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10 tips for live-tweeting sports events

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Photo from the official FIFA World Cup Instagram account. Check official accounts other than Twitter to see how the conversation is going across platforms.

The World Cup kicks off today, and with other exciting sports events on the horizon- the NBA Finals, Stanley Cup, US Open, and more World Cup this weekend alone- we thought we’d expand our 9 tips for watching TV on Twitter to include, specifically, sports events:

  1. Definitely announce ahead of time if you’re going to be live-tweeting a game so your followers who can’t watch in real-time can mute you or avoid Twitter as a whole. Sports fans do not take kindly to being spoiled on events they plan to watch later.
  2. Related: “Do not tweet spoilers” is a trickier rule with sports events; after all, how else can you talk about what is going on if you’re not referring to the plays that are being made and how that can or is affecting the game? With enough warning ahead of time that you intend to live-tweet, and use of official hashtags so your followers can mute event-related tweets, you should be fine talking about everything that’s happening in the game.
  3. Check for an official hashtag. These days it’s rarer that a big event won’t have its own hashtag already set up; check official accounts to see which ones they’re using to talk about events and excitement leading up to the big game. @FIFAWorldCup is keeping it simple with #WorldCup this year for the event as a whole, but they’re also using other hashtags for individual matches: #BRACRO for Brazil vs. Croatia, for example.
  4. Mention official accounts for the teams playing, individual players, the organizers, or even the event itself, if applicable. You never know when you might get a retweet, and those accounts often have a large following. (You can find them by searching Twitter for the show name and choosing the official account that pops up with a verified checkmark, or by going to a team or organization’s website – social profiles are usually prominently displayed.)
  5. If you already have a large following for something unrelated to sports- you’re popular YA author John Green, for example- you might consider setting up a second account for live-tweeting sports events, so those who follow you for the latest news about your book-to-movie adaptations won’t have to mute you every time a game comes on, and you can even potentially reach new fans who are sports fanatics.
  6. Interact with other people talking about the game to enrich your conversation, which should help you find new accounts to follow related to your favorite sports teams, events, organizations and more.
  7. That said sports talk can be contentious, so don’t be afraid to mute someone who is especially volatile, or even block them if they become excessively aggressive or rude.
  8. If you’re having a party to watch the game with friends, consider posting pictures of your setup, and include guest’s handles in your tweets. Some event sponsors have contests around using their products in watch parties, so check those out ahead of time to see if you can win something for a party you were planning to throw anyway!
  9. Share your content to other networks like Tumblr and Instagram. If you’re trying to build a following around live-tweeting games (something you could translate into writing articles, perhaps) you might consider condensing the best of your live-tweets into a story and putting them on your Tumblr, or using Instagram to share a visual live-tweeting of your watch party. But be careful of auto-sharing everything you post elsewhere; those who follow you in multiple places might get bothered by the redundancy and decide to unfollow you. It’s great to cross-post some, but be selective.
  10. Related to that: See what the conversation is like about these events on other networks. What’s the World Cup conversation like on Tumblr, or Instagram? Seeing how people talk about it in those places can give you new outlets to discuss your favorite sports, new ideas for how to talk about them, and new accounts and people to connect and share with.

Do you tweet while you watch sports? Got any tips we missed? Tell us how you do it in the comments below!

Written by Sarah

June 12th, 2014 at 1:02 pm

Posted in Events,Guides

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Super Bowl XLVIII: Brands on Twitter

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On Friday we took a look at all the brand chatter on Twitter leading up to last night’s blowout Super Bowl game between the Seattle Seahawks and the Denver Broncos. The lack of action on the field turned a lot of faces toward their second screen instead, and made for some entertaining brand interactions (Marketing Land catalogued some of them).

Here’s a second look at the brands we examined on Friday- this time for activity on game day alone- and the answer to the eternal question “Is SodaStream still making Coke and Pepsi say #sorry?”

Budweiser

Budweiser’s #UpForWhatever hashtag saw 7k tweets from 6k contributors with an overall reach of 14.6 million; about 5x the activity they saw leading up to the big game. The most retweeted tweet was again from Bud Light and featured Arnold Schwarzenegger:

This tweet has seen 600 RTs so far.

Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola saw 49.4k tweets on big game day, from 41.4k Twitter users for a total reach of 32.5 million, just over three times the activity from their game day lead-up conversations. The most retweeted tweet was from the official Coke account and included their #AmericaIsBeautiful campaign hashtag and was retweeted over 5k times so far:

Doritos

Doritos aired the two winning commercials from their Crash the Super Bowl contest last night, and each saw some activity around around their respective hashtags- #TimeMachine and #CowboyKid- and the whole conversation around Doritos, including their campaign hashtag #ForTheBold, saw 16.7k tweets from 15.1k contributors for an overall reach of 14.6 million. That’s about six times the activity we saw in their game day lead-up.

The most retweeted tweet around the Doritos conversation with the #Doritos hashtag came from their official account, congratulating the Seahawks on their win:

It has seen 94 retweets so far.

Kia

The conversation around Kia last night didn’t change much from their lead-up: 1.4k tweets from 1.2k contributors, for an overall reach of 3.2 million. The most retweeted tweet actually came from some entertaining brand interaction from Xbox, based on Kia’s Matrix-themed commercial:

This tweet was part of a back-and-forth conversation from the brands, and has earned a total of 276 retweets so far.

SodaStream

SodaStream has the most activity around its name by far in the lead-up conversations we looked at last week, but yesterday saw much lower activity numbers for them: 6.6k tweets from 4.9k contributors, for a total reach of 16.4 million. It seems a little brand controversy will get you talked about leading up to an event, but not necessarily boost the conversation once the event takes place.

One of the most retweet tweets featuring their hashtag #SorryCokeAndPepsi came from the official SodaStream account, and referred to their celebrity spokesperson Scarlett Johansson:

It has seen just 23 retweets so far.

Toyota

Terry Crews and The Muppets teamed up for Toyota’s #NoRoomForBoring ad last night, and the conversation around Toyota saw a little boost in activity, if a drop in reach, from their lead-up: 12.4k tweets from 10.2k contributors, for a total reach of 14.3 million.

One of the most retweeted tweets came from the official Muppets account, and featured King Prawn Pepe doing a touchdown dance on Vine:

311 retweets for the dancing King Prawn so far, and some decent crossover exposure for Toyota.

What about brands who didn’t buy ad time?

A lot of brands who don’t buy ad time still live-tweet during big cultural events to interact with viewers and other brands; last night saw a lot of discussion between brands, riffing on the commercials and more. A standout was definitely J.C. Penney, who decided to tweet in a pair of mittens to very mixed results. The numbers, however, are in their favor: 131k tweets from 81.2k contributors, for a total reach of 36.9 million. That’s slightly more reach than Coke, who usurped SodaStream on game day, but more than twice the amount of activity.

Both of their slightly incoherent tweets saw around 20k retweets:

22.7k retweets so far.

19.2k retweets so far.

A number of other brands- even some of the big game advertisers- interacted with J.C. Penney’s tweets:

Coors Light jumped in first, getting some exposure- 7.1k retweets- on a night dominated by their competitor Bud Light.

Kia’s tweet has seen 3.1k retweets so far, while Snickers and Doritos both offered themselves as snacks to soak up any extraneous Coors Light:

Snickers has gotten 3.1k retweets so far, and Doritos 1.3k.

The Takeaways

We are living in the real-time marketing present, it would seem. The brands who saw the most activity and reach last night were the ones who were interacting like people do on Twitter around big cultural events, and inserting their brand in ways that were funny and relevant. J.C. Penney may have confused a lot of people with their decision to tweet in mittens, but it definitely got everyone talking about them. It remains to be seen whether it will help them sell any more mittens.

Watching brands interact during events like the Super Bowl has become an unexpected highlight for many viewers, especially when the action happens to be slow on the main screen.

What was your favorite social moment of the big game last night?

Written by Sarah

February 3rd, 2014 at 8:31 am

Peyton Manning vs. Tom Brady on Twitter

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The NFL NFC and AFC conference championships both played out yesterday, determining the Super Bowl matchup of the Denver Broncos vs. the Seattle Seahawks. To make things more interesting, we took a look at mentions of quarterbacks Peyton Manning of the Broncos and Tom Brady of the New England Patriots on Twitter, before, during and after they played out the AFC championship game. We were curious if the same name would come out ahead in social mentions as in the game itself. The verdict?

Tom Brady came away with about 13% of the mentions in the overall conversation, but Peyton Manning got ahead of him with 15%. And while the range of things said about professional athletes on Twitter is impressive, the two tweets below naming the QBs sum up the mood around each of their mentions pretty well.

The most retweeted tweet mentioning Brady:


And the most retweeted tweet mentioning Manning:

 

This just didn’t turn out to be Brady’s year. Better luck next time, Brady! In the meantime, we’ll keep an eye on the talk around Manning and much more as the Super Bowl approaches.

Written by Sarah

January 20th, 2014 at 4:01 pm

Sports on social media: How fans talk tells you more than just how they feel

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There has been plenty of coverage around Monday night’s BCS Championship Game between Florida State and Auburn; everything from fan to brand reactions on Twitter. On the surface these tweets strike as funny, impassioned, angry, or incredulous– not unexpected reactions when it comes to something fans connect with as deeply as their favorite sports teams. Looking at how people talk about sports on social media like Twitter can tell us more than just which team they’re a fan of, however; it gives us insight into their actions and behaviors. And if you know what it is that a fan is doing with their spare time, then you have a better idea of how to approach them, and talk to them. For brands this is invaluable. As for fans, they get the chance of an individualized approach to putting things in front of them that they’ll want to connect with.

The Action: A favorite game gets rewatched like a favorite movie.

The Implication.

What’s the point in rewatching a sports game you already know the outcome of? It’s not that different from rewatching a favorite movie or television show, really: while you already know what’s going to happen, now you can watch to see how it happens, and gain a deeper understanding of the thing that you love. While you’re likely experiencing the same emotions of elation at a great play or sadness in a defeat, it’s also likely not as strong as when you watched the game live. It’s easier to spot a certain player’s motivations, or how a play completely unraveled, because you’re not sitting on the edge of your seat with your teeth clenched, or screaming at the ref.

For brands whose demographic includes sports fans, this is helpful information. People who save a game to rewatch it are exhibiting behavior that’s planned, thoughtful, and deeply engaging– and that’s the kind of approach any brand wanting to build a relationship with them should take when reaching out to them. That fan behavior shows the kind of loyalty companies are lucky to find in a customer. Reach out the right way, with understanding, and you stand to be rewarded.

The Action: Not holding back feelings about a new way to watch the game.

ESPN debuted their Megacast for the BCS Championship, and like all things on the Internet viewers were not shy about sharing their feelings.

The implication.

Sometimes it’s the simplest lessons that bear repeating: Listen to your audience. Obviously ESPN will never be able to make every single sports fan happy with a magical coverage design, but they can find ways to tweak their Megacast for future games by paying attention to the things their watchers are saying about it. This is also an opportunity to shine a spotlight on certain fans; if you incorporate their idea, highlight the tweet they shared it in on a future broadcast and say thank you. Nothing could spell out clearer that you do care what viewers have to say.

And some of their ideas are pretty entertaining.

Written by Sarah

January 9th, 2014 at 8:27 am

Posted in Events

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TakeFive with TweetReach – Jim Kneer

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Welcome back to TakeFive with TweetReach, our ongoing interview series with influential members of the Twitter measurement universe. This week, we’re happy to highlight Jim Kneer, New Media Specialist for the NBA Champion Miami HEAT basketball team. Coming off a terrific championship season and an Olympic gold medal for Team USA player and Miami HEAT forward Lebron James, we thought it would be a great time to get Jim’s views on Twitter measurement.

TweetReach: Welcome Jim! Can you describe your role in the HEAT organization? How have you used social media, specifically Twitter, as a part of your social media strategy for the team?

Jim Kneer: Our New Media team is the eyes and ears of HEAT fans around the globe. Our job is to connect with as many HEAT fans as we can. We create relationships with our younger fans that will evolve into a strong brand loyalty. We view Twitter as the first true means of establishing two-way communication with our fans.

Our franchise is just entering our 25th season, so we are a relatively young franchise. We are just starting to see our first generation of life-long HEAT fans reach fiscal maturity. It is our goal to take advantage of the amazing team we have to build our fan base and social media, and Twitter specifically, allows us to reach out and communicate with fans.

We use Twitter to provide real-time coverage of all HEAT related news and events. Our New Media team covers all HEAT practices, games and provides behind-the-scenes coverage of HEAT related events.

TweetReach: How important is measurement of engagement on Twitter to your strategy? Do you have specific goals and campaign metrics that you use to measure performance and success?

Jim Kneer: Measurement of social media engagement is key for us. While we may not have specific goals for each initiative we undertake, engagement metrics play a key role in our future initiatives. We like to look at the performance of our tweets and use that data to tailor our coverage to the areas we get the most engagement. We always want to deliver the content our fans want the most.

We also like to use this data to determine time of posting. We want our posts to generate a lot of replies and we try to provide as many answers as time and scheduling allow. Conversely, pictures and posts that will generate a lot of re-tweets are often made during our “off hours” since less attention is required.

TweetReach: Has your social media measurement strategy changed as you’ve gone from the regular season, to the playoffs, to the champion series, to the off-season?

Jim Kneer: During the season, we utilize a lot of the measurements to build our strategy. Each regular season, we find a different tweeting “sweet spot.” Some years we see more interactions of pictures, some years it may be statistical information that gets the best response. Our job during the regular season is to perfect our strategy. Socially, we do not want to be become a nuisance.

I come from an email marketing background. Email marketing has always been referred to as “permission-based marketing.” Moving over to social media, I always treat it as “privilege-based marketing.” We have been lucky to earn a spot in our fans’ timelines and newsfeeds. We treat this as a privilege. We try to avoid straight sales pitches, instead offering exclusive first looks or first opportunities to buy. This gives our sales pitches a more exclusive, offer-based characteristic.

Once we hit the post-season, we intensify our social media efforts. We know that our fans’ appetite for information increases and we begin traveling to away games to help provide coverage to which they may not otherwise have access. This coverage increases each round, as fans want more and more information. During the 2012 NBA Finals, we sent two staff members to Oklahoma City to cover everything, and we were rewarded with a really comprehensive behind the scenes look at the team during our title run.

Our off-season strategy is to provide relevant content when it occurs, but more so to focus on increasing our interactions with fans. We try to reply to as many relevant mentions as we can, while also increasing the amount of interactive tweets we send out.

TweetReach: What’s your opinion on the “second-screen experience” during televised games? Have you seen more consumers actively engaging via Twitter during games and how do you make the most of that for the team?

Jim Kneer: During the regular season, we work very closely with our broadcast partner, Sun Sports/Fox Sports Florida. Last off-season, we had a series of social-broadcast meetings and were able to develop a very interactive broadcast. We developed a Facebook Friday component to help draw viewers to our broadcasts, especially when our local broadcast is up against a national broadcast of the game.

We also got our broadcasters Eric Reid and Tony Fiorentino on Twitter and they were able to interact with fans and answer some questions live during all broadcasts. Additionally, we created a dedicated hashtag to track all comments.

Fans were also actively engaged in twitter polls for the pregame spotlights as well as the poll question for games. We wanted to create a very social feel for our broadcasts and are very happy where they stand after our first season.

TweetReach: Can you describe one of your more successful social media efforts? Were there specific measurement goals you wanted to achieve and how did the campaign perform? Any lessons learned you can share with our audience?

Jim Kneer: I think one of our most successful efforts this year was the unveiling of our new “Black is Back” uniform. We knew this would generate buzz, but the scope of the appeal was amazing. We were able to reach over 4.5 million unique accounts and generate almost 17 million impressions.

We also made a big social media push for the release of our Miami Floridians throwback jersey. This effort reached over 5.8 million unique people and total impressions reached 13 million.

I think the most important thing we took from these campaigns was that we needed to be ready and able to take advantage of these situations the moment they arise. Once we noticed the feedback, the posts, and tweets we were receiving, we really ramped up our efforts. We learned that by monitoring early reaction to a post you can really ride the positive public sentiment and stay ahead of the curve.

TweetReach: Thanks, Jim!

Written by Dean Cruse

August 23rd, 2012 at 7:24 am

Olympic sponsors on Twitter – the final tally

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We’ve monitored and analyzed Twitter activity for the 11 official worldwide sponsors of the 2012 London Olympics for the duration of the games and have been posting summaries of their performance along the way. Now that the games are over, how did the sponsors stack up?

After leading the race for mentions on Twitter since we started tracking on July 27th, McDonald’s has run away with the gold with almost 35,000 tweets mentioning them. In the race for silver, Coca-Cola continued their lead over Team Visa from last week, accumulating over 20,000 mentions. Team Visa, with almost 19,000 mentions on Twitter since the games began, picked up the bronze.

Congratulations to the sponsors! Check out the results below. Click the image for the full-sized version.

Overall, the 11 official worldwide Olympic sponsors had more than 100,000 mentions on Twitter during the games. The most retweeted tweet mentioning an official sponsor was from gold medal winner McDonald’s at over 1,000 retweets:

The next most retweeted tweet mentioning a sponsor clocked in at 686 retweets and was from bronze medal winner Team Visa:

 

We hope you have enjoyed our analysis of tweets from the 2012 Olympic games! If you are interested in doing your own analysis of Olympics tweets, we’d be happy to help. Just let us know!

Written by Dean Cruse

August 14th, 2012 at 3:39 pm

Posted in Olympics,Trends

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Olympic sponsors on Twitter – week 2 leaderboard

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Welcome to another installment in our coverage of the 2012 London Olympics on Twitter. Last week, we posted the Sponsor Leaderboard, looking at how the official sponsors of the games had performed on Twitter after week 1 of the games.

We started tracking mentions of the 11 worldwide Olympic sponsors’ official Twitter usernames when the Olympics began, and now after two weeks of tweeting, how are they stacking up?

McDonald’s continues to lead the pack with almost 29,000 tweets mentioning them since the games began. But, look out for Coca-Cola, who has come from behind this week to surpass Team Visa and grab the silver medal place for now. Also notable, Procter & Gamble, who moved from eighth to sixth place with a 240% increase in tweets and a 29% increase in followers over the past week.

With only a few more days of Olympic activity, who will win the gold for Olympic sponsor Twitter activity? Stay tuned to find out! And, if you are interested in doing your own analysis of Olympics tweets, we’d be happy to help. Just let us know!

Check out the results below. Click the image for the full-sized version.

Written by Dean Cruse

August 10th, 2012 at 12:12 pm

Posted in Olympics,Trends

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Ambush marketing at the Olympics – what does Twitter say?

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Continuing on our Olympics theme, last week we took a look at how the official worldwide Olympic sponsors were performing on Twitter with our Olympic Sponsor Leaderboard. Over $1 billion has been invested by sanctioned companies to sponsor the games and the International Olympic Committee has been adamant in cracking down on ambush marketing at these games. The rules are clear – if you’re not an official sponsor, then don’t try to advertise using any connection to the Olympics. The London Organizing Committee and the British Parliament have even criminalized ambush tactics with fines of up to $30,000 or more according to the New York Times. With “brand police” actively searching out rogue advertisers who haven’t ponied up what in some cases is close to $100 million each, how are non-sponsors taking advantage of Twitter over these few weeks to rise above the Olympic social media noise?

We took a look at the Twitter activity around four of the official Olympic sponsors and compared them to their main competitors who are not official sponsors. We tracked all mentions of the official Twitter usernames for each of the brands from July 27th through August 8th. The high level results are below. If you’re interested in more detailed analysis of the Olympics, just let us know!

To start, we looked at Adidas, an official sponsor of the Olympics and compared them to Nike, who surprising to many, is not a sponsor. Instead of spending the money to sponsor the Olympics, Nike instead has focused its efforts on its #findgreatness campaign featuring the Find Your Greatness video and TV spot highlighting aspiring athletes in cities named London from around the world (excluding the one in Great Britain). That video has now seen in excess of 4.4 million views on YouTube and continues to climb. Of course, many of Olympic athletes are sponsored by Nike (have you seen the yellow shoes?), but even with the subtle brand awareness afforded by these efforts, Adidas has used the Olympics to their advantage and outperformed Nike in terms of Twitter engagement. Since the Olympics began, Adidas has seen 50% more tweets than Nike and 100% more retweets from only 5% more Twitter users who mention them. Advantage: Sponsor Adidas.

Next up, beverages. Coca-Cola, an official sponsor of the Olympics for decades has performed quite well on Twitter this year, and was ranked 3rd in our Sponsor Leaderboard last week. Pepsi, not a sponsor of the games, has not focused on the Olympics at all, instead concentrating their Twitter promotional efforts on Summer music with their #pepsimusicnow campaign. With that and their other non-Olympic efforts, total tweets about Pepsi since the beginning of the Olympics are 62% higher than those mentioning Coke. Pepsi has seen significantly higher engagement on Twitter with almost 3x the number of replies to their tweets than Coke and 37% more Twitter users mentioning them.

Of course, follower count may have something to do with this. Pepsi has seen a 41% increase in Twitter followers over the past 3 months preceding the Olympics and now sits at over 1 million followers compared to an 8% growth in followers for Coke. Advantage: Non-sponsor Pepsi.

Moving on to fast food, long-time Olympic sponsor McDonald’s has topped rival Burger King in terms of Twitter engagement with almost 10x the tweets since the Olympics began. McDonald’s, who held first place in our Sponsor Leaderboard last week, beat Burger King in virtually every aspect of Twitter activity including tweets, retweets, replies, and Twitter users mentioning them. Burger King’s Twitter efforts over the period of the Olympics has been focused on promoting their menu items without targeting a specific campaign effort. Perhaps their strategy has been to sit it out and let the Olympic storm blow over? Their one attempt to subtly mention the games resulted in a grammatically-challenged tweet. Advantage: Sponsor McDonald’s.

Finally, we took a look at financial services. Team Visa, an official Olympic sponsor, created a new Twitter username especially for the games and has used it to their advantage to promote their sponsorship. Despite having 3x the followers on Twitter, rival Mastercard’s participation on Twitter has been dwarfed by Team Visa in every aspect of Twitter engagement. Rather than focus on the Olympics, Mastercard has instead focused its social media efforts on promoting the #dineoutday campaign, a fund raising event targeted to raise money to fund cancer research. While a great cause, in terms of Twitter engagement over the past few weeks, advantage: Sponsor Team Visa.

Overall, three of the four sponsors we tracked significantly out-performed their competitors in terms of Twitter engagement since the Opening Ceremonies on July 27th. Only Pepsi, with their massive Twitter effort, beat out Coke based on our Twitter tracking data. Of course, Twitter is but one part of a marketing campaign and these companies are spending millions of dollars outside of social media to promote their brands. And, some surveys indicate that consumers don’t even know who is sponsoring the Olympics. But, in terms of Twitter engagement specifically during the Olympic games, the sponsors’ investments seem to be paying off when compared to their direct competitors.

Written by Dean Cruse

August 8th, 2012 at 7:04 pm

Olympic sponsors race for the gold on Twitter

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We hope you’re enjoying our series of posts about the 2012 Olympics on Twitter. Next up, we take a look at how the official sponsors of the games are performing. Some of them, such as Coca-Cola, have supported the Olympics for decades. Coke first got involved in 1928 when a freighter delivered the United States team and 1,000 cases of Coca-Cola to the Olympic Games in Amsterdam. McDonald’s famously airlifted hamburgers to homesick American athletes in Grenoble in 1968. Other sponsors are newer, having joined since The Olympic Partners program was first introduced in 1985.

While not without controversy, the monetary effect of the sponsors on the games is massive. Olympic sponsors, partners, supporters, suppliers, and providers have invested well over $1 billion in the 2012 games. How’s that investment paying off? Clearly, these companies will measure results through increases in brand awareness, athlete mentions, and revenue. But in this, the first Twitter Olympics, how are they performing on our favorite social media network?

We’ve been tracking mentions of the 11 worldwide Olympic sponsors’ official Twitter usernames since the Olympics began, and the results for first week are below. So far, McDonald’s leads the pack with more tweets, users, and retweets mentioning them. But, Team Visa is close on their heals and relative to their smaller follower count, is outperforming them all. Click the image for the full-sized version.

We’ll take another look at the leaderboard at the end of week two. And, look for more detailed analysis about the sponsors on Twitter after the games have completed. Interested in doing your own analysis of Olympics tweets? Just let us know!

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Written by Dean Cruse

August 3rd, 2012 at 9:39 am

Posted in Olympics,Trends

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The 2012 Summer Olympics Opening Ceremony in tweets

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On Friday during the 2012 Summer Olympics Opening Ceremony, 6.32 million tweets were posted from 2.65 million unique Twitter accounts* about the London Olympic games. Click the image below for the full size version.

The most retweeted tweet of the night was from @TeamGB, which received more than 30,000 retweets. The most buzzed about country was the United States, the most buzzed about athlete was British diver Tom Daley, and the most buzzed about sponsor was Samsung. The #openingceremony hashtag was used in more than 873,000 tweets.

As we continue to track tweets about the 2012 London Olympics over the next two weeks, we’ll be posting lots more Olympics Twitter analyses. So check back soon for more!

*These tweets were collected from 20:00 UTC July 27 through 07:00 UTC July 28, to include the live UK broadcast of the opening ceremony, as well as the time-delayed East and West Coast US broadcasts of the event.

Written by Jenn D

July 30th, 2012 at 12:30 pm

Posted in Olympics,Trends

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