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The Week in Social Analytics #76

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Social Media Fears, Tips, and Strategies for Small Businesses [from Soshable; written by Chastity Mansfield]

An infographic that highlights the anxieties felt by many small businesses approaching social media, along with tips and strategies for successfully implementing a social program despite them.

SM sm business anxiety infographic

Full infographic at the link above.  

Saving the world through social media? How development is going digital [from The Guardian; written by Maeve Shearlaw]

“From tracking World Bank projects to Twitter conversations with Rwanda’s health minister, technology is driving innovation.”

Social media for social good. Pair with Tumblr’s effort to help with relief aid in the Philippines.

18 Social Media Marketing Tips From the Pros [from Social Media Examiner; written by Cindy King]

Strategies from pros that they use to boost their social media marketing.

The First Tweets of 16 B2B Brands (and a Few Familiar Faces) [from Ann Handley]

A look at some of the first B2B tweets is amusing, and shows just how far Twitter has come since its inception and eventual widespread adoption by businesses.

How Twitter Hijacked My Mind [from New York Magazine; written by Kathryn Schulz]

“Collectively, the people I follow on Twitter — book nerds, science nerds, journalists, the uncategorizably interesting — come pretty close to my dream community. They also function as by far the best news source I’ve ever used: more panoptic, more in-depth, more likely to teach me something, much more timely, cumulatively more self-correcting and sophisticated.”

Defending Your Personal Brand Online – When Should You Respond? [from Forbes; written by Dorie Clark]

“A study from Stanford’s Graduate School of Business indicates that bad publicity harms the reputation of established players, as you might expect. But it can actually help lesser-known figures, because it raises their brand awareness among the public.”

Social Serves Many Purposes for Restaurant Industry Marketers [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Among US restaurants in March 2013, 80% used social media—17 percentage points higher than email, which was the next most popular choice. Social’s ubiquity is likely because it’s viewed as less expensive than traditional forms of marketing.”

A Girl Who Codes [from FastCompany; written by Jillian Goodman]

“‘It showed me that if I have an idea or something that I want to make, I shouldn’t be afraid to go ahead and make it. I think computer science allows you to make your dreams come true.’”

The tech industry’s woman problem: Statistics show it’s worse than you think [from Quartz; written by Lauren Bacon]

“The numbers, while preliminary, are revealing: tech companies employ an average of 12.33% women engineers.”

The Common Sense Guide For Brands That Want to Show Support Without Looking Like Asshats [from Mack Collier]

No-nonsense advice from Mack Collier.

15 Brands Rocking Tumblr [from Mashable; written by Taylor Casti]

Mashable highlights brands who have really taken to Tumblr’s unique possibilities for connecting with customers.

3 in 10 SMBs Advertising on Twitter Seeing “Excellent” or “Extraordinary” ROI [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“. . . this year, 31.1% of those advertising on Twitter perceived their ROI as “excellent” (10-19 times spend; 18.8%) or “extraordinary” (20+ times spend; 12.3%), up from 25% of advertisers in last year’s survey and 17.1% in 2011.”

And two bonus resources:

9 Twitter Chats Every Digital Marketer Should Participate In [from Business to Community; written by Cassie Gray]

We have to add #MMchat to this list. Mondays at 8pm ET.

Which Social Media Icons and Logos Can I Print on Promo Items? [from Quality Logo Products; written by Mandy Kilinskis]

Helpful when you’re creating promo items for the next conference etc your brand plans to attend.

Written by Sarah

November 15th, 2013 at 9:48 am

The Week in Social Analytics #75

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Twitter News Consumers: Young, Mobile and Educated [Pew Research Journalism Project; written by Amy Mitchell and Emily Guskin]

“Nearly one-in-ten U.S. adults (8%) get news through Twitter, according to a new report by the Pew Research Center, in collaboration with the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Compared with the 30% of Americans who get news on Facebook, Twitter news consumers stand out as younger, more mobile and more educated.”

Ten Ways in Which Your Tumblr Blog Can Help in SEO [from Social Media Today; written by Mark Scott]

“Tumblr essentially functions as a secondary blog you can use solely for the purpose of SEO. You can send optimized links back to the main website, allowing your website’s reach to expand and incoming traffic to multiply. What makes Tumblr great for SEO is the inbuilt promotion and SEO-friendly features that it comes packed with by default.”

And here’s a response on that from JD Rucker on Soshable: Tumblr as an SEO Tool.

Our Tumblrs, Our Teenage Selves [from New York Magazine; written by Ann Friedman]

“Way back in 1977, Susan Sontag wrote that  ’industrial societies turn their citizens into image-junkies; it is the most irresistible form of mental pollution.’ And the notion has persisted. The never-ending stream of social-media images is routinely declared a symptom of our collective narcissism or intellectual weakness. Again, perhaps we can take a cue from teenage girls. They’re quite aware that they’re seen as frivolous and self-absorbed, but on a deeper level they know they’re engaged in an important project: figuring out who they are and what they want to be. If we took our Instagrams and Snapchats and reblogs half as seriously as they do, perhaps we’d reach some new insight about our adult selves, too.”

LinkedIn and Tumblr: Tips for Effective Video Marketing [from OnlineVideo.net; written by Shelley M. Johnson]

“This is the art of becoming ubiquitous as a brand. When marketing video, there are more networks to rely on than just YouTube, Twitter, and Vine. Some marketers see this as unchartered territory, but what they fail to realize is that other platforms can be just as effective, if not more.”

It’s a Wide, Wide, Wide, Wide Social Media World: 4 Things You Probably Didn’t Know [from The Measurement Standard]

“Despite being blocked in China, the major social networks still have many millions of Chinese active users who use various stratagems to access these services. Google+ has 100 million users in China, Twitter has 80 million, and YouTube has 60 million.”

The Evolution of Visual Storytelling [from The Buzz Bin; written by Erin Hurley-Brown]

“Our current students see no difference between working traditionally and digitally, they simply see them as different media. Where 10 years ago, an illustrator might have chosen to work in gouache or oils, they now choose to work traditionally or digitally, and that may switch from one assignment to the next.”

Cats Are Over: Social Media in the Post Cat Economy [from The Webby Awards]

Say it ain’t so! The Webby Awards presents their first social media report and presents the notion that we’re living in a post-cat economy. Regardless of whether you agree, it’s a great read with a lot of examples and tips from top brands in social media.

Instagram ads and the future of brand advertising [from Gigaom; written by  Om Malik]

“Systrom explained that in order for companies and their brands to be successful, they need to create Instagram-like content for the advertising campaigns. If the brands veer away from Instagram-i-ness, Systrom said they will run the risk of losing impact in a what is a very high-touch environment. The kind of ads and the number of times they will be shown to us will be key to community acceptance (or rejection) of advertising.”

Unlock the Potential of Real-Time Marketing [from Marketing Profs; written by Jenn Deering Davis]

“And there is good reason to take notice: Regardless of product or category, marketers who engage in real-time marketing can expect a 21% increase in positive brand perceptions and 18% increase in likelihood to buy (Golin Harris).

Real-time is not some marketing fad, but a natural progression of social media marketing and a great way for marketers to capitalize on the immense volume of social conversations. And a key part of unlocking the potential of real-time marketing is implementing social analytics that can help guide your media strategies.”

Do Retailers Understand Millennials? Are They Even Trying To? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Abstaining from any kind of research into this demographic – no matter how difficult it is to decipher – seems curious.”

Consumers Say They Respond to Online Ads With Actions Other Than Clicks [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Indeed, when respondents were asked how long they would generally wait until they researched a company or product whose ad they found interesting but did not click, a majority indicated they would wait longer than one hour, with a significant number doing so ‘days later.’”

Written by Sarah

November 8th, 2013 at 9:45 am

The Week in Social Analytics #74

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Social Data Intelligence: Survey Says [from Thought Experiments; written by Susan Etlinger]

“No big surprises here: the majority of companies we surveyed fall into the “ad-hoc” category, 29 percent into “formalized,” 11 percent into “integrated,” and five percent into “holistic.” To be honest, I want to drill into the self-reporting at the holistic stage, simply because the tools to facilitate scale (the key criterion) are still quite nascent. But that’s less important than the fact that, yes, we’re mostly learning how to do this and operationalize it–from a business, process and technical standpoint.”

Lack of Focus Hurts Social Media Crisis Management Efforts [from Social Media Today; written by Jonathan Bernstein]

“While there is no set formula for determine the best channels to utilize, we suggest you ask the following questions:

1. What medium will best reach the client’s stakeholders?
2. What medium currently features negative information about the client?
3. Where do you already have active advocates and a cushion of goodwill established?”

Enterprise Brands’ Social Success Metrics: Content Shares Considered Most Important [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Separately, the study indicates that the largest companies believe that it’s critically important to integrate social into other digital media initiatives: 54% of respondents from companies with at least $1 billion in revenues consider social’s integration into wider digital media initiatives ‘extremely important,’ with a further 36% perceiving it to be ‘somewhat important.’”

Video Infographic: Your Brain on Visualization [from KISSMetrics; written by staff]

“Here are some interesting facts about infographics:

  • High quality infographics are 30 times more likely to be read than text articles.
  • 90% of information transmitted to the brain is visual, and visuals are processed 60,000 times faster in the brain than text.
  • Infographics are 40 times more likely to be shared on social networks.”

Be sure to check out the video at the link.

Crushing South L.A.’s Digital Divide by Teaching Youth to Code [from GOOD; written by Juan Vasquez and Oscar Menjivar]

“Fifty-five percent of boys in the inner city drop out high school and 70 percent of them will either end up unemployed or incarcerated. We need to change that by giving them hope and a tool for success—computer programming.”

Top 10 Ways To Be a Male Advocate for Technical Women [from the National Center for Women & Information Technology; written by staff]

1. Listen to women’s stories

Male advocates in technical workplaces identify listening to their female colleagues’ and bosses’ stories about their experiences at work as one of the key drivers for their advocacy efforts. The women’s stories alerted them to pressures and circumstances they might never have noticed. Let women know that you are interested in hearing their perspective if they are willing to share.“ 

Understanding You: the birth of social media science [from Wired UK; written by Carl Miller]

“This may all genuinely transform our ability to understand ourselves. Social media is a treasure chest of evidence of behaviour that was once naturally and normally lost to the past. For the first time, we have a measurable, analysable image of a society-in-motion, simply the largest body of information about people and society we have ever had. It is the rendering of normal, day-to-day social interactions into data that can be understood.”

The Demographics of Instagram and Snapchat Users [from Marketing charts; written by staff]

“Fully 43% of 18-29-year-old cell phone users report using Instagram – a number that will likely rise over time given a recent report showing that Instagram is now the second-most important social network to American teens, tied with Facebook behind Twitter.”

Old Meets New: Newspapers Take to Instagram [from Digiday; written by Josh Sternberg]

“Still, some papers that do real journalism (and are looking to attract real readers) are on the photo sharing site, if only to have another venue to showcase their occasionally stellar photography – or, at the very least, remind the digital kids that they still exist. Here are five newspapers using Instagram in a variety of ways, and with varying success.”

How 5 Large Consumer and B2B Brands Are Using Vine [from Top Rank; written by Lee Odden]

“From demonstrating the brand personality and culture to getting creative with company news and industry participation, these 5 major B2B and consumer brands have found ways to use just 6 seconds of video in powerful ways. One important thing to understand about Vine is that the experience for your audience is not limited to one 6 second video. Think about Vine as a TV channel with 6 second episodes. The impact you can make by connecting your string of short videos will be far more impactful than random videos about various topics.”

Written by Sarah

November 1st, 2013 at 10:01 am

The Week in Social Analytics #72

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

11 Big Myths About Social Media and Content Marketing [from Convince & Convert; written by Jay Baer]

Myth 2: Social is not measurable

Social is extremely measurable, but first you have to do something that can be measured. Tracking URLs, visibility into your purchase funnel, unified customer databases. All of it can answer that “are we making money at this?” question, but too often people expect there to be a magic “social media measurement” button, even though there is no such button for radio, TV, email, direct mail, billboards, or fancy business cards.”

Demystifying Marketing & Social Media Measurement [from Social Media Explorer; written by Nichole Kelly]

“Instead of spending time wondering which metrics are important to measure, start by getting marketing and social data into your core systems. Then we can debate which metrics are the best metrics, but I can tell you this. If you aren’t passing campaign data into your CRM, it’s unlikely you are measuring anything meaningful to your executive management team today. It’s time to fix it.”

Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter Traffic Referrals Up 54% in Past Year [from Social Media Today; written by Danny Wong]

1) Facebook, Pinterest and Twitter are dominating. These three social media power players collectively accounted for 15.22% of overall traffic last month. Given their community and share-friendly nature, it’s no surprise that they top the list in traffic referrals and have grown more than 54% each in share of overall visits. Facebook grew 58.81%, Pinterest by 66.52% and Twitter 54.12%. Pinterest’s growth is especially interesting now that the company is flirting with paid advertising.”

Social media brand recommendations rise while face-to-face conversations fall [from Social Media Influence]

“According to new word-of-mouth (WOM) research from COLLOQUY, brand recommendations made via social media have grown 4% since the company’s last report in 2011, while the number of ‘real life’ conversations about brands has dropped 4%.”

Only 1 in 3 Americans Claim That Social Media is Important to Them [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Social media scores higher among women (37%) and those under-35 (45%) in the US, but those figures also lag the corresponding global averages (46% and 50%, respectively).”

85% Of B2B Marketers Use Twitter | INFOGRAPHIC [from AllTwitter; written by Shea Bennett]

“New data has revealed that 87 percent of B2B marketers are now using social media as part of their strategical arsenal, with 85 percent using Twitter.”

Click through for the full infographic. 

U.S., Europe, Asia, Middle East, Africa, Latin America – Social Media Growth Worldwide | INFOGRAPHIC [from All Twitter; written by Shea Bennett]

“Did you know that nearly 1 in 4 people worldwide will use social media in 2013, and that by next year, two billion users globally will log on to platforms such as Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and Instagram?”

SM Worldwide Growth

Click through for the full infographic. 

Social Media Photos: The Eyes Have It [from Heidi Cohen]

“Here are 15 winning tactics divided into 5 broader content marketing strategies for using photos to maximize social media engagement.”

Includes examples.

12 trends shaping digital news [from Pew Internet; written by Andrea Caumont]

3. Social media has grown as a source for news: 19% of Americans saw news on a social network “yesterday” in 2012, more than double the 9% who had done so in 2010. Those in their 30s (30%) are nearly as likely as those 18-24 (34%) to say they saw news or news headlines on Facebook or another social networking site yesterday. (Report)”

Q&A: How to Incorporate Tumblr Into Your Marketing Campaigns [from Business2Community; written by Polina Opelbaum]

“‘People flock to Tumblr to be entertained and inspired, not to be pitched to,’ says Francis Skipper, executive vice president of 451 Marketing. ‘Therefore, it is key to be very visual and to use humor on Tumblr. Pieces should be easy for your audience to digest and promote sharing. And try to provide evergreen content that will have a longer shelf life, so your content can be shared often.’”

Memes and the History of Communication [from Edelman Digital; written by Veronica Barranco]

“Before the Internet became widely used, the media were the masters of the conversation. They filtered conversations and, by doing so, built our view of the world. But the expansion of the Internet blew up the pyramid of authority, making the world a place where everything can be shared, mimicked and copied. Memes never had such a fine environment to grow. Memecracy was born.”

Written by Sarah

October 18th, 2013 at 10:13 am

This Week in Social Analytics #71

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

So You Wrote A Blog Post: How To Get The Most Juice From Twitter [from AllTwitter; written by Lauren Dugan]

“Write for your audience, not for you. So you just launched a new product. Good for you! But that news won’t entice your Twitter followers over to your blog unless you tell them why it matters to them, hopefully by showing them how it can make their lives better in some way. Everything you blog about should have your Twitter (and Facebook, and LinkedIn, etc.) audience in mind, so that your content resonates with as broad of an audience as possible.”

Could Twitter Help Fight Cord-Cutting? Here’s Proof It Can [from Forbes; written by Jeff Bercovici]

“Only 1.7% of the Twitter users in Magid’s survey expected to drop TV subscriptions in the next 12 months, versus 3% of non-users. This even though the Twitter users were on average younger — meaning they should’ve been more inclined to cord-cut, not less.”

Three Ways to Help More Women and Girls Stand Up and Take Risks [from GOOD; written by Manasa Yeturu]

“‘Where the girls at?’ I asked point-blank to a crowd of more than 60 spectators—and directly at the four judges seated in front of me. That question was how I started off my final pitch at a recent Startup Weekend. In short, it encapsulated my whole weekend—a weekend that was by, for, and created to encourage women to step up and into the startup space.”

Social Media Trends for 2014 [from Social Media Today; written by Marina Arnaout]

See which predictions you agree with, and leave your own in the comments.

Quit Trying to Market With a One Size Fits All Mindset [from Danny Brown]

“It’s all well and good having data that shows you the atypical behaviour of a demographic, based on surveys and publications from that specific market. Yet these behaviours are only as good as the situational knowledge we have about that audience.”

Don’t Abandon Social Media [Research] | How To Measure Your Invisible Social Media Audience [from Heidi Cohen]

“If you’re like most people, you probably underestimate the size of your actual social media audience because on social media, engagement doesn’t equal reach.”

Few Consumers Feel That Brands Are Connecting With Them. How Are Brands Failing? [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“The biggest gap between importance and performance came in the area of “communicating openly and transparently about how products are sourced and made.” While 54% of respondents considered that an important area (top-2 box on a 5-point scale) for brands to build and maintain connections with them, just 12% on average believed that the statement applied to the brands in question.”

Written by Sarah

October 11th, 2013 at 10:33 am

This Week in Social Analytics #70

with one comment

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Top 3 Challenges B2B Leaders Face Today | INFOGRAPHIC [from Social Media Today; written by Louis Foong]

Understanding the Direct Marketing vs. Brand Marketing Conflict [from Social Media Explorer; written by Jason Falls]

“It’s not one or the other, but one feeding the other that works best.”

Six Visual Solutions To Complex Digital Marketing/Analytics Challenges [from Occam's Razor; written by Avinash Kaushik]

On a social content strategy:

“Write about topics both of you [you + your potential customers] are interested in. If you sell smoothies, talk about food, how to develop a great palette, travel, evolution, agriculture, the future of the planet… the topics are endless.

Provide utility. Share tips on how to make my life better. Share tips on a healthy lifestyles, exercise, wellness of children, latest relevant mobile apps…. the topics are endless.

Your customers have given you permission to interrupt their day. Don’t suck at it. Be respectful of their attention. Create a warm space in their heart for your brand. Contribute something incredible, of value.

That is the only way to win big.”

avinash_ embarassing_social_strategies

avinash_incredible_social_media_strategy

 

 

How All Star Code is Getting More Young, Black Males into Tech [from Fast Company; written by Christina Chaey]

“‘A lot of people in our community have a problem admitting that to work in technology, you often are a skinny, upper-middle-class white guy,’ says Kane Sarhan, a cofounder of the apprenticeship-based education startup Enstitute and the day’s instructor. ‘These organizations aren’t just saying there’s a massive problem. They’re putting a stake in the ground and saying, There are no black people here or There are no women here.’”

New Stats Show Nearly One Fifth Of US Internet Users Are On Twitter | CHART [from AllTwitter; written by Lauren Dugan]

Can Social Media Save NASA—And The Rest Of The Science World? [from ReadWrite; written by Selena Larson]

“But this might be a great time for NASA’s huge social media following to turn their tweets into action and let Washington know: science is essential to them.”

Let’s Play 20 Questions: Social Media Measurement Style [from MetricsMan; written by Don Bartholomew]

Questions range from opinions on how social media should be addressed in education, to non-profit and B2B considerations and various measurement concerns across the board. Example:

Q10. Any suggestions to measure business impact for B2B organizations? Is there a way to understand the impact of social for B2B organizations?

A10. Most B2B companies have a focus on sales leads. Therefore demonstrating how social is helping create leads or improve lead closure rates is important. There are a lot of uses of social listening in B2B companies as well – how the company is positioned on key issues, who is talking about the company, how products and services are being discussed, etc.”

Social Media & The Law – 11 Things You Need to Know Now [from Top Rank; written by Eliza Steely]

“Essentially there are three things you can do to protect yourself online:

  • Attibute, Quote, Cite…however you have to identify your non-original material
  • Use common sense. If you don’t want someone posting that about you, don’t post it about someone else. If you’re worried about clicking “send” or “post” there’s probably a reason, so don’t do it
  • Know the rules. It’s easier to break them if you pretend they don’t exist, but doing so opens you up for litigation, and backlash in an arena where news travels fast.

A Scientific Guide to Maximizing Your Impact on Twitter, Facebook, and Other Digital Media [from Fast Company; written by Belle Beth Cooper]

“So my suggestion would be to use this guide as just that–a guide to help you work out what to test for in your own audience, so that you can see what actually works best in your specific case.”

Most Companies Believe Social’s Risks Are Avoidable, But Few Assess Them [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“When asked to rank 6 potential risks when using social media, respondents from private companies were most likely to choose negative comments about the company as the top risk, followed closely by disclosure of proprietary information. Respondents from public companies most often ranked disclosure of proprietary information as their top risk, while the exposure of personally identifiable information was the top choice for the second spot.”

Written by Sarah

October 4th, 2013 at 9:30 am

This Week in Social Media Analytics #69

without comments

It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Infographic: Social media as the new face of disaster response [from Social Media Influence; written by staff]

“At the beginning of the year researchers found that earthquake casualties were reduced by 14% thanks to warning messages sent via social, and we took an in-depth look at the variety of other ways social media was playing an important – if not life-saving – role in disaster relief.”

SM & Disasters

Click through for the full infographic. 

Nearly Half of B2Bs Expect a Marketing Budget Bump in 2014 [from eMarketer; written by staff]

“Eighty-four percent of B2B marketers used social networks this year, up from 79% in 2012, while both blogs and microblogs saw a decline in B2B use this year. Photo sharing also saw a precipitous decline over the last year. Video sharing, however, continued its growth trend, in use by 37% of surveyed B2B marketers.”

What inner city kids know about social media, and why we should listen [from Medium; written by Jacqui Cheng]

“Contrary to popular belief among adults, these teenagers are not oblivious to privacy settings and do care a good amount about who can see what online. If anything, most of them have consciously chosen what they want to show to me and the rest of the world through social media. And what they’re telling us is who they are and what they need from us as mentors.”

Who’s not online, and why [from Pew Internet; written by Kathryn Zickuhr]

“As of May 2013, 15% of American adults ages 18 and older do not use the internet or email.

Asked why they do not use the internet:

  • 34% of non-internet users think the internet is just not relevant to them, saying they are not interested, do not want to use it, or have no need for it.
  • 32% of non-internet users cite reasons tied to their sense that the internet is not very easy to use. These non-users say it is difficult or frustrating to go online, they are physically unable, or they are worried about other issues such as spam, spyware, and hackers. This figure is considerably higher than in earlier surveys.
  • 19% of non-internet users cite the expense of owning a computer or paying for an internet connection.
  • 7% of non-users cited a physical lack of availability or access to the internet.”

Social Content Calendars: Few Plan Far Ahead [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“Whatever their calendars, respondents indicate that social is accounting for more traffic to their websites. This year, 29% said they were getting 20% or more of their traffic from social media, up from 13% seeing that level last year. Driving traffic to websites ranked as the second most important strategic social media goal for respondents, behind increasing brand awareness.”

Tweets That Changed the Way We See Twitter [from Mashable; written by Amy-Mae Elliot]

From brand gaffes to the beginning of citizen journalism on Twitter, Mashable takes notes of big moments that changed the way we see the service.

5 Ways B2B Companies Can Generate Leads on Twitter [from Social Media B2B; written by Carolyn Hughes]

“There’s an old adage that says products don’t sell, people sell. So use Twitter for the communication tool that it is and get chatting.”

Twitter’s Semi-Secret Recommendation Account [from Wired Insider; written by Smarter Upstarter]

“That seems to be the sort of thing that triggers Magic Recs, as if to say ‘hey, a few people you follow decided to follow this account recently. Maybe you should too.’”

Beyond Gathering Likes: Moving Past Followers & Fans [from Marketing Land; written by Kelsey Jones]

Choose Promotions Carefully: “Promotional content is something that can also affect audience trust. Whenever you are self-promotional on any social media platform, do so very wisely. Make sure it is something customers actually want.”

Why Agencies and Brands Need to Embrace True Storytelling [from AdWeek; written by Jon Hamm]

“Content is dead. Long live storytelling.”

How To Use Stories To Increase Value and Drive Sales [from Heidi Cohen]

“Stories make your products special thereby increasing their monetary value. Stories set your offering apart from your competitors and near substitutes and build demand.”

Written by Sarah

September 27th, 2013 at 10:05 am

How to market like the movies (without the studio budget)

without comments

Did you miss co-founder Jenn Deering Davis’ talk at SXSW V2V last month? You’re in luck; the video is now available!

“Social media has had a dramatic impact on how we watch TV and movies. The past few years have seen big changes in how TV shows and movies are created, delivered and consumed. These forms of entertainment have been able to adapt to a rapidly changing media environment. How can you use Hollywood’s strategies to market your startup? This panel will focus on examples and lessons learned in the entertainment industry and help you apply them to your startup or small business.”

Let us know what you thought in the comments.

 

Written by Sarah

September 25th, 2013 at 12:07 pm

Posted in Events

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How Etsy and other small sellers can take advantage of social media

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Social media can be a double-edged sword for a small business: it’s technically free (unless you choose to pay to advertise on it) and can be a huge boost to your business, but it also requires time that can be hard to come by on a small staff– particularly when you happen to be an army of one.

Etsy sellers in particular face a unique set of challenges, since at its heart Etsy is a marketplace for handmade crafts which can be incredibly time-consuming to produce and have to compete with sellers producing on a mass scale. These kinds of sellers are also more likely to have bigger sales and marketing resources at their disposal. How do you compete when you might not have any online marketing expertise yourself? Having a Twitter account and a Facebook page doesn’t mean you know how to market in those places, and it can be overwhelming to think about the number of social platforms available.

What to do? Plan, plan, plan. The initial setup takes the most time, but once you get the hang of things, the return will be well worth it if you’ve done your homework. And we’re here to help.

Before there was Etsy, there was this.
[Photo courtesy NYPL Digital Gallery]

1. Decide where you need to be.

This should be determined by where your customers are; if they’re all on Pinterest and Instagram and you devote most of your time to Facebook, well, you can see how that’s not optimal. If you’re limited on time, pick one or two platforms to be really active on and set up alerts for any others so you won’t miss anything (try out free tools like Mention). It’s a good idea to at least have a presence on platforms you use less often, just in case potential customers try to reach you there.

You might also consider something like Tumblr: you can set up a queue of content to automatically post when you’re busy working during the day and sleeping during the night, and hop in to join conversations whenever you have the time (it’s recommended to make time at least once a day). A traditional blog also allows you to draft and schedule posts ahead of time, but Tumblr has the added bonus of established communities that are easy to tap into with tags and reblogs. There’s also the social aspect that comes with the concept of reblogging; you can always find new people to follow and new communities to immerse yourself in this way. Design and fashion are closely linked, for example, and reblogs are great ways to find new people to talk to about in both of these areas and their overlap.

2. Plan your content out.

If you use social media to only promote what it is that you’re selling, you’re missing the social aspect of it entirely. Decide how much time you can devote to sharing original content vs curating and sharing the content of others in your community of choice (with credit of course). A good ratio of sharing your own products and design alongside other content is about 70/30, and it holds fast across platforms.

Photos are popular and perform well across platforms too; Etsy advises sellers to have large, clear images of their products available, and one advantage of this is having high-quality images to pin and share on Instagram, Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr with a description. That’s your 30% promotion right there.

What about the other 70%? Here are some specific ideas:

  • Share what inspires you in real life: Photos of a walk you went on, an inspiring quilt pattern you saw at a resale shop or festival, you hanging out with other creative people at a conference or just a happy hour.

  • Related to that last point, share some little things from your personal life that you’re comfortable with, like pictures of your pets or your bookshelf. A lot of customers like to connect with the seller behind the items they’re making; it’s part of the homemade, handcrafted appeal. They’re not just buying a sweater, they’re buying a sweater from you.

  • Share photos of items you’ve made and loved so much, you kept them for yourself, or are planning to give them as gifts to a friend, partner or family member. That shows the deep pride you take in your work.

  • Share items from fellow Etsy crafters’ stores that you love: They’ll appreciate the promotion, and might return the favor.

  • Share funny little mistakes: Miss a stitch? Drop a bucket of paint? Cat and toddler get into your stock of feathers and glue? These moments can be hilarious, and are humanizing.

  • To that end, any kind of behind-the-scenes photos and descriptions of the process you go through can help customers understand the value of what you’re making by seeing the time and effort that go into it.

  • Mood photos: There are entire Tumblrs and Pinterest boards devoted to fall, or to a specific color scheme. You can start and curate one of your own, pinning your own items that fit in appropriately alongside images of crispy autumn leaves on roads and pumpkins, all-white schemes, or beach-themed boards.

Pick an approach that’s an appropriate fit for you and what you’re selling in your store.

3. Measure and adjust.

Measurement doesn’t have to mean expensive tools and confusing spreadsheets. There are a lot of free tools that can give you an idea of what’s working and what’s not. Run a free TweetReach snapshot report on your Twitter account, for example, to see which tweets have performed the best and which other accounts talk to and retweet you the most. These are people you want to make sure you’re following and engaging with in return as much as possible.

Additionally if you have a blog or a Tumblr, see which posts have performed the best and why. Was it because of the time of day you posted? The content itself? Did someone popular in the community give you a signal boost by repinning it or tweeting about it? Was it a combination of those things? Keeping track of these factors will help you make the best content plan possible moving forward: you’ll know what to do about the ones you can control, like timing and content.

Want more? Check out the Etsy community on Tumblr, as an example; they also have specific advice for Etsy sellers using Tumblr to promote themselves on their blog, along with some handy Twitter advice. Even if you’re not on Etsy specifically, it should give you a good idea of where to start.

Got a question for us about this? Drop us a line.

Written by Sarah

September 24th, 2013 at 9:46 am

This Week in Social Media Analytics #68

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It’s Friday, so that means it’s time for This Week in Social Analytics and our favorite posts of the past week in the world of measurement, analytics, and social media. See a great piece we missed? Link to it in the comments, or tell us about it on Twitter or Facebook.

Not sure if blogging is right for your brand? Try Tumblr [from Nashville Business Journal; written by Samantha Owens Pyle]

“If your brand is still not sure if blogging will help you achieve your overall marketing goals, Tumblr is a simple alternative to a fully integrated blog on your website to test your content strategy.”

4 Ways Twitter Helps SMBs [from Pamorama; written by Pam Dyer]

“2. Twitter followers are emotionally connected to SMBs
63% of people follow SMBs is to show support for that business. 85% also say that they feel more connected to an SMB after following them. This is probably why followers of SMBs are more likely to recommend and purchase from them.”

Study: Customers who follow SMBs on Twitter feel a stronger connection [from Leaders West; written by Jim Dougherty]

  • Nearly three-quarters of respondents said they were more likely to buy from a company after following them on Twitter.

  • 86% of people said they would be more likely to buy from a company if a friend recommended a follow on Twitter

  • More than 64% of people use Twitter to share POSITIVE experiences with an SMB

  • The top reason people follow SMBs on Twitter is to get product updates. #2 – to show support. #3 – to interact with them.

  • 33% of people followed an SMB based upon a Promoted Tweet.

Retract your tweets and alert everyone who retweeted misinformation with new Twitter tool [from Faves + Co; written by staff]

“Now, new Twitter tool Retwact lets you share an updated tweet to anyone who retweeted the initial tweet with misinformation.”

How to Draw Meaningful Conclusions from Social Media Metrics [from Convince & Convert; written by Stephen Monaco]

“Companies typically track “likes” and retweets, but they can also track things they rarely focus on: the qualified leads coming from social, a company’s share of a conversation, and even the amount of revenue generated from an individual social marketing initiative.

Emphasis original.

Research Reveals Most Influential Social Media in B2B Buying [from Social Media Today; written by Steve Rayson]

“1. Industry Forums Are The Most Used Social Channels

Where social media was used by B2B buyers, the social channel they used most frequently was industry forums as shown below. They also ranked industry forums as the most influential source of information in the buying process.”

7 Major Social Media Mistakes You May Be Making Without Knowing It [from Buffer; written by Belle Beth Cooper]

“One of the biggest challenges in doing this is working out exactly what to measure. After all, there are so many different elements to measure, it can be hard to work out which ones are useful and which ones we’re looking at just because they’re easy to measure.

It’s important to realize why we’re looking at these metrics in the first place, so that we can choose the right metrics to focus on.”

Click through for more details on how to define your goals and choose a good metric (or several) to measure.

The Effects of Social Media on How We Speak and Write [from Social Media Today; written by Karan Chopra]

“Social media use requires some unique adaptations, but it also provides us with a whole new way to communicate.”

Does social media make us smarter? [from The Week; written by Monica Nickelsburg]

“On any given day, the average American teenager spends more than 7.5 hours online and uses his or her cellphone 60 times. While these numbers strike fear in the hearts of parents and crotchety novelists lamenting the loss of a more meaningful existence, there are some real benefits to a technology-saturated life: Young people spend far more time consuming new information, honing verbal concision, and interacting with a diverse audience than they have at any point in history.

Emphasis added.

What Internet Users Like to Share on Social Media Sites [from Marketing Charts; written by staff]

“While 7 in 10 overall claim to share content, some demographic groups are more likely to engage in this behavior than others. Respondents aged under 35 are most likely to share (81%), a completely unsurprising result. Still, about 7 in 10 online users aged 35-49 said they had shared content on social media sites during the past month, as did a majority 55% of respondents aged 50-64.”

 

Written by Sarah

September 20th, 2013 at 9:50 am