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Archive for the ‘television’ tag

Game of Thrones Season 4 on Twitter

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The fourth season of Game of Thrones premiere on HBO last night, and Twitter was more than ready for it. Starting Friday, April 2nd and leading up to Sunday night’s premiere 344.3k tweets came from 206.8k contributors, for a unique reach of 112.1M Twitter users, all around Game of Thrones.

The most retweeted tweet came from the actress who plays Sansa Stark on the show, Sophie Turner:

With over 3k retweets and 2k favorites, this tweet was followed closely by one from the official show Twitter account, reminding us all that the next installment is only a week away:

Shows and actors getting more involved in the social conversations around their work is an important trend in social television, and the engagement from fans and followers shows it’s a smart move. Fans feel like they’re getting special access to their favorite shows and actors, and official accounts know what the ongoing conversation around their brand is. It’s hard to be surprised by a “sudden” turn in viewer sentiment if you’ve been part of the conversation all along.

HBO clearly knows this, and the top hashtags were all official hashtags supported and promoted by the brand:

#GameOfThrones

#TakeTheThrone

#GoTSeason4

#GoT

#GoTViewersGuide

The last hashtag leads to an in-depth behind-the-scenes section of HBO’s site, designed to help viewers understand the complex array of characters, relationships, and more behind the show, up to the current season.

Smart move to refresh viewers new and old alike and keep them engaged as season 4 rolls on.

Written by Sarah

April 7th, 2014 at 12:32 pm

House of Cards talk on Twitter

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The second season of the Netflix Original House of Cards premiered over the weekend, and many of us made our couches our Valentines in order to marathon the whole season, while talking about it on Twitter, of course. Starting on February 13 through the weekend, 367.2k tweets came from 210.3k contributors with a reach of 127.7M unique Twitter users. It got a pretty big endorsement:

Some of the other most retweeted tweets came from the official House of Cards Twitter account and were either hyping the release of the second season, or letting followers know it was officially up and available to stream:

Social media means an ever-increasing risk for show spoilers, but Netflix is on top of that with the release of their new Spoiler Foiler, as reported by Mashable:

The most popular hashtags used to talk about the show included use of the new tool, which marks this as a fantastic move from Netflix:

  1. #HouseOfCards
  2. #netflix
  3. #tvtag (an app formerly known as GetGlue)
  4. #FrankUnderwood
  5. #SpoilerFoiler

Did you catch House of Cards over the weekend?

Written by Sarah

February 17th, 2014 at 11:34 am

The Golden Globes hits an all-time high on Twitter

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The 71st Annual Golden Globes aired last night, and we were there as usual in conjunction with mhCarter Consulting and the Hollywood Foreign Press Association to help out on the red carpet and keep track of the social conversation. (Those of us at home did it with our shoes off and our beverage of choice in hand, just like Emma Thompson.)


During the 3-hour show there were 1.59 million tweets, and the awards predictions, red carpet fashion reviews, and general commentary brought the total up to 2.59 million over the course of the entire day. 875k Twitter users generated these tweets, reaching 296.4 million people overall– its biggest year on Twitter yet!

Actor Aaron Paul from Breaking Bad tweeted the most retweeted tweet of the night, with 30k retweets and 530 replies:

The most retweeted tweet from the official @GoldenGlobes Twitter account was a photo of actress Jennifer Lawrence on the red carpet, and it earned 3800 retweets and 550 replies:

Further proof that the Internet still loves Our Lady JLaw (even at the moments when she’s not sneaking up on Taylor Swift).

How does this compare to last year?

The 2013 Golden Globes saw 1.7 million tweets from 598.5k contributors, reaching 184.8 million people and earning 8.1 billion impressions.  This means tweets increased more than 1.5x this year over last year, with nearly 300k more contributors reaching over 100 million more people and doubling in total impressions.

We have to say, we’re looking forward to what the 2015 Golden Globes bring us under the returning helm of hosts Tina Fey and Amy Poehler.

 

 

Written by Sarah

January 13th, 2014 at 9:52 am

The Golden Globes are Sunday!

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It’s that time of year again – awards season! The 71st Golden Globe Awards are this Sunday, and as usual, we’ll be there to track the social media conversation around the event and help out on the #redcarpet.

So, we were wondering… In the days leading up to the first major awards show in Hollywood this season, which movies, TV shows and actors are Twitter and Tumblr buzzing about?

Well, Tumblr can’t get enough of Amy Poehler and Tina Fey, who are coming back for a second year as hosts of the show. Most of the top posts about the Golden Globes right now are GIFs of the comedic duo, taken mostly from the commercials for the upcoming broadcast (like this one from gillianjacobs).

After Tina and Amy, Twitter and Tumblr are both excited about Tatiana Maslany from BBC America’s Orphan Black and Jennifer Lawrence - or JLaw, if you prefer, which we do – from American Hustle. And there’s a lot of talk about Jared Leto from Dallas Buyers Club, Leonardo DiCaprio from The Wolf of Wall Street, and Bradley Cooper from American Hustle.

As far as movies and shows go, Tumblr’s favorite films right now are American Hustle12 Years a Slave, and Dallas Buyers Club. Twitter also loves Catching Fire, partly because Taylor Swift’s song from the film was nominated. And Orphan Black is wildly popular on both networks. Breaking Bad and Scandal are getting some attention on Twitter, while American Horror Story is popular on Tumblr.

Want to follow along with the conversation this week? Find @GoldenGlobes on Twitter and on Instagram, and participate in the conversation with the #GoldenGlobes tag. And stay tuned here, as we’ll update with more social data about the show next week!

Written by Jenn D

January 7th, 2014 at 11:31 am

Arrested Development: talk on Twitter and Tumblr

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One minute after midnight (PDT!) on Sunday, May 26th, Arrested Development (AD) fans will be gathered around their glowing computer screens as the entire fourth season premieres on Netflix. Excited fans have been discussing the countdown to their streaming binges on Twitter and Tumblr, and as Gene Parmesan is unavailable to disclose their discussions with you, you’ll just have to stick with us instead. (Although it’s entirely possible we’re just him in costume.)

Tumblr

As of yesterday- four days away from the season four premiere- 486.6k Tumblr users generated 19.1k posts with over 1 million notes, since we started tracking on April 22nd. Posts about Arrested Development on Tumblr spiked on May 13th (that day accounts for about 8% of total posts so far; we’ll get to why in a minute), and note activity on posts spiked before that, on April 24th: the day that character posters were released.

On May 13th, the big spike in posts came from the release of the first trailer for season four, which can be found in the second of ten most popular AD posts. From April up to this week, the most popular posts from the Tumblr discussion came mostly from fan-run Arrested Development focused blogs; half of the top ten posts came from the aptly named The Bluth Company, including the most popular post overall. (Usually seen as a GIF, that moment from the show is just as fun when drawn out into a high-quality photo series.)

And for those familiar with Tumblr’s format, it’s no surprise that photo posts were the most popular: 12.7k of the total 19.1k posts were photo posts, trailed by 3.5k text posts and under 1.5k video posts. The show title was far and away the most popular tag, featured in 11.5k of the total posts.

Lucille naturally gets two tags of her own, even if Tumblr is something she would probably be suspicious of.

Twitter

Out of the total 105.4k tweets made mentioning Arrested Development on Twitter, activity spiked on different days than on Tumblr, with the most contributors (13.9k) sharing the most tweets (16.1k) on May 20th:

Overall since May 14th there have been 65.1k tweets from 75.7k contributors; that averages out to a little over 11.7k tweets a day, with nearly 1.5 tweets per contributor (we imagine those half-tweets wear cutoff shorts all the time, even in the shower).

The two most retweeted tweets came from unofficial news and quote account bluthquotes and Arrested Development series creator Mitch Hurwitz. They had 2.3k and 2k retweets respectively:


Really the most burning question all of this has left us with is this: is it May 26th yet? We should probably all use the remaining days to stock up on juice boxes, Cornballers and frozen bananas since we’ll be sleeping through all the Memorial Day cookouts with our families to spend hours with the Bluth clan instead.

Written by Sarah

May 23rd, 2013 at 9:25 am

This Week in Social Analytics #47

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

Twitter does drive sales says Deloitte study [from MediaWeek; written by Gordon MacMillan]

“Overall, the study found that a 30% increase in positive tweets is four times more effective in driving sales than a 30% increase in traditional above-the-line advertising, and the effect is most pronounced when it comes to sports games.”

Four Studies on the Adoption of Social Media by Financial Advisors and Investors [from Social Media Today; written by Augie Ray]

“The time has come to look at the data and discard groundless and dangerous beliefs about social media. Here are four recent studies that demonstrate social media has a key place in FinServ strategies”

A Comedy Show That Comes via a Hashtag [from The New York Times; written by Amy Chozick]

“The festival will take place almost entirely on Twitter, with comedians posting video snippets of routines and round tables and posting jokes using the hashtag #ComedyFest.”

Twitter Partnership With Fuse Flips Social TV Scenario, Placing Twitter In The Driver’s Seat [from All Twitter; written by Mary C. Long]

“Citing Twitter’s amazing connection with millennials and its standing of the place ‘where there world unfolds,’ Twitter plans to ‘reinvent television’ by partnering with #Trending10, the first tv program sourced from real-time Twitter conversations.”

How Your Branded Content Can Thrive on Tumblr [from Business2Community; written by Stephen Jeske]

Comscore confirms that Tumblr is the No. 2 social platform — right behind Facebook — in terms of visitor engagement. Moreover, Tumblr is highly popular among internet users and is ranked by Quantcast as one of the top 15 sites in the United States, making it an excellent platform for branded content efforts.”

How Tumblr Forces Advertisers to Get Creative [from MIT Technology; written by David Zax]

“Editorial has won in a sense: the idea that advertising, like editorial content, must be interesting, has won. You can’t just advertise next to someone else’s Tumblr. You’ve got to create a Tumblr of your own.”

Civic Engagement and Social Networks [from Pew Research]

“Our latest Internet report finds that the well-educated and the well-off are more likely than others to participate in civic life online – just as they have always been more likely to be active in politics and community affairs offline.”

You can also find Political Engagement on Social Networking Sites in the same report:

And one more from Pew:

TV Was the Top Source of Information on Boston Attacks

“Television was far-and-away the most widely-used source of information about the bombing and its aftermath; 80% of Americans followed the story on TV. About half (49%) say they kept up with news and information online or on a mobile device, and 38% followed the story on the radio. Only 29% say they kept up with the story in newspapers, about the same number (26%) tracked the story on social networking sites like Facebook or Twitter.”

Old and new “print” media were followed at about the same rate.

Written by Sarah

April 26th, 2013 at 9:16 am

9 tips for watching TV on Twitter

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Live-blogging has spawned a new generation of itself, and the cool kids these days are live-Tweeting and Tumbling while they watch their favorite shows. Sound like something you’d like to get in on? We’ve got some suggestions to help get you started using Twitter while you watch TV.

After all, 4 in 5 Americans multitask while they’re watching TV now, did you know?

From Marketing Charts

If you want to be one of them, here are some tips for getting social while watching your favorite shows:

  1. Check for an official show or episode hashtag. Using this, you can join in the voices of the multitude – or minority – watching. It’s easy to connect with like-minded people this way. You can find these hashtags by searching for an official show handle by typing the show name into Twitter search, and then go to that account to see what hashtag(s) they use. If there’s no official account, or they’re not using hashtags, click through other search results to see what other people are using.
  2. If a hashtag doesn’t already exist, make up your own. People who follow you who watch the show might join in, and it can spread from there. Or someone who follows you who doesn’t even watch the show might start, because they know someone else who watches it.
  3. You might want to announce ahead of time if you’re going to be live-tweeting a show, and that you’ll be using a hashtag, just in case anyone wants to mute it if they’re not interested.
  4. Do not tweet spoilers. Ever. Remember that not everyone is watching live, and you don’t want to be the one who ruins the ending for everyone else.
  5. Interact with other people talking about the show, replying to and retweeting them when appropriate. 
  6. Mention official accounts for the show, the actors or the characters. You never know when you might get a retweet, and those accounts often have a large following. You can find them by searching Twitter for the show name and choosing the official account that pops up with a verified checkmark, or by going to the show’s website – they all have their social profiles prominently displayed.
  7. Follow people you have an interesting interaction with – that’s what being social is all about, after all. You may find some new friends.
  8. For big events where you might have people over to be social IRL too – like a Super Bowl party or Oscar party – post pictures of your setup, and include guest’s handles in your tweets.
  9. Share your content from other networks like Tumblr and Instagram. But be careful of auto-sharing everything you post elsewhere; those who follow you in multiple places might get bothered by the redundancy and decide to unfollow you. It’s great to cross-post some, but be selective.

Do you tweet while you watch TV? Got any tips we missed? Tell us how you do it in the comments below.

Written by Sarah

April 11th, 2013 at 3:10 pm

Posted in Guides

Tagged with , , , ,

Game of Thrones season 3 premiere on Twitter

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GoT S3 Premiere Reach

97.6 million accounts were potentially reached on Twitter about the Game of Thrones premiere last night

Tweet Stats GoT premiere

Game of Thrones premiere tweet stats

The internet was excited for the season 3 premiere of Game of Thrones on HBO last night. You can see the spikes in Twitter reach about it in the graph above (reach in blue, exposure in yellow, times in PDT), particularly leading up to and during the premiere – nearly 98 million unique Twitter accounts received GoT tweets yesterday. In total, 330k people churned out more than 596k tweets yesterday. The top 5 hashtags were #GameofThrones, #GoT, #GoTSigil and #jointherealm (these two are about the ability to create and share your own house sigil), as well as #GetGlue.

The last one is for social television app GetGlue: you check in to the show or sporting event you’re watching and then you can see how many others are watching with you, leave comments about it, comment on other’s posts, and more. You also have the option to share on Twitter and other platforms what you’ve checked into on GetGlue, automatically adding the #GetGlue hashtag.

This is particularly interesting in the wake of a recent study from the Time Warner Media Lab (via AdWeek) which found that emotional engagement on television viewing is higher if you watch with someone else, or if you log in using a social app like GetGlue:

Social TV emotional attachement

Did you watch Game of Thrones last night? Was it social? In person or digitally? Tell us about it in the comments!

Written by Sarah

April 1st, 2013 at 9:39 am

This Week in Social Analytics #43

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

4-in-5 Americans multitask while watching TV [from Marketing Charts]

“Significant numbers of consumers around the world are indeed using their mobile devices to discuss TV programs on social networks as they watch them, even if Americans appear to be behind the curve in that regard.”

Why data without a soul is meaningless [from GigaOM; written by Om Malik]

“What will it take to build emotive-and-empathic data experiences? Less data science and more data art — which, in other words, means that data wranglers have to develop correlations between data much like the human brain finds context. It is actually not about building the fanciest machine, but instead about the ability to ask the human questions. It is not about just being data informed, but being data aware and data intelligent.”

5 Digital Marketing Insights from a New Gartner Study [from Social Media Today; written by Chris Horton]

“When asked which three digital marketing activities are most important to their success, the marketers surveyed listed a corporate website, digital advertising, and a presence on social media.”

Link to Gartner study here

Global media consumption: the digital reality [from The Global Web Index]

“GLOBAL TIME SPENT: Digital is 57% of daily media time. Social 48% of online.”

 

People Try to Put us D-down, Talkin’ ‘Bout Your Reputation – Part 2: Understanding and Acting on What You’ve Discovered [from Social Media Explorer; written by Jim Berkowitz]

Understand and act on what you’ve discovered from listening, as discussed in Part 1 on this topic.

The Definitive Guide to Online Reputation Management [from the KISSMetrics blog; written by Daniele Virgillito]

An outline of the concepts and steps involved in monitoring your reputation online.

Written by Sarah

March 29th, 2013 at 10:11 am

TakeFive with TweetReach – Jim Kneer

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Welcome back to TakeFive with TweetReach, our ongoing interview series with influential members of the Twitter measurement universe. This week, we’re happy to highlight Jim Kneer, New Media Specialist for the NBA Champion Miami HEAT basketball team. Coming off a terrific championship season and an Olympic gold medal for Team USA player and Miami HEAT forward Lebron James, we thought it would be a great time to get Jim’s views on Twitter measurement.

TweetReach: Welcome Jim! Can you describe your role in the HEAT organization? How have you used social media, specifically Twitter, as a part of your social media strategy for the team?

Jim Kneer: Our New Media team is the eyes and ears of HEAT fans around the globe. Our job is to connect with as many HEAT fans as we can. We create relationships with our younger fans that will evolve into a strong brand loyalty. We view Twitter as the first true means of establishing two-way communication with our fans.

Our franchise is just entering our 25th season, so we are a relatively young franchise. We are just starting to see our first generation of life-long HEAT fans reach fiscal maturity. It is our goal to take advantage of the amazing team we have to build our fan base and social media, and Twitter specifically, allows us to reach out and communicate with fans.

We use Twitter to provide real-time coverage of all HEAT related news and events. Our New Media team covers all HEAT practices, games and provides behind-the-scenes coverage of HEAT related events.

TweetReach: How important is measurement of engagement on Twitter to your strategy? Do you have specific goals and campaign metrics that you use to measure performance and success?

Jim Kneer: Measurement of social media engagement is key for us. While we may not have specific goals for each initiative we undertake, engagement metrics play a key role in our future initiatives. We like to look at the performance of our tweets and use that data to tailor our coverage to the areas we get the most engagement. We always want to deliver the content our fans want the most.

We also like to use this data to determine time of posting. We want our posts to generate a lot of replies and we try to provide as many answers as time and scheduling allow. Conversely, pictures and posts that will generate a lot of re-tweets are often made during our “off hours” since less attention is required.

TweetReach: Has your social media measurement strategy changed as you’ve gone from the regular season, to the playoffs, to the champion series, to the off-season?

Jim Kneer: During the season, we utilize a lot of the measurements to build our strategy. Each regular season, we find a different tweeting “sweet spot.” Some years we see more interactions of pictures, some years it may be statistical information that gets the best response. Our job during the regular season is to perfect our strategy. Socially, we do not want to be become a nuisance.

I come from an email marketing background. Email marketing has always been referred to as “permission-based marketing.” Moving over to social media, I always treat it as “privilege-based marketing.” We have been lucky to earn a spot in our fans’ timelines and newsfeeds. We treat this as a privilege. We try to avoid straight sales pitches, instead offering exclusive first looks or first opportunities to buy. This gives our sales pitches a more exclusive, offer-based characteristic.

Once we hit the post-season, we intensify our social media efforts. We know that our fans’ appetite for information increases and we begin traveling to away games to help provide coverage to which they may not otherwise have access. This coverage increases each round, as fans want more and more information. During the 2012 NBA Finals, we sent two staff members to Oklahoma City to cover everything, and we were rewarded with a really comprehensive behind the scenes look at the team during our title run.

Our off-season strategy is to provide relevant content when it occurs, but more so to focus on increasing our interactions with fans. We try to reply to as many relevant mentions as we can, while also increasing the amount of interactive tweets we send out.

TweetReach: What’s your opinion on the “second-screen experience” during televised games? Have you seen more consumers actively engaging via Twitter during games and how do you make the most of that for the team?

Jim Kneer: During the regular season, we work very closely with our broadcast partner, Sun Sports/Fox Sports Florida. Last off-season, we had a series of social-broadcast meetings and were able to develop a very interactive broadcast. We developed a Facebook Friday component to help draw viewers to our broadcasts, especially when our local broadcast is up against a national broadcast of the game.

We also got our broadcasters Eric Reid and Tony Fiorentino on Twitter and they were able to interact with fans and answer some questions live during all broadcasts. Additionally, we created a dedicated hashtag to track all comments.

Fans were also actively engaged in twitter polls for the pregame spotlights as well as the poll question for games. We wanted to create a very social feel for our broadcasts and are very happy where they stand after our first season.

TweetReach: Can you describe one of your more successful social media efforts? Were there specific measurement goals you wanted to achieve and how did the campaign perform? Any lessons learned you can share with our audience?

Jim Kneer: I think one of our most successful efforts this year was the unveiling of our new “Black is Back” uniform. We knew this would generate buzz, but the scope of the appeal was amazing. We were able to reach over 4.5 million unique accounts and generate almost 17 million impressions.

We also made a big social media push for the release of our Miami Floridians throwback jersey. This effort reached over 5.8 million unique people and total impressions reached 13 million.

I think the most important thing we took from these campaigns was that we needed to be ready and able to take advantage of these situations the moment they arise. Once we noticed the feedback, the posts, and tweets we were receiving, we really ramped up our efforts. We learned that by monitoring early reaction to a post you can really ride the positive public sentiment and stay ahead of the curve.

TweetReach: Thanks, Jim!

Written by Dean Cruse

August 23rd, 2012 at 7:24 am