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Archive for the ‘tips and tricks’ tag

TweetReach Tip: Searching for URLs

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If you want to follow a piece of news through Twitter, try searching for the article’s URL instead of its title or a set of keywords. In TweetReach snapshot reports, we can search for a root URL, so even if a link is shrunk into a t.co, bit.ly or other shortener, we’ll pick it up.

Some more tips to get the results you’re looking for:

  • Exclude the http:// or www. They don’t impact your search and lengthen your search query. And depending on the URL shortener, might not even be included in the link.
  • Keep queries at about 60 characters or under. If you have a long URL, consider searching for the second half – the unique part – of the URL to save space.

Want to see an example? Say you want to follow this New York Times article Sushi’s New Vanguard and watch how it spreads through Twitter. In your TweetReach search, you can leave out the http:// and www. portions of the URL. Search just for this:

nytimes.com/2013/10/30/dining/sushis-new-vanguard.html

That will result in this snapshot report. Note how it includes tweets that use nyti.ms shortened URLs, among others.

Have any questions about your URL? Just ask us!

Written by Sarah

November 5th, 2013 at 10:50 am

Twitter Tip: Turn off mobile alerts at bedtime

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If you’ve got Twitter setup to be able to receive notifications and send tweets and more from your phone, you can also turn off notifications for certain periods of time- such as when you’re sleeping- if you don’t want to be woken up by an errant tweet in the middle of the night.

Under the “Mobile” tab in your left-hand menu, scroll down to find this:

Mobile Alerts TR Tip

 

Alternatively if you’re running a campaign, or taking your turn on customer service duty, you can uncheck the box and be able to respond in a timely manner.

Written by Sarah

October 29th, 2013 at 11:49 am

TweetReach Tip: Searching for more than one term in a snapshot report

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If you want to run a TweetReach snapshot report for more than one term, be sure to remember the magic of the “OR” operator. You can search for any two or three queries by combining them together with OR. Example:

term1 OR term2 – search for tweets containing either term1 or term2 (e.g. analytics OR metrics)

A few things to keep in mind to get the best results possible:

  •  Keep queries around 50-60 characters, 100 max.
  • If searching for two word phrases, use quote marks or you might not get the results you’re looking for. Example: “pumpkin ale” OR #manafromthegourd

Written by Sarah

October 24th, 2013 at 1:20 pm

Twitter Tip: Emergency alerts

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A Twitter Quick Tip. 

Twitter now allows you to enable emergency alerts from certain participating organizations. These alerts are meant to complement, not replace, traditional emergency alerts and you can opt in or out at any point.

Red Cross Emergency Alerts

You can find the alerts page for each organization by adding /alerts to the end of their Twitter URL; for example https://twitter.com/redcross/alerts which you can see the page for above. It will prompt you to add a mobile phone to your account if you haven’t done so already.

Want more tips? Click here

Written by Sarah

October 23rd, 2013 at 10:33 am

TweetReach Tip: Measuring the results of a Twitter contest

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If you’re running a contest and using TweetReach to track it, you’ll want to take a look at this post so you don’t miss any of the tweets you want to capture. For best results, we have a few suggestions. Keep your original tweet short (120 characters or less) and unique, and use hashtags and a unique URL to distinguish yourself from other contests (a generic term like “RT for a chance to win an iPad” gets tweeted 40 times a minute).

Now let’s look at specifics, depending on whether you’re measuring results after the fact with a snapshot report or setting up a Tracker to monitor tweets in real-time through your TweetReach Pro subscription.

TweetReach Snapshot Report

There are a few ways to search for contest tweets in a snapshot report. Remember that a snapshot report will look back at up to 1500 recently posted tweets from the past few days, so you can run a snapshot after a contest ends if only ran for a few days and had fewer then 1500 tweets.

1. Don’t search for the entire text of a tweet; search for the first 50-60 characters of your tweet, wrapped in quotation marks. Remember that retweets add characters to the front of your tweet. “jimmyjohn: you so silly Sandwich Place! RT @sandwichartiste: RT if you love meatball subs! #subs4life” is longer than “@sandwichartiste: RT if you love meatball subs! #subs4life”. Make sure that a user adding a note before the text of their retweet won’t push any terms you are searching for beyond the 140 character limit.

2. Use an original hashtag or URL in your contest tweet, and search for all retweets that contain “RT” and your hashtag or URL. (Put exactly RT #subs4life or RT http://bit.ly/12aoGYA in the TweetReach search bar for your snapshot report.) 

TweetReach Pro Tracker

If you expect significant participation or want to run your contest for more than one week, set up a Tracker in advance. Trackers can monitor unlimited tweets for unlimited time; you just need to set them up before your tweets start going out. The same rules apply to a Tracker, but you can (and should) set up a Tracker to search for your contest tweet in both ways.

Search for both the first 50 characters of the tweet, but also any identifying URLs or hashtags you’re using. A Tracker can include up to 15 different queries, so you can enter in several different combinations to make sure you’re getting exactly the tweets you’re looking for.


TR Tip Contest Tracker Queries

 

Written by Sarah

October 16th, 2013 at 10:55 am

Twitter Tip: User Widgets

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A Twitter Quick Tip. 

Love seeing Twitter streams on other people’s websites (very handy for finding and following new accounts at a glance!) and wondering how to get your own? Twitter makes it easy for you. Just go to Settings –> Widgets –> Create new.

Having trouble or curious about the details? Here’s more information from Twitter, and some handy screenshots below.

Twitter User Widget 1

Twitter User Widget 2

Written by Sarah

September 17th, 2013 at 12:43 pm

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