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Announcing the TweetReach API

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Today, we’re happy to announce general availability of the TweetReach API. For those of you who participated in the beta – thanks for your input and feedback! Available now for TweetReach Pro subscribers at the Plus, Premium, and Max levels (and to those of you who participated in the beta), the TweetReach API provides read-only programmatic access to TweetReach Tracker metrics.

So what does this mean for you? It means you can automate the process of importing TweetReach data into your periodic reporting or easily connect TweetReach to your other internal systems. We know that many of our customers have analysts but may not have full-time developers on staff. Don’t worry, we’ve designed our API to be easy to use from tools like Excel Web Queries so your team can pull TweetReach data directly into your Excel-based reports. However, if you do have a developer, we think you’ll appreciate the RESTful simplicity and choice of XML or JSON responses that make our API easy to use from any programming environment.

So what can you do with the TweetReach API?

  • Get a list of all Trackers that have been configured in your TweetReach Pro account along with their summary reach, exposure, activity and contributors metrics.
  • Get data about a specific Tracker. This can be used to provide a summary rollup of reach, exposure, activity and contributor metrics or a trend rollup by day, week or month.
  • Get a list of all contributors within a Tracker including their exposure, activity, retweets, retweet rate, total exposure and amplification multiplier metrics.

If you’re ready to get started, check out our API Documentation for everything you need to get going. And, as always, we’d love to hear your feedback!

Written by Hayes D

January 5th, 2012 at 1:52 pm

Posted in Features

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Measuring participant influence through amplification on Twitter

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We recently upgraded the contributor metrics available in our TweetReach Pro Trackers. Among other metrics we’re now surfacing are new contributor amplification measures, including amplified impressions and an amplification multiplier.

Our objective with these new contributor metrics is to help you find people who are driving conversation and engagement around your campaign or brand. Because, depending on your goals, there probably isn’t one single influence metric that completely captures the contributions of your most important, active participants. So we present you with several contributor metrics:

  • Tweets
  • Direct Impressions
  • Retweets
  • Retweet Rate
  • Total Exposure
  • Amplification Multiplier

RT rate is the average number of retweets per tweet a contributor has posted. This metric is useful for finding people who have contributed to the spread of a message and who have engaged followers. Look at this number in relation to the total number of tweets this contributor has posted.

The amplification multiplier represents the spread of a tweet through retweets. If the original tweet generated 100 direct impressions, and retweets generated 150 additional impressions, then that tweet generated 250 total impressions, resulting in an amplification multiplier of 1.5x the original tweet. For each contributor, this number is calculated as an average for all their tweets in this Tracker. If a participant did not receive any retweets, then that person will not have an amplification multiplier, since her tweets were not amplified. Generally, anyone with an amplification multiplier of 1.2x or higher is doing quite well at spreading conversation. And sometimes you’ll see someone with a huge amplification multiplier – 100x or more. Generally, this person did not generate many direct impressions, but was retweeted by someone with a large following. If a number looks like an outlier, it probably is, so check that person’s other metrics to see what’s causing this spike.

To find influential people in your Tracker, take a look at all of these contributor metrics. Use tweets to find your most active advocates. Use direct impressions to find people with a lot of followers. Use RT rate to find people with an active, engaged following. Use the amplification multiplier to find people with a large secondary audience. Together, you should be able to develop a list of engaged, influential and passionate advocates for your campaign or brand.

You can also drill in to view an individual contributor’s details by clicking on their username anywhere in your Tracker. On the contributor detail page, you’ll find all kinds of information about that Twitter user, as seen here:


Written by Jenn D

November 28th, 2011 at 12:30 pm

New contributor reporting in TweetReach Trackers

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We’ve upgraded our TweetReach Trackers to include a new way to find out even more about who is tweeting about your campaign, your client or your company. Ever wanted to know who’s creating the most popular content and driving the most engagement in the conversations about your campaign? Our new Tracker contributor reporting can help you identify those key contributors – the influencers, the people driving the most retweets, the highest exposure and the widest amplification, your biggest fans and advocates.

In addition to traditional metrics like number of tweets and impressions generated by each contributor, we’ve added a bunch of new metrics about each contributor. Our new contributor metrics include:

  • Retweets: The number of times a contributor’s tweets were retweeted
  • RT Rate: The average number of retweets per tweet a contributor has received
  • Total Exposure: The total number of impressions generated by a contributor, including direct impressions from the contributor’s own tweets, as well as amplified impressions resulting from retweets and replies
  • Amplification Multiplier: A contributor’s rate of amplification, based on how far that contributor’s tweets spread due to the impressions generated by retweets and replies

You can also drill into any contributor to see detailed metrics for that person. Just click on any username to see that contributor’s details.

TweetReach Trackers provide ongoing, real-time Twitter analysis and are available through a TweetReach Pro subscription.

A word to the analytics geeks

The word amplification has been used in a lot of contexts by many very smart people as an important social media metric, most recently by Avinash Kaushik in his post about the best social media metrics. We should note here that what we refer to as retweet rate is roughly the same as what Avinash calls amplification. We obviously believe this is a very important measure or we wouldn’t have included it. However, we think it doesn’t accurately describe the extent to which a contributor’s message is amplified. To do that, one needs to consider the overall increase in audience as a result of the retweets. This is how our amplification multiplier metric works. We look at growth between the impressions generated by the original tweet and the total impressions generated by the original tweet and any RTs or replies to that tweet. We express this as a “multiplier” so that it neatly describes how many times larger the total exposure was vs the original exposure.

Written by Jenn D

November 3rd, 2011 at 7:39 pm

TweetReach case study: Exposed PR’s IKEA Capture the Catalog tournament

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Recently, TweetReach customer Exposed PR, along with C&I Studios, ran a very creative promotion with their client IKEA. We love to highlight interesting – and successful – PR campaigns, so read on for more about this cool promotion.

In July, Exposed PR and C&I Studios teamed up with IKEA to organize an in-store scavenger hunt with an online twist. Called Capture the Catalog, this promotion pitted 11 teams against each other in a scavenger hunt at the IKEA store in Sunrise, Florida, just outside Fort Lauderdale. Teams competed to complete a set of tasks in the store, and tweeted about their achievements as they went, trying to get as many retweets as possible. The teams were competing to see who could generate the most impressions on Twitter in 90 minutes. Exposed PR used TweetReach to track these tweets and measure each team’s impressions. They generated more than 8 million impressions in just an hour and half, reaching more than 700,000 unique Twitter accounts!

We talked to Sara Shake of Exposed PR, one of the creators of this promotion, to understand more about where this clever idea came from and how everything went.

First, tell us a little about the IKEA Capture the Catalog Tournament. What was the goal of this promotion?

The goal of the Ikea promotion was to launch their 2012 Catalog. As a company, Ikea has a few different times throughout the year that are extremely important, and their catalog launch is the biggest. We wanted a creative way to get the word out that didn’t include the typical Media Day festivities that they had done in the past.

How did you come up with the idea for this promotion?

I share my office with a company called C&I Studios. It’s not unusual for us at the end of the day to start speaking in terms of “What If.” Once we’ve completed all the work for the day, we always try to spend sometime just brainstorming without the limitations of the clients that we currently service. We don’t think about location or budget, we just bounce ideas until something sticks. We call these ideas our 5 O’Clock Miracles.

This idea came largely from my frequent frustration with traditional media… We (Joshua Miller from C&I Studios and I) thought there has to be a better way to get the word out, without the help of traditional media. Then we thought about how competition drives people. The original concept was Capture the Flag (which is where Capture the Catalog came from), but it evolved into a scavenger hunt. We knew we needed a forward-thinking brand to latch onto the idea…and this was just about the time that you started hearing about Ikea letting the cats loose in Sweden. We said “We need a brand like Ikea!” We were lucky enough to have one in the neighborhood, so we just called.

How did you decide who won?

The first-place winner was the team with the highest number of impressions of their unique hash tag during the 90-minute scavenger hunt.

What role did TweetReach play in this promotion?

TweetReach was instrumental in the Capture the Catalog tournament. We were able to set up a Tracker to live-track every team’s (there were 11) hashtag throughout the tournament. This way we were able to make announcements like, “So and so is in the lead with 350,000 impressions.” We also announced every time that we reached another million impressions of the combined hashtags. We took snapshot reports for each hashtag at the end of the tournament and that’s how we determined the winner.

What would you change for next time?

We would just find a way to make it bigger and better.

What went well? Was there anything you were particularly proud of?

We were really proud of the teams; they went all out. It was also an amazing experience to work with Ikea as a brand. They believed and bought into the vision, and took it to an entirely different level. From the graphics and signage they produced, to the staff that manned each clue, to the prize that they provided to our winners, it was totally refreshing to work with a brand that didn’t cut a single corner. They were exceptionally thoughtful down to the last detail.

What did IKEA think?

They loved it! In a Miami Herald article about the event, Chantal Nichtawitz, marking manager at Ikea Sunrise, said, “We were certain that the event drove traffic to the store. That Saturday we had one of the biggest Saturdays we’ve seen in over a calendar year.”

Do you have any recommendations or tips for someone running their own promotion or contest on Twitter?

The key is finding the right brand and participants.

You can follow Exposed PR, C&I Studios, and the IKEA Sunrise store on Twitter.

Written by Jenn D

September 20th, 2011 at 12:01 pm

Posted in Events,Trends

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New hashtag and URL analysis in TweetReach Trackers

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Starting today, all TweetReach Trackers now have detailed hashtag and URL reporting. This new analysis allows you to quickly see which hashtags and URLs have been tweeted about the most and get detailed stats about each hashtag and URL in your Trackers.

We’ll show you how it works with an example. We’ve been monitoring tweets about TechCrunch Disrupt this week. As you can see here, the new URL and hashtag analysis is right below the big main graph (highlighted in red). On your main Tracker page, we’ll show you the five most popular URLs and hashtags in your Tracker, and you can drill into a summary of all URLs and hashtags, as well as detailed metrics for each individual URL and hashtag. Read on for more details.

Click those All links next to the Top 5 Hashtags and Top 5 URLs to go to an overall summary report (a URL summary report is pictured just below). This summary report includes overall statistics for each URL or hashtag in your Tracker, and is sortable by the number of tweets, retweets, impressions and contributors.

You can also click through to a detail report for each individual hashtag or URL, which includes stats on that URL’s exposure, tweet activity, and contributors. The detail report also includes a list of all tweets that included this URL and the contributors who posted those tweets.

This URL and hashtag reporting is just the next step in helping surface the most important and interesting data in your Trackers. There’s lots more on the way! Do you have any suggestions for new TweetReach features? Please let us know!

If you’re interested in getting these Twitter analytics for your company, client or campaign, Trackers are available through a TweetReach Pro subscription.

Written by Jenn D

September 12th, 2011 at 7:03 pm

Posted in Features,News

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Detailed hashtag analysis now available in TweetReach Trackers

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Good news, everyone! We’re excited to unveil brand new hashtag analysis in your TweetReach Trackers. You can now get detailed stats on the use of individual hashtags.

To see these stats, simply click on any hashtag anywhere in your Tracker to view detailed information about how that hashtag has been used. You’ll learn more about the number of tweets that included that hashtag, how many impressions have been generated by that hashtag, and how many people contributed tweets with that hashtag. You’ll also get a list of all the tweets that include that hashtag, as well as info about the people who posted those tweets. And like all the rest of your Tracker data, you can export this information to a CSV file for further analysis in Excel or Numbers. Here’s a screenshot.

This hashtag detail report is just the first step in deeper hashtag analysis throughout TweetReach Trackers. While we can’t reveal the rest yet, here’s a sneak peak at something big coming up:

So, more soon! In the meantime, these nice new hashtag reports are only available through TweetReach Pro, so check it out if you haven’t already and let us know if you have any questions.

Written by admin

August 15th, 2011 at 2:12 pm

Posted in Features,News

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TakeFive with TweetReach – Holly Homer

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Welcome back to TakeFive with TweetReach, our ongoing interview series with notable members of the social media analytics and measurement community.

This week we’re happy to welcome Holly Homer, writer of June Cleaver Nirvana, founding partner at Business 2 Blogger, and operator of several websites devoted to her home in Texas, including the popular She is Dallas.

TweetReach: Welcome Holly! Let’s start with talking about how you got started using social media. Can you describe your first “ah-ha” moment?

Holly Homer: I had been blogging for a year or so when Twitter started to become popular among bloggers, but I was Twitter-resistant. I was happily using Plurk. Plurk was great because it was similar to Twitter, but the comments nested so you could follow a full conversation. The Plurk timeline showed a conversation topic and how many people had responded below. I was mocking my friends on Twitter and lamenting how random and pointless Twitter was when one of them said, “Who cares how great Plurk is if everyone is on Twitter.” That was the moment I realized that the key to social media was the social part. I got over my Twitter issues and have grown to find its random nature charming.

TweetReach: How important was measurement in your initial strategy and how has that evolved?

Holly Homer: Initially, I had no strategy. I am a mom blogger. I am posting pictures of my kids and telling silly suburban stories. As my readership grew, I started getting approached by others to write about something on their agenda. Back then, blogging was (and is now to a lesser degree) in no-man’s-land. No one wanted to pay for me to do things because it was unchartered territory, but they still wanted me to do things… just for free. I figured out really quickly that if I ever expected to be paid for blogging, I was going to have to figure out how to prove my worth. I started learning about SEO, Google Analytics, StumbleUpon, Alexa, Twitter and Facebook to help define my sphere of influence.

As my sphere of influence grew, I was getting more and more email pitches. Some mornings I would wake up to an inbox with 5 or 6 new ways I could write about a company in exchange for a product or service. None of these pitches fit my blog, but that didn’t mean they weren’t good opportunities for another blogger so I passed them on to my blogging friends. This went on for a few months and I thought, “Someone needs to organize all this!”. That is when I had the idea for Business 2 Blogger. I bought the URL and sat on it for nearly a year as I tried to avoid taking on another project. In the meantime, I found some partners and in February of 2010 we launched the site that matches companies with bloggers. It is based on the HARO model where businesses tell us what type of bloggers they need and how many and we pass that information on in an email to our blogger members. The interested bloggers “apply” for the opportunity and a match is made.

The information I had learned about how to justify my own worth was now being used to help other bloggers find writing opportunities. I am a big believer in online karma.

TweetReach: What metrics are most important for your job and/or your company?

Holly Homer: Each and every campaign we run at Business 2 Blogger is different. People are looking for different things for different reasons, but all of them have to justify a budget. The better the match, the more effective the message will be within a sphere of influence. BUT we still have to define a sphere of influence. In campaign responses, bloggers self-report traffic but in all of our paid campaigns, we verify with Alexa ranking, Compete score, Twitter metrics, Facebook likes and Klout to try and achieve the most objective picture of actual influence.

When I manage a blogger campaign, my weekly reports include URLs of blog posts written about my client and TweetReach numbers surrounding the promotion’s keywords, the client’s Twitter profile and any related hashtags. I am in LOVE with TweetReach trackers. I buy extra trackers like I buy shoes – a girl needs one for every occasion! Clients appreciate the numbers (and fancy graphs), but it is extremely helpful to me in finding those bloggers who go the extra mile. The extra mile isn’t exclusive to Twitter and often the people at the top of my TweetReach report are also the bloggers who tagged several extra times on Facebook or wrote an extra blog post. They can’t help it and they are the people you want on your next promotion.

TweetReach: Does size matter? David Armano has written about the importance of topical influence. What do you think? How important is the size of someone’s social graph vs. their influence in a particular topical area?

Holly Homer: Size TOTALLY matters. Social media influence is about influence. To influence there needs to be an audience. I hear people claim that they have a “small, but engaged audience”. Just because I have a large number of followers doesn’t mean I don’t have an “engaged” core. This argument is easily won by a TweetReach report. Let’s leave out number of impressions for argument sake and look at number of retweets, recruitment of others to a conversation and number of responses. I will take the blogger with the 5,000 followers almost every time. The fact that someone HAS 5,000 followers shows a serious level of engagement.

TweetReach: Any social media pet peeves? What practices irritate you the most when you look at the state of the industry?

Holly Homer: UGH. I take poor social media skills personally and feel compelled to gently correct. Bad Twitter affects us all. Take the example of the auto-direct message. The fact that 80% (my guess) of people on Twitter now send one out when I follow them has rendered the Twitter DM useless. Who wants to wade through all that spam willingly? People forget that there are OTHER people on the other end of Twitter. Twitter is like a huge networking cocktail party. Introduce yourself, shake a few hands, listen to a few stories and skip the hard sell.

TweetReach: Great advice. Thanks, Holly!

Holly Homer writes June Cleaver Nirvana, runs several websites devoted to her home in Texas including She is Dallas, and is a founding partner at Business 2 Blogger. She is the mom of three boys who occasionally slips away to the nearest casino for a poker tournament. Follow her on Twitter as @Texasholly.

Written by Dean Cruse

August 3rd, 2011 at 5:36 pm

TweetReach Pro plan enhancements

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We’ve heard from a number of you, asking for more options in our TweetReach Pro plans. We’re excited to announce that we’ve added more trackers and reports to our popular Plus, Basic and Mini plans. Starting immediately, the Plus plan includes six Trackers (up from five) and the Basic plan includes three Trackers (up from two). And, we’ve added more reports and support for an additional user to our Mini plan – now with one Tracker, 10 reports and two users.

Even with these increases in options, we’re keeping pricing the same! Existing subscribers will immediately see the added options when you log in to your account.

Written by Dean Cruse

June 1st, 2011 at 4:41 pm

Posted in Features

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Track up to 10 queries in one Tracker

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We’ve been working hard to improve the TweetReach Pro infrastructure behind the scenes so that our tools are faster and smarter than ever. As part of that, we’re excited to announce that you can now track up to 10 search queries in a single TweetReach Tracker! This makes it even easier to find exactly the tweets you’re looking for.

A Tracker can monitor unlimited tweets for unlimited time about a campaign or topic. Each Tracker can include up to 10 search queries and exclude up to 5 terms. Unlike other services that charge per keyword, the TweetReach Tracker allows you to comprehensively search for all tweets that are part of a campaign, with multiple queries and keywords for each campaign.

If you’d like to try the Tracker for yourself, our TweetReach Pro pricing is listed here. And if you’re already a TweetReach Pro user, check out these detailed Tracker setup instructions and get more information about what you can search for in a Tracker.

Written by Jenn D

May 7th, 2011 at 6:20 pm

Posted in Features,News

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New Tracker detail pages for hashtags, mentions and URLs

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TweetReach Trackers (available through TweetReach Pro) now include detail reports for URLs, hashtags, and mentions. Click on any hashtag, username, or URL anywhere in a Tracker for more information.

URLs

When you click the magnifying glass icon next to a URL in a Tracker, you’ll be taken to a URL detail page that shows all tweets that include the URL. If that URL is a bit.ly link, then you’ll also see historical click stats for that URL.

Mentions

When you click on any mentioned username, you’ll be taken to a Twitterer detail page. On this page, you’ll see all tweets that person tweeted and all the tweets she or he was mentioned in this Tracker, as well as influence and share of voice information.

Hashtags

When you click on a hashtag anywhere in a Tracker, you’ll be taken to a detailed listing of all tweets using that hashtag.

Written by admin

April 30th, 2011 at 4:10 pm

Posted in Features

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