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The Week in Social Analytics #109

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Since tomorrow is Independence Day here in America we thought we’d put out This Week in Social Analytics a day early. Here are our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Let us know in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Finally, Most Brands Measuring Social Content Effectiveness [from eMarketer; written by staff]

While the metrics being used are fairly simplistic, it’s a good start.

How Psychology Will Shape the Future of Social Media Marketing [from The Huffington Post; written by Jayson DeMers]

“Technology will never replace the human ability to extract meaningful data from volumes of information.”

More Evidence that Visuals Far Outpace Text [from Geoff Livingston]

“Digiday surveyed attendees of its Agency Innovation Camp about how visual native ads stack up against text based native ads (hat tip: Richard Binhammer). More often than not, attendees favored visuals by 75 percent or more.”

While that might be a very specific audience with very specific opinions about visuals, it’s hard to ignore the overwhelming evidence that humans are visual creatures.

The Conundrum of Ethics and Data Collecting [from Eli Rose Social Media; written by Sunny Serres]

“We need these companies to be more socially responsible because we are entrusting them with our information. In order for us to remove ourselves from these types of data collections, we have to opt out of all of the conveniences that we rely so heavily upon to function within society. . . This just isn’t plausible in today’s society – our reliance on technology has grown so rapidly that opting out of many of these things simply puts those individuals “behind.” It is a vicious cycle, but if companies can perform with more integrity and think about their customers first and foremost rather than profitability or academic accolades, then maybe the question of ethics will become moot.”

3 Steps to Demystifying Social Media Personalities [from Social Media Today; written by Ida Cheinman]

1. Treat Every Tool as a Touchpoint

2. Metaphor the Medium

3. Secure Success Through Story

So How Many Millennials Are There in the US, Anyway? | Updated [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Before putting out some numbers, there are a few problems to take note of. Chiefly, there is no consensus definition of a Millennial.

Nevertheless, things being the way they are, marketers and researchers often look at age groups. So here’s a reference list of some commonly used age brackets and their corresponding population estimates and population shares as of July 1st, 2013.

  • 12-17: 25 million (7.9%)
  • 18-24: 31.5 million (10%)
  • 25-34: 42.8 million (13.6%)
  • 35-44: 40.5 million (12.8%)
  • 45-54: 43.8 million (13.8%)
  • 55-64: 39.3 million (12.4%)
  • 65+: 44.7 million (14.1%)” 

Pair with Millennials Most Likely to Rely on W-O-M For Private Label Shopping Guidance and Who’s Regularly Going Online While Watching TV?.

5 Principles for Creating a Social Media Following That Sticks [from Social Media Today; written by Will Blunt]

“TIP: Your customers care more about themselves than they do you. Ask them questions about what THEY want. Don’t fall into the trap of TELLING them what they want.”

6 Ways To Engage And Maintain A Loyal Twitter Following [from All Twitter; written by Shea Bennett]

Based on a video released by Twitter for Small Business.

Why Brands Should Use GIFs [from Likeable Media; written by Angela Kuo

GIFs are the language of the Internet, after all.

4 Ways To Expand Your Content Marketing With Social Content [from Heidi Cohen]

 ”Social content is about how the content is created, not shared or distributed!”

Written by Sarah

July 3rd, 2014 at 10:40 am

The Week in Social Analytics #83

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Five Social Media Measurement Questions I Hope (NOT) To See in 2014 [from Metrics Man; written by Don Bartholomew]

“‘I don’t measure ‘social media’, I measure what you are trying to accomplish with social media’. . .the distinction is very important. Measurement is fundamentally about performance against objectives. So, we measure our performance against the objectives established in the social media plan. A lot of what passes for measurement in social media is really data collection – tracking Followers or Likes, blog traffic or consumer engagement on Facebook. Unless you have measurable objectives and targets in each of these areas, you are collecting data not measuring. What do you want to happen as a result of your social media campaign or initiative? Measure that.”

Social Media Update 2013 [from Pew Internet; written by Maeve Duggan & Aaron Smith]

“Some 73% of online adults now use a social networking site of some kind. Facebook is the dominant social networking platform in the number of users, but a striking number of users are now diversifying onto other platforms. Some 42% of online adults now use multiple social networking sites. In addition, Instagram users are nearly as likely as Facebook users to check in to the site on a daily basis.”

3 Social Media Trends You Should Know About [from Mashable; written by Alex Honeysett]

“If you haven’t mastered Vine or Instagram’s video feature yet, now is the time to get comfortable. If the prediction is correct, making compelling short videos will be as important as writing in 140 characters. The earlier you can master the trend, the better.”

2014 Marketing Measurement Predictions [from Social Media Explorer; written by Nichole Kelly]

“This is a fundamental shift in how we’ve thought about measuring marketing for decades. It’s not about the campaign, it’s not about the channel, it’s not about the content, it’s about how all of those efforts combined to create revenue.”

Anatomy of a Tumblr [from Medium; written by Daniel Dalton]

“8 Tips for making a successful Tumblr:

1. Do one thing. Do it well. Be consistent. Find your niche and own it.
2. Think different. There are millions of blogs. Find a way to be unique.
3. Make it visual. 60% of shares on Tumblr are images. Show, don’t tell.
4. Get good help. If you can’t write or design, find someone who can.
5. Be a part of the community. Ask for suggestions, take requests. Listen.
6. Fail hard. This isn’t my first dance at the Tumblr party. It’s trial & error.
7. Be excellent to each other. Seriously. This.
8. Tumblr. Because Tumblr.”

Emphasis original.

A Nice Collection of B2B Marketing Stats and Videos [from Paul Gillin]

“Here’s its latest collection of recent trends and statistics: This is the year that was in B2B Marketing crunched. Be sure to check out the links to some of the year’s best B2B videos on slide 37.”

Written by Sarah

January 3rd, 2014 at 10:12 am

The Week in Social Analytics #77

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

The Complete Guide to Tumblr Etiquette [from Mashable; written by Sara Roncero-Menendez]

“Whether you want to maximize your Tumblr experience or just want to learn how to participate in activities on this popular social network, here’s a complete guide to Tumblr etiquette.”

While more of a guide for personal Tumblr use than for brands, it still has some helpful tips on how communities within Tumblr operate; valuable information to any brand that wants to understand and connect to their customers.

How Whole Foods Has Commandeered Tumblr [from Business 2 Community; written by Tree Treacy]

“Dark Rye has a website, but also hosts an analogous Tumblr blog. This is a smart move on the part of Whole Foods for a couple of reasons. The first, of course, is that having multiple venues for content is a great way to reach a wider audience. Tumblr users who may not otherwise be keeping up with Dark Rye are much more likely to follow the online magazine’s blog more casually when it is on this blogging site.”

Your Field Guide to What it Means When Someone Complains About Your Brand Online [via Mack Collier]

“But before you can respond appropriately, you need to properly assess who you are responding to!”

How To Generate B2B Leads With Content Marketing [from Marketing Land; written by Arnie Kuenn]

“There are numerous tactics that can be leveraged to generate B2B leads with content marketing. In fact, 28 percent of B2B marketers reported using between five and nine content marketing tactics to drive leads, while 64 percent reported using more than nine. As you can see from these statistics, a successful B2B content marketing strategy includes a variety of methods and there is no one-size-fits-all solution.”

10 Surprising Social Media Statistics That Will Make You Rethink Your Social Strategy [from Fast Company; written by Belle Beth Cooper]

“1. THE FASTEST GROWING DEMOGRAPHIC ON TWITTER IS THE 55–64 YEAR AGE BRACKET.

This demographic has grown 79% since 2012.

The 45–54 year age bracket is the fastest growing demographic on both Facebook and Google+.

For Facebook, this group has jumped 46%.

For Google+, 56%.”

India Leads Worldwide Social Networking Growth [eMarketer; written by staff]

“This year, eMarketer estimates, 1.61 billion people will log in to social networking sites at least monthly, from any electronic device. That’s a 14.2% gain on social networker numbers from 2012, and double-digit growth is expected to continue for another year. By 2017, 2.33 billion people will use social networks.”

5 forthcoming social media advances you should know about [from iMedia Connection; written by Elisabeth Crane]

“Developing Niche Platforms

Although sites like Google, LinkedIn, and Instagram are major platforms for social media in a bigger context, niche marketing has its place in social media. In fact, many of these niche platforms will be playing a role in specific interests and activities in daily life. Applications will be considered unique to the individual user, such as connecting DIY-saavy designers or those curious to start a new cause.”

Which Social and Mobile Platforms Are Older Teens Using? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

If teens are leaving Facebook, where are they going? (Older teens aren’t leaving, it seems.)

“Given all the fuss about teens leaving Facebook, GlobalWebIndex has taken a look at the most widely-used social platforms and mobile applications by 16-19-year-olds around the world. The global survey finds that Facebook remains the most commonly used social platform, with 56% of respondents claiming to have used it in the past month. Facebook’s mobile app is next, at 43% of respondents, followed closely by YouTube’s mobile app (39%) and site (35%). There are some surprises on the list.”

Written by Sarah

November 22nd, 2013 at 10:04 am

This Week in Social Media Analytics #67

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

It’s a woman’s (social media) world [from Pew Research; written by Maeve Duggan]

“Historically, women have been especially avid users [of social media]. Between December 2009 and December 2012, women were significantly more likely than men to use social networking sites in nine out of ten surveys we conducted. During this period, the proportion of women who used social media sites was 10 percentage points higher than men on average. When we include earlier surveys and our latest reading (spanning May 2008 through May 2013), the average difference [in social use between genders] falls slightly to 8%. Currently, three-quarters (74%) of online women use social networking sites.”

Check out the piece for information on gender-specific use of different platforms as well. (Emphasis above added.)

How The 70/30 Rule Can Rocket Your Twitter Presence To The Top [from All Twitter; written by Lauren Dugan]

“70 percent of the time, you should tweet others’ content. 30 percent of the time, you should tweet your own, branded or promotional, content.

This means that the majority of the time, you’re looking for content to share with your followers that is not created by your brand. That could include things like interesting blog posts, news articles, photos, videos… content from around the web that’s produced by others.”

4 Things Small Businesses Must Understand About Social Marketing [from Social Media Today; written by Mark Cooper]

“Before you launch a Facebook campaign, or start tweeting incessantly, ask a simple question: What are the key objectives I want to accomplish?”

Is Little Data the Next Big Data? [from LinkedIn; written by Jonah Berger]

“Measurement is great. Without it we don’t know where we are, how we’re doing, or how to improve. But we need to be careful about how we use it. Because without realizing it, measurement determines rewards and motivation. It determines what people care about, what they work to achieve, and whether they cheat to get there. Tracking student test scores helps measure achievement, but it also encourages teachers to teach to the test.

So before you obsess over a particular metric, make sure it’s the right metric to obsess over. “

CA School District Announces It’s Doing Round-The-Clock Monitoring Of Its 13,000 Students’ Social Media Activities [from TechDirt; written by Tim Cushing]

A new precedent in security? Students can opt out by making their accounts private, but the company monitoring their activity thinks they won’t choose to. It’s unclear how they will locate all the students’ accounts in order to track them. An interesting read for sure.

Big Social Data: The Second Era Starts [from Social Media Explorer; written by Doug Kessler]

“There’s no structure. Context is buried or lost. The torrent never stops. And the sheer volumes are staggering. This kind of data challenge demands a new kind of analytics stack that doesn’t rely on neat little databases and tidy indexes.”

How To Plan And Manage A Social Marketing Strategy And Still Have Time For Dinner [from Web. Search. Social.; written by Carol Lynn Rivera]

“I’ll tell you exactly the trick I use to focus our social marketing efforts: I think of the one specific person that I’m posting something for.”

Americans More Likely to Share “Funny” Than “Important” Content on Social Media [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“In fact, American respondents were more likely than the average respondent across the 24 countries to typically share funny content (49% vs. 43%).”

The popularity of The Daily Show has been cracked.

Written by Sarah

September 13th, 2013 at 9:21 am

This Week in Social Analytics #44

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

Facebook to See Three in 10 Mobile Display Dollars This Year [from eMarketer]

“Both Facebook and Twitter have benefited from their use of so-called native ad formats that are seamlessly integrated within the core user experiences of their respective products. The resulting ability for both companies to deliver mobile ad impressions at much higher volume than many traditional ad publishers has helped them capture market share very quickly.”

What Does That Second Screen Mean for Viewers and Advertisers? [from AdWeek; written by Lucia Moses]

Social television does more than just give people something to collectively chatter about on a social network; it engages them emotionally:

“When people used Facebook, Twitter or GetGlue while watching TV, their emotional engagement was 1.3 times higher than that of solo TV viewers.”

This has a lot of different implications for advertisers.

Twitter Relaunches Its Twitter For Business Site With More Content, New Video [from Marketing Land; written by Matt McGee]

“Twitter has also published a new video that, in my opinion, is the most effective messaging the company has offered yet for businesses — not just why, but also how to do business on Twitter. It’s basic and meant for beginners, but there’s a lot of information packed into a little more than two minutes.”

More from Twitter Dev: Mobile app deep linking and new cards [from Twitter's Developers blog; written by Jason Costa]

A breakdown of Twitter’s new card capabilities, straight from the development team.

4 Types of Content Consumption (Research) | Content Marketing: How We Use Multiple Devices [from Heidi Cohen's blog; written by Heidi Cohen]

Social Spider-Webbing is the opposite of Investigative Spider-Webbing in that it’s extroverted. Focused on sharing and connecting, it allows viewers to connect with others (both friends and like minded individuals) while watching live events and television shows.

Overwhelmingly social spider webbing makes solitary content consumption a social activity. More than two out of five respondents use it to connect with others. About a third use it habitually. About one in four chooses social spider webbing to enhance their enjoyment of their content consumption.”

You can find the link to the full study here.

And before you ban Facebook at the office:

Social Media: Not the Productivity Killer You Thought? [from Inc; written by Francesca Louise Fenzi]

“This tiny group of social network butterflies, however, ranked as the most efficient. Employees who belonged to more than five social networks had a 1.6 percent higher sales conversion than their counterparts and a 2.8 percent lower average call time.

While the data is interesting, it’s next to impossible to determine causation. But Mike Houseman, the managing director of Evolv, posits that performance may be linked to the sociability of employees who belong to several online networks.”

Written by Sarah

April 5th, 2013 at 9:05 am

This Week in Social Analytics #39

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments!

2013 U.S. Digital Future in Focus [from ComScore]

“Three social networks in particular – Tumblr, Pinterest and Instagram – each gained more than 10 million visitors over the course of the year in part by catering to a desire for more visually appealing content. comScore has called this phenomenon “the rise of the visual web.” Of the three, Tumblr had the largest audience at 30.8 million visitors (up 64 percent from the prior year), while Pinterest (up 284 percent to 28.9 million visitors) and Instagram (up 284 percent to 27.4 million visitors) both shared the same outsized growth rate.”

This graph from ComScore shows the shares for time spent on each site, with Tumblr coming in second behind Facebook.

This graph from ComScore shows the shares for time spent on each site, with Tumblr coming in second behind Facebook.

Download the full report at the link above.

In 2013, Mobile, Social Lead Shift From Traditional Media to Digital [from eMarketer]

“On the digital side, mobile and social media were the two categories expected to see the most increased attention in 2013. In fact, more than eight in 10 of those polled named mobile media as a target for increased focus, while just over three-quarters of respondents said the same for social media.”

Marketing Analytics: 20% of marketers lack data [from MarketingExperiments Blog; written by Daniel Burstein]

“A full 40% of marketers only have ‘an average amount of data,’ which does not sound like an overwhelming vote of confidence they have the information they need to intelligently plan, and execute, tests that will help them learn more about their customers.”

An Autopsy of a Dead Social Network [from MIT Technology Review; written by The Physics arXiv Blog]

“They say that when the costs–the time and effort–associated with being a member of a social network outweigh the benefits, then the conditions are ripe for a general exodus. The thinking is that if one person leaves, then his or her friends become more likely to leave as well and this can cascade through the network causing a collapse in membership.”

It also depends on how large each user’s network of friends is. Overall a fascinating read on the death of Friendster.

Social Media and Branding: Is It Worth The Money? [from Heidi Cohen's Blog; written by Heidi Cohen]

“This research underscores the need for brand marketers to go beyond considering social media in the traditional sense of being a media entity. It’s more than a place to post and distribute promotional messages. Social media requires being social. To this end, brands must engage with their prospects, customers and fans as humans and understand why they’re on social media.”

6 Tips on How to Use Twitter’s New Vine Video App for Marketing [from JeffBullas.com; written by Jeff Bullas]

What to do with 6 seconds of marketing video time.

Friday fun with hypotheticals:

How many unique English tweets are possible? How long would it take for the population of the world to read them all out loud? [From What If?; written by Randall Munroe, creator of xkcd]

“Reading all the tweets takes you ten thousand eternal years. That’s enough time to watch all of human history unfold, from the invention of writing to the present, with each day lasting as long as it takes for the bird to wear down a mountain. 140 characters may not seem like a lot, but we will never run out of things to say.”

And a bonus, if you’re feeling overwhelmed by all of this:

5 Tips for Avoiding SM Burnout [from Social Media Today; written by Rachel Strella]

How a monkey in a coat became an overnight social media sensation

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Excerpted from the Union Metrics Tumblr:

Let’s take a look at the little guy better known as the IKEA monkey, and see how posts about him spread across the social web. Here he is, in what might be the original photo posted by dzd_lisa on Instagram:

Isn’t he cute? That original Instagram photo was first posted to Tumblr by timeforinternet on Sunday night, December 9. After that, posts about the little monkey started to catch on across Tumblr and Twitter, with most activity happening on Monday, December 10.

On December 9, the day the monkey was first spotted at IKEA, there were only 71 posts about it on Tumblr. But on December 10, there were more than 1,100 new posts with 30,100 reblogs and 23,100 likes from more than 42,100 Tumblr users. On Twitter that same day, more than 55,700 tweets were posted from more than 44,100 unique Twitter accounts. Post volume on Tumblr peaked between 8:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. PST on Monday, while tweet volume on Twitter peaked between 11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. PST that day.

  • Tumblr: 31,200 posts and reblogs, 42,100 participants
  • Twitter: 55,700 tweets and retweets, 44,100 participants
Read the full article with all the stats on the Union Metrics Tumblr.

 

Written by Sarah

December 13th, 2012 at 8:34 am