Person, here is a very easy-to-understand ad unit built around a specific topic filled with self-selected followers.”

Written by Sarah

May 9th, 2014 at 9:27 am

The Week in Social Analytics #97

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

How to control rumours on social media during a disaster [from Phys.org; written by staff]

“Dr Oh believes the main motivation for people turning to Twitter in a crisis is to find out what is happening in their immediate area or to acquaintances, so in order to control the flow of misinformation, emergency communication centres need to be set up quickly to respond to misinformation through social media channels.”

How Brands Can Make the Most Out of Twitter’s New Features [from Social Media Today; written by Jaylee Miguel]

“This visually-led profile will give brands the opportunity to raise awareness and drive engagement for competitions and campaign launches. Gone are the days of scrolling through days worth of tweets – instead, the pinning feature can present key information to users as soon as they land on the page.”

The redesign of Twitter is a great opportunity for brands to be able to visually express themselves better on the platform, without losing the engagement and connectivity Twitter is known most for.

What It’d Be Like To Step Inside Your Twitter Feed [from Fast Company; written by Margaret Rhodes]

“You enter your Twitter handle on a touch screen outside, then walk into the high-tech hut filled with screens and mirrors. A kaleidoscopic stream of notifications, updates, and hashtags flicker and flash around you.”

The Hashtag Test: Best and Worst Practices for Social Media Marketers [from TopRank; written by Nick Ehrenberg]

“Hashtag overuse is a common error in social messaging, sending signals of desperation and inexperience.”

In the UK, Real-Time Social Media Marketing Focuses on the Customer [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Interacting with consumers in real time may be beneficial when it comes to fostering relationships, but it’s not easy, with UK marketers citing many challenges. More than three in five respondents said managing engagement outside of normal working hours was a top challenge, the No. 1 response. Consumers use social media before and after the workday—and they may expect brands that respond to them in real time during the day to do the same in the early morning or at night.”

Why your brand should definitely be on Tumblr: 10 fantastic examples [from Econsultancy; written by Christopher Ratcliff]

“Tumblr has a huge youth demographic that’s growing rapidly. This demographic also has a higher than average disposable income and very little competition from other brands.

Tumblr is the fifth most visited site in the USA, but only 31 of the top 100 brands operate a Tumblr page. It seems like a no-brainer.”

SnapChat and Building Community Where Your Audience is [from Spin Sucks; written by Eleanor Pierce]

“Because there’s one big reason SnapChat worked for me: I had a community of people who were already there. I didn’t try to force a community into using a trendy new tool just because I wanted them to be there.”

Emphasis original.

The Ultimate Marketing Guide to Using Snapchat for Business [from Social Media Today; written by Ross Simmonds]

“We’re living a in a time where our attention is minimal. Snapchat is a tool that captures someones attention entirely for a few seconds and has the ability cut through the attention crisis. In a world where our attention span is limited to 5 short minutes, a tool like snapchat could be a marketers dream. Millions of people around the world have become accustomed to receiving their news in 140 characters and watching videos in under 5 minutes. It’s changing the way consumers think and the way marketers must react.”

Boards with Benefits: 5 Stand Out Brands on Pinterest [from Social Media Today; written by Deanna Baisden]

“Having 2.5 billion monthly pageviews, there is a growing opportunity for businesses to find success on Pinterest, but what makes a brand stand out amongst a sea of images?”

These brand examples can show you exactly what’s working for brands in different areas on Pinterest.

8 Ways to Get More Pinterest Followers [from Pamorama; written by Pam Dyer]

“Despite being much smaller than Facebook or Twitter at 25 million users, it accounts for more than 23% of all social media-driven sales. More than 47% of online consumers in the U.S. have made a purchase based on Pinterest recommendations, and the average order placed by users of the platform is $179 — compare that to $80 for Facebook and $69 for Twitter, and you can see why it’s important to get more Pinterest followers.”

6 in 10 Americans Aged 65+ Go Online [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Some 59% of Americans aged 65 and older report using the internet as of the second half of 2013, up 6% points from a similar time a year earlier.”

 

Written by Sarah

April 11th, 2014 at 8:50 am

The Week in Social Analytics #94

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

The common elements of good storytelling [from The Next Web; written by Paul Jarvis]

“Good marketers have used stories to get consumers to do what they want for years—look at any commercial that doesn’t show the product it’s selling, except maybe at the very end, once the story finishes.”

Brand Storytelling: B2B Brands Need to Catch Up [from Lewis PR; written by Uwe Lang]

“The remaining 10 per cent stated that the majority of their communications efforts are focused on story development (i.e. storytelling) that can be used across multiple channels.

Although this is encouraging, it seems B2B brands – particularly within the information technology and telecommunications sectors – have a long way to go if they are to catch up with their B2C counterparts.”

Explore Social Media Formatting Options to Make Your Posts Look Better [from Business 2 Community; written by Ishita Ganguly]

Your posts have a better chance of performing well if they look their best on each respective platform.

Is Instagram Becoming a Boutique Shopping Destination? [from Social Times; written by Kimberlee Morrison]

“While Pinterest keeps ticking up, and Polyvore continues to surprise, Instagram seems overlooked as one of the most spendy networks. In fact, according to recent Shopify data, Instagram converts more frequently than both of the aforementioned networks. And when it comes to average order value, Instagram was the runner up with an average order value of $65.”

How the US intelligence community attempts to rebrand itself – on Tumblr [from The Guardian; written by Spencer Ackerman]

A fascinating read about using Tumblr as a rebranding tool for government transparency.

How Big is Tumblr? | Infographic [from SocialFresh; written by Nick Cicero]

“. . .despite media pressures and some TOS changes following Yahoo’s acquisition, in 2013 the number of Tumblr accounts actually increased, and the site had the second highest Revenue Per  Visit increase behind only Facebook from Q4 ’12 to Q4 ’13.”

Click through the link for the full infographic.

Top Challenges Faced by Brands Marketing on Twitter [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“While measuring ROI is a challenge, 65% of those surveyed agree that Twitter is an effective marketing tool.”

Yes, You Need A Pinterest Business Account [from PR in your Pajamas; written by Elena Verlee]

“So if you’re using Pinterest in any way to promote your business, including products and services, then you must use a business account. Otherwise you’re in violation of Pinterest’s terms of use. How do you know you’re using Pinterest for commercial purposes? Here are some examples:

  • You drive traffic from Pinterest to a website that earns income through ads, sponsored content, or affiliate commissions
  • You drive traffic from Pinterest to a website that promotes your products or services. Examples of services are interior design, writing, bookkeeping, and PR.
  • You Pinterest board builds your personal brand, from which you derive income. For instance, you’re a book author, speaker, or actor.”

6 TV Series That Integrate Social Media With Their Broadcast [from Social Media Today; written by Philip Cohen]

See which shows are going beyond using a hashtag during airtime, and what exactly they’re doing to connect with fans where the fans already are.

US Millennials: TV is the Most Influential Advertising Medium [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“. . .Millennials also tabbed TV as the advertising medium through which they are most likely to be introduced to or find out about a new brand they’ll consider for trial.

Social media, to be fair, is closing the gap.

Here are the numbers:

  • 70% said TV influences the way they perceive and value a brand;
  • 60% said the same about social (66% for women)”

Written by Sarah

March 21st, 2014 at 9:13 am

The Week in Social Analytics #91

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

New Research: Most Companies Do Not Have the Talent to Leverage Marketing Analytics [from Convince & Convert; written by Tom Webster]

“The simple truth is that many marketers can’t show the business impact of social because they can’t show the business impact of a lot of things.

“All of which is to say this: if you are in the business of using social for your marketing efforts, either on the brand-side or the agency-side, now is a great time to dig those wells before you get thirsty. Use those extra dollars, and that extra optimism, to build analytics and pre/post campaign measurement into everything you do and to recruit or develop tomorrow’s analysts. End 2014 with more actionable insight and knowledge about the impact of social on your business than you have today. Hold your efforts to the highest possible standards–and let Darwin take care of the rest.”

Emphasis original.

A Marketer’s Guide to SXSW Brands try to keep Austin wired [from Adweek; written by Christopher Heine]

“For those braving the South-by crowds, be prepared for a little something weird. That’s just part of the deal, friendo.”

Adweek, preparing you for the “controlled chaos” of SXSW. As for us, this is what we’re up to during SXSWi. See you there?

This week had a ton of great articles on Instagram:

Fantastic Infographics, Drawn From A Study of Instagram Selfies [from Wired; written by Liz Stinson]

Finally the selfie gets the serious scientific study it deserves:

“Right now, there are more than 79 million photos on Instagram that fall under #selfie. This is not counting #selfies (7 million photos), #selfienation (1 million photos), #selfiesfordays (400,000 photos) or the countless number of photos with no hashtag at all. You might be thinking: “Finally, we’ve reached peak #selfie!” But according to a new study, only 3-5 percent of photos on Instagram fall into the category.”

Keys to Photog Jamie Beck’s Success: Tumblr, Insta, Hard Work [from Racked; written by Chavie Lieber]

Did social media help at all with the jump start?

‘Well, I was kind of behind on Twitter, but Tumblr for sure, it was amazing. They were really supporting our community of original content creators. We were part of the original smaller group of people [on Tumblr] so it was easier to engage. We went to meet-ups, and made friends who were incredibly supportive. It was definitely right time, right place.’”

Emphasis original.

How Instagram Harnesses the Awesome Power of Mobile, Social Media and Photos: 3 Success Stories [from Jeff Bullas]

“This visual self expression and sharing culture combines the power of three.

  1. People’s obsession with their iPhone (read smartphone)
  2. Engagement power of Facebook
  3. The love of photos that seems to have been reinforced with the easy availability of the camera in your pocket

The only challenge for marketers is how to harness that through a touch of creativity.”

Instagram Captures Higher Interaction Rates than Facebook [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“While Instagram’s community of 150 million monthly active users was a fraction of the size of Facebook’s, and even smaller than Twitter’s, the digital marketing organization found that interaction rates for posts made by the 249 prestige brands studied were some 15 times higher than those on Facebook.

Emphasis added.

Can Flickr Catch Instagram? [from Geoff Livingston]

“Flickr celebrated 10 years of serving photos earlier this month, making it an old man amongst social networks. But the photo network is still relevant today, ranking in the top 10 social networks thanks to a resurgence under Marissa Mayer’s watch. In fact, Flickr is now ranked just one spot behind rival photo network Instagram.”

Here’s how to become the ultimate Tumblr power user [from The Daily Dot; written by Aja Romano]

A fantastic roundup of basic Tumblr tips- including all the changes from Tumblr’s recent revamps- and some excellent power user tips.

10 Must-Know Tips to Leverage Pinterest for Your Business [from Social Media Today; written by Brett Relander]

“Pinterest offers perhaps the most unique benefits among all social media platforms. And if your businesses’ content marketing strategy has not factored Pinterest in the mix you are missing out on a huge chunk of traffic from a site that sends more visitors to web properties than the much-vaunted Twitter and has more than 70 million users.”

Three Ways Twitter Chats Can Help Build Your Technology Brand [from Edelman PR; written by Aurora Arlet]

You can find us hanging out in #MMchat  followed by #socialchat on Monday evenings starting at 7pm CT.

Facebook Pulls Ahead of Twitter in Social TV Battle, But Can It Win the War? [from Social Media Today; written by Elizabeth Kent]

“Why Does Social TV Matter for Marketers?
Last but not least, what does all this mean for marketers? The data acquired from Facebook and Twitter on TV viewing and social media use can be used for:

  • Better insights: Social TV data is critical because it allows marketers to better understand who their audience is.
  • Campaign optimization: Through these insights, marketers can optimize their advertising campaigns to maximize effectiveness.
  • Cost-effective ad purchasing: Understanding when certain ads are most effective will allow marketers to make advertising purchases that are more cost-effective.
  • Real-time change: With real-time data comes real-time change. Marketers may be able to use social TV data to improve their advertising campaigns in real-time for immediate results.
  • Social media integration: Data has shown that when networks and advertisers incorporate social media content into their broadcasts, they are able to engage more effectively with their audience.”

Introducing Promoted Accounts in search [from Twitter; written by Nipoon Malhotra]

“With this launch, relevant Promoted Accounts can be presented to users in search results along with recommendations of people to follow. We automatically select relevant search queries for presenting Promoted Accounts based on an advertiser’s targeting choices, so no additional action is required for your business to access this capability.”

 

Written by Sarah

February 28th, 2014 at 9:12 am

Find health support just a click away

without comments

The state of our health isn’t deemed polite conversation by most of society. Navigating the line between getting support from friends and family when you’re going through a hard time and not being the weird uncle who always talks about their colon at Christmas dinner can take some adept balancing.

Fortunately, just as social platforms can serve as support networks for those making physical changes aimed at fitness, they can also serve as support networks for those living with health issues from the temporary (How do I work out with a broken leg?) to those living with chronic illness (How do I restructure my life with this?).

Reaching out on Twitter

Building a supportive community on Twitter is one of the things that makes the platform the most worthwhile, and it can make a huge difference when a recently diagnosed person is able to surround themselves with supportive people dealing with similar health issues a few tweets away. Reaching out can start with browsing this master list of tweet chats and joining in whichever feel most comfortable; general health chats might point to more specific ones, and it’s hard not to find someone to connect with in most tweet chats. Doctors and other medical professionals sometimes host tweet chats in order to help answer questions from the general public. Building twitter lists of who participates in which chats, or is the most helpful in pointing out resources can help sort a barrage of new information.

There are also specific accounts dedicated to any number of health issues; Invisible Illness Wk, for example, connects those living with invisible illnesses in addition to raising awareness of the issues those will invisible, chronic illnesses face to those who are unfamiliar.

On other platforms

Sometimes there’s nothing more helpful than reading about someone else’s experience dealing with what you’re currently going through. Tumblr offers the same capabilities as a blog, but socially enhanced with reblogging and private messaging options, allowing one blog to draw from and connect with another easily, building up a support network without ever leaving the site.

For particular chronic illnesses, medical professionals will often point those newly diagnosed to message boards specific to a certain condition or related conditions. Inspire.com has a range of different communities that offer support, for example.

YouTube is also a popular platform for sharing experiences and getting feedback. Popular YouTuber Hank Green has shared his experience of living with a chronic illness, and the comments show many viewers grateful to see their own experiences mirrored in his video, especially from someone well-regarded and popular.

The bottom line

Ultimately social media helps connect those whose health might keep them from being able to attend a physical support group, and to supplement and organize the information and support they might receive from other sources.

Written by Sarah

February 12th, 2014 at 9:26 am